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  • 1.
    Danermark, Berth
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Englund, Ulrika
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Germundsson, Per
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Ratinaud, Pierre
    Dept Sci Educ & Format, Univ Toulouse 2, Toulouse, France.
    French and Swedish teachers' social representations of social workers2014In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 491-507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaboration on children at risk is essential, but our knowledge about interprofessional collaboration between social workers and educators is limited.

    The aim of this study is twofold: (1) to describe French and Swedish teachers' social representation of social workers; and (2) to compare these social representations. The French sample group is composed of 77 secondary school teachers (of students from 11 to 18 years old), and the Swedish sample group is composed of 94. The method used was a 'free association task', commonly used to access the semantic content of social representation. Two different social representations of social workers were revealed, one for the French and one for the Swedish teachers. The French representation is characterised by highly positive aspects such as support, listening and competence. Swedish teachers' social representation of social workers is completely different: negative associations were common (44%), and among these, professional secrecy and law and regulations dominated. One plausible explanation is the difference of French and Swedish teachers' roles regarding collaboration with social workers.

  • 2.
    Danermark, Berth
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Germundsson, Per
    Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Englund, Ulrika
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Toward an Instrument for Measuring the Performance of Collaboration across Organisational and Professional Boundaries2013Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present an initial effort in the creation of a generic instrument for measuring the performance of collaboration across organisational and professional boundaries. Based on the literature and previous research on collaboration, a three dimensional instrument for measuring the preconditions for and the performance of collaboration has been constructed. Validity and reliability have been tested, and the instrument has been used in more than 100 projects. It has been demonstrated that  the instrument can serve a number of purposes: to consecutively measure and assess the performance of collaboration; to identify weak parts of the collaboration; to reveal if there are different preconditions for the involved partners’ full engagement in the collaboration; and to relate the performance to other similar collaboration projects. The outcome of the use of the instrument indicates that it can serve as an interactive tool for promoting a learning organisation in the context of collaboration and for building innovative network structures.

  • 3.
    Danermark, Berth
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Germundsson, Per
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Lööf, Kicki
    Englund, Ulrika
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Samverkan: en betraktelse utifrån : utvärderarna i Örebro reflekterar2009In: Kraften av samverkan: om samverkan kring barn och unga som far illa eller riskerar att fara illa : en antologi om samverkan mellan skola, polis, socialtjänst samt barn- och ungdomspsykiatri / [ed] Skolverket, Stockholm: Skolverket , 2009, 1, p. 118-132Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Englund, Ulrika
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Samverkansprojekt, och sen då?: en uppföljande studie av samverkansprocessen kring barn och unga som far illa eller riskerar att fara illa2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Satisfactory collaboration regarding children and youth in need of a comprehensive support is particularly important. Despite extensive research on collaborative work, knowledge of long term development of the collaboration process is lacking. The present thesis concerns inter-organizational collaboration within the framework of a former Swedish policy effort – focusing collaboration between schools, social services, police and the child and youth psychiatry – for the benefit of children and young people in distress or at risk. Applying a critical realist perspective, the overall aim of the thesis is to describe how former collaboration projects develop over time, and to identify significant mechanisms within this development. Through three questionnaire studies, the collaborative process development within the same collaborative settings is described (n=66) over a period of close to seven years. Estimations of 58 collaboration quality indicators within three categories *rules and regulations, *structural aspects and *shared perspectives/ consensus were collected at baseline in 2008, after one year at the final project stage in 2009, as well as five years after the project period (and the policy effort) ended, in 2014 (n=38). Two developmental trends occur: I) an overall positive trend and II) a negative trend on a comprehensive level. I) Collaboration on the target group has increased over time, are mainly incorporated into permanent organizational structures and is judged to have worked well/very well over time. II) Overall deteriorations of high estimates of the 58 quality indicators for collaborations is seen over the five year period, following the project period. However, less dramatic changes is noted on quality indicators concerning shared perspectives/consensus than on matters regarding rules and regulations and structural aspects. Five mechanisms of particular importance for the collaboration development are identified: anchoring, holistic perspectives, engagement, knowledge and clarity.

  • 5.
    Granberg, Sarah
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; HEAD Grad Sch, Linköping Univ, Linköping, Sweden.
    Swanepoel, De Wet
    University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa; University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Australia; Ear Sci Inst Australia, Subiaco WA, Australia.
    Englund, Ulrika
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    The ICF core sets for hearing loss project: International expert survey on functioning and disability of adults with hearing loss using the International classification of functioning, disability, and health (ICF)2014In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 497-506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To identify relevant aspects of functioning, disability, and contextual factors for adults with hearing loss (HL) from hearing health professional perspective summarized using the ICF classification as reference tool.

    Design: Internet-based cross-sectional survey using open-ended questions. Responses were analysed using a simplified content analysis approach to link concept to ICF categories according to linking rules.

    Study sample: Hearing health professionals (experts) recruited through e-mail distribution lists of professional organizations and personal networks of ICF core set for hearing loss steering committee members. Stratified sampling according to profession and world region enhanced the international and professional representation.

    Results: Sixty-three experts constituted the stratified sample used in the analysis. A total of 1726 meaningful concepts were identified in this study, resulting in 209 distinctive ICF categories, with 106 mentioned by 5% or more of respondents. Most categories in the activities & participation component related to communication, while the most frequent environmental factors related to the physical environment such as hearing aids or noise. Mental functions, such as confidence or emotional functions were also frequently highlighted.

    Conclusions: More than half (53.3%) of the entire ICF classification categories were included in the expert survey results. This emphasizes the importance of a multidimensional tool, such as the ICF, for assessing persons with hearing loss.

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