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  • 1.
    Nordin, Erika
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Maten är serverad: en syn- och smalupplevelse: en betraktelse ur kockens perspektiv2005In: Hörsel och lyssnande: ett seminarium om människans hörselsinne, dess funktion och betydelse, januari 2004 / [ed] Lisbeth Axelsson, Örebro: Örebro universitetsbibliotek , 2005, p. 71-87Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Nordin, Erika
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Matlagning och kemi ur ett måltidskunskapsperspektiv2004In: Tid för måltidskunskap: En vänbok till Birgitta Ulmander, Örebro: Örebro universitet , 2004, p. 195-206Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Nordin, Erika
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Måltidens betydelse för folkhälsan: påverkas våra smakpreferenser av klasstillhörighet?2002In: Vård, ISSN 0281-921X, no 4, p. 61-64Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Rapp, Erika
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Öström, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Food and context: the essence of a good meal and a potential model for promoting healthManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Rapp, Erika
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Öström, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Association of gender, body mass index (BMI), eating habits, and attitudes in a middle-aged Swedish populationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Rapp [Nordin], Erika
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Anvisningar för inlämningsuppgifter, PM, rapporter och uppsatser2007Other (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Rapp [Nordin], Erika
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Application of the meal environment as a tool to improve health?2008In: Journal of Foodservice, E-ISSN 1748-0159, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 80-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper was to look into meal experiences with a focus on acceptance and satisfaction in institutional eating locations, primarily in the caring sector. The situation and the context have the ability to influence the acceptability of a meal, as well as the amount eaten. Context factors can be at least important in determining acceptance of food and beverage as sensory factors. Variables such as location, physical and social environment, expectations, description of foods and choice can have an impact on the acceptance of a meal. In addition, proper response to guests' needs and requests can lead to satisfaction. Improvement of the atmosphere in the eating location during the meal has been shown to be a meaningful way to stabilize health and nutritional status, as well as having an impact on the energy intake in patients. When the food and beverage meets certain expectations, the room and the meeting can enhance the atmosphere, and therefore the entire quality of the meal experience.

  • 8.
    Rapp [Nordin], Erika
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Att njuta sig sjuk, att äta sig frisk: smakens betydelse för hälsan2008In: Smaksinnet och den goda smaken: ett seminarium om människans smaksinne : [januari 2005] / [ed] Marieanne Alsne, Inga-Britt Gustafsson, Örebro: Örebro universitet , 2008, p. 65-73Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Rapp [Nordin], Erika
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Den goda måltiden: en kategorisering med FAMM som analysverktyg2007In: Den medvetna måltidskunskapen: en vänbok till Inga-Britt Gustafsson / [ed] Richard Tellström, Lena Mossberg, Inger M. Jonsson, Örebro: Universitetsbiblioteket , 2007, p. 171-181Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Rapp [Nordin], Erika
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Sensory, attitudinal, and contextual aspects of the meal: health implications and connections with risk factors for coronary heart disease and obesity2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim was to study risk factors for obesity and coronary heart disease (CHD), in relation to food and meals. A case-control study of people diagnosed with CHD was used to evaluate preferences for full-fat versus low-fat versions of a range of foods, along with basic taste sensitivity and sensitivity to the bitter substance PROP. No significant differences in taste perception were obtained between the groups. However, in the pooled sample, a heightened sensitivity to sour taste was correlated with low BMI, while a heightened sensitiv-ity to bitter taste was correlated with low HDL-cholesterol, and high BMI and abdominal fat. This indicates a relationship between risk profile, taste sensitivity and food intake. Heightened sensitivity to bitter taste might result in lower consumption of fruit and vegeta-bles including those with a bitter tone. Preference related to total fat content per se was not confirmed as a risk factor for CHD. However, a less favourable metabolic profile were seen in the CHD group, indicating a higher intake of fat-rich and energy-rich food. The sensory effects of fat content were also evaluated, using two sauces as the vehicle. Overall, increased butter content resulted in decreased perception of all flavours except butter flavour, which increased, as did viscosity. However, a high fat content could not always be justified in terms of taste; large increases in energy content produced only small sensory differences.

    Data were also collected through a survey on eating habits and attitudes to health and food consumption. A cluster analysis revealed the existence of a gender-mixed overweight group, with less healthy eating habits. This group seems to consist of women less interested in health and men more interested in getting pleasure from food than general, demonstrating different reasons for unhealthy eating between genders. The essence of a good meal was found to include a number of demands on both food (a restaurant-type meal, a proper meal, sensory experience, satisfying and nourishing, and primary product quality) and context (spirit of community, aesthetic experience, tranquillity, and frame of mind), which might be relevant to the goal of changing people’s eating habits. Additionally, a deeper understanding was gained about meal experiences, with a focus on acceptance and satisfaction in relation to health outcome. Overall, the present findings could be of interest in health promotion and intervention when identifying individuals’ opportunities for and requirements of good meals, starting with one’s own familiar taste and context.

    List of papers
    1. The sensory effect of butter in culinary sacues
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The sensory effect of butter in culinary sacues
    2007 (English)In: Journal of Foodservice, E-ISSN 1748-0159, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 31-42Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A common belief is that when butter is added to food, a more desired flavour develops and that other flavours are enhanced. The aim of this study was to investigate how different amounts of added butter affected the perceived sensory characteristics of tomato sauce and chicken velouté using sensory analysis. In addition, a preference test was performed for tomato sauce. As more butter was added, the intensity of butter flavour and the viscosity increased, and the other flavour, aroma and taste attributes tested were perceived as being less intense in varying magnitudes. No significant difference was obtained in the preference study, except liking of the appearance among the men who preferred the sauce containing less butter. The results show that a large amount of butter is not always essential, unless it is the flavour and aroma of butter itself that is sought, or if it is necessary to balance the flavour, taste and texture attributes. These results could have a positive health effect for consumers if the use of fat in restaurant kitchens is reduced.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Blackwell Publishing, 2007
    Keywords
    Butter, dietary fat, energy content, flavour, sauce, sensory evaluation
    National Category
    Nutrition and Dietetics
    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3002 (URN)10.1111/j.1745-4506.2007.00044.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-10-07 Created: 2008-10-07 Last updated: 2019-03-25Bibliographically approved
    2. Preference for full-fat over low-fat foods among individuals suffering from coronary heart disease and healthy controls
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preference for full-fat over low-fat foods among individuals suffering from coronary heart disease and healthy controls
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: Physiology and Behavior, ISSN 0031-9384, E-ISSN 1873-507X, Vol. 98, no 4, p. 489-497Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Dietary behaviour can modify the risks for coronary heart disease (CHD). Dietary fat contributes to the sensory characteristics of many foods, but there are individual differences in liking for regular and reduced fat products. Preference for dietary fat might differ between healthy individuals and those of diagnosed CHD status. Preference for full-fat versus low-fat foods was assessed in a group suffering from CHD (N = 24) and a healthy control group (N = 41). Preferences were evaluated using a series of paired preference tests including 34 food pairs. Further, patterns across fat preference and a range of known risk factors for CHD were examined. The study was conducted in Sweden; March 2004 until May 2006. Overall the full-fat food items were preferred to the low-fat alternatives by both patients and control participants. The pattern of preference responses diverged significantly between patients and controls on only four of the 34 food items, in both directions, why preference related to total fat content per se is not confirmed as differentiating significantly between a group diagnosed with CHD compared to a healthy control group.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2009
    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-9002 (URN)10.1016/j.physbeh.2009.08.001 (DOI)000271358600017 ()19682474 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-70149085385 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2008-10-07 Created: 2008-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    3. Taste perception: an underlying risk factor for coronary heart disease?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Taste perception: an underlying risk factor for coronary heart disease?
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-15592 (URN)
    Available from: 2011-05-17 Created: 2011-05-17 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
    4. Association of gender, body mass index (BMI), eating habits, and attitudes in a middle-aged Swedish population
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association of gender, body mass index (BMI), eating habits, and attitudes in a middle-aged Swedish population
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-15593 (URN)
    Available from: 2011-05-17 Created: 2011-05-17 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
    5. Food and context: the essence of a good meal and a potential model for promoting health
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Food and context: the essence of a good meal and a potential model for promoting health
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-15594 (URN)
    Available from: 2011-05-17 Created: 2011-05-17 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
    6. Application of the meal environment as a tool to improve health?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Application of the meal environment as a tool to improve health?
    2008 (English)In: Journal of Foodservice, E-ISSN 1748-0159, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 80-86Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper was to look into meal experiences with a focus on acceptance and satisfaction in institutional eating locations, primarily in the caring sector. The situation and the context have the ability to influence the acceptability of a meal, as well as the amount eaten. Context factors can be at least important in determining acceptance of food and beverage as sensory factors. Variables such as location, physical and social environment, expectations, description of foods and choice can have an impact on the acceptance of a meal. In addition, proper response to guests' needs and requests can lead to satisfaction. Improvement of the atmosphere in the eating location during the meal has been shown to be a meaningful way to stabilize health and nutritional status, as well as having an impact on the energy intake in patients. When the food and beverage meets certain expectations, the room and the meeting can enhance the atmosphere, and therefore the entire quality of the meal experience.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Malden, Mass.: Blackwell Publishing, 2008
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3007 (URN)10.1111/j.1745-4506.2007.00084.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-10-07 Created: 2008-10-07 Last updated: 2019-03-25Bibliographically approved
  • 11.
    Rapp [Nordin], Erika
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Smakupplevelse: en riskindikator för övervikt och hjärtkärlsjukdom2008In: Gastronomiska forskning / [ed] Christina Fjellström, Stockholm: Gastonomiska akademien , 2008, p. 181-190Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Rapp [Nordin], Erika
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Öström, Åsa
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Bosander, Fredrik
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    The sensory effect of butter in culinary sacues2007In: Journal of Foodservice, E-ISSN 1748-0159, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 31-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common belief is that when butter is added to food, a more desired flavour develops and that other flavours are enhanced. The aim of this study was to investigate how different amounts of added butter affected the perceived sensory characteristics of tomato sauce and chicken velouté using sensory analysis. In addition, a preference test was performed for tomato sauce. As more butter was added, the intensity of butter flavour and the viscosity increased, and the other flavour, aroma and taste attributes tested were perceived as being less intense in varying magnitudes. No significant difference was obtained in the preference study, except liking of the appearance among the men who preferred the sauce containing less butter. The results show that a large amount of butter is not always essential, unless it is the flavour and aroma of butter itself that is sought, or if it is necessary to balance the flavour, taste and texture attributes. These results could have a positive health effect for consumers if the use of fat in restaurant kitchens is reduced.

  • 13.
    Rapp [Nordin], Erika
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Öström, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Osika, Walter
    Englund, Anders
    Annett, Judith
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Preference for full-fat over low-fat foods among individuals suffering from coronary heart disease and healthy controls2009In: Physiology and Behavior, ISSN 0031-9384, E-ISSN 1873-507X, Vol. 98, no 4, p. 489-497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dietary behaviour can modify the risks for coronary heart disease (CHD). Dietary fat contributes to the sensory characteristics of many foods, but there are individual differences in liking for regular and reduced fat products. Preference for dietary fat might differ between healthy individuals and those of diagnosed CHD status. Preference for full-fat versus low-fat foods was assessed in a group suffering from CHD (N = 24) and a healthy control group (N = 41). Preferences were evaluated using a series of paired preference tests including 34 food pairs. Further, patterns across fat preference and a range of known risk factors for CHD were examined. The study was conducted in Sweden; March 2004 until May 2006. Overall the full-fat food items were preferred to the low-fat alternatives by both patients and control participants. The pattern of preference responses diverged significantly between patients and controls on only four of the 34 food items, in both directions, why preference related to total fat content per se is not confirmed as differentiating significantly between a group diagnosed with CHD compared to a healthy control group.

  • 14.
    Öström, Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Rapp [Nordin], Erika
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Prim, Mia
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    FAMM: from food to meal research on the product aspect of the meal experience2008In: Journal of foodservice, ISSN 1748-0140, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 63-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Five Aspect Meal Model (FAMM) has been widely used at the Institution of Restaurant and Culinary Arts, Örebro University, Sweden, not only for developing meal services in restaurants but also for formulating research questions. The aim of the present paper was to highlight research projects focused on the product aspect of FAMM. Important research fields are the sensory quality of food and meal, and the responsibility of the restaurants and their contribution to a better welfare. Meal service, including ready meals, is a growing sector within the food industry, with important research questions concerning consumers' needs and wishes. To further develop the research on Culinary Arts and Meals Science discipline, a broad perspective on the meal is useful. Research questions based upon FAMM, where the entirety of the meal is studied, present an interesting challenge for the future.

1 - 14 of 14
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  • harvard1
  • ieee
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