oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 36 of 36
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Abdelzadeh, Ali
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Van Zalk, Maarten
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Dissatisfied citizens: an asset or a burden in democratic functioning of a society?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Past research has shown that, whereas the majority of people in democracies support the idea of democracy as a form of governance, some citizens are dissatisfied with the democratic institutions and the way democracy performs. In this paper, we examined democratic characteristics of dissatisfied youths to understand the role they play in the democratic functioning of a society. Based on youth’s dissatisfaction with the performance of political institutions and the principles of democracy, we identified four groups distinct of citizens. Then, we compared these groups in terms of their political engagement, knowledge and interest, values and attitudes, and law breaking attitudes. The results showed that youths with high levels of principle- and performance-driven dissatisfaction were less likely to participate in politics, less knowledgeable and interested in political issues, and more likely to break the laws, even if people got hurt compared to other three groups. In contrast, youths who were only dissatisfied with the performance of democratic institutions were more likely to participate in politics, and have higher humanistic values and tolerance towards immigrants. By examining distinct groups of dissatisfied citizens and their democratic characteristics, the current study contributes to the general debate on the role of dissatisfied citizens in democracies.

  • 2.
    Abdelzadeh, Ali
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Van Zalk, Maarten
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Dissatisfied Citizens: An Asset to or a Liability on the Democratic Functioning of Society?2015In: Scandinavian Political Studies, ISSN 0080-6757, E-ISSN 1467-9477, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 410-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Past research has shown that, although a majority of citizens in democracies support the idea of democracy as a form of governance, some tend to be distrustful of democratic institutions and express dissatisfaction with the way democracy works. It is argued in this article that to better understand the role of various groups of dissatisfied citizens in the democratic functioning of a society, one should examine their democratic characteristics. Based on youth's dissatisfaction with the performance of political institutions and the principles of democracy, four distinct groups of citizens are identified. These groups are then compared in terms of their political engagement, knowledge and interest, values and attitudes, and disposition to break the law. The results showed that youths with high levels of principle- and performance-driven dissatisfaction were less likely to participate in politics, less knowledgeable and interested in political issues, and more likely to break the law, even if people got hurt compared with other groups. In contrast, youths who were only dissatisfied with the performance of democratic institutions were more likely to participate in politics, and had higher tolerance towards immigrants, and political interest and knowledge. They were also more likely, peacefully and without harming other people, to break the law to change society. Overall, by examining distinct groups of dissatisfied citizens and their democratic characteristics, this study contributes to the general debate on the role of dissatisfied citizens in democracies.

  • 3.
    Dahl, Viktor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Van Zalk, Maarten
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Peer networks and the development of illegal political behavior among adolescents2014In: Journal of research on adolescence, ISSN 1050-8392, E-ISSN 1532-7795, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 399-409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined to what extent peer influence explains the development of illegal political behavior controlling for peer selection, legal political peer influence, and gender effects. Late adolescents who filled out questionnaires at two annual measurements were used in a longitudinal social network approach (N = 1006; Mage = 16.62). Results showed that peers’ involvement in illegal political behavior predicted adolescents’ increases in illegal political behavior. Adolescents did not select other peers with similar illegal political behavior. Nevertheless, adolescents selected peers with similar legal political behavior. Findings were discussed in light of a stage process where adolescents initially chose peers with similar legal political behavior. Subsequently, peers influence adolescents on both legal and illegal political behavior.

  • 4. Denissen, Jaap J. A.
    et al.
    Geenen, Rinie
    Selfhout, Maarten
    Utrecht University.
    Van Aken, Marcel A. G.
    Single-item big five ratings in a social network design2008In: European Journal of Personality, ISSN 0890-2070, E-ISSN 1099-0984, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 37-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To develop and validate an ultra-short measure to assess the Big Five in social network designs, the unipolar items of the Ten-Item Personality Inventory were adapted to create a bipolar single-item scale (TIPI-r), including a new Openness item. Reliability was examined in terms of the internal consistency and test-retest stability of self-ratings and peer-rating composites (trait reputations). Validity was examined by means of convergence between TIPI-r and Big Five Inventory (BFI) scores, self-peer agreement and projection (intra-individual correlation between self- and peer-ratings). The psychometric quality of the TIPI-r differed somewhat between scales and the different reliability and validity criteria. The high reliability of the peer-rating composites motivates to use the TIPI-r in future studies employing social network designs.

  • 5.
    Denissen, Jaap J. A.
    et al.
    Humboldt Univ, Berlin, Germany.
    Neumann, Linus
    Humboldt Univ, Berlin, Germany.
    van Zalk, Maarten
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    How the internet is changing the implementation of traditional research methods, people's daily lives, and the way in which developmental scientists conduct research2010In: International Journal of Behavioral Development, ISSN 0165-0254, E-ISSN 1464-0651, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 564-575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent years have seen an impressive increase in web-based research, of which we review and discuss two main types. First, researchers can create online versions of traditional questionnaires. Using the internet in this way usually does not compromise the psychometric properties of such measures, and participants are typically not less representative of the general population than those of traditional studies. Technical guidelines are provided to set up such studies, and thorny issues such as participants' anonymity are discussed. We will also discuss issues regarding the assessment of minors and the repeated assessment of participants to assess developmental changes via the web. Second, the internet has changed the way people interact with each other. The study of the psychosocial consequences of this development is called cyberpsychology. We review emerging findings from this young discipline, with a focus on developmentally-relevant implications such as the use of the internet by adolescents to disclose personal information.

  • 6. Denissen, Jaap J. A.
    et al.
    Schoenbrodt, Felix D.
    van Zalk, Maarten
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Meeus, Wim H. J.
    van Aken, Marcel A. G.
    Antecedents and consequences of peer-rated intelligence2011In: European Journal of Personality, ISSN 0890-2070, E-ISSN 1099-0984, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 108-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study investigated the antecedents and consequences of peer-rated intelligence in a longitudinal round robin design, following previously unacquainted members of small student work groups. Results indicated that peer-reputations of intelligence were reliable, stable and weakly correlated with objective intelligence. Bias was shown by correlations with interpersonal liking (decreasing across time) and idiosyncratic rating tendencies (increasing across time). Agreement between self-ratings and peer-reputations increased over time but was not based on increasing accuracy but on reciprocal associations between self-ratings and peer-reputations in the beginning of the acquaintanceship process, and on peer-reputations predicting changes in self-ratings later on. Finally, it was shown that peer-rated intelligence reputations predict academic achievement across two 4-month periods (even when tested intelligence was controlled) and dropout from university after 8 months. Overall, the pattern of results demonstrates the utility of a socioanalytic perspective in analysing personality and social processes.

  • 7. Deuling, Jacqueline K.
    et al.
    Denissen, Jaap J. A.
    van Zalk, Maarten
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Meeus, Wim
    van Aken, Marcel
    Perceived influence in groups over time: how associations with personality and cognitive ability can change over time2011In: journal of Research in Personality, ISSN 0092-6566, E-ISSN 1095-7251, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 576-585Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability of personality and cognitive ability to predict perceptions of group influence in small work groups are assessed both in initial and advanced stages of group formation. Extraversion is found important to initial perceptions of intra-group influence, which is partially mediated by peer-perceived social-emotional usefulness. After a few months, reputations are established and everyone has met: now work needs to get done efficiently and accurately and cognitive ability predicts increases in perceived group influence, which is partially mediated by perceived intelligence. After even more time, other Big Five personality traits become important to changes in perceived group influence, with positive associations with openness to experience, and negative associations with neuroticism and conscientiousness. The study findings and implications are discussed. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 8.
    Dufner, Michael
    et al.
    Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany; International Max Planck Research School LIFE, Freie Universität Berlin/Humboldt Universität, Berlin, Germany.
    Denissen, Jaap J. A.
    Humboldt-University, Berlin, Germany.
    van Zalk, Maarten
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Matthes, Benjamin
    Friedrich Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany.
    Meeus, Wim H. J.
    Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    van Aken, Marcel A. G.
    Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Sedikides, Constantine
    University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom.
    Positive intelligence illusions: on the relation between intellectual self-enhancement and psychological adjustment2012In: Journal of personality, ISSN 0022-3506, E-ISSN 1467-6494, Vol. 80, no 3, p. 537-572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relation between self-enhancement and psychological adjustment has been debated for over 2 decades. This controversy is partly due to the variety of approaches implicated in the assessment of mainly self-enhancement but also psychological adjustment. We adopted a face-valid approach by statistically removing actual intellectual ability variance from self-rated intellectual ability variance. Study 1 (N?=?2,048), a concurrent Internet investigation, provided initial insight into the relation between intellectual self-enhancement and psychological adjustment. Study 2 (N?=?238), a longitudinal round-robin investigation, allowed a closer examination of the dynamic processes underlying this relation. Self-enhancement was positively linked to multiple indicators of intrapersonal and interpersonal adjustment, and predicted rank-order increases in adjustment over time. The links between intellectual self-enhancement and intrapersonal adjustment were mediated by self-esteem. Finally, the interpersonal costs and benefits of self-enhancement systematically varied depending on methodology.

  • 9.
    Dufner, Michael
    et al.
    Humboldt-University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Denissen, Jaap
    Tilburg University, Tilburg, The Netherlands.
    Sedikides, Constantine
    University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
    Van Zalk, Maarten
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. University of Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Meeus, Wim H. J.
    Tilburg University, Tilburg, The Netherlands; University of Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    van Aken, Marcel
    University of Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Are Actual and Perceived Intellectual Self-enhancers Evaluated Differently by Social Perceivers?2013In: European Journal of Personality, ISSN 0890-2070, E-ISSN 1099-0984, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 621-633Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Do actual and perceived self-enhancement entail differing social impressions (i.e. interpersonal evaluations)? Actual self-enhancement represents unduly positive self-views, as gauged by an objective criterion (in this case, IQ scores), whereas perceived self-enhancement involves the extent to which an individual is seen by informants (i.e. peers or observers) as self-enhancing. In an online survey (N=337), a laboratory experiment (N=75), and a round-robin study (N=183), we tested the effects of actual and perceived intellectual self-enhancement on (informant-rated) emotional stability, social attractiveness, and social influence. Actual self-enhancers were rated as emotionally stable, socially attractive, and socially influential. High perceived self-enhancers were judged as socially influential, whereas low-to-moderate perceived self-enhancers were deemed emotionally stable and socially attractive. Privately entertained, illusory positive (even extreme) self-beliefs confer social benefits, whereas being perceived as self-enhancing buys social influence at the cost of being despised. Copyright (c) 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 10.
    Kerr, Margaret
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    van Zalk, Maarten
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Psychopathic traits moderate peer influence on adolescent delinquency2012In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, ISSN 0021-9630, E-ISSN 1469-7610, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 826-835Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Peer influence on adolescent delinquency is well established, but little is known about moderators of peer influence. In this study, we examined adolescents (targets) and their peers psychopathic personality traits as moderators of peer influence on delinquency in peer networks. We used three separate dimensions of the psychopathic personality: grandiose-manipulative traits, callous-unemotional traits, and impulsive-irresponsible traits. Methods: We used a peer network approach with five waves of longitudinal data from 847 adolescents in one community. Peer nominations were not limited to the school context, thus allowing us to capture all potentially important peers. In addition, peers reported on their own delinquency, thus allowing us to avoid problems of false consensus or projection that arise when individuals report on their peers delinquency. We used simulation investigation for empirical network analyses (SIENA), which is the only program currently available that can be used to study peer influence effects in peer networks of multiple relationships while controlling for selection effects. Results: Targets and peers callous-unemotional and grandiose-manipulative traits uniquely moderated peer influence on delinquency. Relative to those with low levels, targets who were high on these traits were less influenced by peers delinquency, and peers who were high on these traits were more influential on targets delinquency. Selection effects were found for impulsive-irresponsible traits, but these traits did not moderate peer influence on delinquency. Conclusions: As the first study to look at moderating effects of psychopathic traits on peer influence, this study advances knowledge about peer influence on delinquency and about psychopathic traits in adolescents. In addition, the study contributes to the literature by looking at unique effects of the three dimensions of psychopathy and taking a peer network approach, in which network effects, self-selection, and other selection effects are controlled when examining influence and moderators of influence.

  • 11. Mulder, J.
    et al.
    Klugkist, L.
    van de Schoot, Rens
    Selfhout, Maarten
    Utrecht University.
    Meeus, Wim
    Hoijtink, H.
    Bayesian model selection of informative hypotheses for repeated measurements2009In: Journal of mathematical psychology (Print), ISSN 0022-2496, E-ISSN 1096-0880, Vol. 53, p. 530-546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When analyzing repeated measurements data, researchers often have expectations about the relations between the measurement means. The expectations can often be formalized using equality and inequality constraints between (i) the measurement means over time, (ii) the measurement means between groups, (iii) the means adjusted for time-invariant covariates, and (iv) the means adjusted for time-varying covariates. The result is a set of informative hypotheses. In this paper, the Bayes factor is used to determine which hypothesis receives most support from the data. A pivotal element in the Bayesian framework is the specification of the prior. To avoid subjective prior specification, training data in combination with restrictions on the measurement means are used to obtain so-called constrained posterior priors. A simulation study and an empirical example from developmental psychology show that this prior results in Bayes factors with desirable properties.

  • 12.
    Selfhout, Maarten
    et al.
    Utrecht university.
    Branje, S.
    Delsing, M.
    ter Bogt, T.
    Meeus, W.
    Different types of Internet use, depression, and social anxiety: the role of perceived friendship quality2009In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 819-833Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study examined the longitudinal associations of time spent on Internet activities for communication purposes (i.e., IM-ing) versus time spent oil Internet activities for non-communication purposes (i.e., surfing) with depression and social anxiety, as well as the moderating role of perceived friendship quality in these associations. Questionnaire data were gathered from 307 Dutch middle adolescents (average age 15 years) on two waves with a one-year interval. For adolescents who perceive low friendship quality, Internet use for communication purposes predicted less depression, whereas Internet use for non-communication purposes predicted more depression and more social anxiety. These results support social compensation effects of IM-ing on depression and poor-get-poorer effects of surfing on depression and social anxiety, respectively.

  • 13.
    Selfhout, Maarten
    et al.
    Utrecht university.
    Branje, S.
    Meeus, W.
    Developmental trajectories of perceived friendship intimacy, constructive problem solving, and depression from early to late adolescence2009In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, ISSN 0091-0627, E-ISSN 1573-2835, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 251-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined friendship types in developmental trajectories of perceived closeness and balanced relatedness. In addition, differences between friendship types in the development of constructive problem solving and depression were examined. Questionnaire data of five annual waves were used from two adolescent cohorts (cohort 1: M = 12.41 years; cohort 2: M = 16.37 years). Growth Mixture Modeling revealed two developmental trajectories in cognitive representations of perceived friendship intimacy: interdependent and disengaged friendships. Adolescents in interdependent friendships were characterized by high perceived closeness and balanced relatedness across adolescence. Furthermore, adolescents in disengaged friendships had lower levels of and smaller increases in constructive problem solving. Girls in disengaged friendships showed smaller increases in balanced relatedness and higher levels of depression than boys in disengaged friendships and adolescents in interdependent friendships.

  • 14.
    Selfhout, Maarten
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Burk, William
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Branje, Susan
    Univ Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Denissen, Jaap
    Humboldt Univ, Berlin, Germany.
    van Aken, Marcel
    Univ Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Meeus, Wim
    Univ Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Emerging late adolescent friendship networks and Big Five personality traits: a social network approach2010In: Journal of personality, ISSN 0022-3506, E-ISSN 1467-6494, Vol. 78, no 2, p. 509-538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study focuses on the emergence of friendship networks among just-acquainted individuals, investigating the effects of Big Five personality traits on friendship selection processes. Sociometric nominations and self-ratings on personality traits were gathered from 205 late adolescents (mean age=19 years) at 5 time points during the first year of university. SIENA, a novel multilevel statistical procedure for social network analysis, was used to examine effects of Big Five traits on friendship selection. Results indicated that friendship networks between just-acquainted individuals became increasingly more cohesive within the first 3 months and then stabilized. Whereas individuals high on Extraversion tended to select more friends than those low on this trait, individuals high on Agreeableness tended to be selected more as friends. In addition, individuals tended to select friends with similar levels of Agreeableness, Extraversion, and Openness.

  • 15.
    Selfhout, Maarten
    et al.
    Research Centre Adolescent Development, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Delsing, Marc J. M. H.
    Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    ter Bogt, Tom F. M.
    Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Meeus, Wim H. J.
    Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Heavy metal and hip-hop style preferences and externalizing problem behavior: a two-wave longitudinal study2008In: Youth & society, ISSN 0044-118X, E-ISSN 1552-8499, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 435-452Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Selfhout, Maarten
    et al.
    Utrecht university.
    Denissen, J.
    Branje, S.
    Meeus, W.
    In the eye of the beholder: perceived, actual, and peer-rated similarity in personality, communication, and friendship intensity during the acquaintanceship process2009In: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, ISSN 0022-3514, E-ISSN 1939-1315, Vol. 96, no 6, p. 1152-1165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors examined associations of perceived similarity, actual similarity, and peer-rated similarity in personality with friendship intensity during the acquaintanceship process in a naturalistic setting. Self- and peer-rated personality data were gathered from undergraduates (mean age = 18.9) at 5 time points during the first year of university using a round-robin design. Whereas perceived similarity and peer-rated similarity in personality were concurrently associated with more friendship intensity for just-acquainted individuals, actual similarity in personality was not. Further, bidirectional cross-lagged associations between perceived similarity and friendship intensity were found. Peer-rated similarity was also associated with increases in friendship intensity, and this association was mediated by communication frequency. These results indicate that specific types of similarity in personality are differentially associated with friendship intensity during early phases of acquaintanceship in a real-life setting. Further, insight was provided in the direction of causality between similarity and attraction: Perceived and peer-rated similarity seem to breed friendship intensity, whereas friendship intensity seems to breed perceived similarity only. Finally, peers' expectations seem to affect individuals' communicative behaviors, which in turn affect friendship formation.

  • 17.
    Selfhout, Maarten H. W.
    et al.
    Utrecht university.
    Branje, Susan J. T.
    Meeus, Wim H. J.
    The development of delinquency and perceived friendship quality in adolescent best friendship dyads2008In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, ISSN 0091-0627, E-ISSN 1573-2835, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 471-485Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examines both the unique and the combined role of best friends' delinquency and perceived friendship quality in the development of adolescent delinquency. Questionnaire data were gathered from 435 Dutch adolescent best friends (mean age at first wave = 12.97) over a period of 5 years with annual assessments. Results showed that mean levels of delinquency and perceived friendship quality increased over time. Adolescent best friends were highly similar in both mean levels and changes in delinquency over time. For boys, similarity in mean level delinquency between best friends was higher than for girls. In addition, only for boys, friends' delinquency is associated with increases in adolescent delinquency over time, and adolescents' delinquency is associated with increases in friends' delinquency over time. No bidirectional longitudinal associations were found between perceived friendship quality and adolescent delinquency. No interaction effects between friendship quality and friends' delinquency on adolescent delinquency were found. Thus, findings were more in support of the differential association theory than of the social control theory.

  • 18.
    Selfhout, Maarten H. W.
    et al.
    Utrecht university.
    Branje, Susan J. T.
    ter Bogt, Tom F. M.
    Meeus, Wim H. J.
    The role of music preferences in early adolescents' friendship formation and stability2009In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 95-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present Study examines the role of similarity in music preferences in the formation and discontinuation or friendships over a I-year period. Questionnaire data were gathered from 293 Dutch same-sex mutual best friends (mean age = 12.97) in two waves with a I-year Interval. Results show consistent evidence for high similarity in specific music dimensions among friends at both waves. Moderate similarity was found in the overall patterning of preferences for music genres at both waves, even after controlling for similarity in social background. Specific Music similarity in more non-mainstream music dimensions and overall music similarity at Wave I were related to selecting a new friend at Wave 2. However, similarity in music preferences was not related to the discontinuation of an existing friendship at Wave 2. Thus, results suggest that similarity in music preferences is related to friendship formation, and not to Friendship discontinuation. (C) 2007 The Association for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 19. ter Bogt, Tom F. M.
    et al.
    Delsing, Marc J. M. H.
    van Zalk, Maarten
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Christenson, Peter G.
    Meeus, Wim H. J.
    Intergenerational continuity of taste: parental and adolescent music preferences2011In: Social Forces, ISSN 0037-7732, E-ISSN 1534-7605, Vol. 90, no 1, p. 297-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the continuity in music taste from parents to their children is discussed via a multi-actor design. In our models music preferences of 325 adolescents and both their parents were linked, with parental and adolescent educational level as covariates. Parents’ preferences for different types of music that had been popular when they were young were subsumed under the general labels of Pop, Rock and Highbrow. Current adolescent music preferences resolved into Pop, Rock, Highbrow and Dance. Among partners in a couple, tastes were similar; for both generations, education was linked to taste; and parental preferences predicted adolescent music choices. More specifically, the preference of fathers and mothers for Pop was associated with adolescent preferences for Pop and Dance. Parents’ preferences for Rock seemed to indicate their daughters would also like Rock music, but not their sons. Parental passion for Highbrow music was associated with Highbrow preferences among their children. It is concluded that preferences for cultural artifacts such as (popular) music show continuity from generation to generation.

  • 20.
    Van Zalk, Maarten
    Örebro University.
    Online and Offline Friendships: The Roles of Social Anxiety and Self-esteemIn: Journal of personality, ISSN 0022-3506, E-ISSN 1467-6494Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Van Zalk, Maarten
    Örebro University.
    Psychopathic Traits and Violent Behaviors: The Role of Peers.In: Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0012-1649, E-ISSN 1939-0599Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22.
    van Zalk, Maarten H. W.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Branje, Susan J. T.
    Denissen, Jaap
    van Aken, Marcel A. G.
    Meeus, Wim H. J.
    Who benefits from chatting, and why?: the roles of extraversion and supportiveness in online chatting and emotional adjustment2011In: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, ISSN 0146-1672, E-ISSN 1552-7433, Vol. 37, no 9, p. 1202-1215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study aimed to provide more insight into the role of online chatting in young adults’ emotional adjustment. A model was tested that takes into account (a) extraversion of individuals who communicate online, (b) the kind of peers these individuals communicate with online (i.e., online-exclusive peers vs. friends), and (c) the extent to which effects of online chatting on emotional adjustment are mediated by individuals’ ability to provide support to others. Young adults (age M = 18.9) filled out questionnaires about themselves and their fellow students at three measurements with a 4-month interval. Results showed that only for less extraverted individuals, chatting with peers found exclusively online directly predicted higher self-esteem and indirectly predicted less depressive symptoms through increases in supportiveness. Thus, results supported a model of social compensation where effects of online chatting with online-exclusive peers improved young adults’ emotional adjustment.

  • 23.
    van Zalk, Maarten Herman Walter
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Branje, Susan J. T.
    Research Centre for Adolescent Development, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Meeus, Wim H. J.
    Research Centre for Adolescent Development, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    It takes three: selection, influence, and de-selection processes of depression in adolescent friendship networks2010In: Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0012-1649, E-ISSN 1939-0599, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 927-938Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors of this study tested a selection influence de-selection model of depression. This model explains friendship influence processes (i.e., friends' depressive symptoms increase adolescents' depressive symptoms) while controlling for two processes: friendship selection (i.e., selection of friends with similar levels of depressive symptoms) and friendship de-selection (i.e., de-selection of friends with dissimilar levels of depressive symptoms). Further, this study is unique in that these processes were studied both inside and outside the school context. The authors used a social network approach to examine 5 annual measurements of data in a large (N = 847) community-based network of adolescents and their friends (M = 14.3 years old at first measurement). Results supported the proposed model: adolescents tend to select friends with similar levels of depression, and friends may increase each other's depressive symptoms as relationships endure. These two processes were most salient outside the school context. At the same time, friendships seemed to be ended more frequently if adolescents' level of depressive symptoms was dissimilar to that of their friends.

  • 24.
    van Zalk, Maarten Herman Walter
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Branje, Susan J. T.
    Res Ctr Adolescent Dev, Univ Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Meeus, Wim H. J.
    Res Ctr Adolescent Dev, Univ Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Peer contagion and adolescent depression: the role of failure anticipation2010In: Journal of clinical child and adolescent psychology (Print), ISSN 1537-4416, E-ISSN 1537-4424, Vol. 39, no 6, p. 837-848Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study investigated the mechanisms underlying peer contagion of depressive symptoms in adolescence. Five annual measurements of data were gathered from a large (N=842) community-based network of adolescents (M=14.3 years at first measurement). Results showed that, after controlling for selection and deselection of friends on the basis of depressive symptoms, peers' depressive symptoms predicted increases in adolescents' depressive symptoms over time. Failure anticipation mediated effects of peers' depressive symptoms on adolescents' depressive symptoms, particularly for girls. Thus, results suggest that peers' depressive symptoms place adolescents at risk of developing depressive symptoms through increasing in failure anticipation.

  • 25.
    Van Zalk, Maarten Herman Walter
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Van Zalk, Nejra
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Res Dev Ctr, Univ Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Influences Between Online-Exclusive, Conjoint and Offline-Exclusive Friendship Networks: The Moderating Role of Shyness2014In: European Journal of Personality, ISSN 0890-2070, E-ISSN 1099-0984, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 134-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prior research has indicated that shy adolescents are more motivated to form friendships online than to form friendships offline. Little is known about whether having friendships found exclusively online may impact self-esteem and forming offline friendships for these adolescents. This study therefore aimed to provide insight into the moderating role of shyness in the longitudinal interplay between friendships in online and offline contexts in early adolescence. Adolescents and their friends (193 girls, 196 boys; M-age = 13.29) were followed with three consecutive measurements with intervals of eight months. Results showed that particularly for shy adolescents, having friends exclusively online predicted increases in self-esteem. Self-esteem, in turn, was found to predict forming more friendships found both offline and online and forming more friendships found exclusively offline. Thus, findings supported the social compensation perspective that shy adolescents may benefit from having friends exclusively online, as these friendships may increase self-esteem, thereby facilitating the formation of friendships found partially and completely offline. Copyright (c) 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 26.
    Van Zalk, Maarten
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    How Online and Offline Friends Influence DelinquencyIn: European Journal of Personality, ISSN 0890-2070, E-ISSN 1099-0984Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Van Zalk, Maarten
    et al.
    Örebro University.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    What is going on in antisocial networks? The roles of peers and family processesIn: Journal of clinical child psychology, ISSN 0047-228X, E-ISSN 1532-7639Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    van Zalk, Maarten
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    van Zalk, Nejra
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Xenophobia and tolerance toward immigrants in adolescence: cross-influence processes within friendships2013In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, ISSN 0091-0627, E-ISSN 1573-2835, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 627-639Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To what extent do adolescents and their friends socialize each others' attitudes toward immigrants? Can friends' positive attitudes toward immigrants counter adolescents' negative attitudes toward immigrants, and do friends' negative attitudes decrease adolescents' positive attitudes? These questions were examined by following a large (N = 1,472) friendship network of adolescents (49.2 % girls; M (age) = 13.31 at first measurement) across three annual measurements. Selection and influence processes regarding tolerance and xenophobia were distinguished with longitudinal social network analyses, controlling for effects of age, gender, and immigrant background. Findings showed that friends' tolerance predicted increases in adolescents' tolerance and friends' xenophobia predicted increases in adolescents' xenophobia. Moreover, friends' tolerance predicted a lower likelihood of adolescents' xenophobia increasing. The current results suggest that interventions should distinguish between tolerance and xenophobia, as these appear to represent two separate dimensions that are each influenced in specific ways by friends' tolerance and xenophobia.

  • 29.
    Van Zalk, M.H.W.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Callous-Unemotional Traits in Adolescents: Cross-Influence Processes in FriendshipIn: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, ISSN 0091-0627, E-ISSN 1573-2835Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Van Zalk, M.H.W.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Psychopathic Traits and Antisocial Behaviors in AdolescenceIn: Journal of personality, ISSN 0022-3506, E-ISSN 1467-6494Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Van Zalk, Nejra
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Van Zalk, Maarten
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    The importance of perceived care and connectedness with friends and parents for adolescent social anxiety2015In: Journal of personality, ISSN 0022-3506, E-ISSN 1467-6494, Vol. 83, no 3, p. 346-360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nonclinical social anxiety in adolescence can be highly problematic, as it likely affects current and especially new social interactions. Relationships with significant others, such as close friends, mothers, and fathers, could aid socially anxious adolescents' participation in social situations, thereby helping reduce feelings of social anxiety. We examined whether making friends as well as high friendship quality help reduce social anxiety over time, and whether friends', mothers', and fathers' care interact in reducing social anxiety. Using longitudinal data from 2,194 participants in a social network (48% girls; Mage  = 13.58) followed for 3 years, we estimated friendship selection and influence processes via a continuous time-modeling approach using SIENA. We controlled for the effects of depressive symptoms, self-esteem, gender, age, and family structure. Our findings suggest that perceived care by friends mediated the effect of making friends on social anxiety. Perceptions of mother and father, as well as friend care and connectedness, respectively, did not interact in decreasing social anxiety. Nonetheless, care and connectedness with mothers, fathers, and friends jointly predicted decreases in social anxiety. Caring relationships with friends and parents each play a role in mutually protecting early adolescents against increasing in social anxiety over time.

  • 32.
    Van Zalk, Nejra
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Van Zalk, Maarten Herman Walter
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Socialization of social anxiety in adolescent crowds2011In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, ISSN 0091-0627, E-ISSN 1573-2835, Vol. 39, no 8, p. 1239-1249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we looked at whether social anxiety is socialized, or influenced by peers' social anxiety, more in some peer crowds than others. Adolescents in crowds with eye-catching appearances such as Goths and Punks (here termed Radical), were compared with three comparison groups. Using data from 796 adolescents (353 girls and 443 boys; M-age=13.36) at three timepoints, the results show that adolescents affiliating with the Radical crowd tended to select peers from the same crowd group. Being a member of a crowd in itself did not predict socialization of social anxiety, but adolescents in the Radical crowd were more influenced by their peers' social anxiety than adolescents who did not affiliate with the Radical crowd group. The results suggest that through a bidirectional process, adolescents affiliating with Radical crowds may narrow their peer relationship ties in time, and in turn socialize each other's social anxiety.

  • 33.
    van Zalk, Nejra
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Van Zalk, Maarten
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Shy youths chatting with friends versus strangers: implications for emotional adjustment2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    van Zalk, Nejra
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    van Zalk [Zalk-Selfhout], Maarten
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Social anxiety as a basis for friendship selection and socialization in asolescents' social networks2011In: Journal of personality, ISSN 0022-3506, E-ISSN 1467-6494, Vol. 79, no 3, p. 499-526Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Socially anxious children and adolescents have previously been found to have friends with similarly socially anxious, withdrawn behavioral characteristics. How peers might socialize social anxiety over time has, however, not been thoroughly investigated before. We examined this in a sample of 834 youths (339 girls, and 495 boys; M=14.29), followed for three years. We used the social network analysis software, SIENA, to analyze the data. The results showed that youths who were socially anxious were less popular and chose fewer friends in the network. They also tended to choose friends who were socially anxious, and over time they influenced each other into becoming more socially anxious – over and above other effects. Finally, girls' social anxiety was more influenced than boys' by their friends' social anxiety levels. The results showed the significance of looking at socially anxious youths' friendships over time, and embedded in social networks.

  • 35.
    Veenstra, René
    et al.
    University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis
    University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Steglich, Christian
    University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Van Zalk, Maarten
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Network–Behavior Dynamics2013In: Journal of research on adolescence, ISSN 1050-8392, E-ISSN 1532-7795, Vol. 23, p. 399-412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers have become increasingly interested in disentangling selection and influence processes. This literature review provides context for the special issue on network–behavior dynamics. It brings together important conceptual, methodological, and empirical contributions focusing on longitudinal social network modeling. First, an overview of mechanisms underlying selection and influence is given. After a description of the shortcomings of previous studies in this area, the stochastic actor-based model is sketched; this is used in this special issue to examine network–behavior dynamics. The preconditions for such analyses are discussed, as are common model specification issues. Next, recent empirical advances in research on adolescence are discussed, focusing on new insights into moderating effects, initiation of behaviors, time heterogeneity, mediation effects, and negative ties.

  • 36.
    Wölfer, Ralf
    et al.
    University of Oxford, Oxford, England.
    Schmid, Katharina
    University of Oxford, Oxford, England.
    Hewstone, Miles
    University of Oxford, Oxford, England.
    van Zalk, Maarten
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Developmental Dynamics of Intergroup Contact and Intergroup Attitudes: Long-Term Effects in Adolescence and Early Adulthood2016In: Child Development, ISSN 0009-3920, E-ISSN 1467-8624, Vol. 87, no 5, p. 1466-1478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intergroup contact represents a powerful way to improve intergroup attitudes and to overcome prejudice and discrimination. However, long-term effects of intergroup contact that consider social network dynamics have rarely been studied at a young age. Study 1 validated an optimized social network approach to investigate intergroup contact (N=6,457; M-age=14.91years). Study 2 explored the developmental trajectories of intergroup contact by applying this validated network approach in a cross-sequential design (four-cohort-four-wave; N=3,815; 13-26years). Accelerated growth curve models showed that contact predicts the development of attitudes in adolescence, whereas acquired attitudes buffer against decreasing contact in adulthood. Findings highlight the potential of social network analysis and the developmental importance of early intergroup contact experiences.

1 - 36 of 36
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf