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  • 1.
    Ernest, Anya
    et al.
    Interactive Institute Swedish ICT, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    University College of Arts, Crafts and Design (Konstfack), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Exploring the pupil-­student transition through customer journeys2016In: Service design geographies: Proceedings of the ServDes.2016 Conference / [ed] Nicola Morelli, Amalia de Götzen, Francesco Grani, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press , 2016, no 125, p. 557-562Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Being a first time student is not only exciting, it is also like travelling to a new and far-off place. If you are already a resident, then it is hard to grasp what it was like arriving for the first time. This paper presents a project at Karlstad University investigating the experiences of first time students. 13 students from the teaching programs kept diaries for ten weeks concerning their experiences related to the first time at the university. The findings suggested, for example, an overload of information on the first day, a complex web structure, and highlighted the importance of social connectedness as well as the importance of designated facilities to help the students find stability and to focus on their studies. The project suggested low hanging fruit that could be fixed immediately and formulated new areas to be investigated and developed. Further, the information visualizations showed important in order to get things done.

  • 2.
    Hazel, White
    et al.
    University of Dundee, Dundee, UK.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    CTF - Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Pacenti, Elena
    Domus Academy, Milano, Italy.
    Mager, Birgit
    Köln International School of Design, Cologne, Germany.
    What Do Tomorrow’s Service Designers Need to Know?: What should a Masters Level Service Design Curriculum look like?2012Other (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Design i och för offentlig sektor2013In: Swedish Design Research Journal, ISSN 2000-964X, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 28-28Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    University College of Arts, Crafts and Design (Konstfack), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Centrum För Tjänsteforskning (CTF), Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Breaking free from NSD: Design and service beyond new service development2017In: Designing for service: key issues and new directions / [ed] Sangiorgi, D. and Prendiville, A., London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2017, p. 95-105Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Kremel, Anna
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Implementing design thinking as didactic method in entrepreneurship education, the importance of through2019In: Design journal, ISSN 1460-6925, E-ISSN 1756-3062, Vol. 22, no Suppl. 1, p. 163-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Entrepreneurship has traditionally been taught about entrepreneurship. However, teaching entrepreneurship requires practice and learning by doing. Entrepreneurship education requires education through entrepreneurship where the students feel the real life of being an entrepreneur. The process of Design Thinking offers a method for teaching through entrepreneurship. This paper studies the didactic experiences from a course at Orebro University School of Business where entrepreneurship was taught using Design Thinking as a method, enabling the through dimension. Results from a survey show that Design thinking as a method benefits entrepreneurship education. Some of the key elements contributing to the understanding of entrepreneurship and the iterative approach was a study visit and interaction with stakeholders, a target group of elderly people.

  • 6.
    Malmberg, Lisa
    et al.
    FoU i Sörmland, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Rodrigues, Vanessa
    Department of Computer and Information Science, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sweden.
    Länneström, Linda
    Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland, Uppsala University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. FoU i Sörmland, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Vink, Josina
    Service Research Center (CTF), Karlstad University, Karlstad Sweden; Experio Lab, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Department of Computer and Information Science, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sweden.
    Service Design as a Transformational Driver Toward Person-Centered Care in Healthcare2019In: Service Design and Service Thinking in Healthcare and Hospital Management / [ed] Mario A. Pfannstiel, Christoph Rasche, Springer, 2019, p. 1-18Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasingly, healthcare systems around the globe are looking to transition toward person-centered models of care. However, how to effectively support this complex transition is not clear. Here we forward service design as a key driver to aid in catalyzing this transformation. In this chapter, we integrate literature on service design (SD) and person-centered care (PCC) to better understand how a SD approach can aid in the transition toward PCC. Synthesized from existing literature, this chapter offers a framework for transitioning from the biomedical model toward PCC, highlighting key changes across four dimensions: contexts, roles, processes, and outcomes. We then show the alignment between PCC and SD across these dimensions and elucidate how SD can help to catalyze related changes with the support of specific methods. In doing so, this chapter offers a guide for healthcare practitioners looking to use SD to support the transformation toward PCC and builds a platform for future research at the intersection of SD and PCC.

  • 7.
    Malmberg, Lisa
    et al.
    Interaktiva och kognitiva system, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Högskolan för design och konsthantverk, Göteborgs Universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Design in Public Sector: Exploring Antecedents of Sustained Design Capability2016In: The 20th dmi: Academic Design Management Conference proceedings, Boston: Design Management Institute , 2016, p. 1287-1307Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Szücs Johansson, Louisa
    et al.
    Experio Lab, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Vink, Josina
    Experio Lab, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden; Service Research Center (CTF), Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Experio Lab, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden; FoU, Sörmland County Council, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    A Trojan horse approach to changing mental health care for young people through service design2017In: Design for Health, ISSN 2473-5132, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 245-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This case study describes 'First Line', a multi-year service design project focused on changing mental healthcare for young people that was conducted through collaboration between Experio Lab and Första linjen in Karlstad, Sweden. The project reflects a 'Trojan Horse' approach to changing healthcare in that service design was brought in by the clinical team based on the explicit agenda of developing new digital mental health services for young people. However, bringing in service design also came with the somewhat hidden agenda of supporting new ways of working within the context of mental healthcare. This case study tells the story of the overall project, how this 'Trojan Horse' approach to change through service design unravels and the benefits and tensions amid the complexity.

  • 9.
    Vink, Josina
    et al.
    CTF – Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; Experio Lab, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    CTF – Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. County Council of Sörmland, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Department of Marketing, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Elverum, Norway; CTF – Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Reshaping mental models: enabling innovation through service design2019In: Journal of Service Management, ISSN 1757-5818, E-ISSN 1757-5826, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 75-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyze how service design practices reshape mental models to enable innovation. Mental models are actors’ assumptions and beliefs that guide their behavior and interpretation of their environment.

    Design/methodology/approach: This paper offers a conceptual framework for innovation in service ecosystems through service design that connects the macro view of innovation as changing institutional arrangements with the micro view of innovation as reshaping actors’ mental models. Furthermore, through an 18-month ethnographic study of service design practices in the context of healthcare, how service design practices reshape mental models to enable innovation is investigated.

    Findings: This research highlights that service design reshapes mental models through the practices of sensing surprise, perceiving multiples and embodying alternatives. This paper delineates the enabling conditions for these practices to occur, such as coaching, diverse participation and supportive physical materials.

    Research limitations/implications: This study brings forward the underappreciated role of actors’ mental models in innovation. It highlights that innovation in service ecosystems is not simply about actors making changes to their external context but also actors shifting their own assumptions and beliefs.

    Practical implications: This paper offers insights for service managers and service designers interested in supporting innovation on how to catalyze shifts in actors’ mental models by creating the conditions for specific service design practices.

    Originality/value: This paper is the first to shed light on the central role of actors’ mental models in innovation and identify the service design practices that reshape mental models.

  • 10.
    Vink, Josina
    et al.
    Service Research Center (CTF), Karlstad University, Karstad Sweden; Experio Lab, County of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Joly, Maíra Prestes
    Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal; Dipartimento di Design, Politecnico di Milano, Milan, Italy.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. FoU i Sörmland, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    Service Research Center (CTF), Karlstad University, Karstad Sweden; Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Lillehammer, Norway.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Service Research Center (CTF), Karlstad University, Karstad Sweden.
    Changing the Rules of the Game in Healthcare Through Service Design2019In: Service Design and Service Thinking in Healthcare and Hospital Management: Theory, Concepts, Practice / [ed] Mario A. Pfannstiel, Christoph Rasche, Cham: Springer, 2019, p. 19-37Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation in healthcare requires changing the institutional arrangements or what are often referred to as “the rules of the game.” Such a change demands that actors do institutional work—intentionally creating, disrupting, and maintaining the entrenched ways of operating within the system. This chapter explores how service design practices contribute to changing the rules of the game in healthcare by integrating research on service design and institutional work. Based on a literature review, five characteristics of service design practices—multidisciplinary, experiential, participatory, experimental, and reflective—are highlighted and linked to the antecedents of institutional work. Illustrative examples of service design projects from Experio Lab, an embedded service design group in the Swedish healthcare system, are used to contextualize the findings. In doing so, this chapter provides a clear rationale for how service design practices enable innovation in healthcare and offer insights for healthcare practitioners interested in working toward institutional change through service design.

  • 11.
    Vink, Josina
    et al.
    Experio Lab, County Council of Varmland,Karlstad, Sweden; CTF – Service Research Center, Karlstad University.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. County Council of Sörmland, Nyköping, Sweden.
    Aguirre, Manuela
    - Oslo School of Architecture and Design (AHO), Oslo, Norway.
    Designing for Aesthetic Disruption: Altering Mental Models in Social Systems through Designerly Practices2017In: Design journal, ISSN 1460-6925, E-ISSN 1756-3062, Vol. 20, no Supl. 1, p. S2168-S2177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amid all the excitement about transforming social systems through design, there remains a lack of understanding about what design can uniquely offer to support this change. This conceptual paper contributes to the discussion by integrating research on design and systems thinking to develop the concept of aesthetic disruption, highlighting its connection to the alteration of mental models in social systems. With support from empirical illustrations of aesthetic disruption in the context of healthcare, we identify four core components of designing for aesthetic disruption: engagement of the senses, experience of dissensus, exposed assumptions, and reflexive actors. In doing so, we bring aesthetic knowledge to the fore of what design can contribute to social systems transformation and lay the foundation for further research and practice related to aesthetic disruption.

  • 12.
    Vink, Josina
    et al.
    CTF - Service Research Center, Karlstad University & Experio Lab, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    CTF - Service Research Center, Karlstad University & Experio Lab, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    CTF - Service Research Center, Karlstad University & Experio Lab, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Tronvoll, Bård
    CTF - Service Research Center, Karlstad University & Experio Lab, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Understanding the Influence of the Co-Design Process on Well-Being2016In: Service Design Geographies: Proceedings of the ServDes 2016 Conference / [ed] Nicola Morelli, Amalia de Götzen and Francesco Grani, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2016, p. 390-402Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to explicitly link co-design to well-being and expand the conversation about the influence of the co-design process on well-being. This paper highlights considerations for co-design researchers and practitioners interested in enhancing the value created through co-design. The authors draw from discussions in transformative service research (TSR) to better understand how co-design influences well-being. Co-design is defined as a process of joint inquiry and imagination where diverse actors share and combine their knowledge. Based on the broad definition of service set out in service- dominant logic (SDL), the authors take the position that co-design is a form of service and therefore stress the relevance of TSR to co-design. The paper identifies six dimensions of well-being discussed in TSR that extend and highlight gaps in co-design literature related to the influence of the co-design process on well-being. The authors suggest that these dimensions become a component of future evaluations of the co-design process and point to opportunities for further research related to how co-design influences well-being and supports transformation.

  • 13.
    Vink, Josina
    et al.
    Experio Lab, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden; Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. County Council of Sörmland, Nyköping, Sweden.
    Rodrigues, Vanessa
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Designing Good(s)?: Exploring the Politics of Social Design Processes2017In: Conference Proceedings of the Design Management Academy: Volume 3 / [ed] Erik Bohemia, Cees de Bont and Lisbeth Svengren Holm, Glasgow, United Kingdom: The Design Society , 2017, Vol. 3, p. 961-977Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As design shifts from designing objects to designing for social transformation, there is an increasing need to address political dimensions within the design process. This paper explores those dimensions by drawing insights from the field of Science and Technology Studies. In doing so, we bring forward issues of ontological politics within social design processes, including: the recognition of situated knowledges, the multiplicity of reality, and the performative nature of methods. The implications of these issues are investigated through the examination of two practice examples in which different methods were used to support reflection on politics in social design processes. This research highlights the need to be more critical of the “good” that social design processes are working towards and the methods used to support political awareness. It also opens-up a host of new questions about how to address political issues amid the complexity and multiplicity of reality.

  • 14.
    Westerlund, Bo
    et al.
    University College of Arts, Crafts and Design (Konstfack), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    University College of Arts, Crafts and Design (Konstfack) , Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dealing with wicked problems, in messy contexts, through prototyping2017In: Design journal, ISSN 1460-6925, E-ISSN 1756-3062, Vol. 20, no Sup. 1, p. S886-S899Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores how designers’ core competencies relate to the emerging paradigmatic shift in design practice, and provides suggestions for design education. The shift is due to the increased interest from design in engaging with social and political contexts and issues the last fifteen years. Designers have several core competencies and in this paper prototyping and thereby the capacity to work with wicked problems are explored. More explicitly, we suggest that designers can design relevant propositions with the help of successive prototyping. Tightly integrating designing propositions with problem setting is necessary when dealing with wicked problems. This works well when designers deal with signs and things. However, in order to deal with increasingly complex contexts, we suggest that design students should get more relevant experience of prototyping in complex contexts and improved reflection by making use of theories from STS in order to deal with these complex contexts. 

  • 15.
    Westerlund, Bo
    et al.
    Industrial Design, University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Stockholm.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    Industrial Design, University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Stockholm.
    Design beyond service and product - Educating for new vistas of design education: Final report2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Konstfack has had financing from KK-stiftelsen (The Knowledge Foundation) for two years to address emerging design challenges in the increasingly complex contexts that design is engaging with. Examples are healthcare, design for sustainable development, social innovation, service design. The objective has been to explore potential expansion and supplementary developments of the currently well-functioning specialisation Individual Study Plan in Design. This has been done in the project Design, beyond service and product – educating for new vistas of design professions. People from academia, consultancy, business and the public sector have been invited to workshops, seminars and symposia in order to learn from them regarding the current situation and anticipated needs. The project has also done study visits to design schools, organisations and businesses. The report presents reflections on design competencies and a few possible ways to proceed at Konstfack.

  • 16.
    Wetter Edman, Katarina
    Konstnärliga fakulteten, Högskolan för design och konsthantverk (HDK), Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Service Design: a conceptualization of an emerging practice2011Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Service design is an emerging design practice with an interdisciplinary heritage. Most previousresearch has been based on what service designers do; with the increased academic interestin service design over the past decade, the time has come to conceptualize the underlyingdiscourses. The main purpose of this thesis is to contribute knowledge to the emerging servicedesign discourse through conceptual comparisons of key concepts in the design and servicemanagement literatures.This theoretical licentiate thesis consists of a main body text, a Kappa, situating two previouslypublished papers in the research context. The conceptual framework encompasses areas ofdesign research, including design thinking, service design and design management. These areasare related to management research, with a specific focus on service marketing/management,including Service-Dominant logic and service innovation.The thesis includes an interdisciplinary literature review with a specific focus on how userinvolvement is conceptualized in service design and service management respectively, and developsa conceptual framework of service design based in descriptions of service design practicein the literature. The framework presents service design through five characteristics, as an 1) interdisciplinarypractice, using 2) visualization & prototyping, and 3) participation as means fordeveloping the design object, seen as 4) transformation, and 5) value creation. This frameworkleads to an understanding of service design practice as a continuously repositioning activity.The thesis argues that the relation between service marketing/management and service designis complementary, particularly in tools and methods for user involvement and co-creation,and therefore the relation is mutually productive. It further argues that design practice can helprealize Service Dominant logic, and a service perspective can help open up new positions fordesign practice.In sum, this thesis contributes knowledge that enriches the understanding and relevance ofservice marketing/management for the design discourse and vice versa.

  • 17.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    School of Design and Crafts, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Comparing Design Thinking with Service Dominant Logic2010In: Design research journal, ISSN 2000-7574, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 39-45Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The key principles of S-D logic and design practice have different roots yet are strikingly similar. Design practice and the more conceptual discourse design thinking (DT) are deeply concerned with the creation of value and the importance of understanding the users/customers.

    This paper introduces the characteristics of S-D logic and compares them with the central characteristics of DT. The paper explores connections and overlaps between the two concepts, and concludes that the connections are complementary, the main difference being the descriptive nature of S-D logic in relation to the interpretative nature of DT. Some practical implications of the use of service dominant logic for design thinking and design practice are proposed.

  • 18.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    Faculty of Fine, Applied and Performing Arts. University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Design for Service: A framework for articulating designers’ contribution as interpreter of users’ experience2014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During the past approximately 15 years designers have paid increasing attention to service and changes in our society, resulting in a new design discipline – service design. In parallel, designers’ contributions to service development and innovation have been brought forward, often emphasizing designers’ capability of involving users, acting in and through multidisciplinary teams and using visualization skills in these situations.

    Previously, most knowledge about development of new services has been treated within the service marketing and management discourse, where emphasis is put on customer integration in the process, and the co-creation of the value proposition - the service. Despite both knowledge spheres, design and marketing/management, have been deeply involved in the development of new service they have hitherto essentially remained unconnected.

    The overall aim of this thesis is to further explore and develop the connections between design and service logic through development of the Design for Service framework. In addition, this thesis takes specific interest in designers’ contribution as intermediaries between users and organizations in service design and innovation.

    Pragmatist inquiry was used for interlacing theoretical comparisons and explorations in the field to advance the inquiry. A field study of a 10-month collaboration between a design firm and an industrial company, focused on a service design workshop with customers and the outcomes thereof.

    It was found that the designers worked with users’ stories as design material and rematerialized them as scenarios, instead of through anticipated visualization techniques. Narrative analyses brought forward how designers organized the users’ different accounts into coherent stories and in so doing they highlighted conflicts experienced in the users’ value creation practices. The capacity to propose possible futures is generally argued to be core in design practice, this was however not the strongest contribution in this case. Instead the re-materialization of existing situations was the real contribution. Through interpretation the users’ experience was made relevant and actionable for the industrial company.

    This thesis connects research in design practice, user centered design and service logic through development and refinement of a framework - Design for Service. The framework articulates designers’ contribution in terms of value creation. Through this connection designers’ contribution and service design are repositioned from a specific phase of service development to an interpretative core competence for understanding users and value creation in service innovation.

  • 19.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    School of Design and Crafts, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Exploring overlaps and differences in service-dominant logic and design thinking2010In: New perspectives in Design Management: Selected Writings from Business & Design Lab 2007-2010 / [ed] Jill Woodilla, Ulla Johansson, Göteborg: Business & Design Lab Publications , 2010, p. 279-298Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    University College of Arts Crafts and Design (Konstfack), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Materialising contexts through design for service narratives2017In: An Introduction to Industrial Service Design / [ed] Miettinen, S., Routledge, 2017, p. 35-43Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    CTF - Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Relations and rationales of user's involvement in service design and service management2012In: Service design with theory: discussions on change, value and methods / [ed] S. Miettinen and A. Valtonen, Rovaniemi: Lapland University Press, 2012, p. 107-116Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The concept of value in design practice: an interview study2012In: ServDes.2010. Exchanging Knowledge: Conference Proceedings / [ed] Simon Clatworthy, Janne-Valtteri Nisula, Stefan Holmlid, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press , 2012, p. 87-100Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Use and the value thereof are implicit in the design discourse and therefore rarely explicitly spoken of,although they are at the core of design practice. With the recent turn to a service dominant logicperspective, the service marketing discourse opens up for understanding value as value-in-use andvalue-in-context. This paper empirically explores and describes ways in which professional designersthemselves express “value-in-use”. The findings suggest that professional designers do not focusexplicitly on value as a standalone concept, but conceptualize value-in-use through contextualizationand an extensive use of emotions.

  • 23.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    et al.
    CTF - Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Camén, Carolina
    CTF - Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Design thinking in public procured contract – is it possible?2013In: QUIS 13. Service Excellence in Management: Proceedings of the QUIS13 International Research Symposium on Service Excellence in Management, June 10-13 2013, Karlstad Sweden / [ed] Erik Wästlund, Bo Edvardsson, Anders Gustafsson, Mary Jo Bitner, Rohit Verma, Karlstad: CTF, Service Research Center , 2013, p. 164-167Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The tension between the increased demands on innovation, the use of design thinking for innovation when prerequisite for the service is stipulated in a contract is investigated. In the study context the service is public procured and stipulations in the contracts brings legal consequences to the innovations process. Insights how the tensions between design thinking and contract research can be used in order to create and better understand how new innovative service can be created is provided. The extended abstract ends with proposing research questions.

  • 24.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johansson, U.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The Meander Model: a metaphor for user involvement in service design2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    et al.
    Industridesign, Konstfack, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Peter R.
    CTF - Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Capturing Context through Service Design Stories2015In: Design thinking: new product development essentials from the PDMA / [ed] Michael G. Luchs, Scott Swan, Abbie Griffin, Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, 2015, p. 237-251Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    et al.
    CTF - Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Peter R.
    CTF - Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Design as driver for servitization2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    et al.
    CTF - Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Peter R.
    CTF - Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Narratives for probing context - observing service design at work2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    et al.
    HDK, Academy of Design and Crafts, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Lisa
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Experience and expertise: key issues for developing innovation capabilities through service design2016In: Service design geographies: Proceedings of the ServDes.2016 Conference / [ed] Nicola Morelli, Amalia de Götzen, Francesco Grani, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press , 2016, p. 516-521Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public organisations need to rethink the ways they innovate and improve their services. Service design has become a means to achieve innovation capabilities through service design projects with the purpose of both enhancing innovation capabilities, and creating new service. Based on observations, interviews and project documentations this exploratory paper reflects on the role and articulation of design expertise, how and if it may be transferred through design projects. Further, the relation between learning by doing and learning through expert examples is discussed through a pragmatist lens.

  • 29.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. FOU i Sörmland, Landstinget Sörmland, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Malmberg, Lisa
    FOU i Sörmland, Landstinget Sörmland, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Insecure and Inefficient: Employees' Experience of Wickedness in Desing Work2018In: PIN-C 2018 Eskilstuna Sweden: Conference Proceedings, 2018, p. 143-145Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    That design is beneficial for the development of public sector in more general terms and more specifically in public sector health care has been proposed and argued for some time. Emphasis is put on the way design methods and tools engage and integrate a diverse set of perspective, most prominently how patients and citizens are included in the design process. We reflect upon employees’ experience of being part of a participatory collaborative design process across organizational boundaries.

  • 30.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    et al.
    FOU i Sörmland, Landstinget Sörmland, Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Malmberg, Lisa
    FOU i Sörmland, Landstinget Sörmland, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Utskrivning eller hemgång?: Att samverka personcentrerat genom tjänstedesign2018Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This report presents the results of an intervention research project and follow-up carried out in 2017. The project teams, consisting of employees from Sörmland's municipalities and county council, endeavoured to interpret how the guidelines for safe and efficient discharge processes might be put into practice. Collaboration between different actors in the county council and municipalities is crucial to ensure a positive patient experience and a safe return after hospitalization. The Law (2017: 612) on co-operation in the discharge process, as well as local guidelines for safe retirement and effective collaboration that support the application of the law, seek to achieve exactly these outcomes. Following the introduction of the new guidelines in 2017, the research project aimed to investigate and work actively with the guidelines and their subsequent implementation. During 8 months from April to November 2017, the project included 55 participants, in 8 teams, from more than 20 different organizations within Sörmland’s municipalities and county council. The teams worked on adapting and/or finding new solutions to routines and flows in the discharge process that corresponded to the new guidelines. The project work was grounded in service design methodology and incorporated a patient as well as next-of-kin perspective. Service design is both an approach and methodology with the user's needs and experiences as its cornerstone. Utilizing service design enables the examination of several possible solutions, and the iterative testing of the solutions with relevant actors. The teams used approaches and methods from service design to develop and update routines, activities and processes, while upholding the patient as central to their work. The goal of this project was to develop person-centred approaches and routines through service design, and that these should be reflected in the guideline document. In most cases, the teams came up with solutions that led to increased collaboration and changes in work routines. The analysis shows that the solutions aim at enhancing both the safety of the individual and streamlining the work processes, through increased patient /user/ next-of-kin involvement. Furthermore, the analysis of the teams’ work shows that through a joint focus on the end user, cooperation between units is facilitated. Among other things, the project has contributed to the renaming of the guidelines from ‘Safe and Effective discharge process’ to ‘Secure return to home and Effective Collaboration’. However, the direct impact on the guidelines in general is otherwise difficult to assess and quantify. In summary, the guidelines that the project has worked with cannot be seen as person-centred in their application. A person-centred approach is included in the values stated in the guidelines but is not integrated with the ensuing instructions and process flows. However, by using service design, the organizations have created routines that conform to the guidelines and are personcentred. They are based on the patient's perspective and promote their involvement in the discharge process. In addition, the work has supported the participants by creating collaboration between organizations.

  • 31.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Experio Lab, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden; Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Moritz, Stefan
    Veryday, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Empowering transformation through design inquiry in public healthcare2015In: Proceedings of the Third European Conference on Design4Health 2015, Sheffield,13 -16 July 2015, Sheffield: Sheffield Hallam University , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In health and care service processes the coordination between different caregivers is one of the crucial challenges. This paper presents The patient journey project  as a practical application of a pragmatist pattern of inquiry (Dewey, 1938) and as fruitful way to work with/achieve transformative design. Situations of lived experience and moments of reflections perform as a carrier of knowledge and development. The paper argues that the design tools and mindset used in this project are of great importance in the ongoing transformation towards the patients focus in a Swedish public health care organization. 

  • 32.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    et al.
    CTF - Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Sangiorgi, Daniela
    Imagination Lancaster, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    CTF - Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Department of Computer and Information Science, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Grönroos, Christian
    Department of Marketing, Hanken School of Economicsm, Helsinki, Finland.
    Mattelmäki, Tuuli
    Department of Design, School of Arts, Design and Architecture, Aalto University, Helsinki, Finland.
    Design for Service comes to Service Logic2013In: Service Dominant Logic, Network and Systems Theory and Service Science: Integrating three Perspectives for a New Service Agenda, Giannini, Napoli / [ed] E. Gummesson, C. Mele, F. Polese, Napoli: Giannini Editore, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This article aims to bridge recent work on Service Logic with practice and research in Design for Service to explore if and how human-centered participatory design approaches could provide an ideal source for interpreting existing service systems, proposing new ones and thus realize service logic in organizations.

    Design/methodology: This paper compares existing theoretical backgrounds and frameworks from Service Logicand Design for Service studies that conceptualize core concepts for value co-creation: actors, resources, resource integration, participation, context and experience.

    Findings: Service Logic provides a framework to understand service systems in action by focusing on how actors integrate resources to co-create value, while Design for Service provides an approach and tools to analyze current service systems in context to imagine future service systems and how innovation may develop as a result of reconfigurations of resources and actors. Design for Service also provides frameworks, competence and tools enabling involved actors to participate in and be part of the service system re-design. Based in this the model Design for value co-creationis presented.

    Research implications: The authors bridge service research studies with Design for Service, articulating how Design for Service could be a key factorin realizing Service Logic in organizations. Emerging research questions and potentials for interdisciplinary work are part of our final conclusions.

    Originality/value: The paper extends the Service Logic literature by 1) repositioning service design from a phase of development to Design for Serviceas an approach to service innovation centered on understanding and engaging with customers’ own value creating practices 2) extends the meaning of value co-creationto include collaborative approaches for generation of new resource constellations and through this process achieving value co-creation in designing.

  • 33.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    et al.
    Centrum för tjänsteforskning, Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Sangiorgi, Daniela
    Imagination Lancaster, Lancaster University, Bailrigg, United Kingdom.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    Centrum för tjänsteforskning, Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Department of Computer and Information Science, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Grönroos, Christian
    Department of Marketing, Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
    Mattelmäki, Tuuli
    Department of Design, School of Arts, Design and Architecture, Aalto University, Helsinki, Finland.
    Design for Value Co-Creation: Exploring Synergies Between Design for Service and Service Logic2014In: Service Science, ISSN 2164-3962, E-ISSN 2164-3970, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 106-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to bridge recent work on Service Logic with practice and research in the Design for Service to explore whether and how human-centered collaborative design approaches could provide a source for interpreting existing service systems and proposing new ones and thus realize a Service Logic in organizations. A comparison is made of existing theoretical backgrounds and frameworks from Service Logic and Design for Service studies that conceptualize core concepts for value co-creation: actors, resources, resource integration, service systems, participation, context, and experience.

    We find that Service Logic provides a framework for understanding service systems in action by focusing on how actors integrate resources to co-create value for themselves and others, whereas Design for Service provides an approach and tools to explore current service systems as a context to imagine future service systems and how innovation may develop as a result of reconfigurations of resources and actors. Design for Service also provides approaches, competences, and tools that enable involved actors to participate in and be a part of the service system redesign. Design for value co-creation is presented using this model.

    The paper builds on and extends the Service Logic research first by repositioning service design from a phase of development to Design for Service as an approach to service innovation, centered on understanding and engaging with customers' own value-creating practices. Second, it builds on and extends through discussing the meaning of value co-creation and identifying and distinguishing collaborative approaches for the generation of new resource constellations. In doing so, the collaborative approaches allow for achieving value co-creation in designing.

  • 34.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Academy of Design and Crafts, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; Experio Lab, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden; FoUiS, County Council of Sörmland, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Vink, Josina
    Centre for Service Research, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden; Experio Lab, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Blomkvist, Johan
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Staging aesthetic disruption through design methods for service innovation2018In: Design Studies, ISSN 0142-694X, E-ISSN 1872-6909, Vol. 55, p. 5-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the discourse connecting design and innovation, there has been a growing emphasis on the importance of cognitive processes in relation to design methods. However, the over-emphasis on cognition fails to clearly identify the triggers of change necessary for service innovation. In response, this article draws on classic American pragmatism and service-dominant logic to highlight the underappreciated role of actors' bodily experiences when using design methods for service innovation. The authors of this paper posit that design methods stage aesthetic disruption, a sensory experience that challenges actors' existing assumptions. In doing so, the use of design methods can lead to destabilizing the habitual action of participating actors, helping them to break free of existing institutions and contribute to service innovation.

  • 35.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    et al.
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Vink, Josina
    Experio Lab, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden; CTF – Service Research Center, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Edman, Tomas
    Experio Lab, County Council of Värmland, Karlstad, Sweden.
    The Experio Way: operationalizing experiential and aesthetic knowledge for service innovation2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Health care both in public and private spheres is under increasing pressure to innovate. Ageing populations, increasing demands, rising costs and outdated infrastructure are just a few of the many challenges the sector is facing today. Understanding service as value co-creation taking place in interaction (Edvardsson, Gustafsson, & Roos, 2005; Vargo & Lusch, 2004) emphasizes that resources are located within and outside the health care system. Seeing service innovation as novel ways of integrating resources (Lusch & Nambisan, 2015Koskela-Huotari et al, 2016; Rusanen et al, 2014) means that there is a pressing need to involve the knowledge, experiences and skills of employees, patients and relatives in the service development process. Recent advancements in service research emphasize the need to recognize the patient as a co-creator of the care processes, not as a passive receiver. New approaches for understanding the patients within the health care sector are necessary to create solutions that reduce costs while achieving efficiency, engagement and better overall value in delivery. Design thinking and practice, and more specifically service design, are increasingly applied to and used for improvement and innovation in health care settings (Bate & Robert, 2008; Freire & Sangiorgi, 2010). Design methods with participatory, empathic and experiential characteristics are repeatedly employed. Design thinking as concept has been critiqued for a superficial use of design methods without taking design practice experience and aesthetic competence into account (Tonkinwise, 2011). Stephens and Boland (2014)bring specific attention to aesthetic knowledge being core to design thinking and how it challenges what is known in organizations. Aesthetic knowledge is based on learning through our bodily senses and is embedded in design practice and methods. Drawing on a pragmatist position on experience and inquiry, Stephens and Boland argue that aesthetic knowledge is specifically useful for defining and solving problems. Service design methods, based in design knowledge, make explicit use of aesthetic and experiential knowledge for understanding how value co-creation takes place and what is important in the value co-creation situation (Wetter-Edman, 2014). This includes both drawing on the participant’s prior experiences as well as staging situations where lived experiences may be formed. The Swedish national center for patient-focused service innovation, Experio Lab, integrates design within health care for service innovation purposes. The center is a learning project and a part of County Council of Värmland. Experio Lab has the dual goal of developing valuable services from the patient’s perspective and equipping health care personnel with tools to continually involve patients (Experiolab.se). This paper presents three cases from Experio Lab that take different approaches to creating and engaging lived experiences for forming the bases of service innovation:1) The Patient Journey: the purpose of this project was to understand what happens in the care co-ordination process, from the patient’s perspective, when different systems, competences and people interact throughout the patient’s experience. The patient’s journey was investigated before, during and after a specific case of illness. The project involved a combination of several different methods: becoming a user, role-play, participant observation, journey mapping and expert interviews.2) The Test-tube Journey: the purpose of this project was to decrease the error-rate when tests of blood and tissues are taken. In this project, the journey of a test-tube through the system was followed with specific attention paid to the situations where different test are taken. 3) Chronically Devoted: the purpose of this project was to create good examples of how the care of terminally ill can involve higher levels of co-creation for radically improved care. Patients were deeply involved throughout both the exploration and ideation phases of the project. The Experio Way includes three commitments: 1) curiosity and empathy for people’s everyday lives, 2) courage to dream of a better future and 3) co-creation to make it happen. The above project examples show how a foundation can be built within organizations to integrate lived experience and aesthetic knowledge into the service innovation process. These cases demonstrate how the integration of experiential and aesthetic knowledge contributes to patient-centered care within the healthcare system and challenges actors’ existing routines.

  • 36.
    Williams, Helén
    et al.
    Service Research Center and Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Wikström, Fredrik
    Service Research Center and Department of Engineering and Chemical Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Kristensson, Per
    Service Research Center and Department of Social and Psychological Studies, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Decisions on Recycling or Waste: How Packaging Functions Affect the Fate of Used Packaging in Selected Swedish Households2018In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 10, no 12, article id 4794Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The intention of this paper is to learn more about why consumers choose whether or not to recycle, with special attention given to the functions of the packaging itself, in order to provide suggestions for improvements in packaging design, recycling systems and the environmental assessment of different packaging designs. The study focussed on ten households in Sweden that where motivated to participate in the study in order to gain an understanding of the complex matter of this decision-making process. The intention of implementing an interview-based qualitative study was to gain rich data and to reach beyond the respondents’ immediate verbal responses. The respondents were interviewed with open-ended questions, which were supported with pictures of packaging; additionally, their waste bins were examined. This explorative study suggests a set of obstacles that cause consumers to dispose of packaging relating to the functions of packaging. The different obstacles that determine whether or not packaging is recycled were organised according to three different themes: the attitude towards cleanliness, the effort required to clean and sort and uncertainties about the best environmental alternative. The different functions of packaging do in fact influence all of the identified themes and; therefore, influence the decisions consumers make with regards to the recycling of specific packaging. The identified packaging functions were easy to separate different materials, easy to separate different parts, easy to clean, easy to empty, easy to reseal, easy to compress and communication regarding recycling. Consumer behaviour with regards to specific packaging functions and recycling should be further investigated. It should also be considered for inclusion in design processes, to increase the chance of materials being recycled, and in food-packaging life-cycle assessments, to provide results that align more closely with reality.

  • 37.
    Windahl, Charlotta
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. University of Auckland.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Designing for Service: From Service-Dominant Logic to Design Practice (and Vice Versa)2018In: The SAGE Handbook of Service-Dominant Logic / [ed] Stephen L. Vargo, Robert F. Lusch, Sage Publications, 2018, p. 674-688Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Windahl, Charlotta
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Wetter-Edman, Katarina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Dynamic Market Design2018Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
1 - 38 of 38
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