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  • 1.
    Moreno Herrera, Lázaro
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Bilingualism and bilingual education in a complex context2010In: Language, Culture and Curriculum, ISSN 0790-8318, E-ISSN 1747-7573, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 235-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is based on results from a baseline study for an intended intervention project in bilingual-intercultural education in the Municipality of San Miguel Ixtahuacan, in the Department of San Marcos, Guatemala. To a great extent the article deals with issues of bilingual education from the perspective of social justice. It analyses further various components underpinning the attempts to develop a comprehensive bilingual and intercultural education in this specific context. The article is exploratory in character as it intends to develop lines of analysis useful in discussing challenges faced by bilingualism and multilingualism in contexts where factors involve are complex and of vary different nature. Central to the analysis is the assumption that historical factors and social justice have a key role in bilingual, and intercultural education.

  • 2.
    Moreno Herrera, Lázaro
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Re-thinking bilingualism: challenges of multilingualism and communication in classroom settings2010In: Language, Culture and Curriculum, ISSN 0790-8318, E-ISSN 1747-7573, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 171-171Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional discourse in research on bilingualism has been strongly challenged in recent years. In the past, the study of bilingualism often adopted a monolingual perspective and ideology. This bias implicitly regarded monolingualism as the ‘normal’ state, while bi- or multilingualism was treated as the exception to the rule. It failed to recognise and take account of the kind of dynamic negotiation of meaning which social interaction, in multilingual settings actually, entails. In addition, the monolingual perspective favoured a rigid view of languages as a collection of discrete and unchanging entities, a view which is increasingly contested by research revealing the multilingual and multimodal complexity of interaction and language use in multilingual settings. Research has started to attend much more closely to the communicative and socio-cultural dimensions of multilingual language use, particularly in school and classroom contexts. The term ‘bilingualism’ is used in this special issue, therefore, with a critical recognition of the history of the concept and of the new view of language use which it now represents. The papers collected in this special issue evolved from an international workshop conducted as part of the work of the research group KKOM-DS (Communication, Culture, and Multiplicity –Deaf Studies) at O¨ rebro University, Sweden. The workshop became a valuable forum for the analysis and discussion of the challenges currently presented by traditional approaches to bilingualism. It highlighted the need to develop better-informed methodologies with which to approach the complex issue of ultilingualism. The implications for school practices also became a focus for debate. We hope that the articles in this special issue will stimulate greater interest in these issues and will encourage the kind of research work which seems to us to be now urgently needed.

  • 3.
    Musk, Nigel
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wedin, ÅsaÖrebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Flerspråkighet, identitet och lärande: skola i ett föränderligt samhälle2010Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    A restricted curriculum for second language learners: a self-fulfilling teacher strategy?2010In: Language and Education, ISSN 0950-0782, E-ISSN 1747-7581, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 171-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this article is on relations between classroom interaction, curricular knowledge and student engagement in diverse classrooms. It is based on a study with ethnographic perspective in which two primary school classes in Sweden are followed for three years. The analysis draws on Halliday’s Systemic Functional Linguistics. The results indicate that language use in the classrooms is on a basic everyday level and that high teacher control results in low demanding tasks and low engagement among students. Interaction in the classrooms consists mainly of short talk-turns with fragmentised language, frequent repairs and interruptions while writing and reading consists of single words and short sentences. Although the classroom atmosphere is friendly and inclusive, second language students are denied necessary opportunities to develop curricular knowledge and Swedish at the advanced level they will need higher up in the school system. The restricted curriculum that these students are offered in school thus restricts their opportunities to school success. Thus, I argue for a more reflective and critical approach regarding language use in classrooms.

     

  • 5.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Att läsa och skriva på sitt andraspråk2010In: Flerspråkighet, identitet och lärande: skola i ett föränderligt samhälle / [ed] Nigel Musk, Åsa Wedin, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2010, 1, p. 173-192Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Bedöma eller döma?: Språkbedömning och lästest i grundskolans tidigare år2010In: Pedagogisk forskning i Sverige, ISSN 1401-6788, E-ISSN 2001-3345, Vol. 15, no 2/3, p. 219-231Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna artikel argumenteras för vikten av att språkbedömning och lästestning i grundskolans tidigare år ger en mer rättvisande bild av elevernas kunskaper och färdigheter. Med lästest som endast mäter läsning i en begränsad form, som en teknisk färdighet, riskerar man att missa elevers förmåga att använda skrift i andra sammanhang än i skolmiljö. Dessutom riskerar man att flerspråkiga elever i hög grad nedvärderas genom att inte ta hänsyn till deras flerspråkiga kompetens. Sett ur ett demokratiperspektiv bör alla elever ha rätt inte bara till en bedömning som är mer rättvisande, utan också till att själva få ta aktiv del i planering och genomförande av testning. Detta ställer stora krav på lärare som därför behöver ha tillräcklig kunskap både om barns och ungdomars språkutveckling och om bedömning. Av den anledningen är det viktigt att lärarutbildning och lärarfortbildning utformas så att möjligheter ges även för lärare mot skolans tidigare år att skaffa sig fördjupad kunskap.

  • 7.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Classroom interaction: Potential or problem? The Case of Karagwe2010In: International Journal of Educational Development, ISSN 0738-0593, E-ISSN 1873-4871, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 145-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses interactional patterns in classrooms in primary school in rural Tanzania, based on an ethnographic study on literacy practices. The paper argues that the official policy of Swahili-only in primary school, together with the huge gap between high expectations on educational outcome and lack of resources, have resulted in the creation of safety strategies among pupils and teachers. These safety strategies include interactional patterns that also constitute a hindrance for students’ learning. However, I claim that these interactional patterns could constitute a potential for educational development, if research findings from bilingual education were taken into account.

  • 8.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Klassrumsinteraktion i de tidiga skolåren: flerspråkiga elever i skolans språkliga vardag2011In: Nordic Studies in Education, ISSN 1891-5914, E-ISSN 1891-5949, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 210-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Classroom interaction is particularly important for those students who learn school knowledge in a second language. In this article two episodes of whole class teaching in pre-school and standard one are analyzed. The analysis shows the importance of making teachers aware of interactional patterns in classrooms. Although knowledge was presented clearly and concretely and teachers used routines that made norms explicit, inconsistencies in interactional patterns made the role of the teacher stand out as unclear. Whole class teaching of this type does not provide students with such linguistic and intellectual demands that are necessary for their language development.

  • 9.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Language attitudes and schooled education: the case of Karagwe2011In: North-south contributions to African languages / [ed] Christina Thornell, Karsten Legère, Köln: Rüdiger Köppe Verlag, 2011, p. 187-196Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper I argue that language policies for education have effects on pupils’ educational possibilities. With the case of Karagwe district inTanzania, the paper suggests that the policy of ‘Swahili only’ in primary school education inTanzaniafavors the small minority of the school children that live in a context where Swahili is used. This appears to lead to inequality in pupils’ chances in education and to a low level of achievement of academic content in schools. This also promotes the development and use of what I call safety strategies among teachers and pupils that hide failure and prevent pupils’ learning.

  • 10.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Language Attitudes and Schooled education: The Case of Karagwe2009Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper I argue that language policies for education have effects on pupils’ educational possibilities. With the case of Karagwe district in Tanzania, the paper suggests that the policy of ‘Swahili only’ in primary school education in Tanzania favors the small minority of the school children that live in a context where Swahili is used. This appears to lead to inequality in pupils’ chances in education and to a low level of achievement of academic content in schools. This also promotes the development and use of what I call safety strategies among teachers and pupils that hide failure and prevent pupils’ learning.

  • 11.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Language in rural primary schools in multilingual settings: the case of Karagwe in Tanzania2011In: Urban and rural schools: problems, solutions and progress / [ed] Danielle E. Lynch, Hauppauge, N.Y.: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2011, p. 165-180Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter discusses effects of monolingual educational policies in a multilingual setting, with the case of Karagwe in rural Tanzania as an example. The discussion is based on an ethnographic study on literacy practices carried out between 2000 and 2003. The results show that the policy of Swahili-only in primary school favors the minority of the children who are raised in a Swahili-speaking setting, while the far majority is not given a fair chance in school. The high pressure put on teachers and pupils due to both the huge gap between expectations and possible outcome and the authoritative system, has resulted in strategies used on classroom-level that constitute major obstacles for pupils’ learning. In the chapter is argued that new educational policies should be created that take the fact into account that pupils learn Swahili as a second language and that are based on relevant research on second language teaching and learning. Also the importance of policies being created inside Tanzania, without parroting western education, of policies giving room for teachers’ creativity and of adapting policies to local conditions, is pointed out.

  • 12.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Letters, authority and secrecy: the case of Karagwe in Tanzania2013In: Language and Education, ISSN 0950-0782, E-ISSN 1747-7581, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 44-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to show how letters, as a genre of literacy, are used in Karagwe in Tanzania, in relation to authority and secrecy. It is shown that literacy, in the form of letters, plays an important role in the negotiation of authority. Authorities as well as ordinary people use letters according to official norms to claim or manifest authority, while grassroots forms of literacy, dominated forms, are used to resist authorities. Through secret messages and letters people find opportunities to resist that are less dangerous than open rebellion, although the effects may be limited because of the secrecy. It is also shown how children are socialized into this pattern of secrecies through literacy as they are used as messengers. When delivering secret letters and messages, they may be said to exercise a passive voice through literacy.

  • 13.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Literacy in negotiating, constructing and manifesting identities: the case of migrant unaccompanied asylum-seeking children in Sweden2012In: Literacy practices in transition: perspectives from the Nordic countries / [ed] Anne Pitkänen-Huhta, Lars Holm, Bristol: Multilingual Matters, 2012, p. 54-74Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Monologen som en resurs i klassrummet2009In: Pedagogisk forskning i Sverige, ISSN 1401-6788, E-ISSN 2001-3345, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 241-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna artikel analyseras språkmönster i helklassundervisning i skolans tidigare år med fokus på andraspråkselever. Jag argumenterar i artikeln för monologens betydelse för elevernas språkutveckling samt för att mer kunskap behövs om den språkverklighet som andraspråkseleverna befinner sig i, i synnerhet vad gäller helklassinteraktion. Utgångspunkt för analysen tas i Hallidays Systemic Functional Linguistics. Den visade att läraren i detta fall använde sig av tydlighet och ett varierat språk, vilket är positivt för andraspråkseleverna. Eleverna gavs däremot inte utrymme för egen produktion av krävande språk vilket är viktigt för alla elevers språkutveckling, inte minst andraspråkseleverna. Dessutom gynnades elever med förmåga att ta för sig av talutrymmet vilket missgynnar tysta elever.

  • 15.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Monologen som resurs för språkutveckling i klassrummet i förskola och skola2009In: ASLAs skriftserie, ISSN 1100-5629, Vol. 22, p. 57-69Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna artikel diskuteras elevers utveckling av textuell kompetens i förskola och skolans tidigare år som särskilt betydelsefull för den tidiga skriftspråksutvecklingen. Artikeln bygger på en etnografiskt inriktad studie i år f–6 med fokus på andraspråkselever. I artikeln betonas vikten av att elever erbjuds tillfälle att möta och själva uttrycka längre sammanhängande tankar i tal och skrift. Vidare argumenteras för att satsning på elevers utveckling av läs- och skrivförmåga i de tidigare åren inte är tillräcklig utan att även den allmänna språkutvecklingen måste prioriteras. Detta gäller i synnerhet de elever som inte möter skolans språk utanför skolan.

  • 16.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Narration in Swedish pre- and primary school: a recourse for language development and multilingualism2010In: Language, Culture and Curriculum, ISSN 0790-8318, E-ISSN 1747-7573, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 219-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing number of children in Western countries are taught through a second language in school. Research mainly in Australia has shown the importance of developing knowledge-related language skills, academic school language, among all students through schooling. These language skills are necessary for success in different school-subjects later on in school. This is particularly important for L2-students who are less likely to meet this type of language outside school. In this article is argued that the development of academic school language needs to start already in pre- and primary school and that narration could provide necessary linguistic challenges and simultaneously including diversity in classrooms. By listening to stories, oral and written, and by getting opportunities to tell stories of different type, children exercise skills that are typical for academic school language.

  • 17.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Språkande i förskolan och grundskolans tidigare år2011 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Utveckling av tal och skriftspråk hos andraspråkselever i skolans tidigare år. 2011In: Didaktisk Tidskrift, ISSN 1101-7686, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 95-118Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna artikel analyseras tre elevers språk under åren f-3, en med enspråkigt svensk bakgrund och två med flerspråkig bakgrund. Materialet består av inspelade intervjuer och skrivna texter insamlade under en etnografiskt inriktad klassrumsstudie. Analysen är inriktad på textuell kompetens, det vill säga förmåga att föra ordet en längre stund och att uttrycka längre tankar och är genomförd med performansanalys som bas.

    Analysen visar att de två andraspråkselevernas språkliga nivå i svenska är mycket låg i slutet av år tre, i både tal och skrift. En trolig anledning till den låga skriftspråkliga kompetensen antas vara att undervisningen har skett på ett språk som eleverna inte behärskar i tillräckligt hög grad. Samtidigt kan den svaga skriftspråkskompetensen ha bidragit till den låga kompetensen även i talspråket. Genom att dessa elever har varit hänvisade till talet för sin språkutveckling, och detta har givit eleverna få tillfällen till att möta och själva producera längre tal, har inflöde och utflöde av sådant språk varit litet. Det visar att språkutvecklande arbetssätt som även innefattar talet, är av avgörande betydelse för elever som är sena i sin skriftspråksutveckling. Detta gäller särskilt andraspråkselever men även andra elever som inte möter det kunskapsrelaterade språket utanför skolan.

  • 19.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Vägar till svenskt skriftspråk för vuxna andraspråksinlärare2010 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
1 - 19 of 19
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