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  • 1.
    Andersson, Greger
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Klingberg, Per
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Sandberg, Tommy
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Introducion: Sameness and Difference in Narratology2019In: Froniters of Narrative Studies, E-ISSN 2509-4890, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 11-16Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Greger
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Klingberg, PerÖrebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.Sandberg, TommyÖrebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Sameness and Difference in Narratology2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Klingberg, Per
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Asarnas krigiska värld2013In: Axess, ISSN 1651-0941, no 9Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Klingberg, Per
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Att bekämpa det inre Ryssland – om liberalism, nationalism och föreställda gemenskaper i G.H. Mellins Sweriges sista strid (1840)2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Klingberg, Per
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Att få syn på språket2014In: Axess, ISSN 1651-0941, no 8Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Klingberg, Per
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Bäst var sagorna innan de skrubbades rena2016In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 26 augustiArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Klingberg, Per
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Den fascinerande och förvirrande Meyrink2014In: Axess, ISSN 1651-0941, no 2Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Klingberg, Per
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Den monstruösa modern2014In: Tydningen, ISSN 2001-4570, no 12-13, p. 26-33Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Klingberg, Per
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Den produktive viktorianen2016In: Axess, ISSN 1651-0941, no 5Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Klingberg, Per
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Den vilsne visionären – om överflödet av mening i Gèrard Nervals Aurèlia2014In: Finsk tidskrift : kultur, ekonomi, politik, ISSN 0015-248X, no 5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Klingberg, Per
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Disenchantment in Fairy Land?: A discussion of George MacDonald's Phantastes (1858)2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Phantastes (1858), the first major prose work of George MacDonald (1824-1905), was initially greeted with little appreciation and far less understanding by puzzled Victorian critics, who described it as “a wilderness of wilderment” and warned that reading the work may result in “a verdict of ‘determination of nonsense to the brain’”. It is well possible that the story’s protagonist, Anodos, would understand the critics’ predicament: on his twenty-first birthday, a fairy manifests herself to him and promises to show him Fairy Land, where he will be able to sate his longing for a fuller life. Having been ushered into Fairy Land, however, Anodos finds himself curiously torn between belief and disbelief, both rapturing over the “chronic condition of wonder” that Fairy Land fills him with as well as worrying that it may all be a “wandering dream of a diseased imagination”. This, then, is a fairy tale hero that excels in introspection and self-doubt rather than through valiant deeds. Anodos oscillates wildly in his perception of the world: in literally the blink of an eye, Fairy Land shifts from an enchanted landscape, imbued with mystical qualities, to a barren landscape, devoid of any higher meaning, and vice versa. This paper aims to call attention to this instability of vision, and argues that it constitutes one of the key aesthetic features of the text. It is suggested that Phantastes may be read as an attempt at imagining a re-enchanted world, an undertaking that is far from harmonious, as made evident by Anodos’ repeated lapses into dejection and materialism. This discussion will use Charles Taylor’s work on secularism and the modern subject, as presented in Sources of the Self (1989) and The Secular Age (2007), as its point of departure. The disenchantment of the (Western) world, Taylor argues, is intimately linked to the emergence of a new understanding of human selfhood. Discarding an older, magical worldview, we have come to conceive ourselves as “bounded”, “inward spaces”, attributing meaning to internal psychological processes rather than to anything existing in the external world. Any attempt at “re-enchanting” the world, Taylor maintains, will have to proceed from this modern understanding of subjecthood. But of course, accepting the notion that meaning only resides “in the head” creates a fertile breeding ground for relativism and radical doubt. In attempting to apply Taylor’s terminology to a discussion of Phantastes, this paper hopes to account for what could be perceived as a seeming incoherence of the text.

  • 12.
    Klingberg, Per
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Efterord2015Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Klingberg, Per
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    En författare träder fram2017In: Historiskan, ISSN 2002-150X, no 2Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Klingberg, Per
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    En subtilt gåtfull poet2012In: Axess, ISSN 1651-0941, no 8Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    I den norske poeten Steinar Opstads dikter finns en ständig närhet av bara delvis åtkomliga men betydande insikter. Ett av de inslag som bidrar till dikternas speciella karaktär är författarens egenartade bruk av religiöst språkbruk och symbolik.

  • 15.
    Klingberg, Per
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Fairy Land as a (Not So) Safe Space: Piety and Despair in George MacDonald's Phantastes2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Klingberg, Per
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Förbisedde Lindsay fantastisk föregångare2015In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 17 juliArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Klingberg, Per
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    George MacDonalds drömvärldar2014In: Nya Argus, ISSN 0027-7126, no 11Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Klingberg, Per
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    I sinnenas rike – om Jan Švankmajers filmer2014In: Nya Argus, ISSN 0027-7126, no 6Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Klingberg, Per
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Marie Corelli - en bespottad bästsäljare2014In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 25 juliArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Klingberg, Per
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mellan total meningslöshet och utpräglad illvilja2014In: Ny Tid, ISSN 1456-0518, no 1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Klingberg, Per
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    On Monstrous Mothers And Unsettling Nursery Tales: A Discussion of Lucy Clifford’s ‘The New Mother’2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Victorian writer Lucy Clifford’s short story “The New Mother” (1882) is as unsettling as it is hard to immediately classify. Is it a typical cautionary tale of the 19th century or a prime example of weird fiction avant la lettre? The protagonists of the story, the children Blue-Eyes and Turkeys, are tricked by an enigmatic girl into behaving so badly that their loving mother threatens to abandon them, sending a monstrous new mother in her stead, with glass-eyes, claws and a wooden tail. Convinced that this is a mere threat from their mothers’ side, the children persists in their disobedience, only to find out that it was all too true. She leaves them to their fate: and when night falls, the new mother arrives to the cottage. Terrified, the children flee into the surrounding forest where they live out the rest of their days, abandoned and afraid.

    Long a largely forgotten story, “The New Mother” has been the subject of a critical and academic reappraisal during the last decades. In their readings of the work, interpreters such as Alison Lurie and Anita Moss highlights what they view as the subversive nature of the work. There is, however, a harmonizing tendency common to these modern readings that makes them problematic: by trying to fully explain or reduce the bizarre elements of the story, these interpretations are not able to account for the fundamental strangeness of the work. This paper, then, seeks to discuss an alternative ways of reading the story.

  • 22.
    Klingberg, Per
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Provokatören och kosmopoliten Kracht2013In: Axess, ISSN 1651-0941, no 3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Klingberg, Per
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    På imperiets skuggsida2018In: Nation, stat, imperium: 17 försök / [ed] Mattias Hessérus, Peter Luthersson, Axess Publishing AB , 2018, p. 43-49Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Klingberg, Per
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    På tvärs mot historien2016In: Lyrikvännen, ISSN 0460-0762, no 2Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Klingberg, Per
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    René Lalouxs vilda planet2010In: Hjärnstorm, ISSN 0348-6958, no 105Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Klingberg, Per
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Romansens svanesång – om sjuttonhundratalets romanestetik och Charlotte Lennox’ The Female Quixote (1762)2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Klingberg, Per
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Självgestaltning och självmytologisering i Marie Corellis författarskap2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Klingberg, Per
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ständigt nya fall för Hercule Poirot2014In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 4 septemberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Klingberg, Per
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Svenska skräcken har rötter i 1600-talet2017In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 30.
    Klingberg, Per
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Så blev en kuriös parentes fantasygenrens stora pionjär2017In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Klingberg, Per
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Trickster Turned Sadist: The Role of Scottish Folklore in George MacDonald's 'The Carasoyne'2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1871 George MacDonald published a revision of the “The Fairy Fleet”, a work that he originally published in 1866 in the literary journal The Argosy. Now re-titled “The Carasoyne”, the story of the Scottish boy Colin’s mission to rescue a human girl out of her servitude to the Fairy Queen is given a startlingly bleak continuation – Colin, now an adult, must once again deal with the fairies when they snatch away his son. But this time the fairies are no longer portrayed so much as tricksters as genuinely malevolent creatures, who gleefully threatens to maim the child and does not necessarily feel bound by the obligations of their word, the “final proof of moral declension in fairies”. David Robb has noted that there is a “growing respect for evil” throughout the author’s realist novels of the 1870’s, resulting in more confrontative and less conciliatory narratives than those of the earlier works. A similar process can be traced in the author’s later writing for children, although one could question if the shift in style here has been accounted for in a fully satisfying way. This paper presents a close reading of “The Carasoyne” and highlight the way that MacDonald consciously employs motifs from Scottish folklore and ballads to create more unsettling fairies than the Victorian reader of literary fairy tales was accustomed to. The analysis draws on contemporary scholarship on the fairy figure in the British culture(s), as carried out by Caroline G. Silver, Nicola Bown and Diane Purkiss.

  • 32.
    Klingberg, Per
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Uncanny universalism: Gothic imagery in George MacDonald’s Lilith (1895)2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As scholars studying George MacDonald (1824–1905) have paid an increasing amount of attention to genre questions, a discussion of the author’s relation to Gothic literature has emerged. MacDonald is often held to be an author who does not properly belong to the Gothic tradition: although prone to employ its motifs and themes in his work, this is frequently understood as a means to further a benign worldview, ultimately at odds with the bleakness and despair often understood to be characteristic of the genre (cf. Scott McLaren, 2006, Susan Ang, 2008). This paper seeks to problematize this notion in a discussion of MacDonald’s late text Lilith (1895). MacDonald’s son Greville has suggested that Lilith was partly written as a reproach to “increasingly easy tendencies in universalists”, who, believing in universal Salvation, had ceased to seriously consider the need for repentance. The protagonist mister Vane stumbles into an alternative reality, possibly a purgatory of sorts, and learns just how dearly redemption is bought. This is a remarkably uncanny universalism, expressed in imagery familiar from the fin de siècle Gothic. Bearing in mind Nicholas Royle’s definition of the uncanny as that which “is destined to elude mastery, […] what cannot be pinned down or controlled”, however, this paper examines the possibility that the uncanny motifs do not merely serve to convey or to contain a benign message, but also undermines any assurances given to us by the text, thus creating an ambiguous and deeply unsettling text. A universal uncanniness, as it were.

  • 33.
    Klingberg, Per
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    When Cautionary Tales Goes Unheimlich: A Discussion of Lucy Clifford's 'The New Mother' (1882)2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Victorian writer Lucy Clifford’s short story “The New Mother” (1882) is as unsettling as it is hard to immediately classify. Is it a typical cautionary tale of the 19th century or a prime example of weird fiction avant la lettre? The children Blue-Eyes and Turkey are tricked by an enigmatic girl into behaving so badly that their loving mother threatens to abandon them, sending a monstrous new mother in her stead, with glass-eyes, claws and a wooden tail. When the children persist in their disobedience they find out that the threat is all too true. Their mother leaves them to their fate - and when night falls, the new mother arrives to the cottage. Terrified, the children flee into the surrounding forest where they live out the rest of their days, abandoned and afraid.

    Long a largely forgotten story, “The New Mother” has been the subject of a critical reappraisal during the last decades. In their readings of the work, interpreters such as Alison Lurie and Anita Moss highlights what they view as the subversive nature of the work. There is, however, a harmonizing tendency common to these modern readings that makes them problematic: by trying to fully explain or reduce the bizarre elements of the story, these interpretations are not able to account for the fundamental strangeness of the work. Rather, this paper argues, it’s precisely the uncanny quality of Clifford’s tale that allows it to transcend its given historical context and generate new, unsettling meanings for modern readers.

  • 34.
    Klingberg, Per
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zagajewskis kluvna värld2009In: Axess, ISSN 1651-0941, no 9Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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