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  • 1.
    Soron, Mikael
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Prototyping a friction-stir welding robot2006Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Soron, Mikael
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Robot system for flexible 3D friction stir welding2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Applying Friction Stir Welding (FSW) on complex joint geometries requires not only a machine with 3-dimesional work space capacity, but also a sound definition of the part geometry as well as knowledge about the process. Having a joining process, such as FSW, with great characteristics from both seam quality and environmental perspective, but yet only a minor presence in the manufacturing industry may be related to flexibility and cost issues. The machines that are present in production today are mainly devoted towards one single task, with small if any possibility to apply changes. The use of FSW has therefore mainly been introduced in areas where there are extreme demands on the seam quality, or in large scale production. In order to truly challenge the existing solutions using fusion welding techniques, we propose a solution consisting of an industrial robot, which may solve the machine issues to a great extent as well as the flexibility issues by the implementation of planning and control algorithms.

    In this thesis we aim to develop a general methodology towards 3-dimensional FSW on complex objects. This include a robot prototype based on a standard industrial design, modified to carry out the process to a satisfactory extend. The prototype implementation includes software to control the motion of the welding tool, explicitly in the axial direction by the use of force feedback control and implicitly in the plane perpendicular to the axial direction to avoid path deviations. Other tools proposed in this thesis include planning software to create complex paths, both online and off-line, to consider not only the aspects regarding the robot's motion, but also including restraints due to the FSW process.

    The evaluation of the proposed system is conducted with an objective to define weldability, in term of alloys, thicknesses and speed, to verify the path planning algorithms for an online as well as an off-line scenario, and to verify the control algorithms response to path deviation due to manipulator compliance, and merge the results from those studies into a discussion on usability of the proposed system and application areas and operations suitable.

  • 3.
    Soron, Mikael
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Towards multidimensionality and flexibility in friction stir welding using an industrial robot system2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Soron, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Kalaykov, Ivan
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    A robot prototype for friction stir welding2006In: 2006 IEEE Conference on Robotics, Automation and Mechatronics, 2006, p. 1-5Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To apply industrial robots in friction stir welding (FSW) for difficult-to-weld materials and alloys has until recently been a proposed task. However, yet the laboratory experiments did not provide a feasible industrial application. We describe our approach to modify and provide an industrial robot with FS-welding capacity by modifying a standard industrial robot through replacing its sixth axis with FSW related equipment. The emphasis is on achieving reasonable welding speed and path complexity in 3D space. As significant force is needed for FSW and at the same time position precision has to be kept, the control problems become complicated. We demonstrate our first experiments, highlighting this problem and point some possible solutions

  • 5.
    Soron, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Kalaykov, Ivan
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Blending tool paths for G1-continuity in robotic friction stir welding2007In: Proceedings of the fourth international conference on informatics in control, automation and robotics, Robotics and automation 2, Angers, France, May 9-12, 2007 / [ed] Janan Zaytoon, Jean-Louis Ferrier, Juan Andrade-Cetto, Joaquim Filipe, 2007, p. 92-97Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In certain robot applications, path planning has to be viewed, not only from a motion perspective, but also from a process perspective. In 3-dimensional Friction StirWelding (FSW) a properly planned path is essential for the outcome of the process, even though different control loops compensate for various deviations. One such example is how sharp path intersection is handled, which is the emphasis in this paper. We propose a strategy based on Hermite and Bezier curves, by which G1 continuity is obtained. The blending operation includes an optimization strategy in order to avoid high second order derivatives of the blending polynomials, yet still to cover as much as possible of the original path.

  • 6.
    Soron, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Kalaykov, Ivan
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Blending tool paths for G1-continuity in robotic friction stir welding2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In certain robot applications, path planning has to be viewed, not only from a motion perspective, but also from a process perspective. In 3-dimensional Friction Stir Welding (FSW) a properly planned path is essential for the outcome of the process, even though different control loops compensate for various deviations. One such example is how sharp path intersection is handled, which is the emphasis in this paper. We propose a strategy based on Hermite and Bezier curves, by which G1 continuity is obtained. The blending operation includes an optimization strategy in order to avoid high second order derivatives of the blending polynomials, yet still to cover as much as possible of the original path.

  • 7.
    Soron, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Kalaykov, Ivan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Blending tool paths for G1-continuity in robotic friction stir welding2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In certain robot applications, path planning has to be viewed, not only from a motion perspective, but also from a process perspective. In 3-dimensional Friction Stir Welding (FSW) a properly planned path is essential for the outcome of the process, even though different control loops compensate for various deviations. One such example is how sharp path intersection is handled, which is the emphasis in this paper. We propose a strategy based on Hermite and Bezier curves, by which G1 continuity is obtained. The blending operation includes an optimization strategy in order to avoid high second order derivatives of the blending polynomials, yet still to cover as much as possible of the original path.

  • 8.
    Soron, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Kalaykov, Ivan
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Generation of continuous tool paths based on CAD models for friction stir welding in 3D2007In: Mediterranean conference on control and automation, MED '07 Athens, Greece, 2007, New York: IEEE , 2007, p. 1-5Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) in 3-dimensions, due to process constraints, requires an off-line programming approach. The creation of tool paths based on computer aided models for cutting, machining or traditional welding, exists in numerous of applications. But since FSW, until recently, have not been a 3-dimensional application, no proper solution for this process exists. In this paper we propose solutions on how to create FSW tool paths based on the geometric description of CAD models to auto create and export such to the executing control system. The emphasis is on extracting and evaluating the weldability of the defined segments in order to perform robust welding on complex weld seam geometries.

  • 9.
    Soron, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Kalaykov, Ivan
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Online path generation for robotic friction stir welding2006Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 9 of 9
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