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  • 1.
    Gupta, Puneet Kumar
    et al.
    Independent Accessible Media Professional, Meerut, India.
    Mathew Martin, Poothullil John
    Department of Outreach & Extension Services, Ali Yavar Jung National Institute for the Hearing Handicapped, Mumbai, India.
    Comprehension of basic mathematics among children with hearing impairment using multimedia in accesible and non-accesible format a comparative study2013In: 2013 IEEE 63rd Annual Conference International Council for Educational Media (ICEM), IEEE conference proceedings, 2013, p. 1-11Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching mathematics has been a complex issue for educators as well as learners. Same is the condition for the hearing impaired learners. Multimedia can be a big facilitator in order to render simpler and effective learning methods in the field of teaching mathematics to the hearing impaired students. The guidelines of United Nations Convention of Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD, 2007), makes provision for creation of information in accessible format.

    However there are no research studies to establish that teaching mathematics through the accessible format of multimedia would increase comprehension levels in children with hearing impairment. According to Mary Ellen Foster (2003) in her study on visual comprehension found that ‘Intuitively, one way of determining the usefulness of any presentation of data is by measuring the ease with which tasks involving that data can be performed using that presentation’.

    It may be noted that children with hearing impairment use visual techniques in their thought process, therefore accessible format of multimedia will enhance their comprehension levels. Accessible format includes techniques such as captioning, sign language and audio Description.

    This can be very helpful in processing information by hearing impaired children. The study investigated the effects of multimedia in accessible format, through the use of captioning and Indian sign language (ISL), on hearing impaired children. Hearing impaired viewers watched twice, the short multimedia with and without accessibility formats respectively. Their reactions were recorded on a questionnaire developed for the purpose of the study.

    Forty nine students participated in this study from two deaf schools of Mumbai,India. Analysis of the data showed that there was difference in the effects of accessible and non accessible formats of on the Hearing Impaired viewers.

    The study also showed that accessible formats increase the comprehension of the subject of the multimedia and use of ISL and captioning helped hearing impaired students to understand concepts better. The hearing impaired persons correlated watching the ISL interpreter with understanding the concept of the topic of multimedia. Placement of the ISL interpreter in the screen was also covered under the study.

  • 2.
    Mathew Martin, Poothullil John
    Department of Outreach & Extension Service, Ali Yavar Jung National Institute for the Hearing Handicapped, Mumbai, India.
    Content Analysis of “Disability Communication” The Daily Newspaper DNA (Daily News Analysis) : A Short-term Study Report2008In: Language in India, ISSN 1930-2940, Vol. 8, no 11, p. 306-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper I have focused on how to plan and conduct a content analysis of a newspaper daily. This has the potential to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of research process using content analysis. This paper on "Content analysis of 'Disability Communication' in DNA (Daily News Analysis) - a short-term study," I have made an attempt to study the 'disability communication' as available in one of the fast growing dailies, published from Mumbai. This book gives an integral approach to quantitative and qualitative research in content analysis process.The research also demonstrates how a research tool in content analysis can be developed for addressing an issue. The paper depicts the modalities in depicting disability communication under various perspective and the perspective of the society about disability issues.

  • 3.
    Mathew Martin, Poothullil John
    Department of Outreach & Extension Services, AYJNIHH, New Delhi, India.
    Web Accessibility for Persons with Disabilities: Evidence from India2008In: Communicator, ISSN 0588-8093, Vol. XLIII, no 1, p. 28-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Websites are today the face of an organization, with Global reach. The Information and Technology (IT) Act 2000 of India, is entirely silent on the subject of web accessibility. However the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) guidelines of 2009, which has been ratified by Govt. of India, of which Article 9.2 (g) & (h) especially lays down that, states should facilitate access for Persons with disabilities (PWDs) to new information and communication technologies, especially the Internet. A study was undertaken on 3rd December 2009, to analyze the qualities of a website designed by Government Organizations (GOs) and Non-Government Organizations (NGOs) working for PWDs in terms of Information & Dissemination, Accessibility, Design and Interactive participatory features. The main contribution of this study is to illuminate the features of websites used by GOs and NGOs working for PWDs in India and its accessibility.

  • 4.
    Mathew Martin, Poothullil John
    et al.
    Ali Yavar Jung National Institute for the Hearing Handicapped, Mumbai, India.
    Sahasrabudhe, Sujit
    Ali Yavar Jung National Institute for the Hearing Handicapped, Mumbai, India.
    Chavan, Prashant D.
    Ali Yavar Jung National Institute for the Hearing Handicapped, Mumbai, India.
    Toppo, Deepak
    Ali Yavar Jung National Institute for the Hearing Handicapped, Mumbai, India.
    Captioning and Indian Sign Language as Accessibility Tools in Universal Design2013In: SAGE Open, ISSN 2158-2440, E-ISSN 2158-2440, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Universal Design in Media as a strategy to achieve accessibility in digital television started in Spain in 1997 with the digitalization of satellite platforms (MuTra, 2006). In India, a conscious effort toward a strategy for accessible media format in digital television is yet to be made. Advertising in India is a billion dollar industry (Adam Smith, 2008) and digital television provides a majority of the space for it. This study investigated the effects of advertisement in accessible format, through the use of captioning and Indian sign language (ISL), on hearing and deaf people. “Deaf (capital letter ‘D’ used for culturally Deaf) and hearing” viewers watched two short recent advertisements with and without accessibility formats in a randomized order. Their reactions were recorded on a questionnaire developed for the purpose of the study. Eighty-four persons participated in this study of which 42 were deaf persons. Analysis of the data showed that there was difference in the effects of accessible and nonaccessible formats of advertisement on the “Deaf and Hearing” viewers. The study showed that accessible formats increased the comprehension of the message of the advertisement and use of ISL helped deaf persons to understand concepts better. While captioning increased the perception of the hearing persons to correlate with listening and understanding the concept of the advertisement, the deaf persons correlated watching the ISL interpreter with understanding the concept of the advertisement. Placement of the ISL interpreter in the screen and color of the fonts used for captioning were also covered under the study. However, the placement of the ISL interpreter and color of fonts in the screen and their correlation with comprehension of the advertisement by hearing and deaf persons did not show much of significance in the result of the study.

  • 5.
    Poothullil, Mathew Martin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Ali Yavar Jung National Institute of Speech and Hearing Disabilities (Divyangjan) (AYJNISHD(D)), Mumbai, India.
    Rajdeep, Sunder
    Disability and Social Media in India2016In: India Connected: Mapping the Impact of New Media / [ed] Sunetra Sen Narayan, Shalini Narayanan, New Delhi, India: SAGE Publications India, 2016, 1, p. 261-283Chapter in book (Refereed)
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