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  • 1.
    Arafat, Yeasin
    et al.
    Office of the President of the General Assembly United Nations, New York, USA.
    Hellström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Rashid, Jayedur
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Parameterized sensor model and an approach for measuring goodness of robotic maps2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Map building is a classical problem in mobile and au tonomous robotics, and sensor models is a way to interpret raw sensory information, especially for building maps. In this paper we propose a parameterized sensor model, and optimize map goodness with respect to these parameters. A new approach, measuring the goodness of maps without a handcrafted map of the actual environment is introduced and evaluated. Three different techniques; statistical anal ysis, derivative of images, and comparison of binary maps have been used as estimates of map goodness. The results show that the proposed sensor model generates better maps than a standard sensor model. However, the proposed ap proach of measuring goodness of maps does not improve the results as much as expected.

  • 2. Bordignon, Mirko
    et al.
    Rashid, Jayedur
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Seamless integration of robots and tiny embedded devices in a PEIS-ecology2007In: IEEE/RSJ international  conference on intelligent robots and systems, IROS 2007, New York: IEEE , 2007, p. 3101-3106Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fields of autonomous robotics and ambient intelligence are converging toward the vision of smart robotic environments, in which tasks are performed via the cooperation of many networked robotic devices. To enable this vision, we need a common communication and cooperation model that can be shared between robotic devices at different scales, ranging from standard mobile robots to tiny embedded devices. Unfortunately, today's robot middlewares are too heavy to run on tiny devices, and middlewares for embedded devices are too simple to support the cooperation models needed by an autonomous smart environment. In this paper, we propose a middleware model which allows the seamless integration of standard robots and simple off-the-shelf embedded devices. Our middleware is suitable for building truly ubiquitous robotics applications, in which devices of very different scales and capabilities can cooperate in a uniform way. We discuss the principles and implementation of our middleware, and show an experiment in which a mobile robot, a commercial mote, and a custom-built mote cooperate in a home service scenario.

  • 3.
    Rashid, Jayedur
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Towards the development of an ubiquitous networked robot systems for ambient assisted living2010In: 2010 IEEE international workshop on ubiquitous and mobile computing, IEEE conference proceedings, 2010, p. 359-366Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Robotic middlewares increasingly allow the seamless integration of multiple heterogeneous robots into one distributed system. With the inclusion of ambient intelligence and pervasive computing, very simple devices such as WSN motes mounted sensors and actuators, rfid-tag attached everyday objects or smart objects should also be considered as part of this incorporation. Humans should also be a part of this NRS since one of the main objectives of this integrated robot systems is to serve humans. We argue that this inclusion of motes like tiny sensoractuator devices, simple everyday objects and humans as part of the NRS brings many advantages when tasks are performed by cooperation. In order to achieve the goal, presenting all them in a robot middleware, my research (PhD) study has been started since Aug 2006. This paper represents our approach and achievement till today. In this study, models are inherited as well as proposed depending on the existing works. As the proof-ofconcept, an illustrative experiment demonstrates how tiny devices and everyday objects become part of a NRS by adapting the proposed/inherited techniques, during this study, and cooperate to perform complex tasks.

  • 4.
    Rashid, Jayedur
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Indirect reference: reconfiguring distributed sensors and actuators2010In: 2010 IEEE international conference on sensor networks, ubiquitous, and trustworthy computing: SUTC 2010, IEEE conference proceedings, 2010, p. 284-290Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many sensor networks have lately included actuation as an important property of the nodes. With the introduction of actuation, new requirements are posed on these nodes in terms of reconfiguration of collaboration patterns. The sensors/actuators are very often connected to various heterogeneous hardware that have a few KBs of memory, low processing power and communication range, such as WSN motes. Also, for many applications networks of small and simple sensor and actuator nodes need to cooperate with networked robotic devices, which leads to further requirements to enable collaboration between devices of different scales. In this networked robot and sensor/actuator infrastructure, tasks are performed by the cooperation of multiple devices. Dynamically changing availability of devices as well as changes of tasks lead to a need of reconfiguration of the devices at runtime. Therefore a mechanism should be available in the communication level, which affords reconfiguration ability to the sensor/actuator nodes as well as robots. In this article, a concept called indirect reference is proposed, which facilitates dynamic reconfiguration of sets of distributed devices. We describe here also an implementation of the concept on a ubiquitous robotic middleware, which offers seamless integration of robots and WSN motes like tiny embedded devices with an example.

  • 5.
    Rashid, Jayedur
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    A middleware to integrate robots, simple devices and everyday objects into an ambient ecology2012In: Pervasive and Mobile Computing, ISSN 1574-1192, E-ISSN 1873-1589, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 522-541Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fields of ambient intelligence, distributed robotics and wireless sensor networks are converging toward a common vision, in which ubiquitous sensing and acting devices cooperate to provide useful services in the home. These devices can range from sophisticated mobile robots to simple sensor nodes and even simpler tagged everyday objects. In this vision, a milkbox left on the table after the user has left the home could ask the service of a mobile robot to be placed back in the refrigerator. A missing ingredient to realize this vision is a mechanism that enables the communication and interoperation among such highly heterogeneous entities. In this paper, we propose such a mechanism in the form of a middleware able to integrate robots, tiny devices and augmented everyday objects into one and the same system. The key moves to cope with heterogeneity are: the definition of a tiny, compatible version of the middleware, that can run on small devices; and the concept of object proxy, used to make everyday object accessible within the middleware. We describe the concepts and implementation of our middleware, and show a number of experiments that illustrate its performance.

  • 6.
    Rashid, Jayedur
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Digital representation of everyday objects in a robot ecology via proxies2008In: IEEE/RSJ international conference on intelligent robots and systems, 2008, IROS 2008, 2008, p. 1908-1914Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Robotic middlewares increasingly allow the seamless integration of multiple heterogeneous robots into one distributed system. Unfortunately, very simple devices like tagged everyday objects and smart objects are left orphan in this otherwise pervasive trend. We claim that the inclusion of simple everyday objects as part of distributed robot systems would have many advantages, and propose a design pattern to allow this inclusion. We make this pattern concrete by describing an implementation of it using a specific multi-robot middleware, called PEIS-Ecology Middleware. We also show an illustrative experiment which integrates everyday objects in a smart home equipped with mobile robots as well as more advanced distributed sensor nodes.

  • 7.
    Rashid, Md. Jayedur
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Extending a networked robot system to include humans, tiny devices, and everyday objects2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In networked robot systems (NRS), robots and robotic devices are distributed in the environment; typically tasks are performed by cooperation and coordination of such multiple networked components. NRS offer advantages over monolithic systems in terms of modularity, flexibility and cost effectiveness, and they are thus becoming a mainstream approach to the inclusion of robotic solutions in everyday environments.

    The components of a NRS are usually robots and sensors equipped with rich computational and communication facilities. In this thesis, we argue that the capabilities of a NRS would greatly increase if it could also accommodate among its nodes simpler entities, like small ubiquitous sensing and actuation devices, home appliances, or augmented everyday objects. For instance, a domestic robot needs to manipulate food items and interact with appliances. Such a robot would benefit from the ability to exchange information with those items and appliances in a direct way, in the same way as with other networked robots and sensors.

    Combining such highly heterogeneous devices inside one NRS is challenging, and one of the major challenges is to provide a common communication and collaboration infrastructure. In the field of NRS, this infrastructure is commonly provided by a shared middleware. Unfortunately, current middlewares lack the generality needed to allow heterogeneous entities such as robots, simple ubiquitous devices and everyday objects to coexist in the same system.

    In this thesis we show how an existing middleware for NRS can be extended to include three new types of “citizens” in the system, on peer with the other robots. First, we include computationally simple embedded devices, like ubiquitous sensors and actuators, by creating a fully compatible tiny version of the existing robotic middleware. Second, we include augmented everyday objects or home appliances which are unable to run the middleware on board, by proposing a generic design pattern based on the notion of object proxy. Finally,we go one step further and include humans as nodes in the NRS by defining the notion of human proxy. While there exist a few other NRS which are able to include both robots and simple embedded devices in the same system, the use of proxies to include everyday objects and humans in a generic way is a unique feature of this work.

    In order to verify and validate the above concepts, we have implemented them in the Peis-Ecology NRS model. We report a number of experiments based on this implementation, which provide both quantitative and qualitative evaluations of its performance, reliability, and interoperability.

  • 8.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Broxvall, Mathias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Gritti, Marco
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    LeBlanc, Kevin
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Lundh, Robert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Rashid, Jayedur
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Seo, Beom-Su
    Cho, Young-Jo
    The PEIS-ecology project: vision and results2008In: IEEE/RSJ international conference on intelligent robots and systems, IROS 2008, New York: IEEE , 2008, p. 2329-2335Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The vision of an Ecology of Physically Embedded Intelligent Systems, or PEIS-Ecology, combines insights from the fields of autonomous robotics and ambient intelligence to provide a new approach to building robotic systems in the service of people. In this paper, we present this vision, and we report the results of a four-year collaborative research project between Sweden and Korea aimed at the concrete realization of this vision. We focus in particular on three results: a robotic middleware able to cope with highly heterogeneous systems; a technique for autonomous self-configuration and re-configuration; and a study of the problem of sharing information of both physical and digital nature.

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