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  • 1.
    Ahlgren, Mia
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Att äta med ögonen2007In: Att se, tänka och tolka: dokumentation av seminarium om människans synsinne / [ed] Birgitta Borg, Örebro: Örebro universitet , 2007, p. 65-66Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Ahlgren, Mia
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Färdigmat: en njutbar upplevelse?2002In: SIK-nyttigt : information till SIKs medlemsföretag, ISSN 1103-1174, no 2, p. 3-3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Ahlgren, Mia
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Upplevelsen av en färdig måltid2007In: Den medvetna måltidskunskapen: en vänbok till Inga-Britt Gustavsson / [ed] Richard Tellström, Lena Mossberg, Inger M. Jonsson, Örebro: Örebro universitet , 2007, p. 11-16Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Ahlgren, Mia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Hall, G.
    SIK.
    Situational influences on the consumption of ready meals2003In: Culinary arts and sciences IV: global and national perspectives / [ed] John S. A. Edwards, Inga-Britt Gustafsson, Bournemouth: Worshipful Company of Cooks Reserach Centre at Bournemouth University, UK , 2003, p. 192-192Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Ahlgren, Mia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Hall, Gunnar
    Consumers' demands when purchasing ready meals for others and for themselves2005In: Culinary arts and sciences V: global and national perspectives / [ed] J.S.A. Edwards, B. Kowrygo, K. Rejman, Bournemouth: The Worshipful Company of Cooks Research Centre at Bornemouth University , 2005, p. 509-517Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Ahlgren, Mia K.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Ready meal consumption - when, where, why and by whom?2004Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Ahlgren, Mia K.
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts. SIK AB, Göteborg, Sweden; Institutionen för restaurang- och måltidskunskap, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Hall, Gunnar
    The impact of the meal situation on the consumption of ready meals2005In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 485-492Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The context in which a meal is eaten is known to affect intake and choice of food. The purpose of this study was to investigate in what typical situations ready meals are consumed and if consumer demands vary according to different situations. With a market survey four typical ready meal eating situations were identified, and the respondent's ready meal consumption was shown to be affected by situational factors. In the different eating situations there were dissimilar reasons for consumption. Two ready meal eating situations were investigated in greater detail in order to establish what triggered the ready meal consumption in these situations. One of these meal situations proved to be convenience driven and the other time driven. A situation-oriented approach is suggested for further ready meal product development.

  • 8.
    Prim, Mia
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Ready meals from the consumers' perspective: attitudes, beliefs, contexts and appropriateness2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis was to gain a deeper understanding of ready meal consumers and their demands regarding ready meal products in different situations. Data were gathered with one extensive postal survey and five focus group discussions. The aim of the survey was to investigate the beliefs held about ready meal consumers, identify typical ready meal situations, assess the aims of eating ready meals in these meal situations and, finally, to identify demands regarding ready meals in the purchase situation. The results of the survey showed that the image of the frequent ready meal consumer was a person alone and stressed. The ready meal-consuming respondents confirmed this image when they were in actual situations eating ready meals but not in general. Four common ready meal-eating situations were identified. Ready meals were eaten most frequently as lunch at work and dinner at home. The social context in these situations was found to differ and to affect the activities performed. Ready meals for lunch at work were commonly eaten with colleagues and then discussing was a normal activity. For dinner at home ready meals were usually eaten alone watching TV. The reasons why ready meals were chosen as meal solutions differed. Ready meals suitable for lunch at work should be time-saving and for dinner at home the main demand was that the products should be convenient in order to avoid cooking. Purchaser demands regarding ready meals were found to be influenced by the gender of the purchaser and the intended end-consumer. Female ready meal purchasers were more demanding buyers than males, especially concerning health aspects. The aim of the focus groups was to explore consumers' reasons regarding the choice of ready meals for dinner and to find out how ready meals suit their needs. Ready meals were not regarded as being very appropriate for dinner at home. The social setting of the dinner was one of the most important aspects affecting the choice of what to eat. For ready meals to be suitable for dinner use they should be dishes out of the ordinary with more taste. This thesis has demonstrated that the context of meals affects the entire ready meal choice process and that there is a need to broaden the research perspective beyond the meal. The entire food provisioning process needs to be taken into account.

    List of papers
    1. Attitudes and beliefs directed towards ready-meal consumption
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attitudes and beliefs directed towards ready-meal consumption
    2004 (English)In: Food Service Technology, ISSN 1471-5732, E-ISSN 1471-5740, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 159-169Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Our food choice is dependent upon our beliefs about both the products and those who consume them. In this study beliefs about the prototypical attributes of ready meal consumers have been investigated to establish which beliefs exist and whether they have any actual basis when compared with self-reported behaviours of ready meal consumers. In a survey, respondents described what they considered to be common attributes of ready meal consumers. Some of these attributes were supported by the data provided by the ready meal consuming respondents, while many were not. Most interesting was the fact that two frequently mentioned attributes, being alone and no interest in cooking or food, were confirmed by the ready meal consuming respondents in the actual eating situation but not by their life-style and beliefs in general. The results support the call for more situation-oriented food research.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Oxford: Blackwell Science, 2004
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-2847 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-5740.2004.00102.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-11-02 Created: 2007-11-02 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    2. The impact of the meal situation on the consumption of ready meals
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of the meal situation on the consumption of ready meals
    2005 (English)In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 485-492Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The context in which a meal is eaten is known to affect intake and choice of food. The purpose of this study was to investigate in what typical situations ready meals are consumed and if consumer demands vary according to different situations. With a market survey four typical ready meal eating situations were identified, and the respondent's ready meal consumption was shown to be affected by situational factors. In the different eating situations there were dissimilar reasons for consumption. Two ready meal eating situations were investigated in greater detail in order to establish what triggered the ready meal consumption in these situations. One of these meal situations proved to be convenience driven and the other time driven. A situation-oriented approach is suggested for further ready meal product development.

    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-2848 (URN)10.1111/j.1470-6431.2005.00416.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-11-02 Created: 2007-11-02 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Buyers’ demands for ready meals: influenced by gender and who will eat them
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Buyers’ demands for ready meals: influenced by gender and who will eat them
    2006 (English)In: Journal of Foodservice, ISSN 1748-0140, Vol. 17, no 5-6, p. 205-211Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The ready-meal market in Sweden is increasing rapidly, and in the last 10 years has nearly doubled. The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of the demand buyers have for ready meals, both when buying for themselves and for others. A postal survey was completed by 249 residents of Gothenburg, Sweden. Results show that the demand when buying ready meals is dependent on both gender and whether or not the buyer is the end consumer. In general, the buyers' demands for sensory and convenience aspects were the most important. Female respondents were more demanding buyers than males, and their priorities were different. The implications of the findings are that foodservice operators and producers of ready meals must pay attention to the different demands of buyers, their gender and who will be the end consumer.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2006
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-2849 (URN)10.1111/j.1745-4506.2006.00038.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-11-02 Created: 2007-11-02 Last updated: 2018-02-12Bibliographically approved
    4. The appropriateness of ready meals for dinner
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The appropriateness of ready meals for dinner
    2007 (English)In: Journal of Foodservice, ISSN 1748-0140, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 238-250Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Different meal contexts call for different meal solutions. With the aim of understanding how people reason when choosing what to eat for dinner and how ready meal solutions fit their demands in this meal situation, a focus group study was conducted. Although there is an image of the ideal dinner as being cooked and eaten together with the family, this often conflicts with reality and scarcity of time. The social setting was shown to be of utmost importance in the choice of cooking, place to eat and actual meal. Suggestions were given on how to improve the appropriateness of ready meals for consumption at dinner

    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-2850 (URN)10.1111/j.1745-4506.2007.00070.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-11-02 Created: 2007-11-02 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
  • 9.
    Prim, Mia
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Hall, Gunnar
    The appropriateness of ready meals for dinner2007In: Journal of Foodservice, ISSN 1748-0140, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 238-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Different meal contexts call for different meal solutions. With the aim of understanding how people reason when choosing what to eat for dinner and how ready meal solutions fit their demands in this meal situation, a focus group study was conducted. Although there is an image of the ideal dinner as being cooked and eaten together with the family, this often conflicts with reality and scarcity of time. The social setting was shown to be of utmost importance in the choice of cooking, place to eat and actual meal. Suggestions were given on how to improve the appropriateness of ready meals for consumption at dinner

  • 10.
    Öström, Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Rapp [Nordin], Erika
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Prim, Mia
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    FAMM: from food to meal research on the product aspect of the meal experience2008In: Journal of foodservice, ISSN 1748-0140, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 63-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Five Aspect Meal Model (FAMM) has been widely used at the Institution of Restaurant and Culinary Arts, Örebro University, Sweden, not only for developing meal services in restaurants but also for formulating research questions. The aim of the present paper was to highlight research projects focused on the product aspect of FAMM. Important research fields are the sensory quality of food and meal, and the responsibility of the restaurants and their contribution to a better welfare. Meal service, including ready meals, is a growing sector within the food industry, with important research questions concerning consumers' needs and wishes. To further develop the research on Culinary Arts and Meals Science discipline, a broad perspective on the meal is useful. Research questions based upon FAMM, where the entirety of the meal is studied, present an interesting challenge for the future.

1 - 10 of 10
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  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
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