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  • 1.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Andersson, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Berg, Monika
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Karin M
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Hysing, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Löfmarck, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ojala, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Olsson, Jan
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Singleton, Benedict E
    Swedish Biodiversity Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Svenberg, Sebastian
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Öhman, Johan
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Conditions for Transformative Learning for Sustainable Development: A Theoretical Review and Approach2018In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 12, article id 4479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Continued unsustainability and surpassed planetary boundaries require not only scientific and technological advances, but deep and enduring social and cultural changes. The purpose of this article is to contribute a theoretical approach to understand conditions and constraints for societal change towards sustainable development. In order to break with unsustainable norms, habits, practices, and structures, there is a need for learning for transformation, not only adaption. Based on a critical literature review within the field of learning for sustainable development, our approach is a development of the concept of transformative learning, by integrating three additional dimensions—Institutional Structures, Social Practices, and Conflict Perspectives. This approach acknowledges conflicts on macro, meso, and micro levels, as well as structural and cultural constraints. It contends that transformative learning is processual, interactional, long-term, and cumbersome. It takes place within existing institutions and social practices, while also transcending them. The article adopts an interdisciplinary social science perspective that acknowledges the importance of transformative learning in order for communities, organizations, and individuals to be able to deal with global sustainability problems, acknowledging the societal and personal conflicts involved in such transformation.

  • 2.
    Hall, Patrik
    et al.
    Department of Global Political Studies, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Hysing, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Advancing voluntary chemical governance?: The case of the Swedish textile industry dialogue2019In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 62, no 6, p. 1001-1018Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Voluntary environmental governance is a widely used policy approach that has been criticized for its lack of effectiveness. This raises fundamental questions about how to design processes that can advance voluntary programmes in a way that makes them more successful. In this paper, we analyse a government-initiated dialogue process to phase out hazardous chemicals through voluntary action by the Swedish textile industry. The analysis shows that information transfer primarily motivated business participation, while consumer pressure, regulatory threats and traditions of government–business cooperation played minor roles. The institutional design of the dialogue ensured close interaction within a homogeneous group, but collective actions were limited by disagreement about the problems to be addressed, prior unilateral environmental commitments by leading companies, and ambivalent engagement. This case provides valuable insights into the effect of institutional design on the actual interplay between business and government and its effects on voluntary governance.

  • 3.
    Hansla, André
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hysing, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Martinsson, Johan
    Department of Political Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Explaining voting behavior in the Gothenburg congestion tax referendum2017In: Transport Policy, ISSN 0967-070X, E-ISSN 1879-310X, Vol. 53, p. 98-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Gothenburg congestion tax was introduced in 2013 and later subjected to a consultative referendum where the citizens, despite getting first-hand experience with the scheme, rejected it. This article explains voting behavior in the referendum using both self-expressed motives and five nested models to test various explanations suggested in previous research. Drawing on an extensive longitudinal study, we conclude first that although a majority voted against the tax in the referendum, attitudinal preferences have become more positive since its introduction – supporting previous findings and hypothesis of familiarity effects. Second, we present a model for voting behavior that explains significant portions of the variance, concluding that it is not the outcomes of the charges that are important, but rather if the charges are in line with basic values, if the uses of the revenues (in this case, infrastructure investments) are supported, and if the institutions and processes introducing the charges are perceived as legitimate, trustworthy, and responsive. The article ends with general policy recommendations on the basis of these findings.

  • 4.
    Hysing, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Department of Economy and Society, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A Green Star Fading?: A Critical Assessment of Swedish Environmental Policy Change2014In: Environmental Policy and Governance, ISSN 1756-932X, E-ISSN 1756-9338, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 262-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Frontrunner states have been shown highly important for the development and diffusion of progressive environmental policies. History shows, however, that the frontrunner status is dynamic and that previous leader countries have become laggards. Here I assess recent policy changes in Sweden – a state widely recognised as an environmental frontrunner – arguing that environmental policy practice within areas prioritised by the Government (biodiversity, sustainable energy, the marine environment, and climate change) have experienced high-profile, and from a green perspective highly controversial policy changes. This policy development raises critical concerns for the future role of Sweden as an environmental frontrunner.

  • 5.
    Hysing, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Department of Economy and Society, Unit of Human Geography, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Citizen participation or representative government: building legitimacy for the Gothenburg congestion tax2015In: Transport Policy, ISSN 0967-070X, E-ISSN 1879-310X, Vol. 39, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A key dilemma in transport planning involves how to make possible the radical changes needed for long-term sustainability while ensuring political legitimacy and democratic process. Congestion charges are a case in point; despite their being considered an effective policy measure for improving environmental and health problems in cities, it has proved difficult to secure public acceptance for them. This paper analyses the policy process behind the introduction of a congestion tax in the Swedish city of Gothenburg, focusing on strategies for building legitimacy for the tax. The results show that the tax was legitimated primarily through its broad support in the City Council, which had been secured by integrating the tax with infrastructure investments, while strategies for directly involving the citizens in the process, such as public consultation and local referendums, were neglected or actively opposed. The process successfully generated a capacity for decisive political action legitimated through representative government. Over time the decision may gain public acceptance, but the process used might also prove detrimental to the future of the congestion tax and undermine trust in the democratic institutions.

  • 6.
    Hysing, Erik
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    From government to governance?: a comparison of environmental governing in Swedish forestry and transport2009In: Governance. An International Journal of Policy, Administration and Institutions, ISSN 0952-1895, E-ISSN 1468-0491, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 647-672Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From government to governance is a grand story line about the changing role of the state, which has had a great impact upon researchers and practitioners. This article is an empirical assessment of this story line. Three critical dimensions are elaborated into indicators of government and governance: governing styles and instruments, public–private relationships, and policy levels. These indicators are used to assess the role of the state in environmental governing using Swedish forestry and transport as examples. The results show that the story line is too simple; the role of the state is not changing in a unidirectional way. Instead, the comparison shows that environmental governing within the two policy areas is characterized by both government and governance modes of governing, thus questioning the usefulness of the story line as a guideline when framing empirical studies or political decisions.

  • 7.
    Hysing, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Governing towards sustainability?: Comparing Swedish forestry and transport2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Hysing, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Governing towards sustainability: environmental governance and policy change in Swedish forestry and transport2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Faced with environmental problems such as climate change and biodiversity loss, the dominant political response has been sustainable development, balancing environmental protection against economic prosperity and social justice. While political action is increasingly being called for, the role and capacity of the state is questioned – as captured neatly in the story from government to governance that implies a relocation of authority and power between policy levels and in public-private relations, as well as a radical restructuring within public administration. Taking its conceptual point of departure in theories of sustainable development, govern­ance, and policy change, this thesis assesses, explains, and theorises about recent developments of environmental governing within Swedish forestry and transport, two areas with high environmental impact and that involve strong eco­nomic val­ues and interests. The findings are presented in four articles that have all been published in leading academic journals. The thesis concludes that public policy has changed within both policy areas as environmental objectives and new modes of governing have been adopted – a development that can be characterised as governing towards sustainability. However, the storyline from government to governance is too simple to capture these changes. The state remains important in several ways (actor, arena, institutional structure, form of authority) and influ­ences society through a variety of modes of governing. Thus, governance and government remain relevant. To explain policy change we need to recognise mul­tiple barriers to and enablers of change as well as having a contextual under­standing of the policy area in focus. The thesis concludes by arguing that sustain­able development needs to be politicised in terms of visible political action and open political contestation between differing visions of a sustainable society.

    List of papers
    1. Contextualising the advocacy coalition framework: theorising change in Swedish forest policy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contextualising the advocacy coalition framework: theorising change in Swedish forest policy
    2008 (English)In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 730-748Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF) is assessed and elaborated by applying it to the Swedish forestry policy subsystem, a dynamic subsystem in which environmental interests have challenged a dominating production coalition. Forest policy has changed as new ecological values and modes of governing have been introduced through an incremental, pragmatic learning process mediated by a pre-established partnership culture. This policy change is not satisfactorily explained by conventional ACF mechanisms (shocks and brokered learning). Policy change may be better understood if the ACF is nuanced and contextualised by recognising that the learning process has evolved over a long time within the ideological-discursive context of ecological modernisation, and that the forest sector has been under constant pressure due to its strong dependence on world markets.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London: Routledge, 2008
    National Category
    Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
    Research subject
    Political Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3321 (URN)10.1080/09644010802421471 (DOI)000260572000003 ()2-s2.0-55949085792 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2008-12-01 Created: 2008-12-01 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Greening transport: explaining urban transport policy change
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Greening transport: explaining urban transport policy change
    2009 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, ISSN 1523-908X, E-ISSN 1522-7200, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 243-261Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Transport policy has proven highly resistant to change despite growing environmental problems. However, in the Swedish city of Örebro, objectives and policy measures in support of ecological sustainability have successfully been introduced in urban transport policies adopted by the local government. This article explains how this 'greening' became possible. Three variables of change proved highly important to understand policy change in this case: (i) new policy ideas of sustainable transport, (ii) reorganization of the local administration and (iii) the pressure of green policy entrepreneurs. A common denominator behind all these changes was the reformation of urban transport into a political issue through discursive changes and an active involvement by elected politicians, that is, politicization. The continuing importance of politics in contemporary policy processes as complex as transport is an important lesson from this case, that is, politics still matters.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London: Routledge, 2009
    Keywords
    Sustainable transport, policy change, governance, environmental governing, urban planning, politicization
    National Category
    Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
    Research subject
    Political Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-7725 (URN)10.1080/15239080903056417 (DOI)000270423700006 ()2-s2.0-70349970736 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2009-08-25 Created: 2009-08-25 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
    3. Governing without government?: the private governance of forest certification in Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Governing without government?: the private governance of forest certification in Sweden
    2009 (English)In: Public Administration, ISSN 0033-3298, E-ISSN 1467-9299, Vol. 87, no 2, p. 312-326Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The role and capacity of the state are changing. Some researchers argue that the state is transforming, strategically adapting to new circumstances, while others see a development of governing arrangements that are autonomous from the state, governing ‘without’ government. This article assesses the governing without government thesis through the case of forest certification introduced in Sweden in the late 1990s. This is a case of private governance, the governing capacity of which is based on voluntary self-regulation rather than government authority, seemingly a prime example of governing without government. The results show that government nonetheless is involved with forest certification through governance-oriented modes of governing: enabling and influencing the arrangements. Thus, what appeared to be a prime example of governing ‘without’ government is better understood as governing ‘with’ government.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009
    National Category
    Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
    Research subject
    Political Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-7724 (URN)10.1111/j.1467-9299.2009.01750.x (DOI)000266339800009 ()2-s2.0-66349086102 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2009-08-25 Created: 2009-08-25 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
    4. From government to governance?: a comparison of environmental governing in Swedish forestry and transport
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>From government to governance?: a comparison of environmental governing in Swedish forestry and transport
    2009 (English)In: Governance. An International Journal of Policy, Administration and Institutions, ISSN 0952-1895, E-ISSN 1468-0491, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 647-672Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    From government to governance is a grand story line about the changing role of the state, which has had a great impact upon researchers and practitioners. This article is an empirical assessment of this story line. Three critical dimensions are elaborated into indicators of government and governance: governing styles and instruments, public–private relationships, and policy levels. These indicators are used to assess the role of the state in environmental governing using Swedish forestry and transport as examples. The results show that the story line is too simple; the role of the state is not changing in a unidirectional way. Instead, the comparison shows that environmental governing within the two policy areas is characterized by both government and governance modes of governing, thus questioning the usefulness of the story line as a guideline when framing empirical studies or political decisions.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2009
    National Category
    Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
    Research subject
    Political Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-8046 (URN)10.1111/j.1468-0491.2009.01457.x (DOI)000270151200006 ()2-s2.0-70349423543 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2009-10-01 Created: 2009-10-01 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
  • 9.
    Hysing, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Governing without government?: the private governance of forest certification in Sweden2009In: Public Administration, ISSN 0033-3298, E-ISSN 1467-9299, Vol. 87, no 2, p. 312-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role and capacity of the state are changing. Some researchers argue that the state is transforming, strategically adapting to new circumstances, while others see a development of governing arrangements that are autonomous from the state, governing ‘without’ government. This article assesses the governing without government thesis through the case of forest certification introduced in Sweden in the late 1990s. This is a case of private governance, the governing capacity of which is based on voluntary self-regulation rather than government authority, seemingly a prime example of governing without government. The results show that government nonetheless is involved with forest certification through governance-oriented modes of governing: enabling and influencing the arrangements. Thus, what appeared to be a prime example of governing ‘without’ government is better understood as governing ‘with’ government.

  • 10.
    Hysing, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Government engagement with political consumerism2018In: The Oxford Handbook of Political Consumerism / [ed] Boström, Magnus; Micheletti, Michele; Oosterveer, Peter, Oxford University Press, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Political consumerism is described as a civil society response to perceived failures by governments to address global problems. It has been theorized as representing a challenge and complement to the state’s authority and legitimacy. This chapter reviews the roles of government in relation to political consumerism, focusing in particular on how governments have influenced the development and implementation of voluntary nongovernmental labeling schemes. The aim is to discern and discuss critical issues and debates on the interaction between government and political consumerism. It is concluded that political consumerism is part of a new governance landscape but that its development and effectiveness are fundamentally dependent on government. Political consumerism needs to be understood and critically researched in relation to a multifaceted understanding of government actors, responses, and interactions that recognizes both the varying conditions between states and the unique powers and responsibilities of government.

  • 11.
    Hysing, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Greening transport: explaining urban transport policy change2009In: Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, ISSN 1523-908X, E-ISSN 1522-7200, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 243-261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transport policy has proven highly resistant to change despite growing environmental problems. However, in the Swedish city of Örebro, objectives and policy measures in support of ecological sustainability have successfully been introduced in urban transport policies adopted by the local government. This article explains how this 'greening' became possible. Three variables of change proved highly important to understand policy change in this case: (i) new policy ideas of sustainable transport, (ii) reorganization of the local administration and (iii) the pressure of green policy entrepreneurs. A common denominator behind all these changes was the reformation of urban transport into a political issue through discursive changes and an active involvement by elected politicians, that is, politicization. The continuing importance of politics in contemporary policy processes as complex as transport is an important lesson from this case, that is, politics still matters.

  • 12.
    Hysing, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    How Public Officials Gain Policy Influence – Lessons from Local Government in Sweden2014In: International Journal of Public Administration, ISSN 0190-0692, E-ISSN 1532-4265, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 129-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    That public officials influence public policy is generally agreed upon, but the issue of how individual officials gain this influence is less developed in the literature. Here, the stories and experiences of ten officials, active in local environmental governing in Sweden, are used to identify, describe, and discuss key strategies for gaining policy influence. The result shows the importance of accessing key politicians; avoiding isolation within the administration; developing long-term strategies; and being skilled in communication, networking, and generating external resources. The way these officials act and think challenges some well-established theoretical notions and adds empirical insights to the democratic dilemma of bureaucratic power.

  • 13.
    Hysing, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lost in transition?: the green state in governance for sustainable development2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recognising continuing unsustainability as a result of governing failures, governance for sustainable development (GSD) has become the dominant approach to address environmental problems, promoting society-centric modes of governing and challenging traditional state-centric environmental governing. Here I identify key dimensions of GSD; clarify how GSD challenges the state; and argue that the state retains key merits for environmental governing. Rather than being lost in transition, the green state must play a central role in governance for sustainable development.

  • 14.
    Hysing, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Institutionen för Ekonomi och Samhälle, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Lost in transition?: the Green State in governance for sustainable development2015In: Rethinking the Green State: environmental governance towards climate and sustainability transitions / [ed] Karin Backstrand and Annica Kronsell, Routledge, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Why do we need the green state to combat environmental problems? In this chapter, I highlight the key challenges the state faces in governance for sustainable development (GSD) with regard to policy, polity, and political dimensions, and elucidate and discuss the functions and responsibilities the green state brings to efforts to address these challenges. The green state possesses a unique capacity and legitimacy to foster and lead the transition towards a more sustainable society. Rather than being neglected or lost within the scholarly field of GSD, the state should be brought forward as an important actor in governance for sustainable development.

  • 15.
    Hysing, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Representative democracy, empowered experts, and citizen participation: visions of green governing2013In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 955-974Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reforming democratic political systems to handle environmental problems is one of the key political challenges of our time. Here I analyse how local environmental officials in Sweden perceive the shortcomings of the current political system and what reforms they deem necessary to handle key environmental problems. While green political theory tends to focus on the need to deepen democracy through increased citizen participation, analysis of survey data shows that environmental officials, even though their perceptions of the current system’s shortcomings are similar to those presented in the theoretical literature, are more likely to argue for increased expert influence than for direct citizen participation. This result is not easily explained as officials seeking to expand their power, as environmental officials have more complex perceptions of their roles in democracy. The different visions of green professionals and green theory highlight the importance of deliberation on green democratic reforms, including the potentially undemocratic consequences of empowering experts.

  • 16.
    Hysing, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Statslös samhällsstyrning?: governance i svensk skogspolitik2009In: Governance på svenska / [ed] Gun Hedlund, Stig Montin, Stockholm: Santérus Academic Press Sweden , 2009, p. 107-128Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Hysing, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Transnational environmental governance: the emergence and effects of the certification of forests and fisheries by Lars H. Gulbrandsen (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar)2011In: Environment and Planning. C, Government and Policy, ISSN 0263-774X, E-ISSN 1472-3425, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 567-568Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Hysing, Erik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Department of Economy and Society, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Frändberg, Lotta
    Department of Economy and Society, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Vilhelmson, Bertil
    Department of Economy and Society, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Compromising sustainable mobility?: the case of the Gothenburg congestion tax2015In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 58, no 6, p. 1058-1075Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Congestion charging is widely considered an effective policy measure to regulate and reduce car traffic demand and associated environmental and health problems in cities. However, introducing restrictive measures to constrain individual choice and behaviour for the common good has often proven difficult. Using a specific case, the Gothenburg congestion tax introduced in 2013, we study the policy process behind the introduction of the tax and assess to what extent green values were compromised along the way. The tax was made possible by co-financing infrastructure investments, including roads, which seemingly contradicts stated goals of reducing car traffic and emissions. We show how the tax was ‘muddled through’ in a top-down political compromise by a grand coalition where different interests could legitimate their support in relation to the achievement of partially conflicting objectives and projects. However, to declare the regulatory goals fully neutralised would be to underestimate the scheme’s direct environmental effects and restrictive potential. Finding a compromise with powerful political and economic interests was necessary to get it off the ground. Once launched, however, it can over time regain its restrictive properties and lead to more profound long-term effects.

  • 19.
    Hysing, Erik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Department of Economy and Society, Unit of Human Geography, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Karolina
    Department of Society, Actors, Environment and Transport, Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Society, Actors, Environment and Transport, VTI, Linköping, Sweden.
    Building acceptance for congestion charges: the Swedish experiences compared2015In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 49, p. 52-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lack of public and political acceptance is the main barrier to introducing congestion charges. Here we compared the experiences of congestion charge introduction in the Swedish cities of Stockholm and Gothenburg, with the aim of explaining differences in political and public acceptance. The results showed the importance of procedural factors, such as the consistency of objectives in policy packages, communication and marketing efforts, and the use of public referendums, and of contextual factors, including urban form, level of congestion, and functioning of public transport. Important lessons were drawn between the two cities, but primarily on how to design, rather than secure public acceptance for, a congestion tax scheme. To build acceptance for congestion charges, close attention must be paid to the local political and geographical context when designing and implementing such a scheme.

  • 20.
    Hysing, Erik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Environmental Sociology Section.
    Policy Contestation over the Ecosystem Services Approach in Sweden2018In: Society & Natural Resources, ISSN 0894-1920, E-ISSN 1521-0723, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 393-408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecosystem services (ES) is an important approach to biodiversity protection in political rhetoric and policy practice, but it is also highly contested. This paper analyzes the introduction of ES in Swedish environmental policy and how it is contested by key stakeholders, and discusses its implications for biodiversity governance. The results show that although ES is widely accepted on an abstract and conceptual level, critical features and functions are highly contested. These primarily concern the valuation of nature, and the appropriateness of different policy instruments and institutional structures. The paper concludes that while the controversy surrounding ES fills an important role by reinvigorating debate and stimulating reflections on biodiversity loss, it also illustrates how ES is used to further particular values and beliefs and to challenge traditional biodiversity-protecting strategies. Understanding these policy controversies is central to addressing the challenges of transforming the promises of ES into practical policies. 

  • 21.
    Hysing, Erik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Department of Economy and Society, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Lundberg, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Making governance networks more democratic: lessons from the Swedish governmental commissions2016In: Critical Policy Studies, ISSN 1946-0171, E-ISSN 1946-018X, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 21-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Governance networks (GNs) are theorized as institutions for state–civil society interaction with important merits as well as shortcomings for effective and democratic governance. Here we compare GNs with a far less researched type of state–civil society interaction, the Swedish governmental commission (GC), critically discussing them in terms of organizational and functional features, the role of the state and democratic anchorage. Drawing on lessons from the institutional design of GCs, we contest the notion that well-functioning GNs require a low level of formal institutionalization and discuss how democratic problems with GNs could be addressed through a formal institutional framework that provides pre-established and generally applied ground rules, ensures elected politicians the final say on policy, and values broad participation and consultation. Recognizing that GNs are not a self-evident form for state–civil society interactions, traditional institutional designs should be more fully considered in the discussion and theorization of the democratic anchorage of GNs.

  • 22.
    Hysing, Erik
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Olsson, Jan
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Contextualising the advocacy coalition framework: theorising change in Swedish forest policy2008In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 730-748Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF) is assessed and elaborated by applying it to the Swedish forestry policy subsystem, a dynamic subsystem in which environmental interests have challenged a dominating production coalition. Forest policy has changed as new ecological values and modes of governing have been introduced through an incremental, pragmatic learning process mediated by a pre-established partnership culture. This policy change is not satisfactorily explained by conventional ACF mechanisms (shocks and brokered learning). Policy change may be better understood if the ACF is nuanced and contextualised by recognising that the learning process has evolved over a long time within the ideological-discursive context of ecological modernisation, and that the forest sector has been under constant pressure due to its strong dependence on world markets.

  • 23.
    Hysing, Erik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Olsson, Jan
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Green inside activism for sustainable development: political agency and institutional change2017Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book considers how public sector institutions can be transformed to better support sustainable development by exploring the concept of green inside activism and its importance for institutional change. The phenomenon of inside activism has been shown to be crucial for green policy change and this book focuses on public officials as green inside activists, committed to green values and engaged in social movement, acting strategically from inside public administration to change public policy and institutions in line with such value commitment. The book theorizes how green inside activism can contribute to a more sustainable development through institutional change. This theorizing builds on and relates to highly relevant theoretical arguments in the existing literature. The authors also consider the legitimacy of inside activism and how it can be reconciled with democratic ideals. This innovative work will appeal to students and scholars of public policy, political science and environmental politics.

  • 24.
    Hysing, Erik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Olsson, Jan
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Green inside activists?: Understanding policy politics from below2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Hysing, Erik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Olsson, Jan
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Kommunal politisk styrning i förändring: governance, policyförändring och hållbar utveckling2011In: Nordisk kommunforskning: en forskningsöversikt med 113 projekt / [ed] Andreas Ivarsson, Göteborg: Förvaltningshögskolan, Göteborgs universitet , 2011, p. 257-260Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Hysing, Erik
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences. Graduate School of Urban Studies, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Olsson, Jan
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Sustainability through good advice?: assessing the governance of Swedish forest biodiversity2005In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 510-526Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article assesses the possibility of implementing biodiversity policies using voluntary, informative policy instruments. The case is the Swedish forest sector, a policy area where vital national economic interests as well as important ecological values are at stake. The results show that informative policy instruments affect the behaviour of forest owners by providing advice and raising awareness but do not change underlying values and preferences. Sustainability through good advice is an important practice with limited effects, at least in the short run. Private regulations (certifications) have a relatively powerful influence on forest owners and complement the public informative policy instruments, implying that the forest sector can be depicted as private governance with government.

  • 27.
    Hysing, Erik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Olsson, Jan
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Tjänstemän i politiken2012 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Hysing, Erik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Olsson, Jan
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Who greens the northern light?: green inside activists in local environmental governing in Sweden2011In: Environment and Planning. C, Government and Policy, ISSN 0263-774X, E-ISSN 1472-3425, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 693-708Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With this paper we aim to further our understanding of local environmental governing by analysing green inside activists who use expert-based authority, networks, and a professional position within public administration to green government policy and action from the inside. Using new survey data, we identify and analyse who these actors are and whether they matter for local environmental governing in Sweden. The results show that green inside activists operate within 23% of the Swedish municipalities and that these municipalities score higher on three different measurements of environmental governing performance, which supports the conclusion that green inside activists do make a difference. We also show that green inside activists differ from other public officials working with environmental issues in that they are more frequently involved in policy making, have more extensive horizontal and vertical networks, and promote societal changes to a greater degree. We end by raising key questions concerning the democratic legitimacy of these actors.

  • 29.
    Hysing, Erik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Olsson, Jan
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Angelstam, Per
    Grimsö forskningsstation.
    Törnblom, Johan
    Örebro University, Department of Natural Sciences.
    Mer död ved i skogen: är skogsbrukets attityder och beteende ett problem?2005In: Död ved i levande skogar: hur mycket behövs och hur kan målet nås? / [ed] Johnny de Jong, Malin Almstedt Jansson, Stockholm: Naturvårdsverket, 2005, 1, p. 87-110Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Hysing, Erik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Olsson, Jan
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Dahl, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    A radical public administration?: green radicalism and policy influence among local environmental officials in Sweden2016In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 535-552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Green radicalism among local environmental officials in Sweden is examined with the aims of theoretically elaborating on different dimensions of Green radicalism in the context of public administration, exploring the dimensionality of Green radicalism among officials, and examining the extent to which Green radicalism is associated with policy influence. Three types of Green radicalism are identified: Green ethics, Green institutional change, and Green activism. Survey data (N=701) show that the three theoretical dimensions are present among officials, and that there is no negative association between radicalism and influence. It is primarily officials with Green activism beliefs who perceive themselves as able to influence policy. These findings suggest a need for more nuanced understanding of and further studies into the role of public administration in the quest for more radical Green reforms.

  • 31.
    Lundberg, Erik
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hysing, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The Value of Participation: Exploring the Role of Public Consultations from the Vantage Point of Interest Groups2016In: Scandinavian Political Studies, ISSN 0080-6757, E-ISSN 1467-9477, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Consulting interest groups is commonplace in the preparation of policies by democratic governments. It is often assumed that interest groups participate in consultations primarily for the purpose of influencing policy. This article goes beyond this simplified claim and empirically explores the role of consultations from the vantage point of interest groups. Drawing on the Swedish formalized referral process known as the 'remiss procedure' the article shows that interest groups not only participate in consultations in order to effectively change the policy proposal under consideration, but they also use the output of the process in other venues for policy influence, such as direct political contacts and opinion making, and to establish themselves, or maintain their status as legitimate actors in the eyes of the government. In addition, the remiss procedure appears to be intertwined with the groups' own 'internal life', promoting the development and anchorage of policy positions within the organizations. These insights are important for further understanding the promises, as well as the perils, of public consultation.

  • 32.
    Olsson, Jan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Hysing, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Theorizing inside activism: understanding policymaking and policy change from below2012In: Planning Theory & Practice, ISSN 1464-9357, E-ISSN 1470-000X, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 257-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To further our understanding on policymaking and policy change we need to recognize the significance of individual key actors in policy and planning processes. This article theorizes on the characteristics and policy influence of inside activism in which individual public officials act strategically from inside public administration to change government policy and action in line with a civic engagement and value commitment. Based on initial empirical findings from Swedish local government, we argue that inside activism is empirically relevant but not satisfactorily covered by other key actor concepts. We theorize that inside activism is 1) dualistic: open, deliberative, consensus-seeking and tacit, tactical, power-driven; 2) influential through informal networking inside and outside of government; and 3) dynamic as it varies over time and between critical situations. Due to current trends in society and public administration (e.g. governance), we expect inside activism to be increasingly relevant and we encourage further theoretical, empirical as well as normative research and discussion on this phenomenon.

1 - 32 of 32
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