oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 46 of 46
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    I livets slutskede: de anhörigas roll1999Report (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Närståendes behov i palliativ vård2004In: Närståendes behov: omvårdnad som akademiskt ämne III / [ed] Gerthrud Östlinder, Stockholm: Svensk sjuksköterskeförening , 2004, p. 103-115Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Relatives in end-of-life care--part 1: a systematic review of the literature the five last years, January 1999-February 20042006In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 15, no 9, p. 1158-1169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    To review systematically research conducted during the past five years focusing on the relatives' situation and needs in end-of-life care.

    BACKGROUND AND AIM:

    That relatives make a large contribution in the care of the dying is well-known. In this situation, relatives often have to solve many new practical problems in the care as well as dealing with the sorrow of both themselves and the dying person. In recent years, palliative care has been developed in many countries and many new studies have been carried out.

    METHODS:

    A systematic search of the literature was performed in the CINAHL and Medline databases. Of the 94 papers analysed, there were 59 qualitative and 35 quantitative studies with differing designs. The studies were carried out in 11 countries and were published in 34 different journals.

    RESULTS:

    The results were categorized in two main themes with several subthemes: (1) being a close relative--the situation: (i) exposed position--new responsibility, (ii) balance between burden and capacity and (iii) positive values; (2) being a close relative--needs: (i) good patient care, (ii) being present, (iii) knowing and communicating and (iv) support from and trusting relationship with the professional. The relative's feelings of security and trust in the professional were found to be of great importance.

    CONCLUSION:

    More than twice as many studies had a descriptive/explorative design, which is of importance in the assessment of evidence. However, different studies complement one another and in summary, it can be said that analytic evidence is unequivocal: good patient care, communication, information and the attitude of the professional are of decisive importance regarding relatives' situation. These results are also in accord with earlier review studies.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE:

    Staff members have a great deal of responsibility for assuring that the patient feels as good as possible, facilitating relatives' involvement based on the family's wishes and limiting the stress and difficulties experienced by the family. The results showed that the relative's satisfaction could depend on the attitude of the professional as well as on good communication, good listening and good information. This can also be viewed as a prerequisite for the professional to get to know the family and to provide 'care in the light'.

  • 4.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    The situation of relatives and their involvement in palliative care2003In: Austral-Asian Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0972-2556, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 174-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article summarises a number of studies in palliative care with the following primary aims; to describe and obtain increased understanding for the relatives' situation; to analyse the involvement of the relative; to analyse obstacles to and possibilities for the relatives' involvement; and to develop a theoretical framework of understanding concerning their involvement. The main results from the summarised studies show that the relatives' involvement in the patients' care could be classified into three main categories: "to know", "to be" and "to do". The studies show that the relatives' involvement can be described as either involvement in the light or involvement in the dark. Involvement in the light and in the dark illustrates the relatives' understanding of the situation, their possibilities for involvement, ad the attitude of the staff towards the relatives. A pattern which was observed was that those relatives who were involved in the light described having been met with respect, openness, sincerity, confirmation, and connection, while the opposite was the case for those who were involved in the dark. A surprising result was that the time between the patient?s cancer diagnosis and death was three months or less for 49% of 67 patients. In those cases where the course of illness was short, there was no time to lose and it was important that caring delays were avoided. Factors that promoted involvement in the light were professional care based on humanistic values, a stronger sense of coherence of relatives, an appropriate course of illness, and other available resources such as other relatives and one's own health. The result from the studies were summarised in five assumptions which together form a theoretical framework of understanding for the involvement of relatives.

  • 5.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Olsson, Kristina
    Review of research related to Kristen Swanson's middle-range theory of caring2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 598-610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to identify and describe how Kristen Swanson's middle-range theory has been used in nursing practice/research presented in international journals. A total of 120 studies were included in the review and 23 were analysed further. An overview of the studies is presented, followed by four categories of how the theory has been used: referring to the theory (97 papers), applications of the theory to practice/research and/or theoretical discussions (nine papers), relating findings to and/or validation of the theory (eight papers), and development of measurements from and/or testing of the theory (six papers). The use of the theory and conclusions of the studies related to criteria for evaluation of theories were discussed.

  • 6.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Being a close relative of a dying person: development of the concepts "involvement in the light and in the dark"2000In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 151-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study is based on an earlier article in which relatives' involvement in care was described as involvement in the light or involvement in the dark. Involvement in the light was characterized as the relative being well informed and experiencing a meaningful involvement. The relatives involved in the dark felt uninformed, that they were groping around in the dark when they tried to support the patient. The present study analyzed further the meaning of involvement in the light and involvement in the dark, and investigated whether two different care cultures, the relationship with the staff, and a rapid course of illness influence the involvement of relatives. Relatives of 52 patients who died, 30 at a surgical department and 22 in a hospice ward, were interviewed after the patients' deaths. All the relatives of the patients in the hospice ward and 13 of those in the surgical department were judged to be involved in the light. Of the relatives judged to be involved in the dark, 12 either had a sick relative with a rapid course of illness or felt that the sick relative had died unexpectedly. A pattern was clearly observed: The relatives involved in the light described being met with respect, openness, sincerity, confirmation, and connection, whereas the opposite was experienced by those involved in the dark.

  • 7.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Development of a theoretical framework describing relatives' involvement in palliative care2001In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 554-562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    The present study is based on four earlier studies in which the authors classified the relative's involvement in palliative care into different categories and described the involvement as "involvement in the light" or "involvement in the dark".

    AIM:

    The aim of the study was to develop a theoretical framework concerning the involvement of relatives based on an in-depth analysis of the results of the four earlier studies.

    METHOD:

    Walker & Avant's (1995) strategies for theory construction were used for development of the framework. A number of different concepts, assumptions and statements about relatives' involvement were penetrated in an in-depth analysis.

    RESULTS:

    From the concepts two theoretical "blocks" of the relatives' involvement were developed and these constitute the foundation for the framework. One is based on concrete descriptions of the concepts "to know", "to be" and "to do". The other describes how the concepts of "involvement in the light" and "involvement in the dark" differ. Factors that promoted involvement in the light were professional care based on humanistic values, a stronger sense of coherence on the part of relatives, an appropriate illness trajectory, and other available resources. The opposite was the case for those who were involved in the dark. Five assumptions successively developed which together form the theoretical framework.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    An important conclusion that can be of importance in palliative care is that the manner in which the staff act toward the patient and relatives influence relatives' possibilities for involvement, patients' possibilities for an appropriate death, and the possibilities the staff have to give good care.

  • 8.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Involvement of relatives in care of the dying in different care cultures: development of a theoretical understanding1999In: Nursing Science Quarterly, ISSN 0894-3184, E-ISSN 1552-7409, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 45-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A prerequisite for the staff to be able to guide relatives through the dying trajectory is that the staff members know what the relative wants and can do. The aim of this study was threefold: (a) to identify and categorize family members' involvement in the care of a dying relative, (b) to develop a theoretical understanding of their involvement, and (c) to discuss the congruence or incongruence between the empirical results and key concepts in Swanson's and Watson's theories of caring. The results show that the relatives' involvement could be classified into three categories: to know, to be, and to do. Good correspondence was found between these three categories and key concepts in Swanson's and Watson's theories of caring.

  • 9.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Involvement of relatives in the care of the dying in different care cultures: involvement in the dark or in the light?1998In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 106-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this prospective study was to increase existing knowledge about the involvement of relatives in care of the dying and to shed light on the relatives' sense of coherence. Six relatives were followed via qualitative interviews during the patients' final period of life and after their deaths. The patients died in different forms of care: surgical department, nursing home, inpatient hospice ward, and at home. What the relatives had in common was that they had, in different ways, followed the patient from the first symptoms, through different forms of care, up until death. Some participated very actively in the care. Relatives' involvement in care can be described as involvement in the light or involvement in the dark. Involvement in the light is based on a trusting relationship between the family and the staff. Involvement in the dark is based on insufficient interplay and collaboration, in which the relatives are not seen or acknowledged by the staff, but instead must grope around in the dark when they try to support the patient. Rapid course of illness can be a risk factor for involvement in the dark. It seems that the relatives' sense of coherence was an important factor enabling them to be involved in the light. Humanistic care can constitute a buffer, thereby increasing the possibilities for relatives to be involved in the light.

  • 10.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Patterns of care for patients with cancer before and after the establishment of a hospice ward1997In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 42-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A majority of people die in acute hospital care, in a culture of quickness primary aimed at curing. There are indications that hospice care in various forms will spread during the present decade in Sweden. The hospice philosophy contributes to a culture of slowness, where the patient is not only allowed but is encouraged to live at his own pace. As a first step in establishing for whom hospice inpatient care is the best alternative, patient flow to a newly started hospice ward was studied. All patients (n = 1464) who died at the Medical Centre Hospital with a primary diagnosis of cancer during the period of study were compared regarding place of death, diagnosis, gender, age and length of the last period of care. The year before the ward was established, 82% of patients died in acute hospital care compared with 59% during the hospice ward's third year of operation. A total of 315 patients (22%) died in the hospice ward during the study period. The percentage of these patients over the age of 80 was significantly higher (p = 0.0001), and they also had a longer continuous final period of care. More women (57%) than men (43%) were cared for at the hospice ward. The hospice ward has in this way influenced the pattern of care in the hospital.

  • 11.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    The illness trajectory: for patients with cancer who died in two different cultures of care1998In: Omega, ISSN 0030-2228, E-ISSN 1541-3764, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 251-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study has been to retrospectively examine the illness trajectory for a consecutive group of sixty-seven patients with cancer who died at a surgical department or were referred from there to an inpatient hospice ward where they died. Relatives of fifty-two patients were interviewed after the patient's death and all sixty-seven medical records were studied. The data was analyzed with support of Glaser and Strauss' concept of a dying trajectory. A surprising result was that as many as forty-four patients had a short trajectory, and nineteen of these had one month or less between diagnosis and death. Patients at surgical wards followed a faster trajectory and were in a somewhat poorer state of health when compared to patients at the inpatient hospice ward. In the case of trajectories within three months, there is no time to lose, and it is important that caring delay are avoided.

  • 12.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Werkander Harstäde, Carina
    Next of kin's feelings of guilt and shame in end-of-life care2007In: Contemporary nurse : a journal for the Australian nursing profession, ISSN 1037-6178, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 61-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study the aim was to explore and describe next of kin's feelings of guilt and shame in end-of-life care via secondary analysis of 47 qualitative interviews. In the analysis categories and subcategories emerged which conveyed how the next of kin experienced guilt; not having done or talked enough, being absent at important events or making errors of judgement. Categories conveying feelings of shame were situations where the next of kin felt inferior, was ashamed on behalf of the dying person and when family conflicts became apparent. Receiving help and support in order to make the remaining period as pleasant as possible can facilitate the next of kin's sense of having fulfilled their duties and responsibilities and therein reduce feelings of guilt and shame. It is apparent that these feelings should be taken into account and the next of kin should receive support to increase their well-being during the remaining time in end-of-life care and the grieving period.

  • 13. Bergdahl, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Wikström, Britt-Maj
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Esthetic abilities: a way to describe abilities of expert nurses in palliative home care2007In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 752-760Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of this paper is to focus on the abilities needed to create the caring relation in palliative home care and to find ways to describe these abilities and skills from an esthetic perspective.

    BACKGROUND: Nurses in Palliative home care have to create a functioning relationship between themselves the patient and the patient's next of kin, this puts special demands on the nurse. A number of abilities, such as creativity, intuition, empathy and self-knowledge are mentioned in literature related to the caring relation. Many nursing theorists have referred to the art and esthetic of nursing when trying to describe these abilities.

    METHODS: Data were collected using semi-structured interviews with eight expert nurses in palliative home care. The transcribed interviews were analysed using qualitative content analyses.

    FINDINGS: Three main categories where found: The will to do good, Knowledge and Perceptiveness. Subcategories that can be seen as abilities where found in the main categories knowledge and perceptiveness.

    CONCLUSIONS: The main categories can be seen as expressions for abilities, personal qualities and skills needed to create the caring relation in palliative home care. We found interesting connections between the three main categories and the concepts of esthetics, ethics and science. We also found that nurses develop in a way, i.e. similar to an artist.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The concepts brought forward in this paper could be used in clinical supervision and education as well as in clinical practice. If nurses think about the three aspects: Knowledge, the will to do good and perceptiveness, the chance for a positive relation between the nurse and the patient, and the patient's next of kin might increase. One could speculate that perceptiveness is a vital ability in order to achieve the expert level of nursing and that this perspective should be taken in consideration when recruiting nurses and in curriculum development.

  • 14.
    Ek, Kristina
    et al.
    School of Health and Education, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Department of Palliative Care Research, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norway.
    Sahlberg-Blom, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Britt-Marie, Ternestedt
    Department of Palliative Care Research, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    “The unpredictable death”: The last year of life for patients with advanced COPD: Relatives’ stories2015In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 1213-1222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The end stage of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is described as prolonged, and the symptom burden for patients with COPD is often high. It progresses slowly over several years and can be punctuated by abrupt exacerbations that sometimes end in sudden death or a recovery of longer or shorter duration. This makes it difficult to identify the critical junctures in order to prognosticate the progress and time of death. Patients with COPD often express a fear that the dying process is going to be difficult. There is a fear that the dyspnea will worsen and lead to death by suffocation. The present article aimed to retrospectively describe the final year of life for patients with advanced COPD with a focus on death and dying from the perspective of relatives.

    Method: Interviews were conducted with the relatives of deceased family members who had advanced COPD. In total, 13 interviews were conducted and analyzed by means of content analysis.

    Result: All relatives described the patients as having had a peaceful death that did not correspond with the worry expressed earlier by both the patients and themselves. During the final week of life, two different patterns in the progress of the illness trajectory emerged: a temporary improvement where death was unexpected and a continued deterioration where death was inevitable.

    Significance of Results: The patients and their relatives lived with uncertainty up until the time of death. Little support for psychosocial and existential needs was available. It is essential for the nurse to create relationships with patients and relatives that enable them to talk about dying and death on their own terms.

  • 15.
    Ek, Kristina
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Sahlberg-Blom, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Struggling to retain living space: patients' stories about living with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease2011In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 67, no 7, p. 1480-1490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: This paper is a report of a study of the experience of living with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and long-term oxygen therapy when living alone.

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease affects an increasing number of people. Breathlessness, fatigue and dejection are common symptoms during the last years of life.

    Method: Repeated qualitative interviews with four participants were conducted over an 8-month period in 2008. The data comprised 17 interviews, 15 telephone conversations and various field notes. A phenomenological hermeneutical method was used to interpret the text.

    Findings: The analysis resulted in two main themes and five sub-themes. The first main theme, Being subordinated to the sick body, implies that the body, assistive devices and entrusting oneself to the hands of others can both extend and restrict the living space. The second main theme, Protecting significant values of identity, encompasses both the struggle to maintain self-image and the awareness of one's own death.

    Conclusion: Living alone with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a challenging and complex phenomenon. The everyday life was characterized by a struggle to keep autonomy during a time of increasing dependency and need for help. A person-centred nursing care, built upon peoples' own experiences, may be one way to promote identity and dignity in patients even when they are close to death.

  • 16.
    Ek, Kristina
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Sahlberg-Blom, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Shifting life rhythms: couples' stories about living together when one partner has advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary diseaseManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Ek, Kristina
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Department of Palliative Care Research, Ersta Sköndal Universtity College, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Neuroscience and Society, Research and Development Department, Karolinska institutet and Stockholms Sjukhem Foundation, Stockholm, Sweden. .
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Sahlberg-Blom, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Shifting life rhythms: couples' stories about living together when one spouse has advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease2011In: Journal of Palliative Care, ISSN 0825-8597, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 189-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: This study examines couples' experiences of living together when one partner has advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

    Method: Repeated qulitative interviews with four couples over eight-month period, where one spouse in each couple suffered from advanced COPD. The final dataset comprised 19 interviews. A phenomenological-hermeneutical method was used to interpret the interview text.

    Findings: One main theme, "living with the disease and one's spouse in a new and changeable life rhythm", emerged from three subthemes: "living with uncertainty", "living in a changed intimate relationship" and "finding new ways of living together". A mutual sense of comanionship between the spouses facilitated their changes of reshaping their relationship and adapting it to the new life rhythm required by everyday life with the disease.

    Conclusion: The healthy spouse had major responsibility for the health of their sick spouse. Awareness of the couple's own conceptions and knowledge of health and illness is central to person-focused care, as is awareness of what values are important to them when restructing their everyday life.

  • 18.
    Ek, Kristina
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Sahlberg-Blom, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Living in uncertainty: illness and dying trajectory in advanced COPDManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 19. Elmberger, Eva
    et al.
    Bolund, Christina
    Magnusson, Annabella
    Lützén, Kim
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Being a mother with cancer: achieving a sense of balance in the transition process2008In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 58-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For women with cancer and with children living at home, the demands of being a good mother while undergoing treatments and recovering from illness have been described as a difficult life process. The aim of this study was to further examine the transition process with focus on women's experience of their responsibility toward their children. Interviews from 2 previous studies investigating the transition process of women with cancer were gathered and were subjected to a qualitative secondary analysis, an analytic expansion of the transition process. The 3 phases in the transition process were used in an interpretive description: ending an earlier life situation, in-between, and new beginning. A main theme that integrated these phases was constructed: "the desire to manage ones responsibility as a parent," within the context of mothering. The women expressed moral concern about not being able to function as "good" mothers yet attempted to find a balance between experiences of exhaustion and other experiences that made it difficult to maintain their responsibility as parents. All of the women included in this study expressed the need for professional support to help them endure treatment procedures as well as to sustain their moral responsibility as good mothers.

  • 20.
    Eriksson, Monika
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Care dependence: a struggle toward moments of respite2008In: Clinical Nursing Research, ISSN 1054-7738, E-ISSN 1552-3799, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 220-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to describe people's experiences of being dependent on others for care in their final stage of life, as well as what they felt made their experience of being dependent easier or more difficult. The phenomenological-hermeneutical method was chosen, where data collection consisted of open-ended interviews with nine people undergoing palliative care at a hospice unit or at home. The meaning of being care dependent is described via the following themes: changed relationship with oneself and with others, striving to adapt oneself to the situation, obstacles, and opportunities along the way while dependent. The result is described as an effort, a journey from independence to moments where it was possible to rest and recuperate while struggling with care dependency. Nursing staff require knowledge and understanding of experiences with care dependency to make life easier for people during increasing dependency in the final stage of life.

  • 21.
    Ewertzon, Mats
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Svensson, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Lützén, Kim
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Family member's expectation of the psychiatric healthcare professionals' approach towards them2011In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 146-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of involving family members in the care of individuals with schizophrenia or other psychotic illnesses has received increasing attention within psychiatric health-care services. However, several studies suggest that family members often experience a lack of involvement. Furthermore, research indicates that family members’ experience of the professional’s approach has bearing on whether they feel involved or not. Thus, the aims of this study were to investigate the level of importance that the family members of individuals with schizophrenia or other psychotic illnesses ascribe to the professionals’ approach, the level of agreement between their experiences and what they consider as important, and aspects they consider to be important with regards to contact with professionals. Seventy family members from various parts of Sweden participated. Data were collected by the Family Involvement and Alienation Questionnaire and open-ended questions. The median level and quartiles were used to describe the distribution, and percentage agreement was analysed. Open-ended questions were analysed by qualitative content analysis. The results reveal that the majority of the participants consider Openness, Confirmation, and Cooperation as important aspects of a professional’s approach. Continuity emerged as an additional aspect. The results show a low level of agreement between the participants’ experience and what they consider as important.

  • 22.
    Ewertzon, Mats
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. School of Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Cronqvist, Agneta
    Department of Health Care Sciences, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lützén, Kim
    Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Department of Palliative Care Research, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Nursing, Gjövik University College, Gjövik, Norway.
    A lonely life journey bordered with struggle: being a sibling of an individual with psychosis2012In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 157-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research suggests that siblings of individuals with severe mental illness are affected by the situation of their affected sibling and that the health care services seem to partly fail in meeting their needs for support. The aim of this study was therefore to explore how siblings of individuals with a psychotic illness, and who have participated in a support group, experience their situation. Thirteen informants participated in focus group interviews, which were analysed by inductive content analysis. The findings were interpreted in an overall single theme: A lonely life journey bordered with struggle. This theme consists of three categories: facing existential thoughts, facing ambiguity in approach and engagement, and facing disparate attitudes and expectations.

  • 23.
    Ewertzon, Mats
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Lützén, Kim
    Svensson, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Developing the concept of family involvement and the alienation questionnaire in the context of psychiatric care2008In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 439-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research shows that family members of persons with a mental illness often experience a lack of involvement in the psychiatric care of their relative. An interpretation of the findings of these studies raises the question whether the family members’ experience of not being involved can be conceptualised in terms of alienation towards mental health services from their encounter with psychiatric care. 

    In order to explore this possibility, the Family Involvement and Alienation Questionnaire (FIAQ) was constructed, guided by relevant theoretical frameworks and empirical research. The content validity of the questionnaire was evaluated by two groups of experienced researchers who had sound knowledge of the theoretical frameworks used. Validity based on the response process was evaluated by parents of persons with mental illness. The reliability of the questionnaire was evaluated by a test-retest design, in a group of 15 family members. The data were analysed by a non-parametric statistical method.

     

    The results of the validity and reliability evaluations show that of the 46 original items 28 items in the questionnaire would be useful in exploring the concept of family involvement and alienation in the context of psychiatric care. Further, minor modification may make the FIAQ useful in exploring these concepts in other settings.

  • 24.
    Ewertzon, Mats
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences. Sch Hlth Care & Social Sci, Hogskolan Dalarna, Falun, Sweden.
    Lützén, Kim
    Sch Hlth Care & Social Sci, Hogskolan Dalarna, Falun, Sweden.
    Svensson, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences. Dept Palliat Care Res, Ersta Skondal Univ Coll, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Family members' involvement in psychiatric care: experiences of the healthcare professionals' approach and feeling of alienation2010In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 422-432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The involvement of family members in psychiatric care is important for the recovery of persons with psychotic disorders and subsequently reduces the burden on the family. Earlier qualitative studies suggest that the participation of family members can be limited by how they experience the professionals’ approach, which suggests a connection to the concept of alienation. Thus, the aim of this study was in a national sample investigate family members’ experiences of the psychiatric health-care professionals’ approach. Data were collected by the Family Involvement and Alienation Questionnaire (FIAQ). The median level and quartiles were used to describe the distributions and data were analysed with non-parametric statistical methods. Seventy family members of persons receiving psychiatric care participated in the study.  

    The results indicate that a majority of the participants respond that they have experiencing a negative approach from the professionals, indicating lack of confirmation and cooperation. The results also indicate that a majority of the participants felt powerlessness and social isolation in the care being provided, indicating feelings of alienation. A significant but weak association was found between the family members´ experiences of the professionals´ approach and their feelings of alienation.

  • 25.
    Hellsing, Anna-Lisa
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Linton, Steven J.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Bergman, Christina
    Liew, Margareta
    Ergonomic education for nursing students1993In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 499-510Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An educational package of common ergonomic training as well as behavioural training was implemented in nursing education. The teaching methods also had the aim of increasing students' awareness of the importance of total work environment for the prevention of back injuries. The experimental group was, on the whole, more pleased with their education than the control group. The experimental group judged their ability to analyse the work environment higher than the control group did. Observations in some practical work-tasks showed that students from the experimental group worked in physically more favourable positions with less strain on the body.

  • 26.
    Henriksson, Anette
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    A support group programme for relatives during the late palliative phase2007In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 175-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study describes an intervention where relatives were invited to take part in a support group programme during the late palliative phase of their family member. The purpose was to describe their experiences of the support group programme and the subsequent impact on their lives as relatives of a terminally ill person. Qualitative interviews were chosen as the data collection method. The analysis was inspired by the phenomenological method as described by Giorgi (1989). The relatives’ experiences were categorised into six key constituents: confirmation; insight into the gravity of the illness; sense of belonging created by similar experiences; participation in the care system; being able to rest; and strength to provide support for the patient. These six constituents resulted in a sense of safety in relation to the patient, the illness, the nursing staff and the care unit. The study’s findings show that interventions of this kind may be integral to the relatives’ ability to handle their situation when caring for a terminally ill family member.

  • 27.
    Henriksson, Anette
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Department of Nursing, Gjövik University, Gjövik, Norway; Department of Palliative Care Research, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Benzein, Eva
    Department of Palliative Care Research, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden; School of Human Sciences, Linneaus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    School of Human Sciences, Linneaus University, Kalmar, Sweden; Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Adaptation and psychometric evaluation of the Preparedness for Caregiving Scale, Caregiver Competence Scale and Rewards of Caregiving Scale in a sample of Swedish family members of patients with life-threatening illness2012In: Palliative Medicine: A Multiprofessional Journal, ISSN 0269-2163, E-ISSN 1477-030X, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 930-938Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Family members often take on many caring responsibilities, with complex issues and challenges to consider. Feelings of preparedness, competence and reward are identified as concepts that may protect caregiver wellbeing and decrease negative outcomes related to caregiving.

    Aim: This study aimed to translate, adapt and psychometrically evaluate the Preparedness for Caregiving Scale, Caregiver Competence Scale and Rewards of Caregiving Scale in Swedish family members of patients with life threatening illness.

    Design: Correlational.

    Setting/participants: The study took place in four settings including advanced palliative care. The scales were tested in a sample of 125 family members of persons with life-threatening illness. All three scales were tested in relation to distribution of item and scale scores, missing data patterns, dimensionality, convergent validity and reliability.

    Results: The results in this study indicate that the Swedish versions of The Preparedness for Caregiving Scale, Caregiver Competence Scale and Rewards of Caregiving Scale are valid, reliable and user-friendly scales. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the scales were unidimensional and all demonstrated Cronbach’s alpha values of ≥0.9.

    Conclusions: As a result of this study it is anticipated that the Preparedness for Caregiving Scale, Caregiver Competence Scale and Rewards of Caregiving Scale could provide a basis for collaborative research between different countries and make international studies more comparable and generalizable despite differences in language and culture.

  • 28.
    Henriksson, Anette
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Benzein, Eva
    Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö, Sweden.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal högskola, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Meeting needs of family members of persons with life-threatening illness: a support group program during ongoing palliative care2011In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 263-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of the study was to describe family members’ experiences of content, structure, and approach of a potential intervention including a support group program for family members of persons with life-threatening illness.

    Method: The study was a pilot project in a developmental phase in which a potential intervention, a support group program, was investigated. The design of the study was qualitative descriptive. Twenty-nine family members were interviewed by telephone after taking part in the program. The interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: The results indicate that the support group program could work as an acceptable and useful intervention for family members. The program was experienced to cover topics of immediate interest reflecting life close to severely ill persons. The structure of the program was found to be inviting, offering an opportunity to establish relationships with other participants and the caring team in a warm atmosphere.

    Significance of results: The study indicates the importance of health professionals inviting and interacting with family members during ongoing palliative care. The results could inspire nursing staff to initiate, develop, and deliver similar interventions.

  • 29.
    Henriksson, Anette
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Benzein, Eva
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal högskola.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Effects of a support group programme for family members of patients with life-threatening illness during ongoing palliative care2012Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Health care systems in many countries are moving towards outpatient care in which family members are central in providing care for patients with life-threatening illness. Several studies show that family members report lack of preparation, knowledge and ability to handle the caregiver role with a need for information and psychosocial support.

    Aim: The aim was to investigate effects of a support group programme for family members of patients with life-threatening illness during ongoing palliative care

    Design: A prospective quasi-experimental design including an intervention group and a comparison group was used.

    Settings/participants: A support group programme was offered to family members of patients with life-threatening illness during ongoing palliative care at three intervention settings, two specialist palliative care units and one haematology unit. A fourth setting, a specialist palliative care unit was used for comparisons.

    Results: Family members taking part in the support group programme significantly increased their perceptions of preparedness for caregiving, competence for caregiving and rewards of caregiving. No significant changes were shown for hope, anxiety, depression symptoms or health.

    Conclusions: The intervention, including a support group program delivered for family members of persons with life threatening illness during ongoing palliative care proved to be effective in certain domains of caregiving. No negative outcomes were detected. The results indicate that this intervention could be implemented and delivered to family members during ongoing palliative care.

  • 30.
    Henriksson, Anette
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden; Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Benzein, Eva
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden; Department of Palliative Care Research, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Department of Palliative Care Research, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Research and Development Unit, Stockholms Sjukhem Foundation, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Department of Palliative Care Research, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norway.
    Effects of a support group programme for patients with life-threatening illness during ongoing palliative care2013In: Palliative Medicine: A Multiprofessional Journal, ISSN 0269-2163, E-ISSN 1477-030X, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 257-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Health care systems in many countries are moving towards outpatient care in which family members are central in providing care for patients with life-threatening illness. Several studies show that family members report a lack of preparation, knowledge and the ability to handle the caregiver role, and a need for information and psychosocial support.

    Aim: The aim was to investigate the effects of a support group programme for family members of patients with life-threatening illness during ongoing palliative care.

    Design: A prospective quasi-experimental design, including an intervention group and a comparison group, was used. Settings/participants: A support group programme was offered to family members during ongoing palliative care at three intervention settings: two specialist palliative care units and one haematology unit. A fourth setting, a specialist palliative care unit, was used for comparisons.

    Results: Family members taking part in the support group programme significantly increased their perceptions of preparedness for caregiving, competence for caregiving, and rewards of caregiving. Hope, anxiety, depression symptoms and health showed no significant changes.

    Conclusions: The intervention, including a support group programme delivered to family members of patients with life-threatening illness during ongoing palliative care, proved to be effective in certain domains of caregiving. No negative outcomes were detected. The results indicate that this intervention could be implemented and delivered to family members during ongoing palliative care.

  • 31.
    James, Inger
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences. Department of Palliative Care Research, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gustavsson, Bernt
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. South African Chair for Education and Development, University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa; Centre for Adult and Continuing Education, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town, South Africa.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Department of Palliative Care Research, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholms Sjukhem Foundation, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Emotional knowing in nursing practice: in the encounter between life and death2010In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 5, no 2, article id 5367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients, next of kin and nurses in surgical wards often raise existential questions in the encounter between life and death. Nurses' emotional knowing at this encounter is crucial. Consequently, this study's purpose was to analyse and describe nurses' emotional knowing to reveal (a) how this knowing is expressed in daily work and (b) what emotions, thoughts and actions this knowing includes. This study used combined ethnographic and hermeneutic methodologies. Data were collected using participant observations, informal conversations and interviews. We found that nurses' emotional knowing could be interpreted in relation to various rooms of emotions, thoughts and actions. Nurses' judgements formed these rooms. They strived to do things correctly in the normative room; created a safe, secure milieu for patients and next of kin in the safety–security room; and questioned their actions in the critical room. They created affinity for co-operation that benefitted encounters with patients in their affinity room. And they demonstrated sensitivity and compassion to patients and next of kin; sensitivity and compassion were particularly evident in the closeness room. In our main interpretation, we found that nurses' judgements in various rooms (emotional knowing) constitute an expression of practical wisdom (phronesis) in nursing practice.

  • 32.
    James, Inger
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Bernt
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Dept Palliat Care Res, Ersta Skondal Univ Coll, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Knowledge constructions in nursing practice: Understanding and integrating different forms of knowledge2010In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 20, no 11, p. 1500-1518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this combined ethnographic and hermeneutic study we examined which forms of knowledge nurses make use of and how they construct knowledge. We collected data using participant observations, informal conversations, and interviews. Nurses' knowledge construction took the form of a hermeneutic spiral, a journey in which the nurses moved up and down and horizontally, and in which they created understanding. The nurses constructed knowledge from reading the patient's record, the brief oral handover report, greeting the patient, and reading the patient. By being sensitive, using humor, and emotional involvement, they deepened their understanding. By being suspicious and self-critical, they sought interaction with nurse colleagues, the patient, doctor, and relatives, and obtained additional knowledge. They strove throughout the journey to be one step ahead in their efforts to attain an understanding of the patient's situation. We can relate the knowledge nurses make use of to intertwined forms of episteme, techne, and phronesis

  • 33.
    James, Inger
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    A family's beliefs about cancer, dying, and death in the end of life2007In: Journal of Family Nursing, ISSN 1074-8407, E-ISSN 1552-549X, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 226-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this case study was to describe the beliefs over time of a Swedish family and individual family members about cancer and death and how these beliefs affected their daily lives. Data were collected over 10 months using interviews, conversations, and diary notations. The beliefs were aggregated into eight main beliefs and four themes: Cancer is a deadly threat/death is a liberator, death can be held at bay/death can be lived near, dying is done alone/dying should not be done alone, and life has an end/life is endless. These beliefs appear to oscillate between seemingly contrasting poles. Some beliefs were shared by all family members, whereas others were described by only one or more members of the family. The complexity of daily life in families experiencing life-shortening illness underscores the need of individualized nursing care with openness to difference and collaboration as guiding principles.

  • 34.
    James, Inger
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal Högskola .
    The encounter between informal and professional care at the end of life2009In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 258-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to obtain and describe in-depth knowledge about family carers' experiences of the encounter, in a hospital, between informal and professional care at the end of life. A hermeneutic approach was chosen, and we conducted interviews with 27 family carers 6 to 8 months after their loved one's death. In the encounter, the family carers made their own assessment of their loved one's condition and situation. The professionals' attitudes could both promote and impede the interaction between the two forms of care. Family carers' care actions were characterized by struggling to get treatment, being left behind, being partners, keeping the illness at a distance, hovering beside their loved one, waiting for death, and being experts and protectors. The main interpretation of the findings is that family carers possess practical knowledge about what care is the best, or least harmful, for their loved one. This can be linked to what Aristotle called phronesis.

  • 35.
    Johansson, Anita
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Div Psychiat, Skaraborg Hosp, Skövde, Sweden.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård, Ersta Sköndal högskola, Stockholm, Sweden; Ersta Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden; Sektionen för sykepleie, Högskolen, Gjövik, Norge.
    Anderzen-Carlsson, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital.
    Conceptions of mental health care: from the perspective of parents’ of adult children suffering from mental illness2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 496-504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe parents' conceptions of the mental health care provided to adult children suffering from mental illness. Data were collected using qualitative research interviews with a purposive sample of sixteen mothers and ten fathers. Phenomenographic analysis was used to identify conceptions and formulate descriptive categories. The first category, questioning the availability of care, describes mental health care as being unequal in terms of accessibility and lacking in continuity. The second category, disapproval of parental exclusion, illustrates conceptions that mental healthcare professionals disregard parents and do not provide them with adequate information. The third category, questioning the quality of care, encompasses conceptions of lack of trust in the professionals' competence, an unsatisfactory environment as well as inadequate cooperation with other healthcare providers and authorities. Positive aspects, such as being seen and confirmed, were mentioned as valuable by the parents.

  • 36.
    Johansson, Anita
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Enheten för forskning i palliativ vård, Ersta Sköndal högskola, Stockholm, Sverige; Sektionen för sykepleie, Högskolen i Gjövik, Gjövik, Norge.
    Anderzen-Carlsson, Agneta
    Vårdvetenskapligt forskningscentrum, Örebro Läns Landsting, Örebro, Sverige.
    Åhlin, Arne
    Margretelunds Ungdomshem, Statens Institutionsstyrelse (National Board of Institutional Care), Lidköping, Sverige.
    Mothers' Everyday Experiences of Having an Adult Child Who Suffers from Long-Term Mental Illness2010In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 31, no 11, p. 692-699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to describe everyday life experiences of mothers who have an adult child with a long-term mental illness. Sixteen mothers were interviewed. A content analysis resulted in one main theme: My adult child who is struggling with mental illness is always on my mind, and three subthemes: (1) living a life under constant strain, (2) living with an emotional burden, and (3) seeing light in the darkness despite difficulties. Knowledge of mothers’ everyday life experiences is of great importance in order to support them and thereby increase the possibility of these mothers being a source of strength for their child.

  • 37.
    Johansson, Anita
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Division of Psychiatry, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, Sweden.
    Anderzen-Carlsson, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Vårdvetenskapligt forskningscentrum, Örebro Läns Landsting, Örebro, Sweden.
    Åhlin, Arne
    Margretelunds Ungdomshem, Statens Institutionsstyrelse (National Board of Institutional Care), Lidköping, Sweden.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Department of Nursing, NTNU (Norges teknisk-naturvetenskapliga universitet), Gjøvik, Norway; Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fathers’ everyday experiences of having an adult child who suffers from long-term mental illness2012In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 109-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to describe the everyday life experiences of fathers of adult children who have various forms of long-term mental illness. Ten fathers were interviewed. Content analysis revealed one main theme: Maintaining a strong façade while balancing on a thin line, and two sub-themes: (1) A constant struggle and (2) A feeling of powerlessness. The fathers demonstrated great engagement and good will to participate in their child's life. A sense of powerlessness and frustration at not having or being allowed freedom of action emerged. Cooperation between children, parents, the care service providers, and the authorities could increase the parents’ abilities to provide adequate support to the child as well as helping them to understand and make the incomprehensible manageable.

  • 38. Karlsson, Christina
    et al.
    Tisell, Anna
    Engström, Åsa
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Family members' satisfaction with critical care: a pilot study2011In: Nursing in Critical Care, ISSN 1362-1017, E-ISSN 1478-5153, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 11-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this pilot study was to describe family members' satisfaction with the care provided in a Swedish intensive care unit (ICU) based on the following needs: assurance, information, proximity, support, and comfort, which are all included in the Critical Care Family Satisfaction Survey (CCFSS). Background: Knowledge concerning satisfaction with care among family members with a critically ill relative in an ICU is important if the family is to be met professionally. Design: The study design was descriptive and retrospective, with a consecutive selection of family members of critically ill people cared for in an ICU. In total 35 family members participated. Method: Quantitative analyses based on 20 questions, and a qualitative analysis, based on two open questions was used. The median, average value and percent were computed for every question. The open questions were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results: The family members had a high level of satisfaction regarding all groups of needs. They were especially satisfied with flexible visiting hours and the high quality of treatment that the ill person received. The shortcomings that emerged were that family members wanted the physician to be more available for regular talks, the room for relatives was felt to be uncomfortable; and it was felt there were deficiencies in the preparations before the patient's transferral to a ward. Relevance to clinical practice: The results highlight the family members' need for regular information and the need to improve the environment in the waiting rooms for family members. The ICU staff's competence and their way of encountering the ill person and their family seem to be important for family members' satisfaction with the care.

  • 39.
    Ohlsson-Nevo, Emma
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Surgery.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Palliative Care Research, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norway.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Centre for Health Care Sciences, Örebro Country Council, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Anderzen-Carlsson, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Centre for Health Care Sciences.
    Life is back to normal and yet not: partners' and patient's experiences of life of the first year after colorectal cancer surgery2012In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 21, no 3-4, p. 555-563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe the experience of life the first year after surgery from the perspective of persons treated for colorectal cancer and their partners.

    Background: Colorectal cancer is a common cancer form, and treatment can cause unpleasant side effects such as sexual dysfunction and bowel problems. Partners struggle to keep family life normal and provide support. Little is known about couples' experiences a year after treatment for colorectal cancer.

    Design: Qualitative descriptive. Methods. Individual semi-structured interviews with 13 persons treated for colorectal cancer and their partners, a total of 26 participants.

    Results: One theme was identified in the study; ` Life is back to normal and yet not': participants described living a normal but different life than before. Three subthemes were identified; ` Life has a shadow of death', ` The treated body sets the rules' and ` To share or not share the illness'.

    Conclusions: Findings showed that both the patients' and their partners' lives were influenced by uncertainty and the condition of the patient. Attitudes varied towards sharing the illness. It was found that information needs varied both within and between couples. A future challenge to healthcare personnel is the obligation to meet the needs of both patients and their partners on the illness trajectory and recovery after treatment for colorectal cancer.

    Relevance to clinical practice: Findings enhance the understanding of the impact of colorectal cancer on both patients and partners. Healthcare personnel need to assess both the patient's and partner's need for information, support and assistance. Support groups could be an effective tool for providing information, communication and support. Future studies are needed to evaluate such groups.

  • 40.
    Ohlsson-Nevo, Emma
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Palliative Care Research, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norway.
    Nilsson, Ulrica G
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Anderzen-Carlsson, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital.
    Finding a wider horizon: experiences of being a next-of-kin of a person suffering from colorectal cancer as told after having participated in a psychoeducational program2013In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 324-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    The aim of this study was twofold: first, to describe the experience of being the next-of-kin of a person suffering from colorectal cancer (CRC), and second, to describe how a psychoeducational program (PEP) might contribute to the next-of-kin's life experience. Psychosocial interventions for next-of-kin to cancer patients are effective in improving quality of life issues, although there are conflicting results in previous studies. Most studies have evaluated the effects of PEP for mixed cancer groups but there is little knowledge about how next-of-kin to a person treated for CRC describe their experience of life and their experience of participating in a PEP.

    Methods

    The study used a qualitative descriptive design. Individual, open-ended interviews with each of the 18 next-of-kin, of persons receiving treatment for CRC, who participated in a PEP. Data were analyzed using content analysis.

    Results

    Based on the experiences described by the next-of-kin to a person treated for CRC, the subtheme; Facing a personal challenge was developed. From their described experiences of participating in a PEP, the subtheme Obtaining New Insights and Perspectives emerged. One main theme was finally identified; Finding a Wider Horizon. The study illuminates the importance of integrating the next-of-kin/family in the colorectal cancer care.

    Conclusion

    The findings from this study can be used to plan future interventions for next-of-kin to patients with CRC as it offers possibilities to understand the next-of-kin's situation and experience from participating in a PEP.

  • 41.
    Shields, Linda
    et al.
    Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
    Kristensson-Hallström, Inger
    Children’s Hospital/Department of Caring Sciences, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Jackson, Karin
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Nursing and health care in Sweden2002In: The Australian journal of advanced nursing, ISSN 0813-0531, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 20-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden, one of the Nordic countries, has a long history of social justice and equality of access to health care. Nursing plays an important role in this and nursing education is of a high standard. The aim of this paper is to describe Sweden's health system and nursing within it, thereby giving Australian nurses information which may generate an interest in, and provide background for, collaborative work. It is part of a series initiated by the first author who visited Sweden, Iceland and England in 2000 under the auspices of a Churchill Fellowship, and who has returned to Sweden and England to continue work begun during the Fellowship. Sweden's health service is characterised by an ethic of egalitarianism and high standards; primary health care plays a large role and tertiary health care is easily accessible. Nursing in Sweden is of a high standard, with devolvement of responsibility and decision-making to those working in the wards and units. Nursing education has been influenced by the historical development of nursing in Europe and today, Swedish nurses enjoy a high standard of university education with government support readily available to make specialist education accessible. Because of the similarities in both the cultures, and nursing, in Australia and Sweden, Australian nurses would find Sweden a wonderful country in which to implement cross-cultural, collaborative work.

  • 42.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Monika
    Johansson, Ingrid
    A good death - Development of a nursing model of care2002In: Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1522-2179, E-ISSN 1539-0705, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 153-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe the ongoing process at a Swedish hospice to further develop a model for care planning, documentation, and evaluation of the quality of death. The model was adapted to a nursing context by means of concept derivation. The core of the model is the patient as a person, in which that person’s experiences and need for control in his or her life are acknowledged. Six key words have been used as guidelines in this process: symptom control, self-determination, social relations, self-image, synthesis, and surrender. In a retrospective analysis of patient deaths it was found that of 35 patients, 15 had a very good death, 17 a good death, and 3 a bad death. Use of the 6 S key words provided the staff with continual opportunities for reflection, which was described as increasing their awareness concerning the needs of individual patients and concerning individualized nursing care.

  • 43.
    Wallerstedt, Birgitta
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Caring for dying patients outside special palliative care settings: experiences from a nursing perspective2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 32-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to describe nurses' experiences in caring for gravely ill and dying patients outside special palliative care settings. Tape-recorded qualitative interviews were conducted with a total of nine nurses in primary home care, community care and hospitals. The interviews were analysed according to phenomenological methodology, which resulted in the three common structures: ambition and dedication, everyday encounters, and satisfaction/dissatisfaction. In the `everyday encounters' structure, the following key constituents emerged: responsibility, cooperation, experience and knowledge, feelings, and time and resources. The results describe the nurses' high ambitions to give dying patients and their relatives high-quality care. Despite this, they experienced greater or lesser degrees of dissatisfaction because of insufficient cooperation, support, time and resources. They experienced satisfaction through contact with patients and relatives, functioning collegial cooperation, and the knowledge, experience and personal growth the care had given them. The results indicate that nurses need the resources such as time, improved methods of communication and cooperation as well as more support in order to give quality palliative care and achieve satisfaction with the outcome. The need for discussion about the conditions for giving palliative care outside the hospices and other special palliative care settings is also elucidated.

  • 44.
    Wallerstedt, Birgitta
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Benzein, Eva
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden; Department of Palliative Care Research, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Department of Nursing, Gjövik University College, Gjøvik, Norway; Department of Palliative care Research, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sharing living and dying: A balancing act between vulnerability and a sense of security: enrolled nurses' experiences of working in the sitting service for dying patients at home2011In: Palliative & Supportive Care, ISSN 1478-9515, E-ISSN 1478-9523, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 295-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To describe enrolled nurses’ (ENs’) experiences of working in a sitting service for dying patients at home (which in this article will be referred to as SSH).

    Methods: The ENs, who participated in this study, had permanent jobs in community care/ primary care, but were also employed part-time in a special home-sitting-service organisation in a municipality in the south of Sweden. Data were collected by four focus group interviews with 17 enrolled nurses. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data.

    Results: Care-giving in SSH was a balancing act between a sense of security and a feeling of vulnerability. Feeling secure and valued, and that one is developing both professionally and personally stemmed from working in partnership, whereas a feeling of vulnerability was associated with managing closeness and distance, being a mediator, having responsibility and feeling guilty, feeling hindered from doing good, facing loneliness and in affecting private lives.

    Significance of the results: SSH makes it possible for people who are terminally ill to remain at home until they die. If the SSH organisation were not an option for dying patients and their families, the pressure on the healthcare organisation would be dramatically increased.

  • 45. Werkander-Harstäde, Carina
    et al.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Good palliative care - Who and where?2004In: Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1522-2179, E-ISSN 1539-0705, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 27-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     

    The aim of this study was to describe what patients with cancer who are in the final stage of life consider to be good palliative end-of-life care and where they think such care should be carried out. Nine patients receiving palliative end-of-life care were interviewed and the material was analyzed using Grounded Theory. Three main categories (and 7 subcategories) emerged during the analysis: safety, participation, and trust. They were conceptualized metaphorically as a wheel that rolls along smoothly as long as the care is good and all 3 categories are present. The concepts of safety, participation, and trust were interwoven with the patients' beliefs about where this care should be carried out. The majority said that they wanted to be cared for in the hospital.

  • 46. Öhlén, Joakim
    et al.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Berg, Christina
    Frid, Ingvar
    Palm, Carl-Axel
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Segesten, Kerstin
    Relatives in end-of-life care – part 2: a theory for enabling safety2007In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 382-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To develop a goal-oriented praxis theory for enabling safety for relatives when an adult or older patient is close to end-of-life.

    BACKGROUND: This is the second part of a project focusing on the situation and needs of relatives in end-of-life care. Our interpretation of the existing corpus of knowledge pertaining to the needs of close relatives in this situation showed the significance of relatives' need for safety.

    METHOD: The theory was developed step-by-step, through triangulation of critical review of empirical research in the field, our own clinical experiences from end-of-life care, renewed literature searches and theoretical reasoning.

    THEORY: The foundation for the theory is taken from the ethical intention of the philosopher Paul Ricoeur. From this, the theory focuses on relatives in the context of end-of-life care with the goal of enabling safety. This is proposed by four aphorisms functioning as safety enablers and these are directed towards the professional's approach and attitude, the relative's concern for the patient, the specific situation for the relative and the patient's end-of-life period as a period in the life of the relative.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Implications for end-of-life practice are considered and include aspects for promotion of just institutions in end-of-life care, the significance of negotiated partnership in end-of-life care, enabling safety for relatives living in existential and practical uncertainty in connection with end-of-life care and diversity of relatives' preferences as they live through this particular period.

1 - 46 of 46
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf