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  • 1.
    Besic, Nejra
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Shyness as protective factor in the link between advanced maturity and early adolescent problem behaviorManuscript (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Advanced maturity in early adolescence has previously been linked with several problem behaviors. In this study, we examine whether shyness and gender might moderate this link. The participants were 787 early adolescents (Mage = 13.73; 401 girls and 386 boys), followed for one year. We conducted moderation analyses with shyness and gender as moderators of the links between advanced maturity and problem behaviors (drunkenness and intercourse) and between one problem behavior and another. Protective effects of shyness were found for both boys and girls. For high-risk behaviors (risky drinking behaviors and one-night stands) protective effects were found for boys. Controlling for romantic involvement did not alter the moderation effects, thus failing to support the idea that protection was due to shy youths not being drawn into advanced peer groups by romantic partners. Thus, shyness might serve as protective factor against problem behaviors in early adolescence.

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  • 2.
    Darling, Nancy
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH, USA.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    All in the family: Within-family differences in parental monitoring and adolescent information management2019In: Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0012-1649, E-ISSN 1939-0599, Vol. 55, no 2, p. 390-402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article used a sample of 2 adolescents per family to (a) examine the extent to which parental monitoring and adolescent information management are characteristics of families or of dyads and (b) replicate past research on parental monitoring and adolescent information management using models that distinguish differences between families from differences within them. Within- and between-family differences were examined as a function of parents (positive and negative parenting, immigration status), individual and peer-reported problem behavior, and adolescent characteristics (age, gender) in a sample of 300 Swedish families with 2 siblings each (aged 10 to 19). Parents' self-reports of their monitoring of siblings and of their adolescents' information management were consistently more similar than adolescents' self-reports or reports on parents. Siblings' reports of parental monitoring and self-reports of routine and personal information management were modestly related to one another. Reports of secrecy, however, were statistically independent. Results predicting between-sibling differences are consistent with those obtained from longitudinal studies of one sibling per family: adolescents who engage in problem behavior are more secretive and disclose less information to parents. Their parents report them to be more secretive. Siblings who engage in delinquency report lower parent solicitation and control. Siblings' reports of both positive and negative parenting were associated with within-family differences in parental monitoring and their own information management. The results reinforce previous findings on the important role adolescents play in their own socialization. Differences between adolescent and parent reports highlight important methodological biases that may obscure key processes in family communication.

  • 3.
    Darling, Nancy
    et al.
    Oberlin College, Ohio, USA.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Monitoring and routine disclosure: difference within and across families2014In: L. Tilton-Weaver (Chair), A second look: Understanding parental monitoring and disclosure across time and contexts.  , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Elgindy, Hebbah
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Beyond frequencies: exploring communication with parents and peers as predictors of adolescent civic interest and engagement2014In: , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Elgindy, Hebbah
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Beyond frequency of discussions: Understanding how discussions with parents relate to adolescent political and civic development2015In: Politics, Culture and Socialization, ISSN 1866-3427, E-ISSN 2196-1417, Vol. 6, no 1-2, p. 149-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is based on a model of political socialization where discussion frequency with parents drives adolescents’ political and civic engagement. The first aim was to explore aspects of political discussions that reflect their quality. A second aim was to examine the role of discussions in relation to three forms of engagement: adolescents’ political and civic interest, offline engagement, and online engagement. Our final aim was to tease apart the direction of associations. We explored directionality in the relations among frequency and qualities of discussions with parents, and among the three forms of adolescents’ engagement. In the interest of exploring adolescents’ agency, we investigated the direction of associations between aspects of discussions with parents and forms of engagement. These three aims are incorporated into a single cross-lagged model.

  • 6. Facio, Alicia
    et al.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Micocci, Fabia
    Tisak, Marie
    Argentinian adolescents' implicit theories of misconduct2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Galambos, Nancy L.
    et al.
    University of Alberta, Department of Psychology, P-217 Biological Sciences Building, Edmonton, Alta, Canada.
    Barker, Erin T.
    University of Alberta, Department of Psychology, P-217 Biological Sciences Building, Edmonton, Alta, Canada.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree C.
    University of Nebraska, Omaha, NE, United States.
    Who gets caught at maturity gap?: a study of pseudomature, immature, and mature adolescents2003In: International Journal of Behavioral Development, ISSN 0165-0254, E-ISSN 1464-0651, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 253-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research examined links among adolescents’ maturity status, their biological, social, and psychological characteristics, and parents’ perceptions of their adolescents’ maturity. The participants were 430 Canadian adolescents in the sixth and ninth grades, and a subsample of their parents. Pattern-centred analyses confirmed the existence of three clusters of adolescents differing in maturity status: pseudomature (25%), immature (30%), and mature (44%). Further analyses found differences among the clusters in adolescents’ pubertal status, the social context (presence of older siblings and friends), and their desired age, involvement in pop culture, school and peer involvement, and close friendships. Analysis of mother and father reports revealed some differences in how parents of pseudomature, immature, and mature adolescents perceived their adolescents’ maturity, and in how they felt about their adolescents’ maturity. There were few grade differences in the findings. The results suggest that pseudomature adolescents, and to a smaller extent, immature adolescents, are caught in a maturity gap, which could have longer-term implications for their transition to adulthood.

  • 8.
    Galambos, Nancy L.
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.
    Barker, Erin V.
    Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree C.
    University of Nebraska, Omaha, NE, United States.
    Canadian adolescents’ implicit theories of immaturity: what does "childish" mean?2003In: New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development, ISSN 1520-3247, E-ISSN 1534-8687, no 100, p. 77-89Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Galambos, Nancy L.
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, British Columbia.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree C.
    Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.
    Multiple-risk behaviour in adolescents and young adults1998In: Health Reports, ISSN 0840-6529, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 9-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: This article examines the prevalence of four risk behaviours among teenagers and young adults: smoking, binge drinking, sex with multiple partners, and sex without a condom.

    DATA SOURCE: The data are from a Health Canada-sponsored supplement to the 1994/95 National Population Health Survey. The analysis is based on 905 respondents aged 15 to 19 and 1,055 respondents aged 20 to 24.

    ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Prevalence estimates of the four risk behaviours were calculated for males and females in each age group. An index of multiple-risk behaviour was derived by summing the four risk behaviours. Hierarchical multiple regression was used to examine how sets of variables are related to multiple-risk behaviour.

    MAIN RESULTS: Multiple-risk behaviour was higher among young people who had never married, who were not students, and who did not live with a parent. Feeling distressed was positively linked with multiple-risk behaviour, while regular attendance at religious services was negatively linked with such conduct.

  • 10.
    Kakihara, Fumiko
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Adolescents' interpretations of parental control: Differentiated by domain and types of control2009In: Child Development, ISSN 0009-3920, E-ISSN 1467-8624, Vol. 80, no 6, p. 1722-1738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To determine whether adolescents interpret parental behavioral and psychological control differently, type, level, and domain of control were manipulated across 3 interpretations (adolescents’ competence, mattering to parents, and parental intrusiveness). As expected, adolescents (N = 67, M = 14.25 years) generally interpreted high levels of behavioral control more negatively than moderate behavioral control. At high levels, however, adolescents did not differentiate behavioral control and psychological control, interpreting both as indicating less mattering and more intrusiveness. Furthermore, high levels of control over personal domain issues, regardless of type, tended to be interpreted most negatively. In conclusion, adolescents construe control in ways that may have import for their adjustment and this should be accounted for in theoretical models of parental control.

  • 11.
    Kakihara, Fumiko
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Adolescents' perceptions and interpretations of parental control: differentiated by domain and type of control2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Kakihara, Fumiko
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree C.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Links between parenting and adolescent adjustment: what role do adolescents' feelings about their parents and their maturity play?2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Kakihara, Fumiko
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree C.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Links between parenting and adolescent problem behavior: what role do adolescents' feelings play?2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Kakihara, Fumiko
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    The relationship of parental control to youth adjustment: Do youths' feelings about their parents play a role?2010In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 39, no 12, p. 1442-1456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent research suggests that youths interpret parental control and that this may have implications for how control affects youths' adjustment. In this study, we propose that youths' feelings about being over-controlled by parents and feeling connected to parents are intermediary processes linking parental control and youths' adjustment. We used three years of longitudinal data sampled from 1,022 Swedish youths in 7th, 8th, and 9th grade (47.3% girls; 12-17 years old, M age = 14.28 years, SD = .98) who were mainly Swedish in ethnic origin. We tested models linking parental control (i.e., rules, restriction of freedom, and coldness-rejection) to adjustment (i.e., norm-breaking, depressive symptoms, and self-esteem) through youths feeling over-controlled by and connected to parents. The overall model incorporating youths' feelings showed that restrictions and coldness-rejection were both indirectly linked to increases in norm-breaking and depressive symptoms through increases in youths feeling over-controlled. Parental rules still independently predicted decreases in norm-breaking and in self-esteem, and coldness-rejection predicted increases in norm-breaking. In addition, some paths (e.g., feeling over-controlled to self-esteem) depended on the youths' age, whereas others depended on their gender. These results suggest that when youths' feelings are taken into account, all behavioral control is not the same, and the line between behavioral control and psychological control is blurred. We conclude that it is important to consider youths' feelings of being controlled and suggest that future research focus more on exploring this idea.

  • 15. Marshall, S. K.
    et al.
    Young, R. A.
    Lollis, S.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree C.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    The parent-peer linkage and adolescent career development2010In: Career in context, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Marshall, Sheila K.
    et al.
    The University of British Columbia (UBC), Vancouver, Canada.
    Chipman, Jane
    The University of British Columbia (UBC), Vancouver, Canada.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Does mattering matter?: testing cross-lagged associations between mattering and psychosocial well-being over time2012In: In L. Tilton-Weaver (Chair), Adolescents’ interpretations and reactions to parenting, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Marshall, Sheila K.
    et al.
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, Canada.
    Faaborg-Andersen, Pernille
    British Columbia's Children's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, Canada.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree C.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Peer Sexual Harassment and Deliberate Self-Injury: Longitudinal Cross-Lag Investigations in Canada and Sweden2013In: Journal of Adolescent Health, ISSN 1054-139X, E-ISSN 1879-1972, Vol. 53, no 6, p. 717-722Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Although the receipt of peer sexual harassment in schools has been linked to deliberate self-injury, the direction of association over time has not been tested. Two longitudinal studies examined whether receipt of peer sexual harassment within schools predicts engagement in deliberate self-injury or vice versa. Differences between boys and girls were also tested.

    Methods: Surveys were conducted in two countries, Canada and Sweden. Measures of sexual harassment and deliberate self-injury were administered yearly in classrooms. Two waves of data were collected in the Canadian study (N = 161, 59.6% girls, mean age = 13.82 years); three waves of data were collected in Sweden (N = 513, 47% girls, mean age = 13.23 years).

    Results: In the Canadian study, deliberate self-injury predicted subsequent peer sexual harassment; the converse relationship was not significant. No significant gender differences were found. Across the three waves of the Swedish study, peer sexual harassment predicted self-injury from T1 to T2, and self-injury predicted peer sexual harassment from T2 to T3. However, self-injury did not mediate peer sexual harassment at T1 and T3. Tests of gender differences revealed self-injury predicted sexual harassment from T2 to T3 among Swedish girls but not boys.

    Conclusions: Adolescents who deliberately self-injure may be vulnerable to sexual harassment by peers at school. Cultural norms may have a role in whether this process applies primarily to girls or to both genders. Sexual harassment by peers may also increase self-injury, but this is not subsequently linked to increases in receipt of sexual harassment. (C) 2013 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved.

  • 18.
    Marshall, Sheila K.
    et al.
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Adolescents’ perceived mattering to parents and friends: Testing cross-lagged associations with psychosocial well-being2019In: International Journal of Behavioral Development, ISSN 0165-0254, E-ISSN 1464-0651, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 541-552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mattering is the tendency to view the self as significant to other people. Theoretically, mattering has been proposed to promote psychosocial well-being. Although prior research has found positive associations between mattering to parents and psychosocial well-being among adolescents, extant studies have not clarified whether perceptions of mattering predict psychosocial well-being or the other way around. Thus, the direction of the association needs verification. The purpose of this study was to examine the direction of associations between adolescents’ mattering to parents and friends and adolescents’ depressive symptoms and problem behaviors using cross-lag models. A two-wave annual survey assessed mattering to family and friends, depressive symptoms, and problem behaviors of students in grades 6 to 9 (N = 164; 56.1% girls) in a school district in western Canada (Time 1 age range = 11 to 15 years; mean age = 12.23; standard deviation = 1.07). Structural equation modeling was used to assess concurrent, auto-regressive, and cross-lagged associations between mattering and psychosocial well-being. Mattering to mother, father, and friends was assessed in separate models. Significant lags were found only between mattering to friends and depressive symptoms and problem behaviors, with positive associations suggesting a form of socialization through mattering. With one exception, mattering to parents was not directly associated with psychosocial well-being over time. However, gender moderated the association between mattering to mother (Time 1), depressive symptoms (Time 2), problem behaviors (Time 1), and mattering to mother (Time 2). Taken together, these results suggest that mattering may not be as strongly protective of adolescent well-being as previously suggested.

  • 19.
    Marshall, Sheila K.
    et al.
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, Canada.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    When do parents invade adolescents’ privacy?: exploring the roles of adolescent behaviors, parent adjustment, and cognitions2015In: Tilton-Weaver, L. C. (Chair) Privacy and parenting during late childhood and adolescence: Links among cognitions and behaviors., 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Marshall, Sheila K.
    et al.
    School of Social Work and Family Studies, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree C.
    University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE, United States.
    Bosdet, Lara
    University of Guelph, Guelph, Ont., Canada.
    Information management: considering adolescents’ regulation of parental knowledge2005In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 633-647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Employing Goffman’s [(1959). The presentation of self in everyday life. New York: Doubleday and Company] notion of impression management, adolescents’ conveyance of information about their whereabouts and activities to parents was assessed employing two methodologies. First, a two-wave panel design with a sample of 121 adolescents was used to test a model of information management incorporating two forms of information regulation (lying and willingness to disclose), adolescents’ perception of their parents’ knowledge about their activities, and adolescent misconduct. Path analysis was used to examine the model for two forms of misconduct as outcomes: substance use and antisocial behaviours. Fit indices indicate the path models were all good fits to the data. Second, 96 participants’ responses to semi-structured questions were analyzed using a qualitative analytic technique. Findings reveal adolescents withhold or divulge information in coordination with their parents, employ impression management techniques, and try to balance safety issues with preservation of the parent-adolescent relationship.

  • 21. Marshall, Sheila K.
    et al.
    Young, Richard A.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree C.
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Balancing acts: Adolescents' and mothers' friendship projects2008In: Journal of Adolescent Research, ISSN 0743-5584, E-ISSN 1552-6895, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 544-565Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This investigation describes the joint goal-directed series of actions, or joint friendship projects, of 19 mothers and their adolescents. Data were collected through videotaped conversations, video recall interviews, and self-report logs collected over an 8-month period. Qualitative analysis of the data revealed joint projects characterized by the pursuit of competing priorities. Efforts to balance competing priorities are described as three forms of balancing acts: (a) organizing time for friendships and responsibilities, (b) adolescent independence with friends while ensuring physical safety, and (c) balancing inclusion in the peer context and the risk of physical and emotional harm from friends and peers.

  • 22. Marshall, Sheila
    et al.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    To tell or not to tell: examining parental psychological control and adolescents' disclosure about whereabouts and activities2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Marshall, Sheila
    et al.
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, Canada.
    Young, Richard
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, Canada.
    Wozniak, Agnieszka
    University of Guelph, Guelph ON, Canada.
    Lollis, Susan
    University of Guelph, Guelph ON, Canada.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Nelson, Margo
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, Canada.
    Goessling, Kristen
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, Canada.
    Parent-adolescent joint projects involving leisure time and activities during the transition to high school2014In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 37, no 7, p. 1031-1042Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Marshalll, Sheila
    et al.
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Non-suicidal self-injury and depressive symptoms during middle adolescence: a longitudinal analysis2013In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 42, no 8, p. 1234-1242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has shown a consistent positive association between non-suicidal self-injury and depressive symptoms. However, the direction of the effects has not been examined. To understand whether non-suicidal self-injury predicts depressive symptoms or vice versa, we examined the relations between non-suicidal self-injury and depressive symptoms across three waves of self-report data collected 1 year apart from 506 Swedish adolescents (47 % girls; M age = 13.21; SD = .57) who were attending 7th grade at the onset of the study. The results suggest that depressive symptoms predict increases in non-suicidal self-injury 1 year later between the first and second waves of the study. Between the second and third waves of the study depressive symptoms and non-suicidal self-injury were significantly correlated indicating co-occurrence with no direction of effect rather than depressive symptoms predicting non-suicidal self-injury or vice versa. Group comparisons revealed no differences for boys and girls. The findings help clarify the relationships between non-suicidal self-injury and depressive symptoms during middle adolescence.

     

     

  • 25.
    Stattin, Håkan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Parental monitoring: a critical examination of the research2010In: Parental monitoring of adolescents: current perspectives for researchers and practitioners / [ed] Vincent Guilamo-Ramos, James Jaccard, Patricia Dittus, New York: Columbia University Press , 2010, p. 3-38Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Adolescents’ information management: comparing ideas about why adolescents disclose to or keep secrets from their parents2014In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 803-813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recognizing that adolescents providing or withholding information about their activities is a strong predictor of parental knowledge, this article compares several ideas about what prompts adolescents to disclose information or keep secrets from their parents. Using a sample of 874 Northern European adolescents (aged 12-16 years; 49.8 % were girls), modified cross-lagged models examined parental monitoring (solicitation and monitoring rules), adolescent delinquency, and perceived parental support as predictors and consequences of adolescents disclosing to parents or keeping secrets, with adolescents' acceptance of parental authority as a moderator. Results suggest that, when adolescents view their parents as supportive, they subsequently disclose more and keep fewer secrets. Engaging in delinquent behavior was related reciprocally to keeping secrets. By comparison, the results generally did not support the idea that adolescents who are monitored provide information to parents, even when they accept parental authority. These results suggest that relationship dynamics and adolescents' delinquent behaviors play an important role in adolescents' information management.

  • 27.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    An introduction to the special issue on sleep2018In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 68, p. 217-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    An introduction to the special issue on sleep
  • 28.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    An SDT approach to parenting: what can we learn?2015In: E. Sher-Censor (Chair), Toward a deeper understanding of parental autonomy-support and control: Components and complexities across context and culture , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Can parental monitoring reduce the delinquency of adolescents or their peers?2014In: L. Tilton-Weaver (Chair), A second look: Understanding parental monitoring and disclosure across time and contexts, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Discussion: taking the social in social development seriously2014In: J. Van der Graaff (Chair), Parent and peer socialization of adolescents’ prosocial behavior, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Exposure to violence and parent-child relations: Some musings (Discussant): In S. Mrug (Chair), Exposure to community violence and the parent-child relationship: Their interplay and contributions to developmental outcomes2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Information management2016In: Encyclopedia of Adolescence / [ed] Roger J. R. Levesque, Cham, Switzerland: Springer Publishing Company, 2016, 2Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Information management2018In: Encyclopedia of Adolescence / [ed] Roger J. R. Levesque, Cham, Switzerland: Springer, 2018, 2Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Same game, different name?: examining latent profiles of parents’ privacy invasions and psychological control2015In: L. Tilton-Weaver (Chair) Privacy and parenting during late childhood and adolescence: Links among cognitions and behaviors, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Burk, Bill
    Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Can parental  monitoring and peer management reduce the selection or influence of delinquent peers?: testing the question using a dynamic social network approach2013In: Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0012-1649, E-ISSN 1939-0599, Vol. 49, no 11, p. 2057-2070Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We tested whether parents can reduce affiliation with delinquent peers through 3 forms of peer management: soliciting information, monitoring rules, and communicating disapproval of peers. We examined whether peer management interrupted 2 peer processes: selection and influence of delinquent peers. Adolescents' feelings of being overcontrolled by parents were examined as an additional moderator of delinquent selection and influence. Using network data from a community sample (N = 1,730), we tested whether selection and influence processes varied across early, middle, and late adolescent cohorts. Selection and influence of delinquent peers were evident in all 3 cohorts and did not differ in strength. Parental monitoring rules reduced the selection of delinquent peers in the oldest cohort. A similar effect was found in the early adolescent cohort, but only for adolescents who did not feel overcontrolled by parents. Monitoring rules increased the likelihood of selecting a delinquent friend among those who felt overcontrolled. The effectiveness of communicating disapproval was also mixed: in the middle adolescent network, communicating disapproval increased the likelihood of an adolescent selecting a delinquent friend. Among late adolescents, high levels of communicating disapproval were effective, reducing the influence of delinquent peers for adolescents reporting higher rates of delinquency. For those who reported lower levels of delinquency, high levels of communicating disapproval increased the influence of delinquent peers. The results of this study suggest that the effectiveness of monitoring and peer management depend on the type of behavior, the timing of its use, and whether adolescents feel overcontrolled by parents.

  • 36.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree C.
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, ASH 347, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, United States.
    Galambos, Nancy L.
    University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alta., Canada.
    Adolescents' characteristics and parents' beliefs as predictors of parents' peer management behaviors2003In: Journal of research on adolescence, ISSN 1050-8392, E-ISSN 1532-7795, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 269-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined parents’ reported use of peer management behaviors (i.e., communicating preferences, communicating disapproval, supporting friendships, and information seeking) and linked these behaviors to (a) adolescents’ self-reported psychosocial adjustment and friendships and (b) parents’ beliefs about adolescents’ peer relationships (i.e., perceived efficacy in managing adolescents’ friendships and concerns about adolescents’ friendships). The participants were 269 parents (161 mothers, 108 fathers) and their predominantly White adolescents in Grades 6 and 9 (N = 177). Results suggest that parents may be more apt to use some behaviors (e.g., communicating disapproval and information seeking) when there are indications that their adolescents are engaged in problem behaviors and have friends who are deviant. In addition, parents’ concerns about their adolescents’ friends mediate the relationship between adolescent problem behaviors and parents’ communications of disapproval. Parents’ peer management is promising as a route to understand further the nature of parent-peer linkages.

  • 37.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree C.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kakihara, Fumiko
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Marshall, Sheila K.
    Galambos, Nancy L.
    Fits and misfits: How adolescents' representations of maturity relate to their adjustment2010In: Understanding girls' problem behavior: How girls' delinquency develops in the context of maturity and health, co-occuring problems, and relationships / [ed] Margaret Kerr, Håkan Stattin, Rutger C. M. E. Engels, Geertjan Overbeek, Anna-Karin Andershed, Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons , 2010, p. 31-68Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree C.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Marshall, S. K.
    Kakihara, Fumiko
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Fits and misfits: the relationships between adolescents' representations of maturity and their adjustment2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree C.
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Marshall, Sheila K.
    Adolescents' agency in information management2008In: What can parents do?: new insights into the role of parents in adolescent problem behavior / [ed] Margaret Kerr, Håkan Stattin, Rutger C. M. E. Engels, Chichester, West Sussex: John Wiley & Sons , 2008, p. 9-41Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree C.
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Science, University of Nebraska, Omaha, United States.
    Vitunski, Erin T.
    University of Victoria, B.C., Canada.
    Galambos, Nancy L.
    University of Victoria, B.C., Canada.
    Five images of maturity in adolescence: what does "grown up" mean?2001In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 143-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focussed on the subjective meanings of maturity in adolescence, or what it means to adolescents to be grown up. Younger (6th grade) and older (9th grade) adolescents’ descriptions (n=236) of their "grown-up" peers were examined through content analysis. This qualitative analysis revealed five images of maturity portrayed by adolescents: balanced maturity (adolescents who show psychosocial and behavioural maturity, and ability to balance work and play); an image focussed on privileges (adolescents who engage in problem behaviour and present what may be a facade of adult-like behaviour); an image focussed on responsibility (adolescents who may be psychosocially mature, but may have taken on inappropriately high levels of responsibility); an image focussed on power and status (adolescents who seem to have usurped an older status, by being bossy and controlling); and an image focussed on physical development (adolescents who show advanced levels of physical maturity). There were some gender and age differences in the frequencies of these five images. Discussion is directed at understanding the hallmarks of each image relative to scholarly notions of adult maturity.

  • 41.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kakihara, Fumiko
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    How does parental control influence adjustment?: The case for adolescents' needs as mediatorsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Kerr, Margaret
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Pakalniskeine, Vilmante
    Tokic, Ana
    Univ Zagreb, Zagreb 41000, Croatia.
    Salihovic, Selma
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Open up or close down: how do parental reactions affect youth information management?2010In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 333-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to test a process model of youths' information management. Using three waves of longitudinal data collected from 982 youths, we modeled parents' positive and negative reactions to disclosure predicting youths' feelings about their parents, in turn predicting youths' disclosure and secrecy about their daily activities. Gender, age, and psychopathic personality traits were examined as potential moderators. The results showed that parents' negative reactions were associated with increases in youths' feeling controlled and decreases in youths' feeling connected to their parents, which in turn, predicted increased secrecy and decreased disclosure. In contrast, parents' positive reactions predicted increased feeling connected to parents, which in turn predicted increased disclosure. Moreover, these predictive pathways were modified by youths' psychopathic personality traits. Our results are consistent with a transactional model suggesting that how parents react to youths' disclosure affects youths' future decisions to provide their parents with information about their daily activities. The results point to the importance of considering youths' feelings and characteristics.

  • 43.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Marshall, Sheila
    School of Social Work, Adolescent Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
    Governance transfer: A new perspective on adolescent behavioral autonomy and parental control2017In: Autonomy in Adolescent Development: Towards conceptual clarity / [ed] Bart Soenens, Maarten Vansteenkiste, Stijn Van Petegem, East Sussex, England: Routledge, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Marshall, Sheila
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
    Darling, Nancy
    Oberlin College, Oberlin, USA.
    What's in a name?: distinguishing between routine disclosure and self-disclosure2014In: Journal of research on adolescence, ISSN 1050-8392, E-ISSN 1532-7795, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 551-563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A lack of specificity between two types of disclosure has emerged in research on adolescents’ relationship and communication with their parents. Researchers are obscuring the distinctions between self-disclosure and routine disclosure (i.e., disclosure of their whereabouts and activities to parents). In this article, we describe where the problems have arisen and then outline the conceptual differences between the two. Illustrations of how the two types of disclosure overlap or co-occur are provided to demonstrate how fruitful areas for future research can emerge from attending to the distinctions between these two constructs.

  • 45.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Marshall, Sheila K.
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
    Adolescents’ agency and responses to parenting during conversations about extra-curricular activities with peers2012In: In L. Tilton-Weaver (Chair), Adolescents’ interpretations and reactions to parenting, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Marshall, Sheila K.
    Conditions linking adolescent problem behaviors and maternal privacy invasions2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Marshall, Sheila K.
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, Canada.
    Exploring governance transfer: a new model of behavioral autonomy and regulation2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Marshall, Sheila K.
    University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Svensson, Ylva
    University College West, Sweden.
    Depressive symptoms and non-suicidal self-injury during adolescence: Latent patterns of short-term stability and change2019In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 75, p. 163-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Depressive symptoms and non-suicidal self-injury not only increase in prevalence during adolescence, but they can also occur together. Both psychological problems seem to have similar precipitating conditions, suggesting they have transdiagnostic conditions-personal or contextual characteristics that contribute to co-occurrence. We sought to understand when these two problems co-occur and what is related to their co-occurrence.

    METHODS:  = 13.65 years, SD = 0.64), 53.7% boys and 47.3% girls. Most of the adolescents were Swedish (89%), with parents who were married or cohabitating (68%). We also examined the transitions between profiles over time.

    RESULTS: Our results suggest that during this time frame, depressive symptoms and self-injury tend to emerge and stabilize or abate together. We also examined a broad array of predictors, including individual characteristics, emotion dysregulation, experiences with friends, parents' negative reactions to behavior, and school stress. The significant unique predictors suggest that adolescents who reported being subjected to relational aggression, having negative experiences while drinking, and low self-esteem had a greater probability of moving from moderate to high levels or maintaining high levels of depressive symptoms and self-injury, compared to adolescents classified in the other statuses.

    CONCLUSIONS: Focusing on negative interpersonal experiences and selfesteem as transdiagnostic conditions may guide research and aid clinicians in supporting adolescents who feel depressed and engage in self-injury.

  • 49.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Shing, Yee Lee
    Implicit theories of misconduct among ethnic-Chinese adolescents in Malaysia2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Tilton-Weaver, Lauree
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Trost, Kari
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Privacy in the family: adolescents’ views on their needs and their parents’ behaviors2012Conference paper (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 55
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