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  • 1.
    Nordin Olsson, Inger
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Family Medicine Research Centre, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Wätterbjörk, Inger
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Family Medicine Research Centre, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Registered nurses’ perception of their professional role regarding medication management in nursing care of the elderly2014In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 153-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The role of the registered nurse (RN) in the municipality regarding medication management in care for the elderly is rarely discussed. Organizational issues related to medication management often contribute more to the management than needs of the patients, nursing skills, and collaboration with the physician in primary care.

    Objective: The aim of this study was to describe RNs’ perceptions of their professional role, especially regarding medication management in nursing of the elderly.

    Design: The study is descriptive with a qualitative approach. Interviews with 16 RNs working at nursing homes were analysed by content analysis.

    Results: The findings can be grouped into seven categories showing the RN in different roles while performing different aspects of her or his work: as controller, executer, messenger, supervisor, initiator, visionary and solitary worker. These themes were identified in the interviews and characterized the nurses’ own judgements and actions taken, especially regarding drug treatment. Overall, the RNs described nursing in elderly care as an undefined profession lacking leadership regarding medication management.

    Conclusions: The study concludes that medication management ought to be promoted in care for the elderly. To handle the challenge and risks of polypharmacy there must be sufficient and adequate reporting based on the RNs’ nursing and skills to monitor and evaluate the drug treatment in teamwork with the physician. This requires leadership with understanding of the integration of services in care for the elderly, and of the medical processes and nursing skills involved.

  • 2.
    Nordin Olsson, Inger
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Wätterbjörk, Inger
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Registered nurses’ perceptions of their professional role in medication in elderly careManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of the municipal registered nurse (RN) is rarely discussed with regard to multimedication. The aim of this study was to describe RNs’ perceptions of their professional role especially regarding medication management in elderly care. The study is descriptive with a qualitative approach. Interviews with 16 RNs at nursing homes for the elderly were analysed. The RNs described an undefined profession lacking leadership. The findings can be categorized into seven roles showing different aspects of their work: controller, executer, messenger, supervisor, initiator, visionary and solitary worker. Health assessment and medication management should be promoted in elderly care. There must be sufficient and adequate reporting based on the RNs’ nursing and medical skills to monitor and evaluate the drug treatment in teamwork with the physician. This requires leadership with understanding of the integration process in care of the elderly, of the medical processes and nursing skills involved.

  • 3.
    Wätterbjörk, Inger
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Couples' experiences of an extended information visit about prenatal screening: decision making and satisfaction2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this thesis was to describe pregnant women's and partners' views and experiences on early prenatal screening with the combined test, with special focus on the two-step information model.

    Interviews were performed with 15 couples who had taken part in the extended information visit about prenatal screening, describing their perceptions of the information model (I) and ten couples or women of those, for a follow-up interview exploring their decision-making process (II). Seven couples, who had not taken part in the extended information visit, were interviewed describing their views and experiences about prenatal screening (III). A questionnaire was answered by 295 women and by 223 partners about their satisfaction about the decision whether or not to participate in the combined test, and their assessment of whether or not this choice had been difficult (IV).

    The results showed that different opinions were expressed about the offer of the extended information visit. The separate visit was welcomed by most couples (I). The decision-making process regarding whether to take part in the test or not was described by most couples as a fairly straightforward decision, while for others it was a more complex process that required a great deal of consideration (II). An apprehension of the test, by some of those who had refrained the extended information visit, was that it was an expression of society's involvement in decisions that belong to the expectant parents (III). Ninety-three percent of both women and partners considered the decision about participating in the combined tests as uncomplicated, and well over 90%, of both women and partners were satisfied with their decision (IV).

    The conclusions in this thesis, are that the decision whether or not to participate in the combined test is multidimensional and influenced by different views. The two-step information model helped the pregnant woman and the partner to make a decision in a fairly straightforward process or a more complex process with mixed feelings.

    List of papers
    1. Pregnant women's and their partners' perception of an information model on prenatal screening
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pregnant women's and their partners' perception of an information model on prenatal screening
    2012 (English)In: Prenatal Diagnosis, ISSN 0197-3851, E-ISSN 1097-0223, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 461-466Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Extended verbal information on prenatal screening was given when combined ultrasound and biochemistry screening test was offered at Örebro County Council, Sweden, in 2008. The aim of this study was to describe pregnant women's and her partners' perceptions of this information model.

    Method: The interviews were semi-structured, and altogether, 26 interviews were performed with pregnant women and partners. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the data.

    Results: The result consists of two main categories, ‘form and content’ and ‘managing the information’, to describe the couples' perceptions of the information given. Nine categories describe the information model in: voluntariness, a separate visit, a special midwife, the content, missing information, ethical considerations, a visit on equal terms, communication within the couple, communication with other people, and emotional management.

    Conclusion: The information model helps expecting parents to focus on prenatal screening. Only information about prenatal screening and diagnosis was not enough for everybody; some couples want this to be an opportunity to discuss with a professional the pros and cons of prenatal screening as well as ethical considerations. The information visit gives the partner a chance to be involved and an opportunity for the couple to discuss the subject.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Malden, USA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012
    Keywords
    Prenatal screening, CUB, Information model, Qualitative study
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Nursing
    Research subject
    Caring sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-22685 (URN)10.1002/pd.2940 (DOI)000303797700010 ()22505351 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84860770397 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies:

    Örebro County Council, Sweden 

    Signhild Engkvist Foundation, Sweden

    Available from: 2012-04-27 Created: 2012-04-27 Last updated: 2018-05-08Bibliographically approved
    2. Decision-making process of prenatal screening described by pregnant women and their partners
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decision-making process of prenatal screening described by pregnant women and their partners
    2015 (English)In: Health Expectations, ISSN 1369-6513, E-ISSN 1369-7625, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 1582-1592Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pregnant women are often faced with having to decide about prenatal screening for Down’s syndrome. However,the decision to participate in or refrain from prenatal screening can be seen as an important decision not only for the pregnant woman but also for both the partners.

    Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the couples’ processes of decision making about prenatal screening.

    Methods: A total of 37 semi-structured interviews conducted at two time points were analysed using the interpretive description.

    Setting: The study was carried out in Maternal health-care centres,Örebro County Council, Sweden.

    Participants: Fifteen couples of different ages and with different experiences of pregnancy and childbirth were interviewed.

    Results: Three different patterns of decision making were identified. For the couples in The open and communicative decision-making process’, the process was straightforward and rational, and the couples discussed the decision with each other. ‘The closed and personal decision-making process’ showed an immediate and non-communicative decision making where the couples decided each for themselves. The couples showing ‘The searching and communicative decision-making process’ followed an arduous road in deciding whether to participate or not in prenatal screening and how to cope with the result.

    Conclusions: The decision-making process was for some couples a fairly straightforward decision, while for others it was a more complex process that required a great deal of consideration.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2015
    Keywords
    decision making, prenatal, screening, qualitative analysis
    National Category
    Nursing
    Research subject
    Caring sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-31088 (URN)10.1111/hex.12147 (DOI)000365046700079 ()24118867 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84942293987 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2013-10-04 Created: 2013-10-04 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
    3. Views on prenatal screening among pregnant women and partners declining an extended information
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Views on prenatal screening among pregnant women and partners declining an extended information
    (English)Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: A County Council in Sweden has implemented a two-step information model about prenatal screening. In addition to the regular brief information delivered by the midwife at the first routine visit at the maternal health care centre, the two-step model includes an offer of extended information at a separate visit. However, a substantial number of the couples decline and there is a lack of knowledge about their reasons. The aim of this study was to describe views about prenatal screening among couples who had not taken part in an extended information visit, to increase understanding of the perspectives of prenatal screening in this group.

    Method: Qualitative interviews were performed with seven couples not participating in an extended information visit about prenatal screening. Data were analysed using Interpretive Description. Results: The results showed two themes. In the theme “From an individual view”, with the subthemes Declining further information and, Position taken against prenatal screening, the couples saw the invitation and prenatal screening from their own points of view. They refrained because they did not want to receive any more information. In the other theme, “From a societal view”, with the subthemes Society has a hidden agenda and, The health care service’s responsibilities, the couples perceived the offer as part of a societal view on prenatal screening, that they could not support.

    Conclusion: The findings in this group of couples shows that couples’ perceptions of prenatal screening are multidimensional and influenced by different views, from both an individual perspective and a more societal one.

    Practice Implications: Health care professionals should be aware that some persons could be reluctant to accept health care service, and that the challenge is to meet all individuals, without violating their autonomy. Person-centred care could assist with an approach to meeting the person as an individual.

    Keywords
    prenatal screening, extended information
    National Category
    Nursing
    Research subject
    Caring sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-38382 (URN)
    Available from: 2014-11-06 Created: 2014-11-06 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
    4. Decision-making about prenatal screening: are pregnant women and partners satisfied with their decision?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decision-making about prenatal screening: are pregnant women and partners satisfied with their decision?
    2013 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The combined test for Down syndrome is offered to pregnant women. Qualitative studies have shown that the decision, whether or not to accept the test,is a rational one for most couples, although for some it may be difficult. Little is known about the couples’ satisfaction with the decision afterwards; the aim of this study was to extend that knowledge

    Method Pregnant women and their partners were invited to fill out a questionnaire at approximately pregnancy week 20. The questionnaire, which covered aspects of their decision on prenatal testing, was based on the Decision Regret Scale, with additional questions

    Results The response rate was 77% (295/359 women and 223/315 partners). The decision whether or not to participate in the combined test was seen as mutual by 95% of the women and 96% of the partners, and was perceived as uncomplicated by 93% of both women and partners. The decision was considered as difficult/very difficult by 6%. With a range of 93% – 99% women and partners were satisfied with their decision afterwards, but 1%–7% were not

    Conclusion The majority of the participants were satisfied wither their decision. However, a small minority were not, which is important to recognize.

    National Category
    Nursing
    Research subject
    Caring sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-38383 (URN)
    Available from: 2014-11-06 Created: 2014-11-06 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
  • 4.
    Wätterbjörk, Inger
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Sahlberg Blom, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Gravida kvinnors och deras partners beslut om KUB-test2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Wätterbjörk, Inger
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Sahlberg Blom, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    To decide about prenatal screening2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Wätterbjörk, Inger
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Sahlberg Blom, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Tvåstegssamtal inför beslut om fosterdiagnostik2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Wätterbjörk, Inger
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Sahlberg Blom, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Tvåstegssamtal inför beslut om fosterdiagnostik2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Wätterbjörk, Inger
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Sahlberg Blom, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Tvåstegssamtal inför beslut om fosterdiagnostik: en kvalitativ studie2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Wätterbjörk, Inger
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Sahlberg Blom, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Tvåstegssamtal inför beslut om fosterdiagnostik: resultat från en kvalitativ studie2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Wätterbjörk, Inger
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sahlberg-Blom, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Decision-making process of prenatal screening described by pregnant women and their partners2015In: Health Expectations, ISSN 1369-6513, E-ISSN 1369-7625, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 1582-1592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pregnant women are often faced with having to decide about prenatal screening for Down’s syndrome. However,the decision to participate in or refrain from prenatal screening can be seen as an important decision not only for the pregnant woman but also for both the partners.

    Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the couples’ processes of decision making about prenatal screening.

    Methods: A total of 37 semi-structured interviews conducted at two time points were analysed using the interpretive description.

    Setting: The study was carried out in Maternal health-care centres,Örebro County Council, Sweden.

    Participants: Fifteen couples of different ages and with different experiences of pregnancy and childbirth were interviewed.

    Results: Three different patterns of decision making were identified. For the couples in The open and communicative decision-making process’, the process was straightforward and rational, and the couples discussed the decision with each other. ‘The closed and personal decision-making process’ showed an immediate and non-communicative decision making where the couples decided each for themselves. The couples showing ‘The searching and communicative decision-making process’ followed an arduous road in deciding whether to participate or not in prenatal screening and how to cope with the result.

    Conclusions: The decision-making process was for some couples a fairly straightforward decision, while for others it was a more complex process that required a great deal of consideration.

  • 11.
    Wätterbjörk, Inger
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Family Medicine Research Center, AFC, Örebro, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sahlberg-Blom, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Pregnant women's and their partners' perception of an information model on prenatal screening2012In: Prenatal Diagnosis, ISSN 0197-3851, E-ISSN 1097-0223, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 461-466Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Extended verbal information on prenatal screening was given when combined ultrasound and biochemistry screening test was offered at Örebro County Council, Sweden, in 2008. The aim of this study was to describe pregnant women's and her partners' perceptions of this information model.

    Method: The interviews were semi-structured, and altogether, 26 interviews were performed with pregnant women and partners. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the data.

    Results: The result consists of two main categories, ‘form and content’ and ‘managing the information’, to describe the couples' perceptions of the information given. Nine categories describe the information model in: voluntariness, a separate visit, a special midwife, the content, missing information, ethical considerations, a visit on equal terms, communication within the couple, communication with other people, and emotional management.

    Conclusion: The information model helps expecting parents to focus on prenatal screening. Only information about prenatal screening and diagnosis was not enough for everybody; some couples want this to be an opportunity to discuss with a professional the pros and cons of prenatal screening as well as ethical considerations. The information visit gives the partner a chance to be involved and an opportunity for the couple to discuss the subject.

  • 12.
    Wätterbjörk, Inger
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Sahlberg Blom, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Barnmorskan informerar om fosterdiagnostik: vad tycker kvinnan och partnern och hur bestämmer de sig?2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Wätterbjörk, Inger
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Sahlberg Blom, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Information aboutprenatal screening: midwives informs in two steps2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Wätterbjörk, Inger
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Häggström-Nordin, Elisabet
    Hägglund, Doris
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Provider strategies for contraceptive counselling among Swedish midwives2011In: British journal of midwifery, ISSN 0969-4900, E-ISSN 2052-4307, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 296-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have shown that in contraceptive counselling the provider sets the agenda. The aim of this study was to describe how a group of Swedish nurse-midwives think and act in their role as contraceptive counsellors. Semi-structured questions were put to a convenience sample of 16 nurse-midwives. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Five categories were identified: exploring the woman's situation; providing information about contraceptive methods; performing medical evaluation; guiding the decision-making process; and following up on the counselling. Results showed that the providers had developed their own strategies and suggest the use of interventions which combine counselling methods to provide information, with a theory for decision-making, to help in giving advice. This study could contribute to personal reflection on contraceptive counselling in practice, both for experienced counsellors and those new to the task

  • 15.
    Wätterbjörk, Inger
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Family Medicine Research Centre.
    Sahlberg-Blom, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Decision-making about prenatal screening: are pregnant women and partners satisfied with their decision?2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The combined test for Down syndrome is offered to pregnant women. Qualitative studies have shown that the decision, whether or not to accept the test,is a rational one for most couples, although for some it may be difficult. Little is known about the couples’ satisfaction with the decision afterwards; the aim of this study was to extend that knowledge

    Method Pregnant women and their partners were invited to fill out a questionnaire at approximately pregnancy week 20. The questionnaire, which covered aspects of their decision on prenatal testing, was based on the Decision Regret Scale, with additional questions

    Results The response rate was 77% (295/359 women and 223/315 partners). The decision whether or not to participate in the combined test was seen as mutual by 95% of the women and 96% of the partners, and was perceived as uncomplicated by 93% of both women and partners. The decision was considered as difficult/very difficult by 6%. With a range of 93% – 99% women and partners were satisfied with their decision afterwards, but 1%–7% were not

    Conclusion The majority of the participants were satisfied wither their decision. However, a small minority were not, which is important to recognize.

  • 16.
    Wätterbjörk, Inger
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Sahlberg-Blom, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Reasons for declining extended information visit on prenatal screening among pregnant women and their partners2015In: Prenatal Diagnosis, ISSN 0197-3851, E-ISSN 1097-0223, Vol. 35, no 12, p. 1232-1237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: A two-step model on information on prenatal screening consists of brief information at the first visit at the Maternal Health Care Centre and an offer of extended information at a separate visit. There is a lack of knowledge why some pregnant women and their partners refrain from the extended information visit. The aim of this study was to explore their reasons

    Method: Eight qualitative interviews were analysed using Interpretive Description.

    Results: In the first theme “From an individual view”, the interviewees saw the invitation from their own points of view. They refrained because they did not want to receive any more information or had taken an individual position against chromosomal testing. In the theme, “From a societal view”, the interviewees perceived the offer as part of a societal view on prenatal screening that they could not support.

    Conclusion: The findings shows that these interviewees' reasons of declining an extended information visit are multidimensional and influenced by different views, from both an individual perspective and a more societal one. Health care professionals should be aware that some persons could have a different view on health care services and could be reluctant to accept offered services.

  • 17.
    Wätterbjörk, Inger
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Sahlberg-Blom, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Views on prenatal screening among pregnant women and partners declining an extended informationArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: A County Council in Sweden has implemented a two-step information model about prenatal screening. In addition to the regular brief information delivered by the midwife at the first routine visit at the maternal health care centre, the two-step model includes an offer of extended information at a separate visit. However, a substantial number of the couples decline and there is a lack of knowledge about their reasons. The aim of this study was to describe views about prenatal screening among couples who had not taken part in an extended information visit, to increase understanding of the perspectives of prenatal screening in this group.

    Method: Qualitative interviews were performed with seven couples not participating in an extended information visit about prenatal screening. Data were analysed using Interpretive Description. Results: The results showed two themes. In the theme “From an individual view”, with the subthemes Declining further information and, Position taken against prenatal screening, the couples saw the invitation and prenatal screening from their own points of view. They refrained because they did not want to receive any more information. In the other theme, “From a societal view”, with the subthemes Society has a hidden agenda and, The health care service’s responsibilities, the couples perceived the offer as part of a societal view on prenatal screening, that they could not support.

    Conclusion: The findings in this group of couples shows that couples’ perceptions of prenatal screening are multidimensional and influenced by different views, from both an individual perspective and a more societal one.

    Practice Implications: Health care professionals should be aware that some persons could be reluctant to accept health care service, and that the challenge is to meet all individuals, without violating their autonomy. Person-centred care could assist with an approach to meeting the person as an individual.

1 - 17 of 17
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