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  • 1.
    Ericson, Helena
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    A Salutogenic perspective on resistance training: a study on healthy old adult women2018Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of people aged 60 years and over has doubled since 1980and the World Health Organization predicts that the population of over60s will reach 2 billion by the year 2050. An ageing population poses bothchallenges and opportunities for society and for individuals. Whilst theseare positive statements, increases in life spans do not directly lead to increasesin health spans. The naturally occurring ageing process can leadto reductions in functionality and, in order to address this, scholars haveargued the benefits of regularly engaging in physical activity, and especiallyresistance training. Therefore, an important challenge for modernsociety is to develop strategies that delay the onset of disease, such as interventionsthat include physical activity. This licentiate thesis investigatesolder women’s physical activity in a resistance training context and howthis affects different aspects of their health.The overall aim of the thesis is to explore healthy and physically activeolder women’s experiences of what maintains and enhances their healthafter starting resistance training.This thesis used a quantitative and a qualitative approach to investigatea group of old adult women. Data collection was structured in questionnaires(n=32) with one intervention group and one control group for thepaper I, and focus group interviews (n=14) in paper II. Paper I studied theeffects of resistance training on physically active and healthy olderwomen. Paper II relates to the women who continued to exercise after theresistance training intervention ended in order to explore their health resources.The theoretical framework used in this thesis is a movement towardshealth as explained by salutogenic theory.This thesis showed that resistance training has positive effects on psychologicalwell-being and is important because it not only benefits thosewho are physically inactive, but also those who are already physically activeand healthy.From a salutogenic perspective, physical activity provides a meaningful,comprehensible and manageable way for older women to engage in theongoing process of maintaining health.

    List of papers
    1. Resistance training is linked to heightened positive motivational state and lower negative affect among healthy women aged 65–70
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Resistance training is linked to heightened positive motivational state and lower negative affect among healthy women aged 65–70
    2018 (English)In: Journal of Women & Aging, ISSN 0895-2841, E-ISSN 1540-7322, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 366-381Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Resistance training (RT) improves overall health, but the psychological effects of RT in healthy old adults have not been tested. The aim of this study was to investigate a sample of 65–70-year-old healthy and physically active women to assess their sense of coherence, health-related quality of life, hope, and affect, before and after taking part in a 24-week RT intervention (N = 14), compared to controls (N = 18). Findings showed a significant increase in hope (p = 0.013) and a significant decrease in negative affect (p = 0.002). Starting RT after age 65 does not appear to negatively impact on women’s psychological health but seems to be associated with important psychological health benefits.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Taylor & Francis, 2018
    Keywords
    Healthy aging, hope, negative affect, psychological outcomes, resistance training
    National Category
    Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Geriatrics
    Research subject
    Sports Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-57052 (URN)10.1080/08952841.2017.1301720 (DOI)000443902100002 ()28375777 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85017094736 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2017-04-12 Created: 2017-04-12 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
    2. Health resources, ageing and physical activity: a study of physically active women aged 69–75 years
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health resources, ageing and physical activity: a study of physically active women aged 69–75 years
    2018 (English)In: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, ISSN 2159-676X, E-ISSN 2159-6778, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 206-222Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Most studies on issues relating to ageing, physical activity and health are based on an understanding of what causes illness, rather than what promotes health. The health benefits of physical activity relate to questions about how to avoid physical inactivity and overcoming barriers to participating in physical activity, rather than why older people continue to be physically active. The aim of this study was to explore health resources in relation to physical activity, especially resistance training, that physically active women between the ages of 69–75 years characterise as important for the maintenance of health. In order to investigate these health resources, the study drew on salutogenic theory and the concept of sense of coherence. The analysed data came from interviews with 14 physically active Swedish women aged 69–75 years who had previously taken part in a resistance training intervention, but who also had continued to engage in physical activity and resistance training when the intervention ended. We identified seven health resources, social relations and care, positive energy, self-worth, capability in and about physical activity, the habit of exercising, identity as an exercising person and womanhood related to physical activity, in this case resistance training, that physically active women aged between 69 and 75 years characterised as important for maintaining their health. In conclusion, physical activity carried out in a stable group of peers provided a meaningful, comprehensible and manageable way for these older women to engage in the on-going process of maintaining health.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Routledge, 2018
    Keywords
    Health resources, exercise, resistance training, salutogenesis, older adults
    National Category
    Sport and Fitness Sciences
    Research subject
    Sports Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-61946 (URN)10.1080/2159676X.2017.1393453 (DOI)000431127700005 ()2-s2.0-85031919728 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2017-10-24 Created: 2017-10-24 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
  • 2.
    Ericson, Helena
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Skoog, Therése
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Mattias
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Health resources, ageing and physical activity: a study of physically active women aged 69–75 years2018In: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, ISSN 2159-676X, E-ISSN 2159-6778, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 206-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most studies on issues relating to ageing, physical activity and health are based on an understanding of what causes illness, rather than what promotes health. The health benefits of physical activity relate to questions about how to avoid physical inactivity and overcoming barriers to participating in physical activity, rather than why older people continue to be physically active. The aim of this study was to explore health resources in relation to physical activity, especially resistance training, that physically active women between the ages of 69–75 years characterise as important for the maintenance of health. In order to investigate these health resources, the study drew on salutogenic theory and the concept of sense of coherence. The analysed data came from interviews with 14 physically active Swedish women aged 69–75 years who had previously taken part in a resistance training intervention, but who also had continued to engage in physical activity and resistance training when the intervention ended. We identified seven health resources, social relations and care, positive energy, self-worth, capability in and about physical activity, the habit of exercising, identity as an exercising person and womanhood related to physical activity, in this case resistance training, that physically active women aged between 69 and 75 years characterised as important for maintaining their health. In conclusion, physical activity carried out in a stable group of peers provided a meaningful, comprehensible and manageable way for these older women to engage in the on-going process of maintaining health.

  • 3.
    Ericson, Helena
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Skoog, Therése
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Johansson, Mattias
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Wåhlin-Larsson, Britta
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Resistance training is linked to heightened positive motivational state and lower negative affect among healthy women aged 65–702016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Ericson, Helena
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Skoog, Therése
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Mattias
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Wåhlin-Larsson, Britta
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Resistance training is linked to heightened positive motivational state and lower negative affect among healthy women aged 65–702018In: Journal of Women & Aging, ISSN 0895-2841, E-ISSN 1540-7322, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 366-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resistance training (RT) improves overall health, but the psychological effects of RT in healthy old adults have not been tested. The aim of this study was to investigate a sample of 65–70-year-old healthy and physically active women to assess their sense of coherence, health-related quality of life, hope, and affect, before and after taking part in a 24-week RT intervention (N = 14), compared to controls (N = 18). Findings showed a significant increase in hope (p = 0.013) and a significant decrease in negative affect (p = 0.002). Starting RT after age 65 does not appear to negatively impact on women’s psychological health but seems to be associated with important psychological health benefits.

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  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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