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  • 1.
    Adolfsson, Päivi
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Disability and Habilitation, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Disability Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lindstedt, Helena
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Disability and Habilitation, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Norling Hermansson, Liselotte
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Disability and Habilitation, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Center for Clinical Research Dalarna, Falun, Sweden; CHILD, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Perception of the influence of environmental factors in the use of electronic planning devices in adults with cognitive disabilities2016In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 493-500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Adults with cognitive disabilities often have difficulties in dealing with the complexity of everyday life. With cognitive assistive technology (e.g. electronic planning devices [EPDs] and individual support), they can bring order to their often chaotic life. Assumptions are that environmental factors influence with non-use of EPDs.

    Objective: To explore how adults with cognitive disabilities perceive the influence of environmental factors in the use of EPDs.

    Methods: A reference group with experience of use of EPDs assisted the researchers. Twelve adults with cognitive disabilities and experience of using EPDs participated. An interview guide was implemented covering environmental factors according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Qualitative content analysis was applied in the analyses.

    Results: Five categories and two themes emerged, which were integrated into a model of facilitating factors influencing the use of EPDs. Measures to prevent or eliminate negative influences of the device use are important to be taken.

    Conclusions: Professionals need more knowledge about EPDs, while users need individual adaption of the EPDs. EPDs need to be user-friendly, manageable and work in any seasons.

  • 2. Cesta, Amedeo
    et al.
    Cortellessa, Gabriella
    Fracasso, Francessca
    Orlandini, Andrea
    Fredriksson, Carin
    Lidskog, Marie
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Engfeldt, Peter
    Forsberg, Annette
    Östlund, Britt
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Turno, Marcello
    Gutierrez, Carlos
    GiraffPlus: D1.1 User Requirements and Design Principles Report2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This document reports on the work performed in Task 1.1 User requirements analysis and Task 1.2 GiraffPlus Environment Design Principles. Specifically, it describes the results of a deep involvement of users, both primary (elderly living in their apartment), and secondary (health care professional or family members and friends) recruited in our studies. The report details the qualitative and quantitative research carried out in the three countries of Sweden, Spain and Italy, to elicit user requirements and expectations in terms of type of services as well as system design and appearance. Some qualitative cross-cultural analysis has also been performed in order to highlight differences emerged during the studies in the three countries. Result of this effort is list of user requirements and a set of preferences on different mockups of a component of the system that can be both used to influence the future architecture definition and functional specification of the GiraffPlus system. The work described in this deliverable constitutes the starting point of T1.3 Technological Component Assessment and Selection and overall provides useful hints to the whole system development.

  • 3.
    Fredriksson, Carin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hermansson, Liselotte
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hagberg, Lars
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Elderly spouses experiences of powered scooters used by their next of kinManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Fredriksson, Carin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hermansson, Liselotte M. N.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hagberg, Lars
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    The value of a powered wheelchair: spouses´ perspective2013In: Association for the Advancement of Assistive Technology in Europe Conference 2013 (AAATE 2013) / [ed] P Encarnação et al, Amsterdam, Netherlands: Elsevier, 2013, p. 222-225Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research concerning the significance of assistive technology to spouses of persons who uses technology is sparse and the impact of a powered wheelchair on spouses' activity and participation is not at all researched. Thus, the aim was to explore how spouses experience the significance of a powered wheelchair prescribed to and used by their next of kin. A descriptive design with a qualitative approach focusing on the experiences of the spouses was used. The sample comprised of 10 spouses of elderly people that have been prescribed a powered wheelchair. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with the ten spouses (nine women and one man). The participants were 65-86 years of age. The questions posed during the interview concerned: i) the significance of the powered scooter for personal everyday activities, participation and quality of life; ii) the significance of the scooter for shared activity and participation; and iii) the significance of the next of kin using a scooter, from the perspective of the spouse. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The results showed that the spouses experienced that their everyday life and life situation had changed in a positive way as their next of kin received a powered wheelchair. They experienced a sense of freedom that had an impact on their own activities as well as on the activities they performed together with their next of kin. The spouses expressed that they now to a larger extent shared responsibility for different tasks in the home and also how the powered wheelchair had made it possible to spontaneously do things together again and to do things with more ease. In conclusion, the narratives of the spouses of the elderly powered wheelchair users were to a great extent positive. The powered wheelchair was of great value and brought freedom to everyday life.

  • 5.
    Hagberg, Lars
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital. Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Hermansson, Liselotte M.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Fredriksson, Carin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Cost-effectiveness of powered mobility devices for elderly people with disability2017In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 115-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to analyse the cost-effectiveness of prescribing powered mobility devices (PMDs) to elderly users.

    Methods: Forty-five persons participated in the preand post-intervention study with a follow-up at four months. All participants were prescribed a scooter model and were offered individual support to get started using the PMD. In the analysis, the use of the PMD was compared to the situation prior to its use. The cost-utility analysis takes a societal perspective and considers costs, savings and quality of life (QoL) using answers to the EQ-5D questionnaire.

    Results: Costs for the first year with the PMD were 1395 USD and then 592 USD per subsequent year. There was a significant decrease in transportation costs and in relatives' time use, but the increase in QoL of 0.041 was not significant. Costs per gained quality adjusted life year (QALY) were 12 400-14 700 USD/QALY if the value of time saved not was considered and 600-2900 USD/QALY when an hour was valued at 3.6 USD.

    Conclusion: Prescription of PMDs to elderly users might be cost-effective. However, there are shortcomings in measuring QALY gains from the use of a PMD, and it is unclear how time savings among relatives should be valued.

    Implications for Rehabilitation

    • Prescription of powered mobility devices for the elderly with disability seems to be cost effective and should be a standard intervention.

    • In economic evaluations of powered mobility devices and other assistive devices, the commonly used analyses methods are not always appropriate and therefore need to be adjusted.

  • 6.
    Hagberg, Lars
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hermansson, Liselotte M. N.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Fredriksson, Carin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Värdet av en eldriven rullstol: hälsoekonomisk analys av förskrivning av eldrivna rullstolar till äldre personer med funktionsnedsättning2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Delresultat från en studie där man utvärderat om förskrivning av eldrivna rullstolar för äldre personer med bestående funktionsnedsättning och betydande förflyttningssvårigheter är kostnadseffektiv.

  • 7.
    Hermansson, Liselotte M. N.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hagberg, Lars
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Fredriksson, Carin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    The impact of powered wheelchairs on activity, participation and health related quality of life in older people2013In: Special Session Power mobility: User experiences and Outcomes, Association for the Advancement of Assistive Technology in Europe , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Holmqvist, Kajsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Ann-Britt
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Olstam, Margaretha
    Örebro Läns Landsting, Örebro, Sverige.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Yilmaz, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Kartläggning kognitiva hjälpmedel: Projektrapport2011Report (Other academic)
  • 9. Jönsson, Marie
    et al.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Activities of daily living and cognitive function in frail multidiseased elderly patients ready for discharge planning2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Lindstedt, Helena
    et al.
    Uppsala university, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, Päivi
    Uppsala university, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Uppsala university, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hermansson, Liselotte M N
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Environmental help or hindrances? Use of electronic planning devices for people with mental disability2012In: 9th COTEC Congress of Occupational Therapy: Occupational Diversity for the Future, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11. Lindstedt, Helena
    et al.
    Adolfsson, Päivi
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hermansson, Liselotte M N
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Omgivningens hjälp eller stjälp?: dokumentation av personers med psykisk funktionsnedsättning erfarenheter av användning av elektroniska planeringshjälpmedel2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vuxna personer med psykisk funktionsnedsättning har ofta problem med sin kognitiva förmåga, vilket leder till problem med att hantera vardagslivets komplexitet. Med behovsanpassade kognitiva hjälpmedel och individuellt stöd från kunnig personal finns möjlighet för personen att få ordning på sitt ofta kaotiska vardagsliv. Dock finns studier och klinisk erfarenhet som påtalar att hjälpmedel inte används i den utsträckning som förväntats. Antaganden finns om att komplexa faktorer i omgivningen interagerar med hjälpmedelsanvändning.

    Syftet med studien var att dokumentera erfarenheter av underlättande och hindrande omgivningsfaktorer som personer med psykisk funktionsnedsättning har av användningen av elektroniska planeringshjälpmedel.

    Metod: tolv personer med psykisk funktionsnedsättning och med erfarenhet av elektroniska planeringshjälpmedel rekryterades efter informerat samtycke via förskrivare och besök vid dagliga verksamheter. En studiespecifik frågeguide med öppna frågor med ett innehåll som täcker omgivningsfaktorer enligt Klassifikation av funktionstillstånd, funktionshinder och hälsa (ICF) användes i de inspelade intervjuerna. Materialet bearbetades med kvalitativ, induktiv innehållsanalys.

    Resultatet utmynnade i sex kategorier och två teman formade till en modell med underlättande eller hindrande faktorer som inverkar på användning av elektroniska planeringshjälpmedel enligt deltagarna. Kategorierna benämndes: Insikt om funktionsnedsättning/behov; Medveten social omgivning; Egen kontroll och hanterbarhet av hjälpmedel; Nytta av och brister i hjälpmedlets funktion; stöd av Kunnig personal; och Tydligt och lättbegripligt myndighetsutövande. Teman benämndes: Tydlig önskan om delaktighet och Nödvändig individuell anpassnnig. Åtgärder för att förebygga eller förhindra omgivningens negativa inverkan på hjälpmedelsanvändning är angelägen.

  • 12.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Att använda hjälpmedel i vardagen: upplevelser av dubbelhet sett ur brukarens perspektiv2008Report (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    International experiences with self-reporting measures of AT outcomes2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    Örebro University, Department of Nursing and Caring Sciences.
    The meaning of assistive technology devices in daily life2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    The significance of assistive devices in the daily life of persons with stroke and their spouses2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this research project was to explore and describe the significance of assistive devices in daily life. The project involves two qualitative and two quantitative studies. Three of these studies were from the perspective of persons with stroke and one from the perspective of spouses of persons with stroke.

    A hermeneutic phenomenological lifeworld approach was used in the qualitative studies and data was obtained through conversational interviews with the two study groups, 22 persons with stroke and 12 spouses of persons with stroke, after the devices had been used for about a year.

    The results indicated that the lived experiences of assistive devices in respect of the different lifeworld existentials (lived body, lived space, lived time, lived human relation) are closely interconnected in both study groups. The lived body existential included aspects of habits, feelings and the incorporation, figuratively speaking, of the devices into their own bodies. Lived space concerned the gradual development of a new view of the environment and the devices’ role as a prerequisite for being able to live at home. The devices brought about a changed relation to lived time with respect to the temporal perspectives of past, present and future. To be able to take control of one’s own time was an important experience that the devices facilitated. Assistive devices were an integral part of the lived human relation between the couples in the study groups, as well as between the disabled persons/spouses and other people, including the health-care professionals. The devices contributed either to the maintenance or the change of social roles, but they sometimes also gave rise to the experience of being stigmatised. The results in the case of both study groups showed that the use of different devices is complex and often contradictory, especially when it comes to persons with stroke. Overall the persons’ experiences of the advantages of the devices overshadowed their experiences of the disadvantages.

    The quantitative studies included a pre- and post-assessment design. Thirty-two persons with disabilities after stroke were included. The impact of an outdoor powered wheelchair on activity and participation (IPPA, WHODAS II) and quality of life (PIADS, EQ-5D) was measured. Statistical analysis with mainly non-parametric tests was used to determine significant within-group and between-group changes after intervention. The conceptual framework ICF was used in one of the quantitative studies when classifying the participants’ stated problems.

    The results showed that the outdoor powered wheelchair is an essential device for persons with disabilities after stroke with regard to overcoming activity limitation and participation restrictions in everyday life. Furthermore it mostly has a positive impact on such users’ quality of life. However, it is also important to highlight the negative experiences of a few with regard to the use of powered wheelchairs. In sum, these results will enable prescribers to better understand the individual experiences of using assistive devices and the individuals’ and the families’ need for support in connection with the prescription of assistive devices, the particular example being powered wheelchairs.

    List of papers
    1. Lifeworld perspectives utilizing assistive devices: individuals, lived experience following a stroke
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lifeworld perspectives utilizing assistive devices: individuals, lived experience following a stroke
    2007 (English)In: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy / Revue Canadienne d`Ergotèrapie, ISSN 0008-4174, Vol. 74, no 1, p. 15-26Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In lifeworld research, the individual's experience of meaning is of primary importance.PURPOSE: This paper explores how individuals post stroke who have a disability, described their personal meaning and lived experiences associated with the use of assistive devices.METHODS: A hermeneutic-phenomenological research approach was used. A conversational interview was conducted with 22 post-stroke individuals regarding their daily experiences utilizing assistive devices.RESULTS: The results showed a dual experience regarding the use of assistive devices, which is often complex and contradictory. The devices were viewed as a prerequisite for well-being and independence but at the same time, the devices gave rise to negative feelings because of the restrictions implied by their use. These dual experiences were explored in relation to the lived body, space, relations to others, and time.PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: The results of this study will facilitate occupational therapists understanding of an individual's experiences utilizing assistive devices and their need for support with this process.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Toronto: Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists, 2007
    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Nursing Occupational Therapy
    Research subject
    Nursing Science w. Occupational Therapy Focus
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3071 (URN)10.2182/cjot.06.05 (DOI)17319319 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2006-05-11 Created: 2006-05-11 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Lifeworld perspectives on assistive devices: lived experiences of spouses of persons with stroke
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lifeworld perspectives on assistive devices: lived experiences of spouses of persons with stroke
    2005 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 159-169Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to explore how spouses of persons with a disability following stroke describe their lived experiences regarding assistive devices in everyday life. A phenomenological lifeworld approach was used and conversational interviews were conducted with 12 spouses. Their lived experiences of assistive devices were explored in relation to four lifeworld existentials intertwined in everyday life. The results showed that lived body concerns aspects of feelings, habits, and incorporation of the devices with one's own body. The devices are, from the spouses' perspective, a prerequisite for their partner with stroke living at home. Successively the devices are incorporated into the couples' homes, and they provide a new view of the environment, aspects related to lived space. The devices bring about a changed relation to lived time, related to past, present, and future. Further, lived human relation concerns changed relationships to husbands/wives with stroke, including a great responsibility due to the devices and their usage. The results also included stigmatizing aspects and a twofold relationship to health professionals regarding participation in decisions about prescribing assistive devices. Understanding the unique meaning of assistive devices from the spouses' perspective is vital for occupational therapists prescribing such devices.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London: Taylor & Francis, 2005
    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Nursing Occupational Therapy
    Research subject
    Nursing Science w. Occupational Therapy Focus
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3072 (URN)10.1080/11038120510031789 (DOI)
    Available from: 2006-05-11 Created: 2006-05-11 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
    3. The effect of an outdoor powered wheelchair on activity and participation in users with stroke
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effect of an outdoor powered wheelchair on activity and participation in users with stroke
    2006 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 235-243Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose.Persons with disabilities after stroke are often restricted in activity and participation in society because of mobility limitations. An outdoor powered wheelchair may be one among other interventions in a rehabilitation programme. The aim of this study was to describe and compare activity limitations and participation restrictions in persons with stroke from their own perspective, before and after using an outdoor powered wheelchair. Method. At baseline and follow-up two instruments were used: Individually Prioritized Problem Assessment (IPPA) and World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHODAS II). Results. The results indicated that the powered wheelchair has a great positive effect on activity and participation assessed with IPPA. The results also showed that most of the participants' problems could be categorised as belonging to the domain of 'Community, social and civic life' according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), and the effect size in this domain was large (2.4) after the participants had used the wheelchair. Conclusion. An outdoor powered wheelchair is an essential device for persons with disability after stroke with regard to overcoming activity limitations and participation restrictions in everyday life.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Abingdon, Oxford, UK: Taylor & Francis, 2006
    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Nursing Occupational Therapy
    Research subject
    Nursing Science w. Occupational Therapy Focus
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3073 (URN)10.1080/17483100600757841 (DOI)
    Available from: 2006-05-11 Created: 2006-05-11 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
    4. The value of an outdoor powered wheelchair with regard to the quality of life of persons with stroke: a follow-up study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The value of an outdoor powered wheelchair with regard to the quality of life of persons with stroke: a follow-up study
    2007 (English)In: Assistive technology, ISSN 1040-0435, E-ISSN 1949-3614, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 143-153Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Evaluating the use of a powered wheelchair is of importance because of the increasing number of people with disabilities who are provided with one. The aim of this study is to describe characteristics of persons with stroke using an outdoor powered wheelchair and to evaluate the impact of the wheelchair on quality of life. A further aim is to compare the impact on quality of life in respect to age, gender, different disability characteristics, and living conditions. The 32 participants with stroke were recruited consecutively from three county council areas in Sweden. A follow-up design was applied including the EuroQol-5D questionnaires at baseline before the persons were prescribed an outdoor powered wheelchair, and after the participants had used the wheelchair for 3 to 5 months, data were collected by means of the EuroQol-5D and the Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices Scale (PIADS). The results indicated an improved quality of life with respect to the items competence, independence, capability, quality of life, well-being, happiness, and self-esteem on the PIADS. The usual activity dimension on the EuroQol-5D showed a significant improvement after wheelchair use. The group who drove the powered wheelchair at least once a day in the summer showed a more positive score on the total PIADS and its Competence subscale than persons who drove less. Furthermore, the group with higher rankings of the importance of the powered wheelchair scored higher on psychosocial impact than did the group with lower rankings. The conclusion is that the powered wheelchair mostly has a positive impact on the quality of life of users with stroke. Service providers should be alert, however, to the possible negative impact of a powered wheelchair on quality of life and support the user.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    New York, NY: Demos, 2007
    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Nursing Occupational Therapy
    Research subject
    Nursing Science w. Occupational Therapy Focus
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3074 (URN)17937056 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2006-05-11 Created: 2006-05-11 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
  • 16.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Upplevelser och utvärdering av att använda hjälpmedel2007Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    Örebro University, Department of Nursing and Caring Sciences.
    Vad betyder det för den enskilde individen att använda hjälpmedel i vardagen?2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Nursing and Caring Sciences.
    Ahlström, G.
    Värdet av hjälpmedel i vardagslivet2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Törnquist, Kristina
    The value of an outdoor powered wheelchair with regard to the quality of life of persons with stroke: a follow-up study2007In: Assistive technology, ISSN 1040-0435, E-ISSN 1949-3614, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 143-153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evaluating the use of a powered wheelchair is of importance because of the increasing number of people with disabilities who are provided with one. The aim of this study is to describe characteristics of persons with stroke using an outdoor powered wheelchair and to evaluate the impact of the wheelchair on quality of life. A further aim is to compare the impact on quality of life in respect to age, gender, different disability characteristics, and living conditions. The 32 participants with stroke were recruited consecutively from three county council areas in Sweden. A follow-up design was applied including the EuroQol-5D questionnaires at baseline before the persons were prescribed an outdoor powered wheelchair, and after the participants had used the wheelchair for 3 to 5 months, data were collected by means of the EuroQol-5D and the Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices Scale (PIADS). The results indicated an improved quality of life with respect to the items competence, independence, capability, quality of life, well-being, happiness, and self-esteem on the PIADS. The usual activity dimension on the EuroQol-5D showed a significant improvement after wheelchair use. The group who drove the powered wheelchair at least once a day in the summer showed a more positive score on the total PIADS and its Competence subscale than persons who drove less. Furthermore, the group with higher rankings of the importance of the powered wheelchair scored higher on psychosocial impact than did the group with lower rankings. The conclusion is that the powered wheelchair mostly has a positive impact on the quality of life of users with stroke. Service providers should be alert, however, to the possible negative impact of a powered wheelchair on quality of life and support the user.

  • 20.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Nursing and Caring Sciences.
    Appelros, P.
    Ahlström, G.
    Lifeworld perspectives on using assistive devices - lived experiences of persons with stroke2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Appelros, Peter
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Lifeworld perspectives utilizing assistive devices: individuals, lived experience following a stroke2007In: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy / Revue Canadienne d`Ergotèrapie, ISSN 0008-4174, Vol. 74, no 1, p. 15-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In lifeworld research, the individual's experience of meaning is of primary importance.PURPOSE: This paper explores how individuals post stroke who have a disability, described their personal meaning and lived experiences associated with the use of assistive devices.METHODS: A hermeneutic-phenomenological research approach was used. A conversational interview was conducted with 22 post-stroke individuals regarding their daily experiences utilizing assistive devices.RESULTS: The results showed a dual experience regarding the use of assistive devices, which is often complex and contradictory. The devices were viewed as a prerequisite for well-being and independence but at the same time, the devices gave rise to negative feelings because of the restrictions implied by their use. These dual experiences were explored in relation to the lived body, space, relations to others, and time.PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: The results of this study will facilitate occupational therapists understanding of an individual's experiences utilizing assistive devices and their need for support with this process.

  • 22.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Nursing and Caring Sciences.
    Berndtsson, I.
    Appelros, P.
    Ahlström, G.
    Perspectives on assistive devices: lived experiences of spouses of persons with stroke2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Berndtsson, Inger
    Appelros, Peter
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Örebro University, Department of Nursing and Caring Sciences.
    Lifeworld perspectives on assistive devices: lived experiences of spouses of persons with stroke2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 159-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to explore how spouses of persons with a disability following stroke describe their lived experiences regarding assistive devices in everyday life. A phenomenological lifeworld approach was used and conversational interviews were conducted with 12 spouses. Their lived experiences of assistive devices were explored in relation to four lifeworld existentials intertwined in everyday life. The results showed that lived body concerns aspects of feelings, habits, and incorporation of the devices with one's own body. The devices are, from the spouses' perspective, a prerequisite for their partner with stroke living at home. Successively the devices are incorporated into the couples' homes, and they provide a new view of the environment, aspects related to lived space. The devices bring about a changed relation to lived time, related to past, present, and future. Further, lived human relation concerns changed relationships to husbands/wives with stroke, including a great responsibility due to the devices and their usage. The results also included stigmatizing aspects and a twofold relationship to health professionals regarding participation in decisions about prescribing assistive devices. Understanding the unique meaning of assistive devices from the spouses' perspective is vital for occupational therapists prescribing such devices.

  • 24.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Fahlström, Gunilla
    Betydelsen av hjälpmedel ur hemtjänstpersonals perspektiv2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Fahlström, Gunilla
    Home care staff experiences of assistive devices at work: an explorative study2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Fahlström, Gunilla
    Roles of assistive devices for home care staff in Sweden: a qualitative study2010In: Disability and rehabilitation: assistive technology, ISSN 1748-3107, Vol. 5, no 5, p. 295-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     PURPOSE: To explore home care staff experiences in relation to assistive devices and the use of assistive device at work.

    METHOD: Individual conversational interviews with 14 home care staff were used. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data.

    RESULTS: A broad meaning attached to the use of assistive devices at work emerged in three themes. In 'staff's role at work in relation to assistive devices', their different roles emerged in relation to knowledge and instruction as well as safeguarding the user. 'Assistive devices as a product and their significance for staff' showed that devices were an integrated part of staff work in the users' home. Devices influenced staff cooperation, feelings and were significant in relation to time and finance. Regarding 'assistive devices and their significance for the user from the staff's perspective', the staff felt that devices were a prerequisite for the user coping with everyday life and they also had an emotional significance.

    CONCLUSION: Assistive devices play a significant and important role for home care staff. An increased understanding among prescribers and other health care staff about home care staff knowledge about, work with and experience from assistive devices could contribute to a better care and rehabilitation for home care recipients.

  • 27.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hagberg, Lars
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Vårdvetenskapligt forskningscentrum, Örebro Läns Landsting, Örebro, Sverige.
    Fredriksson, Carin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hermansson, Liselotte M. N.
    Vårdvetenskapligt forskningscentrum, Örebro Läns Landsting, Örebro, Sverige.
    Effekten av en eldriven rullstol (scooter) för äldre personer2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Att kunna förflytta sig är ofta en förutsättning för att kunna delta i olika aktiviteter, en eldriven rullstol kan bidra till detta.

    Syfte: Syftet var att undersöka effekten av en eldriven rullstol på äldre personers aktivitet, delaktighet och livskvalitet.

    Metod: Personer > 65 år som för första gången remitterats till Centrum för hjälpmedel; ÖLL, för utprovning av eldriven rullstol för utomhusbruk inkluderades konsekutivt. Mätning gjordes före förskrivning och efter 4 månaders användning av eldriven rullstol med olika instrument för aktivitet, delaktighet (Individually Prioritized Problem Assessment, IPPA och WHO-Disability Assessment Schedule, WHODAS 2.0) och hälsorelaterad livskvalitet (SF-36). Analyser genomfördes med t-test. Cohens d användes för beräkning av effektstorlek. För att klassificera deltagarnas självskattade aktivitetsproblem (IPPA) användes Klassifikation av funktionstillstånd, funktionshinder och hälsa (ICF).

    Resultat/preliminärt resultat: Fyrtiofem personer (m=78 år, 36 män, 9 kvinnor inkluderades, samtliga fick en trehjulig eldriven rullstol med manuell styrning förskriven (scooter). För hela gruppen visade resultatet en statistisk signifikant förbättring med stor effekt av scootern på personernas aktivitetsproblem (IPPA; n=164). Majoriteten av problem var inom områdena Hemliv (i huvudsak olika inköp) och Samhällsgemenskap, socialt och medborgerligt liv (rekreation och fritidsaktiviteter): För hela gruppen framkom små signifikanta förbättringar inom WHODAS 2.0 domän Delaktighet och inom SF-36 index Fysisk hälsa och delskala Fysiska roller. Vid subgruppsanalyser framkom medelstora signifikanta förbättringar för kvinnor inom domänen Delaktighet (WHODAS 2.0) och för män små förbättringar inom delskalorna Fysiska roller och Social funktion (SF-36).

    Slutsats: En eldriven scooter har ett stort positivt värde för äldre personers egna prioriterade aktiviteter och en liten effekt på hälsorelaterad livskvalitet.  

  • 28.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hagberg, Lars
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Fredriksson, Carin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hermansson, Liselotte M N
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    The effect of powered scooters on activity, participation and quality of life in elderly users2016In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 11, no 7, p. 558-563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim was to explore the effect of using a powered mobility device (PMD) on older peoples’ activity, participation and quality of life (QoL).

    Method: A pre- and post-intervention design with outcome measures for activity, participation (Individually Prioritized Problem Assessment, IPPA; World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule, WHODAS 2.0) and QoL (SF-36) were used. T-test was used to analyse the data. The magnitude of the effects was measured by Cohen’s criteria for effect sizes (d).

    Results: The sample consisted of 45 individuals (36 men) aged 66–88 years referred for prescription of a PMD. All were prescribed a powered scooter (PS). A statistically significant improvement with a large effect on IPPA in the ICF domains of Self-care (d¼2.47), Domestic life (d¼2.40), Interpersonal interactions and relationships (d¼2.08), and Community, social, and civic life (d¼2.36) was found. Medium-sized improvement on the WHODAS 2.0 domain of Participation and small improvements in the SF-36 domains of Physical Health and Role-Physical were also found.

    Conclusion: A PS has significant effects on the areas of activity, participation and QoL in elderly people. These findings have implications for prescriptions of a PS to this population.

  • 29.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hermansson, Liselotte M N
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hagberg, Lars
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Larsholt, Gunilla
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Fredriksson, Carin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Värdet av en eldriven rullstol: fokus på äldre användare och anhöriga2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Undersökningen som redovisas i den här rapporten har studerat värdet av en eldriven rullstol för den primära användaren och dennes anhörige. Syftet har varit att få en djupare förståelse för hur förskrivning av en eldriven rullstol till äldre personer med funktionsnedsättning påverkar vardagen för äldre anhöriga.

  • 30.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Pettersson, Viktor
    Frisk, Margot
    Current knowledge about the application of the ICF in relation to occupational therapy2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Viktor
    Skövde Municipality Rehab, Skövde, Sweden.
    Frisk, Margot L. A.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    ICF from an occupational therapy perspective in adult care: an integrative literature review2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 260-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since its launch there has been increasing interest in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) within occupational therapy (OT). The aim of this study was to perform an integrative literature review, in order to present an overview of knowledge, where the ICF constitutes a significant part in relation to OT. A systematic literature search, covering the period 2001–2008, was performed in the databases MEDLINE, AMED, and CINAHL. A total of 112 articles were included and the majority had exploratory and descriptive designs. The results showed that ICF was valuable for research, clinical practice, and education. ICF was used to link existing instruments and to construct new outcome measures. Occupational therapists have been members of expert groups involved in the development of Core Sets for certain health conditions. Several positive aspects were described, e.g. an effective medium for communication at different levels. Many limitations were mentioned, such as unclear concepts and lack of subjective experiences. Suggestions for improvements were described. The conclusion was that the ICF has been used for a broad spectrum of purposes. The results indicated that further research is needed concerning application of the ICF in clinical practice and education.

  • 32.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Nursing and Caring Sciences.
    Törnquist, K.
    Ahlström, G.
    The impact of a powered wheelchair for outdoor use on activity, participation and quality of life2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Nursing and Caring Sciences.
    Törnquist, K.
    Ahlström, G.
    The value of an outdoor powered wheelchair with regard to the quality of life of persons with stroke: a follow-up study2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Törnquist, Kristina
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    The effect of an outdoor powered wheelchair on activity and participation in users with stroke2006In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 235-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose.Persons with disabilities after stroke are often restricted in activity and participation in society because of mobility limitations. An outdoor powered wheelchair may be one among other interventions in a rehabilitation programme. The aim of this study was to describe and compare activity limitations and participation restrictions in persons with stroke from their own perspective, before and after using an outdoor powered wheelchair. Method. At baseline and follow-up two instruments were used: Individually Prioritized Problem Assessment (IPPA) and World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHODAS II). Results. The results indicated that the powered wheelchair has a great positive effect on activity and participation assessed with IPPA. The results also showed that most of the participants' problems could be categorised as belonging to the domain of 'Community, social and civic life' according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), and the effect size in this domain was large (2.4) after the participants had used the wheelchair. Conclusion. An outdoor powered wheelchair is an essential device for persons with disability after stroke with regard to overcoming activity limitations and participation restrictions in everyday life.

  • 35. Söderback, Ingrid
    et al.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    Örebro University, Department of Nursing and Caring Sciences.
    von Essen, Louise
    Stein, Franklin
    Cancer patients´ and their physicians´ perceptions of the formers' need for occupational therapy2000In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 77-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of the study were to identify cancer patients" need for occupational therapy by (a) describing their and their physicians" perceptions of the former"s needs (b) exploring whether patients and physicians agree on the patient"s need for occupational therapy, and (c) identifying the factors related to the physicians" and the patients" perceptions of patient needs. One-hundred-and-two patients with a cancer disease and the 11 physicians responsible for them completed the “Occupational Therapy Needs Assessment” during a visit to a medical consultation unit. Fifty-six percent of the patients felt a need for occupational therapy. In 59% of cases, their physicians judged that there was a need for occupational therapy. Patients and physicians both judged that those patients who were older than 66 years and in the active phase of the disease needed therapy more than those patients under 66 years and not in an active phase of the disease. More patients judged by their physicians to have more than 6 months to live needed occupational therapy more than those judged to have less than 6 months. In conclusion, it seems that occupational therapy is felt by cancer patients and their physicians to be underutilised.

  • 36.
    Widehammar, Cathrine
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hermansson, Liselotte
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Experiences of myoelectric arm prosthesis users: the influence of environment: Influence of environment on myoelectric prosthesis useManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Widehammar, Cathrine
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hermansson, Liselotte M. N.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    The influence of environment: experiences from users of myoelectric arm prostheses2014In: MEC'14: Redefinig the Norm, Frederiction, New Brunswick, Canada: University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, Canada , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Myoelectric prostheses are used in varying degrees. According to the International Classification of functioning, disability and health (ICF) the environment includes the physical, social and attitudinal environment in which people live and conduct their lives. An environment with barriers, or without facilitators, will restrict the individual’s occupational performance and can result in limitations of Quality of Life. Few studies have been made to see the impact of environmental factors on prosthesis use. In this study the ICF- model is the framework to understand the complexity of environmental factors influence on prostheses use. The aim of this study was to describe the experience of how environmental factors affect the use of myoelectric arm prostheses..                        

    Method: A qualitative descriptive approach was used and interviews were conducted with 13 adult prosthesis users at the Prosthetics and Orthotics Outpatient Clinic in Örebro, Sweden. The participants were 9 males and 4 females with age ranging from 20-74 years ; they had acquired (n=5) or congenital (n=8) cause of absence at trans humeral (n=3 ) or trans radial (n=10 ) level. Their experience from prosthesis use was ranging from 2- 30 years. Qualitative content analysis with an inductive approach was used for data analysis.        

    Results: Participants’ experiences of prosthesis use and how environmental factors affect them could be divided into seven categories: Various adaptations to the environment; Other peoples attitudes affect use; Support promotes use; Technical shortcomings affect use; Climate affects comfort and function; Ignorance and legislation complicates; Different approach to usability. Two themes occurred in all the categories and gave an overall perspective of what the participants believe have an important impact on prosthesis use: The prosthesis is/is not a part of my body; and, It is important to be like everyone else. A model was created to clarify the relation between environmental factors and prosthesis use/non-use. It illustrates how a persons coping strategy interacts with all the different environmental factors it is exposed to and how this leads to usability in different degrees. The prosthesis use can be a barrier or a facilitator for activity, participation and body structure.  

    Conclusions: Embodiment of prosthesis reduces environmental barriers and facilitates future use in both congenital and acquired upper limb amputees. Support to the persons and their family in prosthetic use, access to prosthesis training close to home, and considerations taken to the prosthesis appearance and function will facilitate future prosthesis use.

  • 38.
    Widehammar, Cathrine
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Pediatrics, Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Center for Clinical Research Dalarna, Falun, Sweden.
    Hermansson, Liselotte
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    The influence of environment: experiences of users of myoelectric arm prosthesis - a qualitative study2018In: Prosthetics and orthotics international, ISSN 0309-3646, E-ISSN 1746-1553, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 28-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Prostheses are used to varying degrees; however, little is known about how environmental aspects influence this use.

    Objectives: To describe users" experiences of how environmental factors influence their use of a myoelectric arm prosthesis.

    Study design: Qualitative and descriptive.

    Methods: A total of 13 patients previously provided with a myoelectric prosthetic hand participated. Their age, sex, deficiency level, etiology, current prosthesis use, and experience varied. Semi-structured interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed through inductive content analysis.

    Results: Four categories were created from the data: "Prosthesis function," "Other people's attitudes," "Support from family and healthcare," and "Individual's attitude and strategies." The overarching theme, "Various degrees of embodiment lead to different experiences of environmental barriers and facilitators," emerged from differences in individual responses depending on whether the individual was a daily or a non-daily prosthesis user. Environmental facilitators such as support from family and healthcare and good function and fit of the prosthesis seemed to help the embodiment of the prosthesis, leading to daily use. This embodiment seemed to reduce the influence of environmental barriers, for example, climate, attitudes, and technical shortcomings.

    Conclusion: Embodiment of prostheses seems to reduce the impact of environmental barriers. Support and training may facilitate the embodiment of myoelectric prosthesis use.

    Clinical relevance: For successful prosthetic rehabilitation, environmental factors such as support and information to the patient and their social network about the benefits of prosthesis use are important. Local access to training in myoelectric control gives more people the opportunity to adapt to prosthesis use and experience less environmental barriers.

  • 39.
    Widehammar, Cathrine
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Centre for Clinical Research Dalarna (CKF-Dalarna), Falun, Sweden; Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Disability and Habilitation, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hermansson, Liselotte
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    The influence of environment: experiences of users of myoelectric arm prosthesis, a qualitative study2016In: “Advances in our Understanding”: The Compendium, 2016, p. 56-56Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: Myoelectric prostheses can be prescribed to people born with upper limb reduction deficiency or with acquired amputation in order to improve their function and quality of life. Despite this, prostheses are used in varying degrees. An environment with barriers, or without facilitators, will restrict the individual’s occupational performance and can also result in limitations of Quality of Life. According to the International Classification of Functioning, disability and health (ICF) the environment includes the physical, social and attitudinal environment in which people live and conduct their lives. Few studies have been made to see the impact of environmental factors on prosthesis use. In this study the ICF- model is the framework to understand the complexity of environmental factors influence on prostheses use. The aim of this study was to describe users’ experience of how environmental factors influence their use of a myoelectric prosthesis in both congenital and acquired absence of a hand.

    Method: Qualitative descriptive approach. Semi-structured interviews were audiotaped, transcribed by the first author and analyzed through inductive content analysis according to Graneheim & Lundman. Investigator triangulation was used to ensure the credibility.

    Subjects: Strategic selection was used to get a varied sample in terms of sex, age, deficiency level, etiology, current prosthesis use, and length of experience. Interviews were conducted with 13 adult patients, previously provided with a myoelectric prosthetic hand at the Prosthetics and Orthotics Outpatient Clinic in Örebro, Sweden. The participants were 9 males and 4 females with age ranging from 20-74 years; they had acquired (n=5) or congenital (n=8) cause of absence at trans-humeral (n=3) or trans-radial (n=10) level. Their experience from prosthesis use was ranging from 2- 30 years. At the time of data collection the participants reported different patterns of prosthesis use: daily (n= 6) or non-daily (n=7), ranging from use only at work to never.

    Results: The overarching theme “Different degree of embodiment provides various experiences ofinfluence from environment” illustrates the participants’ adaptation to prosthesis, which in turn influences the ability to manage environmental barriers. Four categories emerged from the data, “The prosthesis function”, “Other peoples’ attitudes”, “Support from family and healthcare” and “Personal approach to the environment”. Environmental facilitators such as, support from family and healthcare, and, good function and fit of the prosthesis, helped to make the prosthesis an embodied experience, leading to daily use. This embodiment reduces the influence of environmental barriers, e.g. climate, attitudes, and technical shortcomings. Myoelectric prosthesis use facilitates activity and participation among daily users.

    Conclusions: The embodiment of the prosthesis may reduce influence of environmental barriers and promote myoelectric prosthesis use in both congenital and acquired upper limb deficiency. The users’ experience in this study indicates that support and training can facilitate the embodiment of myoelectric prosthesis. Thus, as prescribers of prostheses it is our responsibility to give support and information to the patient and also to family, pre-school and school teachers, and local healthcare, in order to motivate and encourage prosthesis use in everyday life.

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