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  • 1.
    Adamic, M.
    et al.
    Dermatol Ctr Parmova, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Pavlovic, M. D.
    Dermatol Ctr Parmova, Ljubljana, Slovenia; Fac Med, Univ Maribor, Maribor, Slovenia.
    Rubin, A. Troilius
    Ctr Laser & Vasc Anomalies, Dept Dermatol, Skåne Univ Hosp, Malmö, Sweden.
    Palmetun-Ekback, M.
    Örebro University Hospital. Dept Dermatol, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Boixeda, P.
    Dept Dermatol, Laser Serv, Ramon & Cajal Hosp, Univ Alcala De Henares, Madrid, Spain.
    Guidelines of care for vascular lasers and intense pulse light sources from the European Society for Laser Dermatology2015In: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, ISSN 0926-9959, E-ISSN 1468-3083, Vol. 29, no 9, p. 1661-1678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimLasers and non-coherent intense pulse light sources (IPLS) are based on the principle of selective photothermolysis and can be used for the treatment of many vascular skin lesions. A variety of lasers has been developed for the treatment of congenital and acquired vascular lesions which incorporate these concepts into their design. Although laser and light sources are very popular due to their non-invasive nature, caution should be considered by practitioners and patients to avoid permanent side-effects. The aim of these guidelines is to give evidence-based recommendations for the use of lasers and IPLS in the treatment of vascular lesions. MethodsThese guidelines were produced by a Consensus Panel made up of experts in the field of vascular laser surgery under the auspices of the European Society of Laser Dermatology. Recommendations on the use of vascular lasers and IPLS were made based on the quality of evidence for efficacy, safety, tolerability, cosmetic outcome, patient satisfaction/preference and, where appropriate, on the experts' opinion. The recommendations of these guidelines are graded according to the American College of Chest Physicians Task Force recommendations on Grading Strength of Recommendations and Quality of Evidence in Clinical Guidelines. ResultsLasers and IPLS are very useful and sometimes the only available method to treat various vascular lesions. It is of a paramount importance that the type of laser or IPLS and their specific parameters are adapted to the indication but also that the treating physician is familiar with the device to be used. The crucial issue in treating vascular lesions is to recognize the immediate end-point after laser treatment. This is the single most important factor to ensure both the efficacy of the treatment and avoidance of serious side-effects.

  • 2.
    Ekbäck, Gunnar
    et al.
    Department of Dentistry, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ordell, Sven
    Dental Commissioning Unit Östergötland County Council, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Oral Public Health, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Ekbäck, Maria Palmetun
    Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Drug and Therapeutic Committee, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ekbäck, Gustav
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Unell, Lennart
    Department of Oral Public Health, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden; Post Graduate Dental Education Centre, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Johansson, Ann-Katrin
    Department of Clinical Dentistry – Cariology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Reporting dental caries disease in longitudinal studies - a suggestion2016In: Swedish Dental Journal, ISSN 0347-9994, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 173-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In general, most infectious and/or lifestyle-related diseases are defined as being present when sufficient signs or symptoms occurs in an individual. The term "sufficient" is a relative concept and a disease can therefore be measured with different degrees of certainty. These symptoms are commonly defined in such a way that it is possible to determine the incidence and prevalence of the disease and also the proportion of individuals that are cured from the disease. If dental caries is an individual disease which can be compared to other diseases regarding incidence and prevalence, it is important to determine for how long an individual must be free from new signs of the disease before being considered cured or free from the disease and to define the "sufficient" signs or symptoms needed for a diagnose. Based on these thoughts, the purpose of this study was to calculate caries incidence and prevalence in a group of adolescents from a definition of dental caries based on ICD-10. This study included all 12 year olds in 1990 who attended a clinical dental examination in 1990-1995 in Orebro County, Orebro, Sweden, yearly during these six years. Dental caries disease at the individual level was defined as Ko2.1 (dentinal caries) according to ICD-bo while freedom of caries was defined as the absence of Ko2.1 during a three-year period. In this study the yearly prevalence was 12%, the three year cumulative incidence was 18% and the incidence rate 13%. Results of this study highlight the poor outcomes in curing caries disease in this age-group, according to the criteria in this study, as only 17% of the children with caries at the outset of the study were free from the disease three years later. Defining both a practical level to measure signs of dental caries, and the period an individual must be free from them to be classified as cured from the disease create new opportunities to compare and communicate the disease of dental caries with other diseases. This way of registration is also of advantage for planning purposes as there the centre of interest must be the individual patient and not the tooth or surface.

  • 3.
    Ekbäck, Maria Palmetun
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hirsutism and quality of life with aspects on social support, anxiety and depression2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Hirsutism is excessive hair growth in women. The prevalence is estimated at 5%. The aim of this thesis was to describe different aspects of how life is affected for women suffering from hirsutism. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used. Study I showed that hirsutism deeply affects women’s experiences of their bodies in a negative way and was experienced as a life sorrow. In Study II the patient-physician relationship was described. The patient-physician relationship from the patient’s perspective was suboptimal, as most meetings included feelings of being rejected and even humiliation. In Study III the aim was to translate and psychometrically evaluate an instrument that measures perceived social support, “The Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support” (MSPSS). The translation was performed according to WHO:s official process, and validation was performed in a sample that consisted of 281 participants, 127 women with hirsutism (main sample) and 154 nursing students. MSPSS had good psychometric properties with regard to factor structure, construct validity, internal consistency and reproducibility. Study IV described different aspects of HRQoL in the main sample, the correlation of anxiety, depression, level of hairiness, age and BMI. The F-G scores were dichotomized into minor (F-G ≤14) and major (F-G≥15) hair growth. Higher levels of hair growth were significantly correlated to a lower level of QoL measured by DLQI, EQ-5D and symptoms of both anxiety and depression measured by HADS. Study V investigated if social support was associated with quality of life and outcome of HRQoL compared to a reference group of women (n=1115). SF-36, the MSPSS and the F-G scale were used. Compared to the reference group, women with hirsutism reported lower quality of life in all dimensions of SF-36 (p<0.01) The dimension most affected was vitality (VT=41.2), which had a lower value than has been reported for patients with MS and myasthenia gravis. A Multiple Regression Analysis showed a significant relation between quality of life and social support, indicating its importance for the ability to adapt, in spite of low quality of life.

    List of papers
    1. "It is always on my mind": women's experiences of their bodies when living with hirsutism
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>"It is always on my mind": women's experiences of their bodies when living with hirsutism
    2009 (English)In: Health Care for Women International, ISSN 0739-9332, E-ISSN 1096-4665, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 358-372Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Many women suffer from excessive hair growth, often in combination with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). It is unclear how hirsutism influences such women's experiences of their bodies. Our aim is to describe and interpret women's experiences of their bodies when living with hirsutism. Interviews were conducted with 10 women with hirsutism. We used a qualitative latent content analysis. Four closely intertwined themes were disclosed: the body was experienced as a yoke, a freak, a disgrace, and as a prison. Hirsutism deeply affects women's experiences of their bodies in a negative way.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London: Taylor & Francis, 2009
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Dermatology and Venereal Diseases
    Research subject
    Dermatology and Venerology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-11650 (URN)10.1080/07399330902785133 (DOI)19350434 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2010-08-27 Created: 2010-08-27 Last updated: 2019-03-06Bibliographically approved
    2. “We feel rejected”: experiences of women with hirsutism consulting physicians
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>“We feel rejected”: experiences of women with hirsutism consulting physicians
    2011 (English)In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 157-159Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to describe how women with hirsutism experience their relationship with health care. Data were collected by tape-recorded individual interviews, which were analyzed by means of qualitative content analysis. The results showed that the relationship with health care, from the perspective of patients with hirsutism, is suboptimal.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Informa Healthcare, 2011
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Research subject
    Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-17020 (URN)10.3109/0167482X.2011.599461 (DOI)000293692200008 ()21824045 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-80051707123 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2011-09-07 Created: 2011-09-02 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
    3. Health-Related Quality of Life, Depression and Anxiety Correlate with the Degree of Hirsutism
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health-Related Quality of Life, Depression and Anxiety Correlate with the Degree of Hirsutism
    2013 (English)In: Dermatology, ISSN 1018-8665, E-ISSN 1421-9832, Vol. 227, no 3, p. 278-284Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Hirsutism has a negative impact on women’s quality of life. The relation between quality of life, anxiety, depression and the level of hairiness has not been described.

    Aims: To investigate the correlations between the levels of hairiness, quality of life, anxiety and depression. Methods: 200 patients from Malmö, Örebro and Uppsala, who had been in contact with the clinics for problems with excessive hair growth, were invited to answer a self-administered questionnaire including sociodemographic questions, EQ- 5D index score, Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Ferriman- Gallwey scale (F-G); of these, 127 women participated in the study.

    Results: The mean values were: EQ-5D index 0.73 (SD = 0.27), EQ visual analogue scale 61.0 (SD = 22.6), HADSanxiety 9.5 ± 5.3 and HADS-depression 6.5 ± 4.6. The mean DLQI was 11.8 ± 8.4, indicating a very large effect on patients’ lives. All were significantly correlated with the amount of hairiness.  

    Conclusions: Higher levels of hair growth were significantly correlated with a lower level of quality of life and symptoms of both anxiety and depression.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    S. Karger, 2013
    Keywords
    hirsutism, ferriman-gallwey scale, poor health-related quality of life, dermatology life quality index, eq-5d index score, hospital, anxiety and depression scale, low health status

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Research subject
    Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-32708 (URN)10.1159/000355356 (DOI)000327675500014 ()24107472 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agency: Nyckelfonden; Örebro County Council

    Available from: 2013-12-10 Created: 2013-12-10 Last updated: 2019-10-08Bibliographically approved
    4. Health-Related Quality of Life, Depression and Anxiety Correlate with the Degree of Hirsutism
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health-Related Quality of Life, Depression and Anxiety Correlate with the Degree of Hirsutism
    2013 (English)In: Dermatology, ISSN 1018-8665, E-ISSN 1421-9832, Vol. 227, no 3, p. 278-284Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Hirsutism has a negative impact on women’s quality of life. The relation between quality of life, anxiety, depression and the level of hairiness has not been described.

    Aims: To investigate the correlations between the levels of hairiness, quality of life, anxiety and depression. Methods: 200 patients from Malmö, Örebro and Uppsala, who had been in contact with the clinics for problems with excessive hair growth, were invited to answer a self-administered questionnaire including sociodemographic questions, EQ- 5D index score, Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Ferriman- Gallwey scale (F-G); of these, 127 women participated in the study.

    Results: The mean values were: EQ-5D index 0.73 (SD = 0.27), EQ visual analogue scale 61.0 (SD = 22.6), HADSanxiety 9.5 ± 5.3 and HADS-depression 6.5 ± 4.6. The mean DLQI was 11.8 ± 8.4, indicating a very large effect on patients’ lives. All were significantly correlated with the amount of hairiness.  

    Conclusions: Higher levels of hair growth were significantly correlated with a lower level of quality of life and symptoms of both anxiety and depression.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    S. Karger, 2013
    Keywords
    hirsutism, ferriman-gallwey scale, poor health-related quality of life, dermatology life quality index, eq-5d index score, hospital, anxiety and depression scale, low health status

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Research subject
    Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-32708 (URN)10.1159/000355356 (DOI)000327675500014 ()24107472 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agency: Nyckelfonden; Örebro County Council

    Available from: 2013-12-10 Created: 2013-12-10 Last updated: 2019-10-08Bibliographically approved
  • 4.
    Ekbäck, Maria Palmetun
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Benzein, Eva
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden; Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Palliative Research Centre, Ersta Sköndal University College and Ersta hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Health-Related Quality of Life, Depression and Anxiety Correlate with the Degree of Hirsutism2013In: Dermatology, ISSN 1018-8665, E-ISSN 1421-9832, Vol. 227, no 3, p. 278-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Hirsutism has a negative impact on women’s quality of life. The relation between quality of life, anxiety, depression and the level of hairiness has not been described.

    Aims: To investigate the correlations between the levels of hairiness, quality of life, anxiety and depression. Methods: 200 patients from Malmö, Örebro and Uppsala, who had been in contact with the clinics for problems with excessive hair growth, were invited to answer a self-administered questionnaire including sociodemographic questions, EQ- 5D index score, Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Ferriman- Gallwey scale (F-G); of these, 127 women participated in the study.

    Results: The mean values were: EQ-5D index 0.73 (SD = 0.27), EQ visual analogue scale 61.0 (SD = 22.6), HADSanxiety 9.5 ± 5.3 and HADS-depression 6.5 ± 4.6. The mean DLQI was 11.8 ± 8.4, indicating a very large effect on patients’ lives. All were significantly correlated with the amount of hairiness.  

    Conclusions: Higher levels of hair growth were significantly correlated with a lower level of quality of life and symptoms of both anxiety and depression.

  • 5.
    Ekbäck, Maria Palmetun
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Benzein, Eva
    Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Health and Caring Science, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Department of Health and Caring Science, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden; Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Palliative Research Centre, Ersta Sköndal University College and Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Social support: an important factor for quality of life in women with hirsutism2014In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 12, article id 183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Women with hirsutism have reported imparied health and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Social support is a factor that might increase HRQoL in chronic diseases, but little is known about this association among women with hirsutism.

    Aim: The aim of the study was to describe social support and explore its association with HRQoL among women with hirsutism. A further aim was to compare HRQoL in women with hirsutism with a Swedish normal population.

    Methods: A questionnaire including socio-demographic questions, Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS), and a self-estimation of hairiness using the Ferriman-Gallway scale (F-G scale) was answered by 127 women with hirsutism.

    Results: Multiple regression analyses showed significant associations between social support and all health dimensions in the SF-36, also after the model was adjusted for age, hairiness and body mass index. Compared to the normal Swedish population, women with hirsutism reported significantly lower HRQoL in all dimensions of the SF-36 (p < 0.01).

    Conclusions: There is a significant positive association between social support and HRQoL, demonstrating its importance for the ability to adapt to problems associated with hirsutism. As women with hirsutism reported poorer HRQoL compared to the normal population, social support may be a factor to consider in clinical practice.

  • 6.
    Ekbäck, Maria Palmetun
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital. Dept Dermatol, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Drug & Therapeut Committee, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Troilius, Agneta
    Laser & Vascular Anomalies, Dermatol Dept, Skåne Univ Hosp, Malmö, Sweden.
    Laser therapy for refractory discoid lupus erythematosus when everything else has failed2013In: Journal of Cosmetic & Laser Therapy, ISSN 1476-4172, E-ISSN 1476-4180, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 260-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) is restricted to the skin, mostly the face, often chronic and disfiguring. Standard medical therapies include topical corticosteroids and antimalarials. This is a retrospective long-term follow-up of refractory DLE treated with different lasers and intense pulsed light (IPL). Methods and materials : Sixteen patients with histologically confirmed DLE participated in this study. Two men and fourteen women, aged 28-69 years, mean age 54 years, were treated at the laser units of the Departments of Dermatology at the University Hospital of Orebro from 2001 and at Skane University Hospital in Malmo, Sweden from 1999. Several therapies, including first- and secondline treatments and even cryotherapy, had been used without response. Many patients had marked scarring. Pulsed dye laser (PDL) and IPL were used with low fluencies. Results: Of 16 patients, 14 were improved regarding itching, erythema, scaling, scarring and pain. There was no scarring as a side effect of laser therapy or IPL. Two patients were not satisfied: one because of long healing time, and the other because of post inflammatory hyper pigmentation. Conclusion: IPL and PDL is a safe adjunctive therapy to conventional treatment of DLE. In the effort to prevent severe scarring and disfigurement it should be used as early as possible.

  • 7.
    Ekbäck, Maria [Palmetun]
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Medicine, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Uggla, Bertil
    Department of Internal Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Paraneoplastic pemphigus associated with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: treatment with alemtuzumab2012In: Leukemia research: a Forum for Studies on Leukemia and Normal Hemopoiesis, ISSN 0145-2126, E-ISSN 1873-5835, Vol. 36, no 8, p. E190-E191Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Ekbäck, Maria [Palmetun]
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Benzein, Eva
    "It is always on my mind": women's experiences of their bodies when living with hirsutism2009In: Health Care for Women International, ISSN 0739-9332, E-ISSN 1096-4665, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 358-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many women suffer from excessive hair growth, often in combination with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). It is unclear how hirsutism influences such women's experiences of their bodies. Our aim is to describe and interpret women's experiences of their bodies when living with hirsutism. Interviews were conducted with 10 women with hirsutism. We used a qualitative latent content analysis. Four closely intertwined themes were disclosed: the body was experienced as a yoke, a freak, a disgrace, and as a prison. Hirsutism deeply affects women's experiences of their bodies in a negative way.

  • 9.
    Ekbäck, Maria [Palmetun]
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. University hospital Örebro, Örebro, Sweden; Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden; Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; ; Ersta Sköndal University College and Ersta hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Benzein, Eva
    Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. University hospital Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Social support and quality of life among women diagnosed with hirsutismManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Women with hirsutism report more anxiety, depression and lower quality of life. However, their social situation with a family and employment does not differ from other women. Social support is a factor that might increase quality of life in chronic diseases. Little is known about social support and skin diseases.

    Objectives: The aim was to evaluate the relation between health-related quality of life and social support among women with hirsutism.

    Methods: A questionnaire including socio-demographic questions, Short Form 36 (SF-36), the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) and a self-estimation of hairiness using the Ferriman-Gallway scale (F-G scale) was filled out by 127. MSPSS has three sub-scales (family, friends, significant others) and a total score, that was used for calculation.

    Results: Compared to a Swedish population based reference group women with hirsutism reported lower quality of life in all dimensions of SF-36 (p<0.01). Multiple regression analysis showed a significant correlation between the MSPSS and SF-36 in the initial and adjusted model.

    Conclusions: There is a significant positive relation between quality of life and social support, demonstrating its importance for the ability to adapt to problems associated with hirsutism. It can be postulated that social support is important for the quality of life in chronic skin diseases wich merits further investigations.

  • 10.
    Evenhamre, Karolina
    et al.
    Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ekbäck, Maria Palmetun
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Dermatology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Correlations Between Disease-specific DLQI and Generic WHOQOL-BREF Quality of Life Instruments in a Clinical Population with Mixed Dermatological Diagnoses: A Pilot Study2017In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 97, no 2, p. 270-272Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Wallén, Stefan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Pharmacology and Therapeutic Department, Region Örebro County, University Hospital of Örebro, Läkemedelscentrum, Universitetssjukhuset, Örebro, Sweden.
    Szabo, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Surgery.
    Palmetun-Ekbäck, Maria
    Pharmacology and Therapeutic Department, Region Örebro County, University Hospital of Örebro, Läkemedelscentrum, Universitetssjukhuset, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Näslund, Ingmar
    Department of Surgery, University Hospital of Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Use of Opioid Analgesics Before and After Gastric Bypass Surgery in Sweden: a Population-Based Study2018In: Obesity Surgery, ISSN 0960-8923, E-ISSN 1708-0428, Vol. 28, no 11, p. 3518-3523Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Little is known regarding the use of opioid analgesics among patients who have undergone bariatric surgery. The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) procedure has been shown to significantly increase the rate of absorption of and exposure to morphine, raising concerns regarding the potentially increased risk of side-effects and the development of substance-use disorder.

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe the pattern of opioid use over time following RYGB and to see if the pattern differs between patients with a high opioid consumption (HOC) prior to surgery and those with a low consumption (LOC).

    Setting: University Hospital of Örebro, Sweden.

    Methods: The study was a descriptive retrospective population-based cohort study where two registers with complete coverage were cross-matched.

    Results: The study population comprised 35,612 persons (1628 HOC, and 33,984 LOC). After surgery, the number of HOC patients increased to 2218. Mean daily opioid consumption in the total population and the LOC group increased after surgery (p <.0005). In the HOC group, there was no difference between mean daily consumption before and after surgery.

    Conclusion: In this nationwide study, we have showed that there is an increase in consumption of opioid analgesics after gastric bypass surgery in Sweden. The increase in the number of individuals with high opioid consumption in the total population was mainly due to an increase in the group of patients with a low consumption prior to surgery.

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