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  • 1.
    Aramo-Immonen, Heli
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Carlborg, Per
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Hasche, Nina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Kask, Johan
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Linton, Gabriel
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Nykvist, Rasmus
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Shahin Moghadam, Sarah
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Jussila, Jari J.
    Jyväskylä University, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Mustafee, Navonil
    University of Exeter Business School, Exeter, United Kingdom.
    Shams, Tawfiq
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Clustering the imp thought: searching roots and diversities in imp research2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMP research is often treated as an empirical perspective describing complexities of repeated business-to-business exchanges and their embeddedness. While building on some common understandings and concepts, this paper asks: How homogeneous is the IMP research? This paper uses cluster analysis to capture the roots and various sub-groups of IMP research as means to depict the question of homogeneity (i.e. a core focus in the research) or heterogeneity (i.e. using references from other fields or specific to sub-fields) of the IMP thought. In this scientific work in progress paper we introduce how we design to use bibliographical methods in order to harvest data from an extensive amount of IMP-related articles written from the 1970’s onwards. In this first attempt to reveal IMP we used overall 294 articles yielded to 10,615 co-citation relationships. A threshold of minimum number of citations of a cited reference was set to five (5) to capture such references that have been cited in multiple publications. We introduce visual mapping of defined subject area clusters and as an example we describe shortly clusters. Perhaps not surprisingly our findings suggest that IMP research is not so homogenous, with at least four clear clusters of IMP-research each utilizing different key references.

  • 2.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Stockholm Business School, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholm Business School, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fashion weeks - Engagement concentration or spill over?2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore the interplay between social media, fashion weeks and the degree to which participating and non-participating brands enjoy engagement of social media users.

    Design/methodology/approach: A material of 4424 user-generated content published before, during and after Fashion Week Stockholm in February 2016 were collected and analysed.

    Findings: The presented results show that the studied fashion week both concentrates engagement for participating brands but also creates spillover engagement to non-participating brands.

    Research limitations/implications: Because of the specific characteristics of the Swedish fashion industry and the Swedish media landscape, empirical illustrations from fashion weeks in other fashion cities would be valuable to verify the presented findings.

    Practical implications: As participating brands enjoy an increased level of engagement during the fashion week, but that engagement for non-participating brands simultaneously increase, these findings question whether individual brands should be official participants of fashion weeks.

    Social implications: Since the fashion week seems to have transformed from a marketing platform to a brand of its own, this shift can enable closer collaborations with the tourism and hospitality industry as well as efforts related to the promotion of place brands.

    Originality/value: This paper contributes to the field of fashion marketing and management by illustrating the dynamic interplay between engagement created in social media and fashion weeks while also pointing out the conceptual and managerial implications this development generatesfor participating and non-participating brands.

  • 3.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Stockholm Business School, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholm Business School, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    User engagement in social media: an explorative study of Swedish fashion brands2016In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 177-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to add to the literature by exploring how curvilinear manifestations of user engagement can be explained in the setting of fashion-oriented social media.

    Design/methodology/approach - This study analyses how ten Swedish fashion brands have been integrated in expressions of user engagement in social media. In total, a material of 11,173 user-generated contents from different types of social media applications over a period of 12 weeks was collected and analysed.

    Findings - The results of this paper show that user engagement fluctuates considerably over time in social media. It also shows that the degree of engagement varies between different forms of social media applications.

    Originality/value - This study contributes to the literature on fashion marketing and user engagement by adding empirical support for the suggestion that expressions of engagement found in social media are curvilinear in their nature. It also concludes that highly involved and engaged users, instead of being brand activists, tend to be variety seekers in the studied setting that when taken together represents an emerging managerial challenge for the fashion industry and particularly fashion firms.

  • 4.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden; Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    Chalmers University of Technology, GotheEburg, Sweden; The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Klas
    Department of Economic History, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nykvist, Rasmus
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Digital entrepreneurship and field conditions for institutional change – Investigating the enabling role of cities2019In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 146, p. 877-886Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital entrepreneurship may result in institutional turbulence and new initiatives are frequently blocked by vested interest groups who posit superior financial and relational resources. In this paper, we explore the role of cities in facilitating digital entrepreneurship and overcoming institutional resistance to innovation. Drawing upon two historical case studies of digital entrepreneurship in the city of Stockholm along with an extensive material on the sharing economy in Sweden, our results suggest that cities offer an environment that is critical for digital entrepreneurship. The economic and technological diversity of a city may provide the field conditions required for institutional change to take place and to avoid regulatory capture.

  • 5.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian G.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Assessing consumer goals in the sharing economy: Evidence from Airbnb2018In: Academy of Management Proceedings, Academy of Management , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to analyze how consumers’ articulate goals associated with the sharing economy and its associated implications for consumer policy. By utilizing the methodological approach of Social Media Analytics (SMA), we track the ways in which consumers’ express goals and criticism associated to the popular accommodation sharing platform Airbnb. Based on our empirical material that covers 7,022 user-generated content published over a 12-month period, we illustrate a spectrum of eight distinct goals as well as associated dimensions of criticism that consumers demonstrate. While goals associated towards financial and efficiency gains are dominating, consumers’ criticism tends to be centered on macro environmental consequences of the sharing economy. In view of previous studies suggesting that utilitarian goals almost entirely dominate consumers’ goals associated with the sharing economy, this paper therefore contributes to extant literature on the phenomenon by illustrating the multitude of ways in which consumers relate to the sharing economy and the associated consequences for the scope, scale and speed of future ways in which the sharing economy can be regulated.

  • 6.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Imitating Airbnb and Uber: On the Interconnectedness of Sharing Economy Platforms and Digital Business Ventures2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Sandström, Christian
    Assessing the sustainability impact of the sharing economy2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden; Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Sciences and Technology Studies, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    How sustainable is the sharing economy?: On the sustainability connotations of sharing economy platforms2019In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 206, p. 419-429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sharing economy has evolved and spread to various sectors of the economy. Its early idea linked to the creation of more sustainable uses of resources. Since then, the development of the sharing economy has included a professionalization with self-employed suppliers rather than peers, and the question is whether the platforms following this development maintain the focus on sustainability. This paper describes and classifies the sustainability connotation of sharing economy platforms. It analyses 121 platforms derived through social media analytics to figure out whether they describe themselves as sustainable. The findings suggest that the sustainability connotation closely connects to specific sectors such as fashion, on-demand services and logistics. Meanwhile, the dominant role model platforms do not communicate about being sustainable. These findings contribute to previous research through (1) giving a systematic empirical account on the way various sharing economy platforms describe themselves in terms of sustainability, (2) pointing out the differences among the platforms, and (3) indicating the diversity in sustainability connotation among various sectors of the economy.

  • 9.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Sandström, Christian
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sick, Nathalie
    Suseno, Yuliano
    Market and Non-market perceptions at fringes of the Sharing Economy: Evidence from Foodora2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nykvist, Rasmus
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Predicting network pictures – manager’s mental capacity to adumbrate change2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Nykvist, Rasmus
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Exploring Changing Priors in the Wake of the Sharing Economy2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nykvist, Rasmus
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Institutional orders in the sharing economy: Community as an answer to the state-market-interlock2018In: Academy of Management Proceedings, Academy of Management , 2018, article id 17365Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the emergence of sharing economy firms changes existing institutional structures and bring forth increasing institutional complexity for firms, regulators and users alike, this paper aims to analyze how the public adhere to institutional orders in resolving emerging controversies associated with the sharing economy. By analyzing four cases of societal controversies concerning the accommodation sharing platform Airbnb in the Swedish market during 12 months between the years 2015-2016, we illustrate the ways in which the public adhered to three main institutional orders of state, market and community in resolving four identified controversies related to prostitution, racism, failure to pay taxes and housing shortage allegedly caused by the firm. In perspective to the ways in which extant literature emphasize state and market as fundamental institutional orders for resolving institutional complexity, our results highlights the role of community as a key institutional order situated in the intersection between the state and the market in the setting of the sharing economy.

  • 13.
    Möhlmann, Mareike
    et al.
    The University of Warwick, Coventry, England.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ration Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Trust in the Sharing Economy: Platform-Mediated Peer Trust2018In: The Cambridge Handbook of the Law of the Sharing Economy / [ed] Nestor M. Davidson, Michèle Finck, John J. Infranca, Cambridge University Press, 2018, p. 27-37Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Pihl, Christofer
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Consumer brand involvement and engagement in user-generated content: an explorative study of Swedish fashion brands in social media2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rise of social media and user-generated content (UGC) has created new challenges for the theoreti-cal understanding of consumer brand involvement and engagement. As a result, a plethora of works suggesting how firms can foster close relationships with consumers in the digital media landscape has been presented. The present paper aims to add to this literature by exploring how different indications of consumer brand involvement and engagement can be spotted in the setting of in UGC. This is done by studying how ten Swedish fashion brands have been portrayed within different forms of social media. Data collection was conducted by using a social media analytics tool developed for the Swedish market, covering a sampled material of 38,696 user-generated contents. The findings of this paper illustrates that levels of brand involvement and engagement fluctuates considerably over time, also depending on the form of social media in which UGC is produced and the size of the firm in question. Moreover, the study shows how professional firms in the fashion industry have embraced UGC by starting to take part in its production. In contrast to previous works suggesting how consumer brand involvement and engagement is characterising by a stable and enduring nature, this paper conclude by arguing that these concepts in the setting of UGC and the fashion industry is characterised by constant change.

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