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  • 1.
    Gorreja, Frida
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital. Hospital Pharmacy, Veneto Institute of Oncology - IRCCS, Padua, Italy.
    Damuzzo, Vera
    Hospital Pharmacy, Veneto Institute of Oncology IRCCS, Padua, Italy; School of Hospital Pharmacy, University of Padua, Padua, Italy.
    Gallo, Umberto
    Pharmaceutical Department, Local Health Unit n. 6 Euganea, Padua, Italy.
    Russi, Alberto
    Hospital Pharmacy, Veneto Institute of Oncology IRCCS, Padua, Italy.
    Lo Re, Francesco
    Hospital Pharmacy, Veneto Institute of Oncology IRCCS, Padua, Italy.
    Ciampalini, Susanna
    Ministry of Health, Rome, Italy.
    Guidotti, Lucia
    Ministry of Health, Rome, Italy.
    Serena, Marta
    School of Hospital Pharmacy, University of Padua, Padua, Italy.
    Palozzo, Claudio
    Hospital Pharmacy, Veneto Institute of Oncology IRCCS, Padua, Italy.
    A survey on patients medication reconciliation process in an oncological hospital2017In: Recenti Progressi in Medicina, ISSN 0034-1193, Vol. 108, no 3, p. 141-148Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of medication reconciliation in the clinical practice from a hospital pharmacist point of view.

    Methods. A survey of the medication taken by cancer patients was performed on admission and on discharge in an Oncological hospital, and then the subjects were followed up until discharge for 8 weeks. The pharmacist entered the data collected into a computer based tool which, by using Screening Tool of Older Persons’ Potentially Inappropriate Prescriptions (STOPP criteria) and Micromedex™ interactions database, automatically produces a report indicating the possible inconsistencies. The report is to check all potentially inappropriate prescriptions (PIPs) correlated to the drugs assumption by the patient. The appropriateness of the medication was scored using a Medication Appropriateness Index (MAI index) which was used to reconcile the medication list accordingly.

    Results. Patients reconciled at admission were 98, while patients reconciled at discharge were 90, 8 patients dropped out due to death. After the intervention of the hospital pharmacist, the average value of MAI index showed a significant reduction (3,391 to 2,552 p=0.039) and the median number of drugs prescribed per patient was decreased (7 vs 6; p=0.8058).

    Conclusion. Our study demonstrated that the forms used in the reconciliation process, in particular the record card, is a promising method to increase the quality of the information related to drug use in clinical decisions. We think that medication reconciliation softwares should be widely used by health care professionals involved in the recording of drug history or prescription process.

  • 2.
    Gorreja, Frida
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Rangel, Ignacio
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Rush, Stephen
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Wall, Rebecca
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    De Vos, Willem M.
    Wageningen University & Research Centre, Wageningen, Netherlands; Department of Bacteriology and Immunology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
    Brummer, Robert Jan
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Double-blind cross-over trial reveals human mucosal transcriptome responses to variants of LGG administration in vivo2018In: Targeting microbiota: 6th World congress on targeting microbiota towards clinical revolution / [ed] Peter Konturek, Porto, Portugal: ISM , 2018, Vol. 5, article id 978-2-35609-010-2Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Gorreja, Frida
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Rush, Stephen
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Kasper, Dennis
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Boston, USA; Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA.
    Brummer, Robert Jan
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Meng, Di
    Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA; Mucosal Immunology Laboratory, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Boston, USA.
    Walker, W. Allan
    Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA; Mucosal Immunology Laboratory, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Boston, USA.
    Beneficial bacteria that affect Toll-like receptors in the gut immune system: the case of PSA on Bacteroides fragilis and transcription profile of developmentally-regulated genes2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Gorreja, Frida
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Rush, Stephen
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Marques, Tatiana M.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Repsilber, Dirk
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Baker, Adam
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Head of Discovery, Microbiome and Human Health, Christian Hansen, Danimark.
    Wall, Rebecca
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Brummer, Robert Jan
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    The impacts of probiotics and prebiotics on the gut mucosa and immune system through targeting inflammation and intestinal barrier function2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Löwa, Anna
    et al.
    Institute for Pharmacy, Pharmacology & Toxicology, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Jevtic, Marijana
    Institute for Pharmacy, Pharmacology & Toxicology, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Gorreja, Frida
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Hedtrich, Sarah
    Institute for Pharmacy, Pharmacology & Toxicology, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Alternatives to animal testing in basic and preclinical research of atopic dermatitis2018In: Experimental dermatology, ISSN 0906-6705, E-ISSN 1600-0625, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 476-483Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease of increasing prevalence, especially in industrialized countries. Roughly 25% of the children and 1%-3% of adults are affected. Although significant progress has been made in the understanding of the pathogenesis of AD, many aspects remain poorly understood. Moreover, there is a pressing need for improved therapeutic options. Studies to elucidate the pathophysiological pathways of AD and to identify novel therapeutic targets over the last few decades have been conducted almost exclusively in animal models. However, in vitro approaches such as 3D skin disease models have recently emerged due to an increasing awareness of distinct interspecies-related differences that hamper the effective translation of results from animal models to humans. In addition, there is growing political and social pressure to develop alternatives to animal models according to the 3Rs principle (reduction, refinement and replacement of animal models).

  • 6.
    Russi, Alberto
    et al.
    Hospital Pharmacy, Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-I.R.C.C.S., Padua, Italy.
    Damuzzo, Vera
    School of Specialisation in Hospital Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, University of Padua, Padua, Italy.
    Serena, Marta
    School of Specialisation in Hospital Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, University of Padua, Padua, Italy.
    Gorreja, Frida
    Hospital Pharmacy, Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-I.R.C.C.S., Padua, Italy.
    Palozzo, Angelo C.
    Hospital Pharmacy, Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-I.R.C.C.S., Padua, Italy.
    Improving the management of high cost anticancer drugs in a health care system2016In: Global and Regional Health Technology Assessment, ISSN 2284-2403, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 155-158Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As a consequence of the rise in cancer prevalence and in the cost of anticancer drugs, global spending for cancer is increasing rapidly. The aim of this work is to identify and assess some effective cost management parameters and possible strategies to contain expenditure. Cost limitation could be achieved by implementing effective prevention measures and other main actions: diffusion of tailored therapies; systematic postmarketing reviews; cost-effectiveness assessment; accurate treatment choices; more transparent and effective managed entry agreement policies; waste management through personalized dose preparation. To better manage high cost anticancer drugs, oncologists and hospital pharmacists should collaborate in choosing the right drug, for the right patient, at the right time. In addition, besides promoting the use of biosimilars and generic drugs, when different products have a similar clinical effectiveness, a cost-minimization analysis should be performed to identify the best clinical approach at the lowest cost. With the same purpose, verifying real life outcomes by managing postmarketing analyses helps to renegotiate price agreements in a value-for-money model; this could be arranged if the regulatory agencies renegotiate the previously established price within a defined time period. Finally, the centralization of high-cost drug preparation and the implementation of a drug-day (vial sharing) will reduce drug waste.

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