oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 32 of 32
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Boström, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Andersson, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Berg, Monika
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Karin M
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Hysing, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Löfmarck, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ojala, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Olsson, Jan
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Singleton, Benedict E
    Swedish Biodiversity Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Svenberg, Sebastian
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Uggla, Ylva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Öhman, Johan
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Conditions for Transformative Learning for Sustainable Development: A Theoretical Review and Approach2018In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 12, article id 4479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Continued unsustainability and surpassed planetary boundaries require not only scientific and technological advances, but deep and enduring social and cultural changes. The purpose of this article is to contribute a theoretical approach to understand conditions and constraints for societal change towards sustainable development. In order to break with unsustainable norms, habits, practices, and structures, there is a need for learning for transformation, not only adaption. Based on a critical literature review within the field of learning for sustainable development, our approach is a development of the concept of transformative learning, by integrating three additional dimensions—Institutional Structures, Social Practices, and Conflict Perspectives. This approach acknowledges conflicts on macro, meso, and micro levels, as well as structural and cultural constraints. It contends that transformative learning is processual, interactional, long-term, and cumbersome. It takes place within existing institutions and social practices, while also transcending them. The article adopts an interdisciplinary social science perspective that acknowledges the importance of transformative learning in order for communities, organizations, and individuals to be able to deal with global sustainability problems, acknowledging the societal and personal conflicts involved in such transformation.

  • 2.
    Elander, Ingemar
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Fridolfsson, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Faith-based engagement and place: Searching for a Swedish muslim identity2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Elander, Ingemar
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Fridolfsson, Charlotte
    Department of Political Science, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Swedish muslims and secular society: faith-based engagement and place2015In: Islam and Christian-Muslim Relations, ISSN 0959-6410, E-ISSN 1469-9311, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 145-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article sets out to explore how Muslims in Sweden identify with and create social life in the place where they live, that is, in their neighbourhood, in their town/city and in Swedish society at large. In a paradoxical religious landscape that includes a strong Lutheran state church heritage and a Christian free-church tradition, in what is, nevertheless, a very secular society, Muslims may choose different strategies to express their faith, here roughly described as “retreatist,” “engaged” or “essentialist/antagonistic.” Focusing on a non-antagonistic, engaged stance, and drawing upon a combination of authors' interviews, and materials published in newspapers and on the Internet, we first bring to the fore arguments by Muslim leaders in favour of creating a Muslim identity with a Swedish brand, and second give some examples of local Muslim individuals, acting as everyday makers in their neighbourhood, town or city. Third, we also give attention to an aggressively negative Islamophobic stance expressed both in words and in physical violence in parts of Swedish society. In conclusion, we reflect upon the challenges and potentialities of an emotionally engaged, dialogue-orientated Muslim position facing antagonistic interpretations of Islam, and an ignorant, sometimes Islamophobic, environment.

  • 4.
    Elander, Ingemar
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Granberg, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Kommunen - klimataktör med stor potential2010In: Sverige i nytt klimat - våtvarm utmaning / [ed] Birgitta Johansson, Stockholm: Forskningsrådet Formas, 2010, 1, p. 389-400Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Elander, Ingemar
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    From policy community to issue networks: Implementing social sustainability in a Swedish urban development programme2019In: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, ISSN 2399-6544, E-ISSN 2399-6552, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 1082-1101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article a “sustainable urban development” programme in Sweden (Delegation for Sustainable Cities, 2008–2012) is analysed, with a particular focus on the social dimension, and in the light of a commonly held assumption of a general shift in politics over time “from government to governance”. However, on closer examination the programme comes out as something quite different. Taking “policy community” as our conceptual point of departure the article first portrays how post-war housing policy in Sweden was implemented jointly by a potent central government, strong local governments, public housing companies and major interest organisations. The Delegation for Sustainable Cities, on the other hand, was launched as “a national arena for sustainable urban development” with a multifaceted mission, including the production and dissemination of knowledge through best practice; the promotion of multi-actor dialogue and coordination; and the use and export of green technology. Implementation of the programme was delegated to a small number of projects in selected housing districts. In relation to the narrative “from government to governance”, the Delegation for  Sustainable Cities rather indicates the opposite, i.e. government steering by a combination of structural non-intervention, rhetorical flair and selective fragmentation into project-bound issue networks. The  sustainability discourse thus turned out to be a perfect umbrella for the fragmented implementation structure of the Delegation for Sustainable Cities programme. Instead of a tight, multi-level, national governance structure (policy community) we thus have a case of governing at some distance by a combination of what in recent literature have been labelled the Regulatory State and the Networked Polity.

  • 6.
    Elander, Ingemar
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Nyanser av grönt i den urbana hållbarhetskören: några aktuella exempel2015In: Biodiverse, ISSN 1401-5064, no 2, p. 5-7Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Elander, Ingemar
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    Örebro University.
    Urban Governance, Networking Cities and Climate Change: The Swedish Context2007In: SURF 2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    Örebro University.
    Climate change mitigation: burden or opportunity?2009In: The 2009 Annual meeting of Association of American Geographers (AAG), 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract to the session: From Growth to Resilience: Changing Perspectives on Regional Development.

    There is a growing awareness in cities, regions and nations all over the world of an ongoing global warming and its effects. The industrialized world has undertaken the task to lower the green house gas emissions, and most probably larger assignments will be distributed in future agreements. Opponents argue that this implies restrictions that threaten economic development; others argue that climate change mitigation can be looked upon as an opportunity to enhance national and regional economic development and the creation of new jobs. In times of economic decline, innovations in climate friendly technology are put forward from national and local governments as an appropriate cure. This follows the line of argumentation in the ecological modernization discourse. To make it short - economic growth and the creation of new jobs is one of many challenges for cities and regions, combating climate change is another. Is it possible to make a win-win solution out of these challenges? Based on two Swedish case studies, we put forward two different local solutions to this challenge. In both cases networking on different scales and across sectors is part of the strategy. In one of the cases the city is very active in using its networks as platforms both for advertising climate friendly production and boosting itself as a forerunner in climate mitigation. The case studies show that local resources to some degree determine the way climate mitigation and climate friendly production are combined with growth strategies in the two cities, shaping climate policies.

  • 9.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    Örebro University.
    Enkät till 1000 personer i Askersund och Laxå kommuner om attityder till klimatfrågan: Genomförd i januarifebruari 20102010Other (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Households as Role Models in Local Climate Change Mitigation: experiences from municipal dialogue projects in Sweden.2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been a growing interest in the role of households and local governments in climate change mitigation. In Sweden, lately a number of small scale projects have appeared, involving households and local governments in dialogue. The aim of this paper is to analyze and discuss the potentials of these projects in reducing CO2 emissions. The paper takes its point of departure in Spaargaren´s conceptualization of citizens/consumers in climate change mitigation; i.e. in terms of the ecological citizen, political consumerism and lifestyle politics. The dialogue projects are located in the context of Swedish climate policy developing from top-down project orientation to local initiatives, as exemplified by a number of dialogue projects involving local governments and selected citizens, with the latter as potential role models. This part of the paper is based on interviews with project participants, a survey, and documentary studies. Using Spaargaren´s terminology we find that the participants in the projects are becoming more conscious about their lifestyles as ecological consumers and citizens.

    The main conclusion is that this kind of projects may have some success provided the participating households will find long-term support by local governments considering the projects as something more than isolated events. The experience from the projects has to be disseminated broadly in the municipality, and also get tangible results in terms of better public transport, energy savings advice etc. This may also give municipalities the opportunity to present themselves as ecological forerunners, provided that they make local climate change mitigation policy a key priority.

  • 11.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Klimat, hållbarhet och deltagande: erfarenheter från två lokala utvecklingsprojekt2012In: Hållbar utveckling: samhällsplanering, lokala villkor och globala beroenden / [ed] Lennart Tonell, Stockholm: Svenska sällskapet för antropologi och geografi , 2012, 1, p. 135-162Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Klimatarbete i kommuner: utmaningar, möjligheter och konflikter2010In: Klimatets krav på samhället / [ed] Göran Graninger, Christer Knuthammar, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2010, p. 91-107Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Mellan det lokala och det globala: klimat, kommuner, nätverk2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Between the local and the global: climate, local governments, networks

    The notion of an ongoing global warming is shared by a large number of researchers and decision-makers around the world. Through the act of signing the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change a majority of the world's naitons have accepted the idea of human induced climate change, and to develop national climate change mitigation programmes. The Kyoto protocol later quantified the commitments made by the nations.

    The issue of climate change has become a political issue of its own. In the European Union as well as in Sweden and other nations, climate mitigation goals, programmes and strategies are developed. This is also the situation on the local level, for example in Swedish municipalities, which is the context of this study. Local goverment is an important actor in climate mitigation, both as a political organization in its own right and as an arena involving actors from different sectors in society. Climate change mitigation measures conducted by local governments re partly shaped by national grant programmes. The study shows, however, that the local context - the palce - with its natural prerequisites, economic structures and composition of actors, is just as decisive for how the local climate policies are developed and implemented. It also shows that although responsibility for the environment is an important driving force in local climate mitigation there are at least two other dirving forces; local and regional development and the symbolic valute of being in the forefront of climate change mitigation.

    Another arena where actors in climate change mitigation meet is the network. Together wiht actors from different sectors and levels many municipalities participate in various networks, with local to global extension. The fact that the netsorks like climate change in inself transcends political and administrative borders, is alsö addressed theoretically in the study, focusing upon the concepts of re-scaling, multilevel governance and network governance, which constitute the theoretichal fram of the thesis.

  • 14.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Renovering av ett miljonprogram2019In: Samhällsplaneringens teori och praktik / [ed] Forsberg, Gunnel, Stockholm: Liber, 2019, p. 188-196Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    Örebro University.
    Tid, pengar eller ett personligt klimatsamvete vad kan inspirera vanligt folk att ändra sitt vardagsliv i mer klimatvälig riktning?: Resultat av en intervjustudie i samband med starten av projektet Klimatpiloterna i Askersund och Laxå kommuner, genomförd i september 2009.2010Other (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Elander, Ingemar
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Behaving Clean without Having to Think Green?: Local Eco-Technological and Dialouge-Based, Low-Carbon Projects in Sweden2017In: The Journal of urban technology, ISSN 1063-0732, E-ISSN 1466-1853, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 93-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two kinds of local low-carbon initiatives are the focus in this paper: those initiated under the umbrella of a central government program, and those initiated from below by individuals and municipalities in Sweden. The project studied in the first category was focused on eco-technological innovations undertaken by a municipal housing company. The case in the second category was a dialogue-based program with selected citizens willing to test a climate-friendly lifestyle. The latter approach faced strong barriers when going from words to deeds, lacking the large-scale favors of massive eco-technological investments. Highlighting one particular project in each category, we illustrate the potentials and barriers of each approach. it is concluded that policymakers have to find ways to combine the two, otherwise there is a risk that low-carbon committed individuals will become disillusioned or that eco-technological gains will be spoiled by "rebound consumption".

  • 17.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Elander, Ingemar
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Cocky and climate smart?: Climate change mitigation and place-branding in three Swedish towns2012In: Local Environment: the International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, ISSN 1354-9839, E-ISSN 1469-6711, Vol. 17, no 8, p. 769-782Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable development has emerged as a distinctive marker of place identity in addition to traditional markers such as buildings and spectacles. Climate change mitigation as a potential place brand, indicating sustainable development, is in focus of this article, comparing such efforts in three Swedish towns. Based on documentary studies and interviews, it demonstrates how one town has been successful in branding itself as “the Greenest City in Europe”, whereas mitigation efforts in two other towns are barely known outside the town halls. In the first case, a combination of material, symbolic, and institutional components has been decisive in establishing a brand with internal and external legitimacy. This case highlights the importance of a dedicated network of influential actors and a potent governance structure visualising the will of a town to make its climate mitigation efforts known. Despite similar material conditions, the two others come short on the symbolic and the institutional dimensions, although they may still have a potential for future success in terms of mitigation both in practice and as a marker of identity.

  • 18.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Elander, Ingemar
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Greenest of them all?: climate change mitigation and place branding in three Swedish towns2015In: Place and identity: a new landscape of social and political change in Sweden / [ed] Marco Eimermann & Anders Trumberg, Stockholm: Santérus Academic Press Sweden, 2015, p. 76-96Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Elander, Ingemar
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Households as role models for sustainable consumption: the case of local climate dialogues in two Swedish towns2013In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 56, no 2, p. 194-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The research problem addressed concerns the interplay between households as consumers, and local governments as policy makers and service providers. Mainly based on interviews with selected households, the paper explores the activities, results and potential long-term gains of a climate dialogue project undertaken in two Swedish towns. The findings are interpreted in terms of Spaargaren and Oosterveer's ideal types of the consumer as ecological citizen, political consumer and moral agent. The main finding is that although the immediate gains in terms of GHG reduction are small, such projects may function as triggers of future change towards more sustainable policies and everyday practices.

  • 20.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Elander, Ingemar
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Killing three birds with one stone?: Participatory planning and the challenge of multi-dimensional sustainability2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro University.
    Elander, Ingemar
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Local and Regional Climate Change Mitigation in the Financial Crisis: Burden or Opportunity?2009In: The 15th ISDR Conference 2009 in Utrecht, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract to the track Responding to the Financial Crisis: Opportunities for Ecological Transition from/within a Colapsed Economy

    There is a growing awareness in cities, regions and nations all over the world of an ongoing global warming and its effects. The industrialized world has undertaken the task to lower the green house gas emissions, and even stronger commitments to that goal may be taken in future agreements. Opponents argue that this implies restrictions that threaten economic development; others argue that climate change mitigation can be looked upon as an opportunity to enhance national and regional economic development and the creation of new jobs. In times of economic decline, innovations in climate friendly technology are sometimes put forward by national and local governments as an appropriate cure. This follows the line of argumentation found in the ecological modernization discourse. To make it short - economic growth and the creation of new jobs is a challenge that has become top priority for cities and regions in the current state of economic crisis. How does this combine with high ambitions in combating climate change? Is it possible to make a win-win solution out of these challenges? Based on two Swedish case studies, we identify two different, locally based solutions to this challenge. In both cases networking on different scales and across sectors is part of the strategy. In one of the cases the city is very active in using a number of multi-scalar networks as platforms both for advertising climate friendly production and boosting itself as a forerunner in climate mitigation. Although not really boosting its ambition to contribute to climate change mitigation the other city is also involved in networking, particularly at the regional level. The case studies show that different geographies, different historical paths of development, and the presence of key actors together determine the way climate mitigation and climate friendly production are combined with growth strategies in the two cities. In what way the current financial crisis will affect the fairly ambitious climate mitigation policies of the two cities is too early to say, but will be hypothetically discussed in the concluding part of the paper.

  • 22.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Elander, Ingemar
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    ‘My Green Neighbourhood’: potentials and limits of a redevelopment initiative in a stigmatized housing estate2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the shadow of the debate on the role of global, national and local government levels in environmental governance the potentials and willingness of households/individuals to change their attitudes and behaviour towards sustainable consumption and life styles are issues increasingly raised in policy and research, as illustrated by concepts like “ecological citizen”, “political consumer” and “moral agent”. The empirical focus of this paper will be upon an attempt by a municipal housing company to approach the residents of a stigmatized, multi-family estate with a redevelopment scheme expressing a will to combine social and ecological qualities under the brand “My Green Neighbourhood”. Considering the area´s multi-ethnical, socially vulnerable, and “stigmatized” character, the company wants to increase residents´ participation, and identification with the area, and at the same time changing their behaviour by constructing energy saving and other “green” technical solutions.  Drawing upon data describing the aim and scope of the redevelopment scheme as presented by the company, the dialogue activities planned, and partly implemented, and the residents´ reactions so far our analysis will be related to similar research done by ourselves and others, and interpreted in the framework of current theoretical debates on the potentials and limits of deliberative environmentalism. Can projects like this inspire residents to make them “behaving clean”, maybe even without “thinking green”, and at the same time strengthen their positive identification with the neighbourhood? What are the potentials and limits of deliberative top-down interventions of this kind?  Do they contribute to accountable, just and legitimate earth governance?

  • 23.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Elander, Ingemar
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    "My Green Neighbourhood": sustainability potential of a redevelopment initiative in a stigmatized housing estate2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary

    One million homes were built in Sweden during the period 1965-1974, mostly financed by state housing loans and made available for renting. Large-scale rented housing then became commonplace, mostly built on virgin land on the outskirts of cities and towns. Although most of these 850,000 apartments are considered decently maintained, some 300,000 are still in need of refurbishment, especially with regard to bathrooms, kitchens, insulation and ventilation. This is a great opportunity for technological innovations, potentially contributing to energy-saving and climate mitigation on a broad scale. However, many of these estates have also been associated with social problems like spatial segregation and social exclusion. Under the label “suburb” [förort], these estates have become stigmatized, triggered by massive critique from journalists, writers, politicians, architects and even researchers.

    The empirical focus of this report is on an attempt by a municipal housing company to approach the residents of a multi-family housing estate with a redevelopment scheme expressing a will to combine social and ecological qualities under the brand “My Green Neighbourhood”. The company wants to change their everyday behaviour by constructing energy-saving technical solutions, increase residents’ participation and social inclusion and redress the identity of the area in the eyes of residents, visitors and outside spectators. Drawing upon data describing the aim and scope of the redevelopment scheme, the dialogue activities undertaken during the planning phase, and residents’ reactions, the analysis relates to current debates on the potentials and limits of citizen participation in urban renewal in terms of the sustainability discourse.

    Although the study only covers the planning process until the end of 2011 when the housing company took its final decision, conclusions also consider the potential of future implementations. Whereas prospects of success with regard to energy-saving investments are bright, other results are more open to question. Thus, whether technological innovations will also inspire households to lead a more climate-friendly life in general must also take other things than housing into consideration, in particular their life situations and lifestyles in a broad sense. Thus, residents’ willingness to participate in planning and politics, and their social inclusion in society at large are matters not only related to housing. Depending on the capacity and willingness of residents to pay and stay it is unclear how many of the present inhabitants will stay or leave for other households to move in.

    There is little doubt regarding the housing company’s commitment in terms of professional and long-term financial responsibility. In addition, the company’s social ambitions do not only include a willingness to engage residents in planning and caring for their apartments and the outdoor environment. The housing company also cooperates with the main contractor with a view to employing more than 50 until now unemployed residents in the building process.

    Finally, at the time of writing, it seems that My Green Neighbourhood should not be disregarded as just one more number in a never-ending parade of temporary projects. Its brand of social, economic and technological innovations have multi-dimensional sustainability potential that may even contribute to a decent make-over and a positive branding of a large, previously stigmatized multi-family city district.

  • 24.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Elander, Ingemar
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Social hållbarhet i stadsutveckling?: Uppföljning av tio projekt i svenska städer2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Boverket med flera myndigheter och organisationer har på senare tid starkt argumenterat för ökad satsning på åtgärder i syfte att stärka den sociala dimensionen av hållbar stadsutveckling. Delegationen för hållbara städer (DHS) ger under perioden 2009 - 2014 ekonomiskt stöd till 98 projekt som ska främja hållbar stadsutveckling. Rapporten redovisar ett uppdrag från Boverket att ”följa upp sociala effekter” i 7 investerings- och 3 planeringsprojekt. I studien undersöks hur man i dessa projekt närmat sig frågan om social hållbarhet.

    Föreställningen om ”social hållbarhet” är en vision och ett övergripande värde som kan preciseras i olika riktningar och med olika fokus, något som tydligt framgår av de tio projekt vi studerat. Social hållbarhet framstår här sammantaget som en positivt laddad etikett som klistras på ett brett spektrum av åtgärder. Med hjälp av en teoretiskt förankrad, men pragmatiskt konstruerad tankeram har vi stegvis närmat oss de aspekter projekten själva explicit förknippat med eller implicit verkar se som uttryck för social håll-barhet. Strategin finns beskriven i en tidigare rapport till Boverket (Gustavsson & Elan-der 2013b). Den rapporten utmynnar i en ”hållbarhetspyramid” med åtföljande frågor och förklarande resonemang som i urval har använts i den aktuella uppföljningen.

    Eftersom projekten avslutas först i och med utgången av 2014 är det inte möjligt att nu dra bestämda slutsatser om effekter och resultat. Dessutom pågår i projektområdena parallella och delvis sammanvävda processer som gör det svårt att urskilja vilket specifikt bidrag som kan härledas till ett visst projekt. Däremot finns ett överflöd av material som ger kunskap om mål, påbörjade och delvis genomförda åtgärder. Källmaterialet är i huvudsak begränsat till projektledningarnas bilder, berättelser och självvärderingar som de framgår av projektrapporter, enkätsvar och samtal på plats. Forskarnas roll har i huvudsak varit att observera och dokumentera vad som sker, men också att i samtal tillföra erfarenheter och reflektioner baserade på annan forskning om sociala perspektiv på stadsutveckling.

    Studien visar att projekten har en potential att efter projekttidens slut införlivas med långsiktig och samordnad planering och verksamhet i en etablerad struktur med kommuner och/eller bostadsföretag, ofta i samverkan med näringsliv och/eller aktörer i det civila samhället. I några projekt finns dock en oro för att de mervärden som utvunnits under projekttiden kan komma att ebba ut, därför att personella resurser som tillförts tack vare projektstödet inte får någon alternativ finansiering. Några garantier för en fortsättning på den verksamhet projekten initierat finns alltså inte.

    En uttalad tanke har varit att projekten ska fungera som ”goda exempel” för kommuner, bostadsföretag och andra relevanta aktörer. Studien visar att projekten genomgående varit bra på att exponera sig via kanaler för information och kommunikation såsom del-tagande i nätverk, hemsidor på internet, studiebesök, utställningar, projekttävlingar etc.

    I rapporten ges exempel på hur projekt gjort insatser för att skapa praktikplatser och jobb, att engagera barn, ungdomar och andra boende för gemenskap i sin stadsdel, att lära vuxna cykla, med flera åtgärder för social inkludering. Flera projekt har satsat på att skapa nya mötesplatser och stråk för cykling, promenader och kollektivtrafik med potential att bidra till integration mellan människor i olika delar av staden. Platsidentitet är ett tema som aktualiserats i flera projekt, där man både inåt och utåt vill skapa en mer positiv bild av tidigare stigmatiserade områden. I några fall har det varit ett sätt för en stadsledning att använda en viss stadsdel som varumärke för hela staden i nationella och internationella sammanhang. Ett genomgående tema har varit åtgärder för att genom olika former av dialog försöka skapa delaktighet och deltagande från boende och medborgare, bland annat genom kreativa komplement till traditionella planprocesser. Sammantaget ger studien bilden av ett myllrande projektliv vars bestående effekter påkallar nya, fördjupade studier om några år.

  • 25.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Elander, Ingemar
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Social hållbarhet inte bara "sustainababble"?: Från mångtydig vision till analytiskt redskap vid uppföljning av stadsbyggnadsprojekt2013Report (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Elander, Ingemar
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Sustainability potential of a redevelopment initiative in Swedish public housing: The ambiguous role of residents’ participation and place identity2016In: Progress in Planning, ISSN 0305-9006, E-ISSN 1873-4510, Vol. 103, p. 1-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During 1965–1974 one million dwellings were built in Sweden, most of these financed by state housing loans and available for renting. Although most of these 850,000 apartments are considered decently maintained about 300,000 are considered in need of thorough refurbishment. This is a great opportunity for technological innovations, contributing to energy saving and climate mitigation on a broad scale. However, many of these estates have also been associated with spatial segregation, social exclusion and related challenges. The empirical focus of this article is on an attempt by a municipal housing company to approach the residents of a multi-family housing estate with a redevelopment scheme expressing a will to combine social, ecological and economic qualities under the brand ‘‘My Green Neighbourhood’’. Drawing upon data describing the initial phase and the dialogue activities undertaken during the planning phase, and the residents’ reactions the study is conceptually framed by an eclectic approach inspired by the spatial triad of Lefebvre, Relph’s notion of place identity, and Arnstein’s ladder of citizen participation, including references to some related, recent works. Considering a common picture of municipal, multi-family housing in Sweden as a ‘‘success story’’ the case study is of relevance in the wider context of coping with the challenges of sustainable urban development. It is concluded that projects like this have a potential to decrease energy consumption substantially, as well as contributing to long-term financially sound management by housing companies. However, when it comes to social aspects of sustainability the picture becomes more complicated. First, most sitting tenants would have preferred a change in terms of proper maintenance and modest improvements. Second, most of them will not return to their apartments after rehabilitation, partly due to rising rents. Third, the position of the tenants was not very strong, instead planning rather had a tokenist bias. Fourth, the local government’s social mix strategy has to be questioned on theoretical as well as empirical grounds. Despite these and other critical observations, My Green Neighbourhood should not be disregarded as just one more in a never-ending parade of low impact ad hoc projects. Up-scaling the experience of this and similar running projects would represent a substantial contribution to urban sustainable development, at least in terms of energy saving. Finally, to understand the complexities of a redevelopment planning process it is concluded that decisionmakers have to be very observant of the different time perspectives linked to the structural positions and interests of the various stakeholders, for example a building company’s desire to make short time profits through major reconstruction, sitting tenants’ demand for sustainable maintenance and cautious refurbishment, local politicians´ wish to create another social mix in the area, and a public housing company’s attempt to reconcile the views of different actors

  • 27.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Elander, Ingemar
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lundmark, Mats
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Klimatpolitikens lokala geografi: exempel från svenska kommuner2009In: Global uppvärmning och lokal politik / [ed] Ylva Uggla, Ingemar Elander, Stockholm: Santérus Förlag, 2009, 1, p. 83-108Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Elander, Ingemar
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lundmark, Mats
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Multilevel governance, networking cities and the geography of climate-change mitigation: two Swedish examples2009In: Environment and Planning. C, Government and Policy, ISSN 0263-774X, E-ISSN 1472-3425, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 59-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What geographical and instiutional conditions are important for initiating and sustaining climate-change mitigation at the local level? Taking this question as a point of departure, we analyze local climate mitigation as a case of multilevel network governance. This is illustrated by the case of two Swedish cities, which are both involved in city networking in favour of climate-change mitigation. Different business structures and other local conditions in significant ways influence both the level of ambition and the climate-policy strategies of the two cities, The sheer size and intensity of the networking activities clearly illustrate the fact that cities are increasingly becoming arenas of globalization, rather than passive victims of global forces, thus confirming the call for a multilevel netork-governance approach in policy and politics as well as in research.

  • 29.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Högskolan Dalarna, Fauln, Sverige.
    Håkansson, Johan
    Högskolan Dalarna, Fauln, Sverige.
    Vilken image har miljonprogrammets bostadsområden i medelstora städer?2012Report (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro University.
    Lundmark, Mats
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Climate Change Mitigation and Economic Growth: Determinants for Local Level Climate Policy?2008In: The 2008 Annual meeting of Association of American Geographers (AAG), 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Kristianssen, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Elander, Ingemar
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Citizen-centred innovations between responsive and inclusive democracy.: Examples from a Swedish city.2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Representing all citizens, as well as their needs and interests within its territory, municipalities have a unique role in setting a legitimate policy agenda. In times of economic recession, fiscal austerity becomes a huge challenge for local governments to tackle. This challenge has triggered experiments with new forms of citizen-local government interaction.

    In some of these experiments citizens have been invited to participate in decision-making or implementation, and new forms of “participatory engineering” have become commonplace, including dialogue forums in social media and elsewhere (Zittel & Fuchs 2007). Citizen participation has been loudly praised by decision-making authorities when it comes to area based interventions and broader programs. There is a belief that including citizens will increase efficiency and legitimacy of government as well as social capital among citizens.

    Other experiments are focusing on providing the best possible service with a focus on quality and citizen needs rather than participation or on institutional innovations (Graham, 2009) for alleviating citizen-government interaction.

    The prospects, aims and outcomes of these experiments raise a range of normative, theoretical and empirical questions. In the light of recent literature on social and democratic innovations, the purpose of this paper is to scrutinize two cases of citizen-focused innovations in the mid-size Swedish city of Örebro. The first case is the establishment of a citizen service center where all local government citizen interaction is gathered in one location both physically and virtually. The second is a case of neighborhood renewal, where the municipal housing company plays a vital role, involving residents in the planning process, and offering opportunities of employment. The study contributes to the broader conceptual discussion about citizen-focused innovations and critically discusses the prospects of applying these with regard to citizens with limited resources. To put it brief, are they tools for democracy or rather cases of tokenism?

    References

    Smith, Graham (2009) Democratic Innovations: Designing Institutions for Citizen

    Participation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Zittel, Thomas and Fuchs, Dieter (2007) Can Participatory Engineering Bring Citizens Back

    In? NewYork: Routledge.

  • 32.
    Trumberg, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Patterns of segregation in small cities: the case of Borlänge, Sweden2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Research about segregation in Sweden is mainly concentrated on large cities where the effects of ethnic and socioeconomic segregation in housing are believed to be more apparent that in smaller cities or towns. Relatively few statistical studies, none in smaller cities, look at the underlying migration dynamics over time that causes segregation on the individual level.  These underlying dynamics are instead often studied by means of qualitative research.  In this study we adapt, on individual level, a longitudinal statistical analysis on the underlying migration dynamics that results in ethnic and socioeconomic segregation. We combine this analysis with an interview investigation on people’s perceived images on different living areas in the cities. The analysis is conducted on a smaller city, Borlänge, a small rural town in central Sweden. The aim of the presentation is to examine how the migration to Borlänge has influenced the segregation in housing from the year 1990 to 2008 and if this process is compatible with the inhabitant’s experience of living in segregated areas of the city. The conclusion is that in recent years the visible minorities are being concentrated to certain neighborhoods due to the moving patterns, meaning an inflow of visible minorities and an outflow of people with Swedish background and invisible minorities. The interview material shows that the inhabitants are aware of living in stigmatized areas and that an inner differentiation between the minority groups and of the neighborhood is taking place, where the inhabitants are dividing their  neighborhood in good and bad parts.  

1 - 32 of 32
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf