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  • 1. Roderick, Noah
    After Universal Grammar: The Ecological Turn in Linguistics2012Ingår i: Logos & Episteme: an International Journal of Epistemology, ISSN 2069-0533, E-ISSN 2069-3052, Vol. 3, nr 3, s. 469-487Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Of all the human sciences, linguistics has had perhaps the most success in pivoting itself towards the physical sciences, particularly in the past fifty years with the dominance of Universal Grammar, which is most closely associated with the work of Noam Chomsky. One of the most important implications of Universal Grammar has been that language production in its most natural and optimal state is organized analytically, and thus shares the same organizational logic of other knowledge systems in Western science, such as the binomial taxonomization of nature and analytic geometry. This essay argues that recent challenges to Universal Grammar represent more than just a theoretical dispute within a single discipline; they threaten to undermine the hegemony of analytical knowledge systems in general. While analytical logic has served Western science well, analogical knowledge systems may be able to address problems that analytical logic cannot, such as ecological crises, the limitations of artificial intelligence, and the problems of complex systems. Instead of studying languages as a means of modeling human thought in general, languages should also be studied and preserved as heteronomous knowledge systems which themselves exist as embodied objects within particular ecologies. Rethinking language as existing on a univocal plane with other ecological objects will provide us with new insight on the ethics and epistemology of analogical knowledge production.

  • 2. Roderick, Noah
    Analogize This!: The Politics of Scale and the Problem of Substance in Complexity-Based Composition2013Ingår i: The Best of the Independent Rhetoric and Composition Journals 2012 / [ed] Julia Voss, Beverly Moss, Steve Parks, Brian Bailie, Heather Christiansen, and Stephanie Ceraso, Anderson, South Carolina, USA: Parlor Press, 2013, 1, s. 25-47Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In light of recent enthusiasm in composition studies (and in the social sciences more broadly) for complexity theory and ecology, this article revisits the debate over how much composition studies can or should align itself with the natural sciences. For many in the discipline, the science debate—which was ignited in the 1970s, both by the development of process theory and also by the popularity of Thomas Kuhn’s The Structure of Scientific Revolutions—was put to rest with the anti-positivist sentiment of the 1980s. The author concludes, however, that complexity-based descriptions of the writing act do align the discipline with the sciences. But the author contends that while composition scholars need not reject an alignment with complexity science, they must also be able to critique the neoliberal politics which are often wrapped up in the discourse of complexity. To that end, the author proposes that scholars and teachers of composition take up a project of critical analysis of analogical invention, which addresses the social conditions that underlie the creation and argument of knowledge in a world of complex systems.

  • 3. Roderick, Noah
    Analogize This!: The Politics of Scale and the Problem of Substance in Complexity-Based Composition2012Ingår i: Composition Forum, ISSN 1522-7502, ISSN 1522-7502, Vol. 25Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In light of recent enthusiasm in composition studies (and in the social sciences more broadly) for complexity theory and ecology, this article revisits the debate over how much composition studies can or should align itself with the natural sciences. For many in the discipline, the science debate—which was ignited in the 1970s, both by the development of process theory and also by the popularity of Thomas Kuhn’s The Structure of Scientific Revolutions—was put to rest with the anti-positivist sentiment of the 1980s. The author concludes, however, that complexity-based descriptions of the writing act do align the discipline with the sciences. But the author contends that while composition scholars need not reject an alignment with complexity science, they must also be able to critique the neoliberal politics which are often wrapped up in the discourse of complexity. To that end, the author proposes that scholars and teachers of composition take up a project of critical analysis of analogical invention, which addresses the social conditions that underlie the creation and argument of knowledge in a world of complex systems.

  • 4.
    Roderick, Noah
    Department of English, Illinois State University, Normal, IL, USA.
    Gods, Grammars, and Genres: Towards an Ethics of English Studies in Imperial Sovereignty2009Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    In this dissertation, the author argues that the post-process movement towards genre-based writing pedagogies is reproducing the logic of neoliberal or free-market ideology. By analyzing the relationship between three paradigms of sovereignty (feudalism, the nation-state, and globalization) and institutionalized language, the author demonstrates that teaching writing as multiple and genred as opposed to teaching it as a single, abstract skill is no a more rational approach, but rather a differently rational approach.

  • 5. Roderick, Noah
    Hawk, Byron. A Counter History of Composition: Toward Methodologies of Complexity. Pittsburgh: UP of Pittsburgh, 2007: 400 pp. [Review]2009Ingår i: Acta Antiqua Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae, ISSN 0044-5975, E-ISSN 1588-2543, Vol. 20Artikel, recension (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 6.
    Roderick, Noah
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    How to be a Realist about Similarity: Towards a Theory of Features in Object-Oriented Philosophy2018Ingår i: Open Philosophy, E-ISSN 2543-8875, Vol. 1, nr 1, s. 327-341Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay calls for an independent theory of features in object-oriented philosophy. Theories offeatures are in general motivated by at least two interconnected demands: 1) to explain why objects have thecharacteristics they have, 2) to explain how regular divisions in those characteristics can be intuited. Whilea theory of universal properties may be the most internally consistent means of addressing these demands,an object-oriented metaphysics needs to address them without a concept of shared features. This meansthat regular divisions of invariant features and our intuitions of them cannot be explained by the repetitionof self-same characteristics or natural laws. They can instead be explained by the immanent repetition ofsimilar features. However, this requires a new, radically aesthetic understanding of what it means to besimilar in the first place, one in which similarity is an emergent process rather than a state of affairs existingbetween resembling particulars.

  • 7.
    Roderick, Noah
    Columbus State University, Columbus GA, USA.
    In Defense of Grade Grubbers2011Ingår i: The Chronicle of higher education, ISSN 0009-5982, E-ISSN 1931-1362Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 8.
    Roderick, Noah
    Lourdes University, Sylvania, OH, USA.
    The Being of Analogy2016 (uppl. 1)Bok (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Similarity has long been excluded from reality in both the analytical and continental traditions. Because it exists in the aesthetic realm, and because aesthetics is thought to be divorced from objective reality, similarity has been confined to the prison of the subject. In The Being of Analogy, Noah Roderick unleashes similarity onto the world of objects. Inspired by object-oriented theories of causality, Roderick argues that similarity is ever present at the birth of new objects. This includes the emergent similarity of new mental objects, such as categories—a phenomenon we recognize as analogy. Analogy, Roderick contends, is at the very heart of cognition and communication, and it is through analogy that we can begin dismantling the impossible wall between knowing and being.

  • 9.
    Roderick, Noah
    et al.
    Department of English, Lourdes University, Sylvania, OH, USA.
    Olson, Travis
    Department of Teaching and Learning, the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV, USA.
    Beyond the Common Denominator: Exposing Semiotic (Dis)Unity in Mathematics Textbooks2012Ingår i: The New Politics of the Textbook: A Project of Critical Examination and Resistance / [ed] Heather Hickman and Brad J. Porfilio, Rotterdam, The Netherlands: Sense Publishers, 2012, 1, s. 151-162Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Mathematics teachers (K-12) utilize textbooks to largely determine the scope and the sequence of mathematics concepts taught in their classrooms (see, e.g., Braswell et al., 2001; Clements, 2002; Grouws & Smith, 2000; Grouws, Smith, & Sztajn, 2004; Woodward & Elliot, 1990). However, little is known of the nature of the learning trajectories of important mathematical concepts defined by textbook authors in the written curricula that serve as the conceptual basis for the scope and sequence of what and when mathematics is taught. Olson (2010) identified articulated learning trajectories (ALTs) defined by authors’ placement of concepts within the written text. The ALTs identified were related to the development of algebraic thinking concepts (e.g., functions) through the use of patterning concepts within four middle school mathematics textbook series: Saxon Math (Saxon) (Hake, 2007), Glencoe Mathematics: Applications and Concepts (Glencoe) (Bailey et al., 2006), McDougal Littell Math Thematics (Math Thematics) (Billstein & Williamson, 2008), and Connected Mathematics 2 (CMP) (Lappan, Fey, Fitzgerald, Friel, & Phillips, 2009). Importantly, differences in the development of algebraic concepts were identified among the four textbook series, as was the divergent use of mathematics terms critical in the mathematical development identified in the ALTs examined in the four curricula.

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