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  • 1.
    Galak, Eduardo
    et al.
    National University of La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.
    Varea, Valeria
    The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; National University of La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Introducción2013In: Cuerpo y Educación Física: Perspectivas latinoamericanas para pensar la educación de los cuerpos / [ed] Valeria Varea & Eduardo Galak, Buenos Aires: Editorial Biblos , 2013, p. 9-14Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Gonzalez-Calvo, Gustavo
    et al.
    Departamento de Didáctica de la Expresión Musical, Plástica y Corporal, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain.
    Varea, Valeria
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Martinez-Alvarez, Lucio
    Departamento de Didáctica de la Expresión Musical, Plástica y Corporal, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain.
    'I feel, therefore I am': unpacking preservice physical education teachers' emotions2019In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The teaching profession requires an understanding of teachers' and students' emotions, and teachers' emotions can influence their teaching practice, professional development and pedagogical approaches. Furthermore, emotions are embodied and they may have a detrimental effect on wellbeing if they are not addressed properly. This paper explores the emotional dimensions of preservice primary teachers' practicum experiences in physical education (PE). Body journals were used to collect data which were analysed using a Sociology of Emotions (SoE) approach. The findings revealed that preservice teachers' emotions manifest physically during their practicum, especially at particular junctures, such as at the beginning of their teaching. Preservice teachers felt the need to make a 'good impression' within the school through the regulation of their emotions as they faced continual challenges to succeed in unfamiliar teaching circumstances. The conclusions of this study demonstrate the benefits of providing opportunities for preservice PE teachers to reflect on their emotions during the practicum and the consequences that these may have on their bodies and teaching practices.

  • 3.
    González-Calvo, Gustavo
    et al.
    Department of Musical, Plastic and Body Expression, University of Valladolid, Palencia, Spain.
    Varea, Valeria
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    A Turning Point as an Opportunity to (Re)Think and Give a Voice to One’s Own Body2019In: Societies, E-ISSN 2075-4698, Vol. 9, no 3, article id 60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the intersectionalities of masculinity, fatherhood, and physical activity in relation to a Physical Education teacher who has been diagnosed with an illness. In so doing, we draw on autobiographical narratives to delve into how embodied subjectivities are constructed to advance knowledge on a new embodied way of being a man and a PE teacher that can be accepted and embraced. The results are organised into three main themes: (1) narratives of continuation: the “before” of chronic illness; (2) narratives of disruption: back pain and temporary physical disability; and (3) restitution narratives: damn it, now that I am a father. The results suggest that narratives such as those presented in this article contribute to the continuously changing process of life projects and that illness can assist in redefining and reconstituting the persona of a PE teacher.

  • 4.
    González-Calvo, Gustavo
    et al.
    University of Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain.
    Varea, Valeria
    School of Education, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia.
    Martínez-Álvarez, Lucio
    University of Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain.
    Health and body tensions and expectations for pre-service physical education teachers in Spain2019In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 158-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of the Physical Education (PE) teacher’s body, particularly for teaching PE, has been highlighted in literature. PE teachers are expected to be clear role models to students through their acts, behaviours and bodies. However, their strong embodied subjectivities, particularly those related to their teaching practices, may be problematised. This paper explores the ways in which a group of 15 pre-service PE teachers from a Spanish university constructed perspectives about the body and health in relation to their professional practices. Body journals were used to collect data, which were analysed using a Deleuze-Guattarian approach. The findings reveal the significant emphasis participants placed on their own bodies while teaching PE and the pressure they felt to conform to certain expectations of their professional roles. In response, we propose critical reflection on the content of Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) programmes and incorporation of alternative pedagogical approaches to alleviate the heavy reliance on pre-service teachers’ bodies.

  • 5.
    Haynes, John E.
    et al.
    School of Education, University of New England, Armidale NSW, Australia.
    Miller, Judith A.
    School of Education, University of New England, Armidale NSW, Australia.
    Varea, Valeria
    School of Education, University of New England, Armidale NSW, Australia.
    Preservice generalist teachers enlightened approach to teaching Physical Education through Teacher Biography2016In: Australian Journal of Teacher Education, ISSN 1835-517X, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 21-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a new learning experience, which was introduced following an examination of the literature regarding preservice primary school teachers' (PPST) notions of their past experience in Physical Education (PE) (Elliott 2013). PPSTs were given the opportunity to recognise, reflect, interrogate and reframe a critical incident from their schooling in PE or Sport. This exercise was designed to enlighten students about their own schooling and the potential impact this event may have on pre-conceived ideas and opinions about teaching PE. Students (N=214) enrolled in off and on campus mode, of a preservice teacher education program in a university located in regional NSW, were asked to provide information about, and to analyse, an incident, either positive or negative that occurred in PE or Sport during their primary or secondary school years. In addition, students were encouraged to reframe the incident and to seek out alternative actions that could have influenced the outcome. The aim was to encourage reflection about how preconceived notions pertaining to PE might be dealt within their present position as a preservice teacher. The PPSTs scripts were analysed using the Leximancer text mining software (Smith, 2000). Findings from the analysis provided themes and concepts, which suggest a similarity for both, off and on campus, males and females. However, there are some subtle differences between the cohorts that may be due to age or experience.

  • 6.
    Martinez-Alvarez, Lucio
    et al.
    University of Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain.
    Varea, Valeria
    School of Education, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia.
    Gonzalez-Calvo, Gustavo
    University of Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain.
    Exploring touch in Primary Physical Education practicum2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physical Education (PE) is a profession in which physical contact is often considered ‘normal’ or embedded in the profession. Touching has been questioned lately and studies suggest that PE teachers are confused and worried about how to act in particular situations. The decrease of touch in the last few years has recently been explored, particularly in Anglo-Saxon and Scandinavian contexts in relation to child protection discourses and current no touch policies. However, there is little research about physical contact in PE classes in Latin contexts where physical contact has usually been taken-for-granted.

    The aim of this paper is to explore how pre-service PE teachers in Spain identify and negotiate touch with primary school students during their practicum. Embodied teaching journals were used to collect data among a total cohort of 40 pre-service male and female PE teachers from a university in Spain. Participants had two practicum experiences during their degree and data presented in this paper refer only to the second practicum, which is mainly focused on PE.

    The findings reveal that participants attach different meaning to different touches according to physical space, age and sex of their students, or to their pedagogical practices. However, these meanings tended to change throughout the practicum. Participants considered physical contact as ‘normal’ for the profession, yet they noticed some surveillance while touching their students.

    Results show that PE teachers may be more distant with their students and may try to minimise physical contact with their students. Also, this may lead to consider that all physical contact is sexualised and PE teachers may have conflicting and contradictory professional subjectivities. Finally, this topic may need to be included in Physical Education Teacher Education programmes, particularly during the practicum.

  • 7.
    Ndhlovu, Sithembile
    et al.
    School of Education, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia.
    Varea, Valeria
    School of Education, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia.
    Primary school playgrounds as spaces of inclusion/exclusion in New South Wales, Australia2018In: Education 3-13, ISSN 0300-4279, E-ISSN 1475-7575, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 494-505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to determine how the design and organisation of primary school playground spaces may result in the inclusion or exclusion of some groups of children. Two primary school playgrounds in rural New South Wales, Australia, were selected for this investigation. Data were collected through observations and unstructured interactional interviews. Data analysis revealed the design and organisation of primary school play spaces may lead to segregation among school children. Gender, safety concerns and school rules were also established as factors restricting full use of the playground space. The identification of these factors is vital in guiding future school reform programmes and policies aimed at enhancing participation in play and a sense of belonging for all children. The results suggest that there is need to promote schools’ understandings of the significance of playground spaces in children’s social lives so children can fully benefit from the time they spend in school playgrounds.

  • 8.
    Olive, Rebecca
    et al.
    The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Varea, Valeria
    School of Education, University of New England, Armidale NSW, Australia.
    Healthy, happy, active, strong: Progress selfies and the construction of women’s bodies2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Olive, Rebecca
    et al.
    The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Varea, Valeria
    School of Education, University of New England, Armidale, Australia.
    Healthy, happy, strong and active: Progress selfies and the construction of women’s bodies on Instagram2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Social media is awash with images that women post to represent themselves: their lifestyles, bodies, communities, and aspirations. On Instagram, women’s health and fitness accounts are promoting the taking and posting of selfies in similar terms, encouraging women to use before-and-after ‘progress selfies’ to chart their body changes across time. This presentation, given by Dr Olive, will explore progress selfies re-posted on the Instagram account of women’s fitness celebrity, Kayla Itsines, to consider how healthy bodies are understood as always ‘in progress’.

  • 10.
    Pang, Bonnie
    et al.
    School of Science and Health, University of Western Sydney, Penrith NSW, Australia.
    Alfrey, Laura
    Faculty of Education, Monash University (Peninsula Campus), Melbourne VIC, Australia.
    Varea, Valeria
    School of Education, University of New England, Armidale NSW, Australia.
    Young Chinese Australians' subjectivities of ‘health’ and ‘(un)healthy bodies’2016In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 21, no 7, p. 1091-1108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Young people with English as an Additional Language/Dialect backgrounds are often identified in public health messages and popular media as ‘bodies at risk’ because they do not conform to the health regimens of contemporary Western societies. With increasing numbers of Chinese students in Australian schools, it is necessary to advance teachers' understandings of the ways in which these young people negotiate notions of ‘health’ and ‘(un)healthy bodies’. This paper explores the ways in which young Chinese Australians' understand health and (un)healthy bodies. The data upon which this paper focuses were drawn from a larger scale study underpinned by critical, interpretive, ethnographic methods. The participants in this study were 12 young Chinese Australians, aged 10–15 years, from two schools. Photographs of a variety of bodies were sourced from popular magazines and used as a means of interview elicitation. The young people were invited to comment on the photographs and discuss what ‘health’ and the notion of a ‘(un)healthy body’ meant to them. Foucault's concepts of discursive practice and normalisation are used alongside Chinese concepts of holistic paradigms and Wen–Wu to unpack the young people's subjectivities on health and (un)healthy bodies. The findings invite us to move beyond Western subjectivities of health and (un)healthy bodies and highlight the multidimensional and diverse perspectives espoused by some of the young Chinese Australians in this study. The research findings can inform future policy and practice relevant to the exploration of health and (un)healthy bodies in health and physical education and health and physical education teacher education.

  • 11.
    Pang, Bonnie
    et al.
    School of Science and Health, Institute for Culture and Society, University of Western Sydney, Penrith NSW, Australia.
    Varea, Valeria
    School of Education, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia.
    Cavallin, Sarah
    School of Science and Health, University of Western Sydney, Penrith, NSW, Australia.
    Cupac, Alexia
    School of Science and Health, University of Western Sydney, Penrith, NSW, Australia.
    Experiencing risk, surveillance, and prosumption: health and physical education students’ perceptions of digitised health and physical activity data2019In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 24, no 8, p. 801-813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital technologies are now considered important in shaping young people's engagement in and with health and physical activity. Recent discussions show that the use of digital technologies to track health and fitness may over-emphasize the linear understanding of the body and health generally underpinned by Western health ideologies such as healthism. Other studies have shown the increased use of digital technologies in teaching Health and Physical Education (HPE) and as a means to enhance health and increase physical activity. Despite the opportunities and risks apparent in these studies, little is known about how HPE students make choices, negotiate, and resist or embrace the digitalisation of physical activity, exercise, and more broadly health. This study examines HPE students’ meaning making of risk and surveillance associated with the self-digitisation of exercise. The study further investigates how the concept of ‘prosumption’; the production, curation and consumption of self-data within the context of digitised health and physical activity, is understood. Based on the findings, we have constructed a typology of prosumers that can be used as a pedagogical device to illustrate the various kinds of subject positions students take up with digital technology in health and physical activity. This study extends the current understanding of prosumers by identifying the ‘ambivalent prosumer’. The results provide insights that have direct pedagogical implications in HPE teacher education specifically in the areas of knowledge production and consumption of knowledge through digital technology in health and physical activity.

  • 12.
    Scharagrodsky, Pablo
    et al.
    Departamento de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, Bernal, Argentina; Departamento de Educación Física, Universidad Nacional de la Plata, La Plata, Argentina.
    Varea, Valeria
    School of Education, University of New England, Armidale, Australia.
    Tracking the origins of Physical Education in Argentina and Australia2016In: International Journal of the History of Sport, ISSN 0952-3367, E-ISSN 1743-9035, Vol. 33, no 8, p. 777-796Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The origins of sports in Argentina and Australia have been widely investigated. However, little research has been conducted to investigate the origins of Physical Education (PE). This paper explores the origins of PE in both Argentina and Australia. It first describes the general social context and the education system for both countries. Then, it explores the foundations of PE as a school subject and as a university degree in Argentina and Australia. Finally, it compares the origins of PE in both countries. The research reveals how these two countries share similarities and differ in regard to the origins of PE both as a school subject and as a university degree.

  • 13.
    Varea, Valeria
    The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; National University of La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Argentina, Educación Física y la producción de conocimiento: El caso de EFDeportes.com2010In: Lecturas: Educación Física y Deportes, ISSN 1514-3465, Vol. 15, no 149, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Varea, Valeria
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Behind the 8 Ball: Pre-service Health and Physical Education teachers and the new Australian Curriculum2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores how a cohort of pre-service Health and Physical Education (HPE) teachers from an Australian university describes and constructs health and the body. The courses that these undergraduates take in their degree program present different perspectives about health and the body to students. Some perspectives take the status of taken-for granted truths and others are dismissed or ignored. A relevant question is to what extent do these perspectives adequately equip these future HPE teachers to successfully teach the recently released Australian Curriculum: Health and Physical Education. Taking a poststructuralist Foucauldian perspective, the aim of this paper is to explore the challenges and dissonances that these undergraduates might face between how they have been schooled during their undergraduate programs and what the Australian Curriculum: Health and Physical Education expects from them to teach. How pre-service HPE teachers think about and relate to health and the body is important in terms of how they think about their professional practice and the influence they might have on students.

  • 15.
    Varea, Valeria
    The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Bodily identities and possible methodology: First steps2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Varea, Valeria
    University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia.
    Body fat, pre-service Health and Physical Education teachers and moral connotations2016In: Active + Healthy Magazine, ISSN 1837-7378, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 14-16Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Varea, Valeria
    The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Bodytime: Exploring body dispositions of HMS (Education) professionals2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Varea, Valeria
    School of Education, University of New England, Armidale, Australia.
    Coming to research bodies in Health and Physical Education: An autoethnographic approach2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Varea, Valeria
    University of New England, armidale, NSW, Australia.
    Cuerpos, feminidades y masculinidades en el deporte: Un abordaje sociocultural2017In: Pan, queso y ojotas: Estudios alternativos sobre el deporte / [ed] A. Riccetti, A. Chiecher, A., & D. Donolo, La Laguna: Sociedad Latina de Comunicación Social , 2017, p. 377-390Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20. Varea, Valeria
    El cuerpo de la Educación Física tradicional2009In: Profes, Vol. 52, p. 1-5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21. Varea, Valeria
    El cuerpo en el juego: Posibles diferencias entre el juego espontáneo y el juego de la clase de Educación Física2010In: Investigaciones en la Educación Física que viene siendo / [ed] C. Centurión et al, Río Cuarto: Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto , 2010, p. 133-147Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Varea, Valeria
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Embodying latinness in Australia through dance2019In: Revista Tempos e Espaços em Educação, ISSN 1983-6597, E-ISSN 2358-1425, Vol. 12, no 31, p. 81-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dance, as an embodied activity, is shaped by culture, and simultaneously shapes culture. Significantly, over the last few years there has been a worldwide boom in Latin dance, which is often considered an ‘exotic’ and ‘sexy’ activity. This paper explores experiences of teaching Latin dance as a service activity (extensión, in Spanish) by an academic in Australia, shaped by the theoretical ideas of public and body pedagogies. The reflections are presented under two broad themes: the potential of Latin dance as a service activity, and the processes of integrating and othering Latinness in Australia.

  • 23.
    Varea, Valeria
    The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; National University of La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    En la búsqueda de significaciones socioculturales de cuerpos en la Educación Física2013In: Cuerpo y Educación Física: Perspectivas latinoamericanas para pensar la educación de los cuerpos / [ed] Valeria Varea & Eduardo Galak, Buenos Aires: Editorial Biblos , 2013, p. 191-210Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 24. Varea, Valeria
    Entre la diversidad metodológica: Estrategias proyectivas para el estudio de las representaciones de cuerpo2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25. Varea, Valeria
    Estrategias proyectivas en estudios sobre representaciones sociales del cuerpo en Educación Física2008Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Varea, Valeria
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Estrategias proyectivas para el abordaje de representaciones del cuerpo2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27. Varea, Valeria
    Explorando el juego y el jugar: Implicancias de los jugadores en dos situaciones de juego2012Book (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Varea, Valeria
    The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Exploring body dispositions among Health and Physical Education professionals2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Varea, Valeria
    School of Education, University of New England, Armidale, Australia.
    Exploring play in school recess and physical education classes2018In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 194-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to explore children’s play during recess and in physical education (PE) classes from the perspective of Huizinga’s theory of play. Specifically, this study investigated how primary school PE teachers used the concept of play, how it was understood by student participants, and how the participants engaged in the different phases of play during recess. Two groups of Year 3 children from two different schools participated in the study. Observations and unstructured group and individual interviews were used to collect data. The results reveal that PE teachers used the concept of play to propose activities, therefore employing play as a pedagogical tool. Participants engaged in some short breaks during the different parts of the PE class, during which they engaged in a ludic mode of play. Finally, the players communicated with each other in different ways while playing in a ludic mode during recess, using verbal and non-verbal communication and a combination of both. The results suggest that PE teachers need to determine which approaches to play are more appropriate to use in their classes.

  • 30.
    Varea, Valeria
    The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Exploring the origins and consequences of Health and Physical Education undergraduates’ body dispositions2013In: The International Journal of Sport and Society, ISSN 2152-7857, E-ISSN 2152-7865, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 207-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is considerable literature that supports the proposition that the body is central concern for Health and Physical Education (HPE) professionals. This particular group of individuals has certain dispositions with regard to the body that can be readily conveyed to their students in intentional and unintentional ways through pedagogical encounters. This paper will discuss how a group of undergraduate HPE students think about and consider the body. Taking a poststructuralist perspective and drawing mainly on the work of Foucault, in-depth interviews were used as method to explore how these HPE undergraduates came to shape their particular dispositions across time. Three main themes emerged: the ‘normal’ body, fat bodies and the HPE teacher’s body. Findings from this study will be helpful in understanding HPE undergraduates’ body dispositions and how they shape up their idea of teaching.

  • 31. Varea, Valeria
    Formación y práctica docente en Educación Física desde las representaciones de los graduados2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Varea, Valeria
    National University of La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina; The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    ‘Había una vez…’: La influencia de la literatura infantil en la construcción social del cuerpo2010In: Lecturas: Educación Física y Deportes, ISSN 1514-3465, Vol. 15, no 146, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Varea, Valeria
    The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    HMS Understandings of the Body2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Varea, Valeria
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    ‘I Feel, therefore I am’: Unpacking Preservice Physical Education Teachers’ Emotions2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35. Varea, Valeria
    Implicancias de las perspectivas socioculturales del cuerpo en la educación física2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36. Varea, Valeria
    La enseñanza de la Gimnasia en las clases de Educación Física: ¿una práctica corporal olvidada?2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Varea, Valeria
    The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    La influencia de los superhéroes infantiles en la construcción social del cuerpo: Posibles implicancias para la Educación Física2012In: Lecturas: Educación Física y Deportes, ISSN 1514-3465, Vol. 16, no 164, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Varea, Valeria
    National University of Río Cuarto, Río Cuarto, Argentina.
    La utilización de técnicas no convencionales para el estudio de representaciones del cuerpo: El caso de las estrategias proyectivas2009In: Lecturas: Educación Física y Deportes, ISSN 1514-3465, Vol. 13, no 128, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Varea, Valeria
    School of Education, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia.
    Mixed messages: Pre-service Health and Physical Education teachers’ understandings of health and the body and the expectations of the Australian curriculum2018In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 244-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores how a cohort of pre-service Health and Physical Education (HPE) teachers from an Australian university describe and construct their understandings of health and the body. Given that the courses that these undergraduates take in their degree programme present different perspectives on health and the body, a relevant question is to what extent these perspectives adequately equip these future HPE teachers to successfully teach the recently released Australian HPE curriculum. The participants in this study were 14 pre-service teachers, 11 females and 3 males, aged between 18 and 26 at the time of the first interview. The data used for this paper were taken from a larger study and were generated through interviews, the analysis of two undergraduate course profiles and an analysis of the new National HPE curriculum. Results reveal that there are some dominant discourses in health-related courses that may have a significant impact on these students. The purpose of HPE, the role of the HPE teacher and the idea of the HPE teacher as role model are also discussed. The results suggest that pre-service teachers face several challenges and dissonances between what they learn during their undergraduate programme and what the Australian HPE curriculum expects them to teach. How pre-service HPE teachers think about and relate to health and the body is important in terms of how they think about their professional practice and the influence they may have on their future pupils.

  • 40.
    Varea, Valeria
    University of New England, Armidale, Australia.
    Mujeres en Movimiento. Deporte, cultura física y feminidades. Argentina, 1870-1980: [Women in Movement. Sport, physical culture and femininities. Argentina, 1870-1980]2018In: Sport History Review, ISSN 1087-1659, E-ISSN 1543-2947, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 212-213Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Varea, Valeria
    The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    New methodological approaches to studying the body among HPE trainee teachers2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Varea, Valeria
    School of Education, University of New England, Armidale, Australia.
    On being a non-white academic in physical education and sport pedagogy2019In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 325-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conversation regarding the challenges and pressures that Early Career Academics (ECAs) face in the current context of the neoliberal university sector has begun to grow generally, and in the field of Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy (PESP) in particular. However, the additional challenges faced by non-white PESP academics in their early careers have, as yet, been absent from the ECA conversation. In this paper, I draw upon my own experiences as a non-white, female ECA with English as an additional language (EAL), working in the field of PESP in a developed English-speaking country, to explore racialised discourses and practices in the academia. To do so, I make use of a critical whiteness lens and an autoethnographic approach. In the analysis of the narratives, I invite others to reflect on how race is socially constructed, on the ‘extra effort’ that non-white academics with EAL must expend in order to survive colour-blind academia, and on the limited options for agency among non-white ECAs. The paper concludes with reflections on how academics need to open the dialogue ‘just a bit more’ to include non-white academics in the conversation about ECAs working in neoliberal university contexts to create spaces for equitable work.

  • 43.
    Varea, Valeria
    University of New England, Armidale, Australia.
    Percepciones sobre la grasa corporal en estudiantes de posgrado de Educación Física2016In: Ágora para la Educación Física y el Deporte, ISSN 1578-2174, E-ISSN 1989-7200, E-ISSN 1989-7200, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 117-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to explore body fat perceptions of a group of Physical Education (PE) postgraduate students. Seven postgraduate students from an Australian university participated in the project. A Foucauldian theoretical framework was used, particularly his concepts of discourse and Panopticon. Collective biographies were used for data collection. Results revel how significant others (e.g., parents, friends and partners) may act as Panopticon in participants’ bodies. While these significant others surveil students’ bodies at first instance, this is frequently changed to self-surveillance, and therefore, participants learn how to discipline their own bodies to try to achieve a specific body type. Results from this study have significant implications given that this group of postgraduate PE students will soon work with students or clients, and it has been demonstrated how they can transfer their own body and body fat perceptions to others.

  • 44. Varea, Valeria
    Perspectivas socio-culturales para pensar el deporte2016Book (Refereed)
  • 45. Varea, Valeria
    Por qué una sociología del cuerpo y del deporte2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Varea, Valeria
    School of Education, University of New England, Australia.
    Pre-service Health and Physical Education teachers’ discourses of the body and health in Australia and Argentina2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47. Varea, Valeria
    Representaciones acerca de la formación y práctica docente en el campo de la Educación Física: Una mirada desde los graduados noveles2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Varea, Valeria
    The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Shaping Body Ideas: Body Perceptions of Health and Physical Education Undergraduates2014In: Exploring Bodies in Time and Space / [ed] L. McLean, L. Stafford & M. Weeks, Oxford: Inter-Disciplinary Press, 2014, p. 49-60Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Varea, Valeria
    The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    The body as a professional ‘touch stone’: In the search of Health and Physical Education undergraduates’ body perceptions through visual methodologies2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Given the significance of the increase of the visual phenomenon in Western Society, new research methods that include a visual component have been developed in the last few years and are growing in popularity, including the field of Human Movement Studies (HMS). This paper will discuss how a group of undergraduate Human Movement Studies (Education) students think about and consider the body, through the use of media pictures.

    How HMS undergraduates think about and relate to the body is important in terms of how they think about their professional practice and the influence they might have on students. Taking into consideration the number of idealised bodies (active, healthy and 'well'-shaped) that are portrayed in the media, people tend to 'learn' attitudes and beliefs related to the 'appropriate' body appearance through the media. In this process the media does pedagogical work akin to a 'hidden curriculum' for many people, especially for young ones.

    The use of visual methodologies for this study is significant in helping to theorise young people's bodies, particularly on ideas around a 'normal body', the 'ideal body' and the 'HPE teacher's body'. Such methodologies provide the base for visual processes of meaning-making as a structure for people to behave and practice the body in physical activity, health and fitness contexts.

  • 50. Varea, Valeria
    The body as a professional ‘touchstone’: Exploring Health and Physical Education undergraduates’ understandings of the body2014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
12 1 - 50 of 63
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