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  • 1.
    Almoosawi, Suzana
    et al.
    Brain Performance & Nutrition Research Centre, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne Tyne and Wear, UK.
    Palla, Luigi
    Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
    Walshe, Ian
    Department of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne Tyne and Wear, UK.
    Vingeliene, Snieguole
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Ellis, Jason G.
    Northumbria Sleep Research Laboratory, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne Tyne and Wear, UK.
    Long Sleep Duration and Social Jetlag Are Associated Inversely with a Healthy Dietary Pattern in Adults: Results from the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey Rolling Programme Y1-42018In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 10, no 9, article id 1131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Limited observational studies have described the relationship between sleep duration and overall diet. The present study investigated the association between sleep duration on weekdays or social jetlag and empirically derived dietary patterns in a nationally representative sample of UK adults, aged 19-64 years old, participating in the 2008-2012 UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey Rolling Programme. Survey members completed between three to four days of dietary records. Sleep duration on weekdays was categorized into tertiles to reflect short, normal, and long sleep duration. Social jetlag was calculated as the difference between sleep duration on weekends and weekdays. The association between sleep duration/social jetlag and dietary patterns, derived by principal components analysis, was assessed by regressing diet on sleep, whilst accounting for the complex survey design and adjusting for relevant confounders. Survey members in the highest tertile of sleep duration had on average a 0.45 (95% Confidence Interval (CI) -0.78, -0.12) lower healthy dietary pattern score, compared to middle tertile (p = 0.007). There was an inverted u-shaped association between social jetlag and the healthy dietary pattern, such that when sleep on weekends exceeded weekday sleep by 1 h 45 min, scores for indicating a healthy dietary pattern declined (p = 0.005). In conclusion, long sleep duration on weekdays and an increased social jetlag are associated with a lower healthy dietary pattern score. Further research is required to address factors influencing dietary patterns in long sleepers.

  • 2.
    Almoosawi, Suzana
    et al.
    Brain, Performance, and Nutrition Research Center, Northumbria University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, United Kingdom; Nestlé Research Center, Institute of Nutritional Sciences, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Vingeliene, Snieguole
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Gachon, Frederic
    School of Life Sciences, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland; Department of Diabetes and Circadian Rhythms, Nestlé Institute of Health Sciences, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Voortman, Trudy
    Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Palla, Luigi
    Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.
    Johnston, Jonathan D.
    Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, United Kingdom.
    Van Dam, Rob Martinus
    Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore.
    Darimont, Christian
    Nestlé Research Center, Institute of Nutritional Sciences, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Karagounis, Leonidas G.
    Nestlé Research Center, Institute of Nutritional Sciences, Lausanne, Switzerland; Nestlé Health Science, Vevey, Switzerland; Experimental Myology and Integrative Physiology Cluster, Plymouth Marjon University, Plymouth, United Kingdom.
    Chronotype: Implications for Epidemiologic Studies on Chrono-Nutrition and Cardiometabolic Health2019In: Advances in Nutrition, ISSN 2161-8313, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 30-42Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chrono-nutrition is an emerging research field in nutritional epidemiology that encompasses 3 dimensions of eating behavior: timing, frequency, and regularity. To date, few studies have investigated how an individual's circadian typology, i.e., one's chronotype, affects the association between chrono-nutrition and cardiometabolic health. This review sets the directions for future research by providing a narrative overview of recent epidemiologic research on chronotype, its determinants, and its association with dietary intake and cardiometabolic health. Limited research was found on the association between chronotype and dietary intake in infants, children, and older adults. Moreover, most of the evidence in adolescents and adults was restricted to cross-sectional surveys with few longitudinal cohorts simultaneously collecting data on chronotype and dietary intake. There was a gap in the research concerning the association between chronotype and the 3 dimensions of chrono-nutrition. Whether chronotype modifies the association between diet and cardiometabolic health outcomes remains to be elucidated. In conclusion, further research is required to understand the interplay between chronotype, chrono-nutrition, and cardiometabolic health outcomes.

  • 3.
    Vingeliene, Snieguole
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.
    Chan, Doris
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.
    Vieira, Ana Rita
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.
    Polemiti, Elli
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.
    Stevens, Christophe A.T.
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.
    Abar, Leila
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.
    Navarro Rosenblatt, Deborah A.
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.
    Greenwood, Darren C.
    Division of Biostatistics, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
    Norat, Teresa
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.
    An update of the WCRF/AICR systematic literature review and meta-analysis on dietary and anthropometric factors and esophageal cancer risk2017In: Annals of Oncology, ISSN 0923-7534, E-ISSN 1569-8041, Vol. 28, no 10, p. 2409-2419Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In the 2007 World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research Second Expert Report, the expert panel judged that there was strong evidence that alcoholic drinks and body fatness increased esophageal cancer risk, whereas fruits and vegetables probably decreased its risk. The judgments were mainly based on case-control studies. As part of the Continuous Update Project, we updated the scientific evidence accumulated from cohort studies in this topic.

    Methods: We updated the Continuous Update Project database up to 10 January 2017 by searching in PubMed and conducted dose-response meta-analyses to estimate summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using random effects model.

    Results: A total of 57 cohort studies were included in 13 meta-analyses. Esophageal adenocarcinoma risk was inversely related to vegetable intake (RR per 100 g/day: 0.89, 95% CI: 0.80-0.99, n = 3) and directly associated with body mass index (RR per 5 kg/m2: 1.47, 95% CI: 1.34-1.61, n = 9). For esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, inverse associations were observed with fruit intake (RR for 100 g/day increment: 0.84, 95% CI: 0.75-0.94, n = 3) and body mass index (RR for 5 kg/m2 increment: 0.64, 95% CI: 0.56-0.73, n = 8), and direct associations with intakes of processed meats (RR for 50 g/day increment: 1.59, 95% CI: 1.11-2.28, n = 3), processed and red meats (RR for 100 g/day increment: 1.37, 95% CI: 1.04-1.82, n = 3) and alcohol (RR for 10 g/day increment: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.12-1.41, n = 6).

    Conclusions: Evidence from cohort studies suggested a protective role of vegetables and body weight control in esophageal adenocarcinomas development. For squamous cell carcinomas, higher intakes of red and processed meats and alcohol may increase the risk, whereas fruits intake may play a protective role.

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