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  • 1.
    Aramo-Immonen, Heli
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Carlborg, Per
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Hasche, Nina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Kask, Johan
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Linton, Gabriel
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Nykvist, Rasmus
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Shahin Moghadam, Sarah
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Jussila, Jari J.
    Jyväskylä University, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Mustafee, Navonil
    University of Exeter Business School, Exeter, United Kingdom.
    Shams, Tawfiq
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Clustering the imp thought: searching roots and diversities in imp research2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMP research is often treated as an empirical perspective describing complexities of repeated business-to-business exchanges and their embeddedness. While building on some common understandings and concepts, this paper asks: How homogeneous is the IMP research? This paper uses cluster analysis to capture the roots and various sub-groups of IMP research as means to depict the question of homogeneity (i.e. a core focus in the research) or heterogeneity (i.e. using references from other fields or specific to sub-fields) of the IMP thought. In this scientific work in progress paper we introduce how we design to use bibliographical methods in order to harvest data from an extensive amount of IMP-related articles written from the 1970’s onwards. In this first attempt to reveal IMP we used overall 294 articles yielded to 10,615 co-citation relationships. A threshold of minimum number of citations of a cited reference was set to five (5) to capture such references that have been cited in multiple publications. We introduce visual mapping of defined subject area clusters and as an example we describe shortly clusters. Perhaps not surprisingly our findings suggest that IMP research is not so homogenous, with at least four clear clusters of IMP-research each utilizing different key references.

    Download full text (pdf)
    CLUSTERING THE IMP THOUGHT: SEARCHING ROOTS AND DIVERSITITES IN IMP RESEARCH
  • 2.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Is the Sharing Economy just a Collective Fantasy? Exploring Institutional Illogics in Market Societies2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This conceptual paper aims to continue the debate initiated by Vince (2019) to deepen the understanding of institutional logic by further bringing psychoanalytical concepts into organizational and institutional scholarship. The paper argues the (re)enactment of institutional logics is based on the crucial dialectic between conscious manifestations and the unconscious ones. Institutional illogics as the hidden 'other' side of institutional logics may be a missing piece in the puzzle of understanding how institutions are (re-)enacted in institutionalization and institutional change processes. The conceptual arguments this paper illustrates review and analyze the contemporary phenomenon of the platform-mediated sharing economy. Based on the previous academic and public discourse, the sharing economy's institutionalization process can be described as having become a sharing fantasy where collectively structured fantasies unfold due to hidden and unseen patterns. By framing sharing as a structured fantasy, three institutional illogics emerge dehumanizing illogic, as-if illogic, and illogic of unconscious guilt. By combining micro-level analysis of the market society, such as psychoanalytical decision-making processes, with macro-level perspectives of institutions, we can understand how the (re)enactment of dominant (il)logics as collective fantasies jeopardize fundamental institutional change.

  • 3.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Platforms in Liquid Modernity: Essays about the Sharing Economy, Digital Platforms, and Institutions2021Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The year 2020 feels like the beginning of a crescendo of change. As environmental and social challenges reach an all-time high, the organization of our societies is coming under scrutiny. We, as a society, turn to technology to reinvent the organization of social life after disruptive episodes. Inspired by Bauman's theorizing to describe the cultural and societal zeitgeist, this thesis explains the institutionalization of one of the most promising alternative forms of organization of the past decade: the sharing economy.

    Comprised of nine essays centered around three focal areas: (1) Organizational change, (2) Market change, and (3) Societal change, this thesis aims to explain the institutionalization of digital sharing platforms in liquid modern society.

    This thesis finds that digital sharing platforms act as societal organizers on several dimensions of “in-betweenness.” As this moment in time can also be characterized as a period of “interregnum”—another moment of in-betweenness—where old structures are continuously disrupted but no clear new path has emerged, digital platform providers fill a structural void in our highly individualized society. Digital platform providers use community as an anchor, a belief, and sets of practices to create an emerging (intermediary) institution around which different forms of organization manifest.

    Digital sharing platforms have, however, remained a grace note on systemic change: ornamental and practically non-essential. Still, digital platforms are setting new norms in all areas of organizational, market, and societal life. By evoking both elements of community and market, digital platforms are playing an important part in creating a symphony of our future societal order.

    List of papers
    1. Digital Disruption beyond Uber and Airbnb-Tracking the long tail of the sharing economy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digital Disruption beyond Uber and Airbnb-Tracking the long tail of the sharing economy
    2020 (English)In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 155, article id UNSP 119323Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The sharing economy can be regarded as a discontinuous innovation that creates increased abundance throughout society. Extant literature on the sharing economy has been predominantly concerned with Uber and Airbnb. As little is known about where the sharing economy is gaining momentum beyond transportation and accommodation, the purpose of this paper is to map in what sectors of the economy it is perceived to gain traction. Drawing on data from social and traditional media in Sweden, we identify a long tail of 17 sectors and 47 subsectors in which a total of 165 unique sharing-economy actors operate, including sectors such as ondemand services, fashion and clothing, and food delivery. Our findings therefore point at the expanding scope of the sharing economy and relatedly, we derive a set of implications for firms.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2020
    Keywords
    Sharing economy, Digital disruption, Long tail, Uber, Airbnb, Social media analytics
    National Category
    Economics and Business
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-81893 (URN)10.1016/j.techfore.2018.06.012 (DOI)000528313800002 ()2-s2.0-85048878217 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2020-05-18 Created: 2020-05-18 Last updated: 2021-03-24Bibliographically approved
    2. The Identity Crisis of ‘Sharing’: From the Co-Op Economy to the Urban Sharing Economy Phenomenon
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Identity Crisis of ‘Sharing’: From the Co-Op Economy to the Urban Sharing Economy Phenomenon
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Business Administration
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-90705 (URN)
    Available from: 2021-03-24 Created: 2021-03-24 Last updated: 2021-03-24Bibliographically approved
    3. How sustainable is the sharing economy?: On the sustainability connotations of sharing economy platforms
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>How sustainable is the sharing economy?: On the sustainability connotations of sharing economy platforms
    2019 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 206, p. 419-429Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The sharing economy has evolved and spread to various sectors of the economy. Its early idea linked to the creation of more sustainable uses of resources. Since then, the development of the sharing economy has included a professionalization with self-employed suppliers rather than peers, and the question is whether the platforms following this development maintain the focus on sustainability. This paper describes and classifies the sustainability connotation of sharing economy platforms. It analyses 121 platforms derived through social media analytics to figure out whether they describe themselves as sustainable. The findings suggest that the sustainability connotation closely connects to specific sectors such as fashion, on-demand services and logistics. Meanwhile, the dominant role model platforms do not communicate about being sustainable. These findings contribute to previous research through (1) giving a systematic empirical account on the way various sharing economy platforms describe themselves in terms of sustainability, (2) pointing out the differences among the platforms, and (3) indicating the diversity in sustainability connotation among various sectors of the economy.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2019
    Keywords
    Platform, Sharing economy, Social media analytics, Sustainability
    National Category
    Environmental Sciences Economics and Business
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-70361 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2018.09.196 (DOI)000449449100036 ()2-s2.0-85054876983 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2018-11-29 Created: 2018-11-29 Last updated: 2021-03-24Bibliographically approved
    4. Is the Sharing Economy just a Collective Fantasy? Exploring Institutional Illogics in Market Societies
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is the Sharing Economy just a Collective Fantasy? Exploring Institutional Illogics in Market Societies
    2020 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This conceptual paper aims to continue the debate initiated by Vince (2019) to deepen the understanding of institutional logic by further bringing psychoanalytical concepts into organizational and institutional scholarship. The paper argues the (re)enactment of institutional logics is based on the crucial dialectic between conscious manifestations and the unconscious ones. Institutional illogics as the hidden 'other' side of institutional logics may be a missing piece in the puzzle of understanding how institutions are (re-)enacted in institutionalization and institutional change processes. The conceptual arguments this paper illustrates review and analyze the contemporary phenomenon of the platform-mediated sharing economy. Based on the previous academic and public discourse, the sharing economy's institutionalization process can be described as having become a sharing fantasy where collectively structured fantasies unfold due to hidden and unseen patterns. By framing sharing as a structured fantasy, three institutional illogics emerge dehumanizing illogic, as-if illogic, and illogic of unconscious guilt. By combining micro-level analysis of the market society, such as psychoanalytical decision-making processes, with macro-level perspectives of institutions, we can understand how the (re)enactment of dominant (il)logics as collective fantasies jeopardize fundamental institutional change.

    Keywords
    institutional illogics, institutional logics, market society, unconscious institutions, sharing economy
    National Category
    Business Administration
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-90704 (URN)
    Conference
    36th EGOS Colloquium: Organizing for a Sustainable Future: Responsibility, Renewal & Resistance (EGOS 2020), University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany (virtual conference), July 2–4, 2020
    Available from: 2021-03-24 Created: 2021-03-24 Last updated: 2021-03-24Bibliographically approved
    5. The sharing economy and the transformation of work: evidence from Foodora
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The sharing economy and the transformation of work: evidence from Foodora
    Show others...
    2022 (English)In: Personnel review, ISSN 0048-3486, E-ISSN 1758-6933, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 584-602Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This article explores the various stakeholders' perceptions of the ways digital work is organised within the sharing economy and the social implications of the transformation of work.

    Design/methodology/approach: Applying social media analytics (SMA) concerning the sharing economy platform Foodora, a total of 3,251 user-generated content was collected and organised throughout the social media landscape in Sweden over 12 months, and 18 stakeholder groups were identified, discussing digital work within seven thematic categories.

    Findings: The results show that the stakeholder groups in the Swedish context primarily expressed negative views of Foodora's way of organising digital work. The social media posts outlined the distributive and procedural justice related to the working conditions, boycott and protests and critical incidents, as well as the collective bargaining of Foodora.

    Originality/value: By utilising a novel SMA method, this study contributes to the extant literature on the sharing economy by providing a systematic assessment concerning the impact of the sharing economy platform on the transformation of work and the associated social consequences.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2022
    Keywords
    Sharing economy, The transformation of work, Stakeholders, Social media analytics, Social equity
    National Category
    Business Administration
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-90065 (URN)10.1108/PR-08-2019-0450 (DOI)000618849900001 ()2-s2.0-85101469932 (Scopus ID)
    Funder
    The Jan Wallander and Tom Hedelius Foundation
    Available from: 2021-03-03 Created: 2021-03-03 Last updated: 2022-06-14Bibliographically approved
    6. Trust in the Sharing Economy: Platform-Mediated Peer Trust
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trust in the Sharing Economy: Platform-Mediated Peer Trust
    2018 (English)In: The Cambridge Handbook of the Law of the Sharing Economy / [ed] Nestor M. Davidson, Michèle Finck, John J. Infranca, Cambridge University Press, 2018, p. 27-37Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Cambridge University Press, 2018
    National Category
    Business Administration
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-75929 (URN)10.1017/9781108255882.003 (DOI)
    Available from: 2019-08-28 Created: 2019-08-28 Last updated: 2021-03-24Bibliographically approved
    7. Tracking the institutional logics of the sharing economy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tracking the institutional logics of the sharing economy
    2019 (English)In: Handbook of the sharing economy / [ed] R. W. Belk, G. M. Eckhardt & F. Bardhi, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing , 2019, p. 177-192Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2019
    National Category
    Business Administration
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-85303 (URN)10.4337/9781788110549.00022 (DOI)9781788110532 (ISBN)9781788110549 (ISBN)
    Available from: 2020-09-03 Created: 2020-09-03 Last updated: 2021-03-24Bibliographically approved
    8. Institutional orders in the sharing economy: Community as an answer to the state-market-interlock
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Institutional orders in the sharing economy: Community as an answer to the state-market-interlock
    2018 (English)In: Academy of Management Proceedings, Academy of Management , 2018, article id 17365Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the emergence of sharing economy firms changes existing institutional structures and bring forth increasing institutional complexity for firms, regulators and users alike, this paper aims to analyze how the public adhere to institutional orders in resolving emerging controversies associated with the sharing economy. By analyzing four cases of societal controversies concerning the accommodation sharing platform Airbnb in the Swedish market during 12 months between the years 2015-2016, we illustrate the ways in which the public adhered to three main institutional orders of state, market and community in resolving four identified controversies related to prostitution, racism, failure to pay taxes and housing shortage allegedly caused by the firm. In perspective to the ways in which extant literature emphasize state and market as fundamental institutional orders for resolving institutional complexity, our results highlights the role of community as a key institutional order situated in the intersection between the state and the market in the setting of the sharing economy.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Academy of Management, 2018
    Series
    Academy of Management Proceedings, ISSN 0065-0668, E-ISSN 2151-6561 ; 2018
    National Category
    Business Administration
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-75932 (URN)10.5465/AMBPP.2018.17365abstract (DOI)
    Conference
    78th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management (AOM 2018), Chicago, Ill., United States, August 10-14, 2018
    Available from: 2019-08-28 Created: 2019-08-28 Last updated: 2021-03-24Bibliographically approved
    9. “Own it” or “share it”: Transformations of regulatory and community norms in the Swedish housing market
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>“Own it” or “share it”: Transformations of regulatory and community norms in the Swedish housing market
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Business Administration
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-90706 (URN)
    Available from: 2021-03-24 Created: 2021-03-24 Last updated: 2021-03-24Bibliographically approved
    Download full text (pdf)
    Platforms in Liquid Modernity: Essays about the Sharing Economy, Digital Platforms, and Institutions
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  • 4.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Christofer, Laurell
    Stockholm School of Economics, Institute for Research, Stockholm, Sweden; Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Christian, Sandström
    Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden; The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Gigging in the sharing economy2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Gigs define temporary works performed by individuals in various settings (Bogenhold, Klinglmair, & Kandutsch, 2017; Healy, Nicholson, & Pekarek, 2017; Horney, 2016; Lehdonvirta, 2018). Coined in the 1920s, its long tradition relates to music and art performers and their acting on stage. It represents some sort of temporality, meaning that the exact same task may not appear again, at least not in the same surrounding. Recent trends in business life have redefined work (cf. Öberg, 2012), have brought forth such concepts as freelance and gig economies to portray individuals as self-employed and the mentioned temporality of task (Gandini, 2016; Janofsky, 2015).

    At the rise of the sharing economy, that is, peer-to-peer based exchanges accomplished by digital platforms (e.g., Belk, 2014), the providing parties’ operations could well be seen as gigs intermediated online, but facilitated offline in temporary exchanges with users. The development of the sharing economy includes an increased plurality in ways to operate though (Mair & Reischauer, 2017), not the least underlined by how the peer-to-peer exchanges have sometimes turned into ways to earn living by the providing parties. This paper sets to investigate this phenomenon by particularly focusing on how various stakeholders – internal and external actors with direct or indirect influence or participation in the exchanges (cf. Freeman, 1984) – comprehend this development. The purpose of the paper is to categorize various stakeholders’ viewpoints and their influence on the understanding of gigs in the sharing economy.

    Empirically, the paper departs from two social-media data sets: one describing Uber, the other one Foodora, as two examples of sharing economy platforms. The data sets comprises more than 30,000 social media posts. The paper analyses how the providing side of these platforms is reported on in social media also taking into account who (type of stakeholder) posts about them. Preliminary findings indicate how the providing side, albeit both studied platforms would be characterized as highly commercialized, demonstrate quite different results related to those work conditions actually at hand. While this being the case, the data reveals a shared pattern of negative connotation across stakeholder groups, with them influencing one another across the social media. The negative descriptions do, as opposed to learnings from traditional stakeholder theory, indicate expressions well beyond stakes and influences by the particular stakeholder group: a user may well engage in talks about legal regulations, for instance, while it would had been expected to mostly engage with services provided, payments, and deliveries.

    The paper contributes to previous research in several ways: Firstly, the sharing economy literature is still mainly focused on the user side of sharing, meaning that this paper fills an empirical hole in its perspective. Secondly, the methodological approach taken allows for a broad, but also integrated capturing of individual stakeholders’ understanding of the phenomenon. Hence, it includes both the definition of various stakeholder groups and how they may influence one another. Thirdly, and as the theoretical contribution, the paper provides understanding for stakeholders, their influence and participation in digital settings, and particularly how influences and viewpoints of stakeholders become separated from their participation.

  • 5.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, C.
    Stockholm School of Economics Institute for Research, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Multibrand events and social media engagement: Concentration or spillover?2020In: Event Management, ISSN 1525-9951, E-ISSN 1943-4308, Vol. 24, no 2-3, p. 253-262, article id 6011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To what degree do participating and nonparticipating brands enjoy engagement of social media users in the setting of multibrand events? Based on empirical material comprising 4,424 user-generated content published before, during, and after Fashion Week Stockholm in February 2016, this article illustrates how the studied multibrand event both concentrated engagement for participating brands and created spillover engagement to other, nonparticipating brands. Therefore, these findings question whether individual brands benefit from being official participants in multibrand events. This article contributes to the field of event management by illustrating the dynamic interplay between engagement created in social media and multibrand events, while also highlighting associated conceptual and managerial implications.

  • 6.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Stockholm Business School, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholm Business School, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fashion weeks - Engagement concentration or spill over?2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore the interplay between social media, fashion weeks and the degree to which participating and non-participating brands enjoy engagement of social media users.

    Design/methodology/approach: A material of 4424 user-generated content published before, during and after Fashion Week Stockholm in February 2016 were collected and analysed.

    Findings: The presented results show that the studied fashion week both concentrates engagement for participating brands but also creates spillover engagement to non-participating brands.

    Research limitations/implications: Because of the specific characteristics of the Swedish fashion industry and the Swedish media landscape, empirical illustrations from fashion weeks in other fashion cities would be valuable to verify the presented findings.

    Practical implications: As participating brands enjoy an increased level of engagement during the fashion week, but that engagement for non-participating brands simultaneously increase, these findings question whether individual brands should be official participants of fashion weeks.

    Social implications: Since the fashion week seems to have transformed from a marketing platform to a brand of its own, this shift can enable closer collaborations with the tourism and hospitality industry as well as efforts related to the promotion of place brands.

    Originality/value: This paper contributes to the field of fashion marketing and management by illustrating the dynamic interplay between engagement created in social media and fashion weeks while also pointing out the conceptual and managerial implications this development generatesfor participating and non-participating brands.

  • 7.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholm School of Economics Institute for Research, Stockholm, Sweden; Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Tracing brand constellations in social media: the case of Fashion Week Stockholm2018In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 35-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of fashion weeks on brand constellations of participating fashion companies in social media.

    Design/methodology/approach: The study analyses how brand constellations take form for seven Swedish fashion companies before, during and after Fashion Week Stockholm. In total, 3,449 user-generated contents referring to the sampled brands were collected and analysed.

    Findings: On average, brand constellations of participating companies are increasingly incorporating other participating brands as a result of the fashion week. Based on the presented results, four brand constellation outcomes for participating fashion companies are identified: brand constellation amplification, concentration, division and dilution.

    Research limitations/implications: As this paper is focussed on the Swedish market, additional results from fashion weeks taking place in other cities would be beneficial to verify the four brand constellation outcomes.

    Practical implications: The results question the resilience of professionally curated brand constellations due to the emergence of user-driven constellations that also shape the position of fashion brands. Therefore, this development can potentially have a considerable impact on often carefully orchestrated brand positioning strategies executed by fashion companies.

    Social implications: Digitally fuelled interdependences of brand constellations by professionals and consumers attest to the dilution of borders between consumers and producers.

    Originality/value: This paper contributes to the field of fashion marketing and management by identifying four different brand constellation outcomes in social media for participating fashion companies as a result of fashion weeks and how to managerially handle these respective outcomes.

  • 8.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Stockholm Business School, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholm Business School, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    User engagement in social media: an explorative study of Swedish fashion brands2016In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 177-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to add to the literature by exploring how curvilinear manifestations of user engagement can be explained in the setting of fashion-oriented social media.

    Design/methodology/approach - This study analyses how ten Swedish fashion brands have been integrated in expressions of user engagement in social media. In total, a material of 11,173 user-generated contents from different types of social media applications over a period of 12 weeks was collected and analysed.

    Findings - The results of this paper show that user engagement fluctuates considerably over time in social media. It also shows that the degree of engagement varies between different forms of social media applications.

    Originality/value - This study contributes to the literature on fashion marketing and user engagement by adding empirical support for the suggestion that expressions of engagement found in social media are curvilinear in their nature. It also concludes that highly involved and engaged users, instead of being brand activists, tend to be variety seekers in the studied setting that when taken together represents an emerging managerial challenge for the fashion industry and particularly fashion firms.

  • 9.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden; Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Möhlmann, Mareike
    Warwick Business School, University of Warwick, UK.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Collaborative economy in social media – Collective action in Sweden2019In: 6th International Workshop on the Sharing Economy, June 27-29, Utrecht University: List of abstracts, 2019, p. 64-64Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper assesses the role of social media to enable collective action, that is, parties’ attempts to change behaviour in such a manner that a common goal is achieved. It studies collective action in the light of the sharing economy and some parties’ attempts to reverse the commercialisation of the sharing economy and (partially) recreate it as a collaborative economy. This paper draws social media data for almost 36 months, from 14 March 2016 to 11 February 2019, generating a dataset of 11,553 social media posts for the sharing economy, from which a subsequent dataset consisting of 533 social media posts with reference to the collaborative economy was derived. Findings point at how the collective actors were caught between conflicting interests and chose to prioritise the marketing of their own services, rather than supporting the collective action movement. Increased transactional behaviours and difficulties to reach through counteracted the collective action idea. Based on these findings, we contribute to previous research by discussing ways in which digital technology facilitates or hinders collective action in the context of digitalisation.

  • 10.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Ratio Institute, Stocholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholm School of Economics Institute for Research, Stockholm, Sweden; Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sandstrom, Christian
    Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden; Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Digital Disruption beyond Uber and Airbnb-Tracking the long tail of the sharing economy2020In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 155, article id UNSP 119323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sharing economy can be regarded as a discontinuous innovation that creates increased abundance throughout society. Extant literature on the sharing economy has been predominantly concerned with Uber and Airbnb. As little is known about where the sharing economy is gaining momentum beyond transportation and accommodation, the purpose of this paper is to map in what sectors of the economy it is perceived to gain traction. Drawing on data from social and traditional media in Sweden, we identify a long tail of 17 sectors and 47 subsectors in which a total of 165 unique sharing-economy actors operate, including sectors such as ondemand services, fashion and clothing, and food delivery. Our findings therefore point at the expanding scope of the sharing economy and relatedly, we derive a set of implications for firms.

  • 11.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden; Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    Chalmers University of Technology, GotheEburg, Sweden; The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Klas
    Department of Economic History, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nykvist, Rasmus
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Digital entrepreneurship and field conditions for institutional change: Investigating the enabling role of cities2019In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 146, p. 877-886Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital entrepreneurship may result in institutional turbulence and new initiatives are frequently blocked by vested interest groups who posit superior financial and relational resources. In this paper, we explore the role of cities in facilitating digital entrepreneurship and overcoming institutional resistance to innovation. Drawing upon two historical case studies of digital entrepreneurship in the city of Stockholm along with an extensive material on the sharing economy in Sweden, our results suggest that cities offer an environment that is critical for digital entrepreneurship. The economic and technological diversity of a city may provide the field conditions required for institutional change to take place and to avoid regulatory capture.

  • 12.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian G.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Assessing consumer goals in the sharing economy: Evidence from Airbnb2018In: Academy of Management Proceedings, Academy of Management , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to analyze how consumers’ articulate goals associated with the sharing economy and its associated implications for consumer policy. By utilizing the methodological approach of Social Media Analytics (SMA), we track the ways in which consumers’ express goals and criticism associated to the popular accommodation sharing platform Airbnb. Based on our empirical material that covers 7,022 user-generated content published over a 12-month period, we illustrate a spectrum of eight distinct goals as well as associated dimensions of criticism that consumers demonstrate. While goals associated towards financial and efficiency gains are dominating, consumers’ criticism tends to be centered on macro environmental consequences of the sharing economy. In view of previous studies suggesting that utilitarian goals almost entirely dominate consumers’ goals associated with the sharing economy, this paper therefore contributes to extant literature on the phenomenon by illustrating the multitude of ways in which consumers relate to the sharing economy and the associated consequences for the scope, scale and speed of future ways in which the sharing economy can be regulated.

  • 13.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Imitating Airbnb and Uber: On the Interconnectedness of Sharing Economy Platforms and Digital Business Ventures2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden; Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Interconnectivity of Sharing Economy Platforms2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sharing economy increasingly gains momentum in several business sectors. This paper sets to investigate the interconnectivity among platforms in the sharing economy through reporting on how new platforms are created with reference to previous ones. The paper points out a seamless, unobtrusive, imitation pattern of spread of the sharing economy business model. It could be seen as information or availability based focusing on reproducing activities in ever new resource settings. Contributions are made to IMP research in the sense of continuing the discussion on how the sharing economy can be understood from the IMP perspective, and it broadens the discussion to include the network level. Imitation as a mechanism of spread raises new insights to understand how current business landscapes transition into a new logic of operations.

  • 15.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholm School of Economics Institute for Research, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Assessing the impact of the sharing economy on the evolution of online commerce2020In: ISPIM Conference Proceedings, Manchester: The International Society for Professional Innovation Management (ISPIM) , 2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to assess the impact of the sharing economy on ways in which online commerce is evolving. By utilising Social Media Analytics to systematically track the developments of the sharing economy visà-vis online commerce, we analyse an empirical material of 8,755 user-generated content covering a time period of 24 months. Our findings illustrate that the sharing economy fuels platforms focusing attention to sharing commerce but also platforms engaged in social commerce and more general forms of e-commerce. Furthermore, our findings show the sectors in which sharing commerce, social commerce and general forms of e-commerce have become particularly prevalent. The paper contributes to previous literature by providing a systematic empirical contribution on the impact of the sharing economy on the evolution of online commerce and by conceptually explaining why the sharing economy gives rise to a relatively wide plethora of online commerce initiatives.

  • 16.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Sandström, Christian
    Assessing the sustainability impact of the sharing economy2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden; Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Sciences and Technology Studies, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    How sustainable is the sharing economy?: On the sustainability connotations of sharing economy platforms2019In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 206, p. 419-429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sharing economy has evolved and spread to various sectors of the economy. Its early idea linked to the creation of more sustainable uses of resources. Since then, the development of the sharing economy has included a professionalization with self-employed suppliers rather than peers, and the question is whether the platforms following this development maintain the focus on sustainability. This paper describes and classifies the sustainability connotation of sharing economy platforms. It analyses 121 platforms derived through social media analytics to figure out whether they describe themselves as sustainable. The findings suggest that the sustainability connotation closely connects to specific sectors such as fashion, on-demand services and logistics. Meanwhile, the dominant role model platforms do not communicate about being sustainable. These findings contribute to previous research through (1) giving a systematic empirical account on the way various sharing economy platforms describe themselves in terms of sustainability, (2) pointing out the differences among the platforms, and (3) indicating the diversity in sustainability connotation among various sectors of the economy.

  • 18.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Tracking the institutional logics of the sharing economy2019In: Handbook of the sharing economy / [ed] R. W. Belk, G. M. Eckhardt & F. Bardhi, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing , 2019, p. 177-192Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Sandström, Christian
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sick, Nathalie
    University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
    Suseno, Yuliani
    School of Business and Law, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Australia.
    Institutional Change at the Sharing Economy's Fringes: Evidence from Foodora2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Sandström, Christian
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sick, Nathalie
    University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
    Suseno, Yuliani
    School of Business and Law, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Australia.
    Social media analytics for knowledge acquisition of market and non-market perceptions in the sharing economy2021In: Journal of Knowledge Management, ISSN 1367-3270, E-ISSN 1758-7484, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 500-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Using the case of Foodora, this paper aims to assess the impact of technological innovation of an emerging actor in the sharing economy through stakeholders' perceptions in the market and non-market domains.

    Design/methodology/approach: Using a methodological approach called social media analytics (SMA) to explore the case of Foodora, 3,250 user-generated contents in social media are systematically gathered, coded and analysed.

    Findings: The findings indicate that, while Foodora appears to be a viable provider in the marketplace, there is mounting public concern about the working conditions of its employees. In the market domain, Foodora manages its status as an online delivery platform and provider well, but at the same time, it struggles with its position in the non-market sphere, suggesting that the firm is vulnerable to regulatory change. These insights highlight the importance of simultaneously exploring and balancing market and non-market perceptions when assessing the impact of disruptive innovation.

    Originality/value: This study offers originality by providing an integrative approach to consider both the market and non-market domains. It is also novel in its use of SMA as a tool for knowledge acquisition and management to evaluate the impact of emerging technologies in the sharing economy.

  • 21.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Sandström, Christian
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sick, Nathalie
    Suseno, Yuliano
    Market and Non-market perceptions at fringes of the Sharing Economy: Evidence from Foodora2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Center for Sports and Business, Stockholm School of Economics, Institute of Research, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Harvard University, Cambridge Massachusetts, USA.
    Sandström, Christian
    The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Suseno, Yuliani
    Faculty of Business and Law, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia.
    Assessing user perceptions of the interplay between the sharing, access, platform and community- based economies2020In: Information Technology and People, ISSN 0959-3845, E-ISSN 1758-5813, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 1037-1051Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Digitally intermediated peer-to-peer exchanges have accelerated in occurrence, and as a consequence, they have introduced an increased pluralism of connotations. Accordingly, this paper aims to assess user perceptions of the interplay between the sharing, access, platform, and community-based economies.

    Design/methodology/approach: The sharing, access, platform, and community-based economies have been systematically tracked in the social media landscape using Social Media Analytics (SMA). In doing so, a total material of 62,855 publicly posted user-generated content concerning the four respective economies were collected and analyzed.

    Findings: Even though the sharing economy has been conceptually argued to be interlinked with the access, platform, and community-based economies, the empirical results of the study do not validate this interlinkage. Instead, the results regarding user perceptions in social media show that the sharing, access, platform, and community-based economies manifest as clearly separated.

    Originality/value: This paper contributes to existing literature by offering an empirical validation, as well as an in-depth understanding, of the sharing economy's interlinkage to other economies, along with the extent to which the overlaps between these economies manifest in social media.

  • 23.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Department of Industrial Economics and Management,KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandström, Christian
    Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden; The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Suseno, Yuliani
    Newcastle Business School, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia.
    The sharing economy and the transformation of work: evidence from Foodora2022In: Personnel review, ISSN 0048-3486, E-ISSN 1758-6933, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 584-602Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This article explores the various stakeholders' perceptions of the ways digital work is organised within the sharing economy and the social implications of the transformation of work.

    Design/methodology/approach: Applying social media analytics (SMA) concerning the sharing economy platform Foodora, a total of 3,251 user-generated content was collected and organised throughout the social media landscape in Sweden over 12 months, and 18 stakeholder groups were identified, discussing digital work within seven thematic categories.

    Findings: The results show that the stakeholder groups in the Swedish context primarily expressed negative views of Foodora's way of organising digital work. The social media posts outlined the distributive and procedural justice related to the working conditions, boycott and protests and critical incidents, as well as the collective bargaining of Foodora.

    Originality/value: By utilising a novel SMA method, this study contributes to the extant literature on the sharing economy by providing a systematic assessment concerning the impact of the sharing economy platform on the transformation of work and the associated social consequences.

  • 24.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nykvist, Rasmus
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Predicting network pictures – manager’s mental capacity to adumbrate change2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Nykvist, Rasmus
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Exploring Changing Priors in the Wake of the Sharing Economy2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nykvist, Rasmus
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Institutional orders in the sharing economy: Community as an answer to the state-market-interlock2018In: Academy of Management Proceedings, Academy of Management , 2018, article id 17365Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the emergence of sharing economy firms changes existing institutional structures and bring forth increasing institutional complexity for firms, regulators and users alike, this paper aims to analyze how the public adhere to institutional orders in resolving emerging controversies associated with the sharing economy. By analyzing four cases of societal controversies concerning the accommodation sharing platform Airbnb in the Swedish market during 12 months between the years 2015-2016, we illustrate the ways in which the public adhered to three main institutional orders of state, market and community in resolving four identified controversies related to prostitution, racism, failure to pay taxes and housing shortage allegedly caused by the firm. In perspective to the ways in which extant literature emphasize state and market as fundamental institutional orders for resolving institutional complexity, our results highlights the role of community as a key institutional order situated in the intersection between the state and the market in the setting of the sharing economy.

  • 27.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nykvist, Rasmus
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    How do managers get their heads around artificial intelligence? Extending the network picture discussion2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Artificial intelligence (AI) expects to increasingly transform ways in which business is conducted. With change follows a need to question current ways of acting and interacting. Yet, the past becomes the frames through which the future is understood. By drawing on Predictive Brain Theory, which shares the same fundamental underpinnings as the Bayesian brain hypothesis, but uses insights from machine learning and neuroscience, the paper conceptualizes that prospective sense making as a skill to update in-flux network pictures are increasingly required for business managers, which the paper reflects on in the light of AI. The paper provides a novel approach to business managers’ mental capacity in understanding change and in their ability to adapt to structural shifts that require an update on gone-solid assumptions about the business environment, while linking this to AI both as a motor of change, and as challenging the human thought with machine learning.

  • 28.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Nykvist, Rasmus
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Managers, minds and machines in the age of artificial intelligence: Extending the network picture discussion2020Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pelgander, Louise
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Identity Crisis of ‘Sharing’: From the Co-Op Economy to the Urban Sharing Economy PhenomenonManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Pelgander, Louise
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    The identity crisis of ‘sharing’: from the co-op economy to the urban sharing economy phenomenon2021In: A Modern Guide to the Urban Sharing Economy / [ed] Thomas Sigler; Jonathan Corcoran, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2021, p. 41-55Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Imitating Airbnb and Uber? Tracking sharing economy diffusion2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Möhlmann, Mareike
    et al.
    The University of Warwick, Coventry, England.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. The Ration Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Trust in the Sharing Economy: Platform-Mediated Peer Trust2018In: The Cambridge Handbook of the Law of the Sharing Economy / [ed] Nestor M. Davidson, Michèle Finck, John J. Infranca, Cambridge University Press, 2018, p. 27-37Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Nykvist, Rasmus
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Eriksson, Klas A.M.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    “Own it” or “share it”: Transformations of regulatory and community norms in the Swedish housing marketManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Pihl, Christofer
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Consumer brand involvement and engagement in user-generated content: an explorative study of Swedish fashion brands in social media2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rise of social media and user-generated content (UGC) has created new challenges for the theoreti-cal understanding of consumer brand involvement and engagement. As a result, a plethora of works suggesting how firms can foster close relationships with consumers in the digital media landscape has been presented. The present paper aims to add to this literature by exploring how different indications of consumer brand involvement and engagement can be spotted in the setting of in UGC. This is done by studying how ten Swedish fashion brands have been portrayed within different forms of social media. Data collection was conducted by using a social media analytics tool developed for the Swedish market, covering a sampled material of 38,696 user-generated contents. The findings of this paper illustrates that levels of brand involvement and engagement fluctuates considerably over time, also depending on the form of social media in which UGC is produced and the size of the firm in question. Moreover, the study shows how professional firms in the fashion industry have embraced UGC by starting to take part in its production. In contrast to previous works suggesting how consumer brand involvement and engagement is characterising by a stable and enduring nature, this paper conclude by arguing that these concepts in the setting of UGC and the fashion industry is characterised by constant change.

  • 35.
    Weidenstedt, Linda
    et al.
    Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lougui, Monia
    Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Ratio Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    What about us? A literature review of workers’ perspectives on the gig economy2020Conference paper (Other academic)
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