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  • 1.
    Andersson, Rebecca
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden, Sweden.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Department of Food and Nutrition and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden, Sweden.
    Career paths of Swedish top-level women soccer players2018In: Soccer & Society, ISSN 1466-0970, E-ISSN 1743-9590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores seven Swedish top-level women’s soccer players’ career development experiences. Data were produced through semi-structured interviews and a biographical mapping grid. The theoretical framework of ‘careership’ was employed to understand the data. The results showed homogenous career paths. Moreover, the data show that the players decided at a young age to pursue a career in soccer; experienced the transition from junior to senior level soccer as difficult because of a lack of physical preparedness; soccer over school commitments. We recommend that soccer stakeholders (e.g. federations, clubs, coaches) give the transition from junior to senior level soccer special attention to prevent intense demands that may cause dropout. We further propose that if athletes should give sport and education equal priority, the Swedish dual career concept of high school education and sport needs further reflection and adjustment.

  • 2.
    Barker, D.
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hanging up the shirt: an autoethnographic account of disengaging from a social rugby culture2016In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 711-725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Violent practices are a common feature of homosocial sporting environments. The objective of the current paper is to explore how one individual disengaged from a sporting community characterized by such practices. An autoethnographic approach involving recollection and interactional exchanges is used to create a realist narrative account which offers insight into the process of disengagement. The narrative focuses on the: (1) ongoing nature of cultural participation; (2) agency and the restriction of ways of being in sports teams and (3) the durable nature of personal characteristics that are learned in sporting environments. These issues are discussed in light of cultural learning theory and specifically, the analytic concept, ‘becoming’. The paper concludes with methodological reflections and a consideration of directions for future research.

  • 3.
    Barker, D.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gerber, M.
    University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Gerlach, E.
    University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Sattler, S.
    University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Pühse, U.
    University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Youths with migration backgrounds and their experiences of physical education: An examination of three cases2014In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 186-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While understanding young people has never been easy, migration trends make it increasingly difficult. Many classrooms have become culturally heterogeneous and teachers are often faced with pupils with diverse linguistic and cultural heritages. Current scholarship suggests that as a discipline, physical education has not adapted to this diversity. In fact, commentators have suggested that physical education alienates pupils from minority groups and that traditional practices work to maintain cultural difference. The broad objective of this paper is to provide insights into how physical education intersects with biographies shaped by migration. Drawing from a case study investigation, this paper presents interview data from three youths with migration backgrounds living in a German-speaking region of Switzerland. The cases were selected because they highlight various ways in which physical education (PE) comes to make sense for adolescents. The key arguments that we develop are that ethnicity often works at an implicit level in PE, that young people experience the effects of migration backgrounds in diverse ways, and that migrants themselves support official educational discourses that work to disadvantage people with migration backgrounds. A key implication is that in a cultural milieu in which generalisations are normal and sometimes considered desirable, both researchers and practitioners need to be wary of racialising discourses. As an alternative, it is suggested that focusing on individual processes can improve the conceptualisation and implementation of physical education pedagogies.

  • 4.
    Barker, D.
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rynne, S. B.
    School of Human Movement Studies, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Lee, J.
    School of Public Health, Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia.
    Olympism as education: Analysing the learning experiences of elite athletes2012In: Educational review (Birmingham), ISSN 0013-1911, E-ISSN 1465-3397, Vol. 64, no 3, p. 369-384Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Olympic athletes are potentially the most visible exponents of Olympic values. How athletes learn values, however, has not captured the attention of those responsible for Olympic documentation or pedagogues. This paper examines how aspects of Olympism became relevant for three former Olympians during their athletic careers. Interview material suggested that: (1) inconsistencies within official expressions of Olympism mirror tensions in athletic experiences; (2) some claims concerning sport made in the Olympic Charter are simplistic and translate poorly to Olympic experiences that are multidimensional and complex; and (3) universal ethical principles have limited influence on how athletes conduct themselves. The results imply that pedagogues working with elite athletes should make discursive discontinuities in sport explicit, reflect on traditional views of sport education while acknowledging implicit learning, and approach questions of ethics from a specific and practice-oriented standpoint rather than a universal and principle-based one.

  • 5.
    Barker, Dean
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gerber, Markus
    Institute for Exercise and Health Sciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Gerlach, Erin
    Institute for Exercise and Health Sciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Sattler, Simone
    Institute for Exercise and Health Sciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Bergman, Max
    Department of the Social Sciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Pühse, Uwe
    Institute for Exercise and Health Sciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Swiss youths, migration and integrative sport: A critical-constructive reading of popular discourse2013In: European Journal for Sport and Society, ISSN 1613-8171, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 143-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper critically interrogates widespread assumptions pertaining to the integrative function of sporting involvement in Switzerland. It focuses specifically on young people living in a culturally diverse area and how they make use of discursive variations of the integrative sport text. Interview material draws attention to four main sub-texts that frame sport as: a pedagogical tool, a site of interpersonal exchange, a method of catharsis, and as an apolitical activity without relevance to ethnicity. It is argued that these sub-texts: (1) are embedded within broader culturalist discourse and, (2) either support divisive social relations or do little to challenge them. Both instances suggest that changes are necessary to the way sport is ‘produced’ in discourse if it is to positively influence ethnic relations.

  • 6.
    Barker, Dean
    et al.
    Department for Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Department for Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gerber, Markus
    Institute of Exercise and Health Sciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Pühse, Uwe
    Institute of Exercise and Health Sciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Maria: Italian, female, and pursuing dreams of elite soccer success in Switzerland2014In: Pedagogical Cases in Physical Education and Youth Sport / [ed] Kathleen Armour, Taylor & Francis, 2014, Vol. 9780203795927, p. 171-183Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Barker, Dean
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rynne, Steven
    School of Human Movement Studies, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Lee, Jessica
    School of Public Health, Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia.
    'Just do a little more': examining expertise in high performance sport from a sociocultural learning perspective2014In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 92-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research suggests that extensive training is necessary for the development of sporting expertise. Research also suggests that extensive training can lead to overuse injuries. The aims of this paper are to: (1) expand the concept of expertise in high performance sport, and (2) contribute to the discussion of how high performance athletes move towards expert performance in sustainable ways. To achieve these aims, data from retrospective interviews with four Olympians from four different sports are presented. As a way of extending traditional approaches, a pedagogical framework focusing on dispositional learning is employed to examine athletic development. The notion of threshold concepts is used as a specific analytic tool for thinking about how athletes come to make sense of their sporting environments. Interpretations of the data provide insights into the nature of thresholds in high performance sport, factors that facilitate threshold crossing, and factors that may prevent athletes from making advances, all of which have implications for practitioners interested in developing expertise.

  • 8.
    Barker, Dean
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rynne, Steven
    School of Human Movement Studies, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Lee, Jessica
    School of Public Health, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, Southport, Australia.
    Moving out of sports: A sociocultural examination of olympic career transitions2014In: International journal of sports science & coaching, ISSN 1747-9541, E-ISSN 2048-397X, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 255-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article outlines sociocultural learning theory, shows how this theory can be used to examine end-of-career athletic transitions, and stimulates discussion on the implications of this framework for sport professionals. The central question addressed is how learning in elite sport affects participation in activities beyond sporting settings. Data from in-depth, semi-structured interviews with three former Olympians are presented. The interpretation suggests that: 1) movement to new social settings involves abandoning some elements of athletic dispositions and developing new elements, 2) transitions are affected by prior learning in sport and the characteristics of new settings, and 3) learning in sporting environments is often unintentional or implicit. The results encourage practitioners to acknowledge the effort involved in developing new dispositions in different settings. They support a case-specific view of transitions where 'success' is considered in contextual terms. Further, the data highlight a need for sport professionals to recognize tacit learning.

  • 9.
    Barker, Dean
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wals, Arjen
    Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands; University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA.
    Tinning, Richard
    School of Human Movement Studies, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; School of Curriculum and Pedagogy, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
    High performance sport and sustainability: a contradiction of terms?2014In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Success in high performance sport has always been highly valued. Today, lucrative contracts, sponsorship deals and opportunities for celebrity status are balanced against substantial time spent training and high chances of failure. With pressure mounting on athletes to make the most of their athletic 'investment', the temptation to compromise their future well-being by exploiting their bodies for short-term gain and/or by cheating is growing. The aim of this paper is to explore the utility of sustainability science for thinking about these types of issues. Sustainability science is an emerging field which seeks to preserve the well-being of the planet and those on it by exploring the potential of nature and culture without compromising the future resource base. It specializes in developing holistic perspectives, considering multiple time scales, optimizing current systems without compromising the carrying capacity of the Earth, but also questioning the values and principles that dominate current ways of producing and consuming. Sustainability science acknowledges that we live in a rapidly changing world characterized by high levels of complexity and uncertainty. The proposition developed in this paper is that an exploration of sustainability perspectives can be generative in re-thinking and re-orienting the principles of high level competitive sports.

  • 10.
    Barker, Dean M.
    et al.
    Institute of Exercise and Health Sciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Institute of Exercise and Health Sciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Pühse, Uwe
    Institute of Exercise and Health Sciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Constructive readings of interactive episodes: Examining ethics in physical education from a social constructionist perspective2013In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 511-526Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we illustrate how ways of thinking about ethics are tied up with sport and physical education practice and introduce an alternative approach that can help to develop ethical pedagogies. We begin by locating socio-moral education in physical education within historical and contemporary pedagogical scholarship. Our argument is that the work of today's physical educators is still shaped by claims that were made about school sport in the nineteenth century and that sport scholars have long had difficulties proving these claims empirically. Rather than search for data that can confirm or refute claims of moral learning, we examine how incidents related to moral behaviour occur during physical education lessons. To do this we draw on data from an ethnographic investigation of a school in North Western Switzerland. Specifically, we present three episodes of interaction in three different physical education lessons. To make sense of these episodes, we introduce a social constructionist perspective. The main assumptions of this perspective are: (1) meanings are created through dialogue and consensus and are context-relative; (2) interactions between people are joint accomplishments; and (3) contexts affect how people interact with one another. Equipped with a constructionist framework, we then inspect the interactive episodes more closely. We include brief discussions of how constructionist understandings might inform ethics pedagogies in the future, suggesting that practitioners should be cautious of universal understandings of ethics, consider pupils as members of communities that are held together by shared practices, provide space for pupils to position themselves differently during lessons and, finally, account for contextual factors when evaluating pupils' actions.

  • 11.
    Barker, Dean
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nielsen, Jacob
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wahlström, Martin
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Carlén, Urban
    University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Jacob and Martin: Developing digital technology competence in physical education teacher education2016In: Digital Technologies and Learning in Physical Education: Pedagogical Cases / [ed] Ashley Casey, Victoria A. Goodyear & Kathleen M. Armour, Taylor & Francis Group, 2016, p. 231-246Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter provides an illustration of how digital technologies (DTs) are experienced by Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) students. The illustration is based on the reflections of two students at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. The students received an assignment that involved demonstrating how a specific DT could be implemented. Three perspectives of the practitioners' experiences are provided. A Deweyan perspective shows how the students and their situations are transformed by DTs. A Foucauldian perspective focuses on the regulating aspects of technology. An applied Information Technology perspective demonstrates how DTs become part of the social practices of physical education.

  • 12.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    "They must be working hard": An (auto-)ethnographic account of women's artistic gymnastics2008In: Cultural Studies - Critical Methodologies, ISSN 1532-7086, E-ISSN 1552-356X, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 372-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article includes narrative excerpts compiled from field notes the author collected observing six Australian women's elite artistic gymnasts and their two coaches. Using creative nonfiction and auto-ethnography, the stories' plots describe the gymnasts' daily training realities and include personal reflections on the author's gymnastics experiences and reactions to what she saw during the observations. The stories illustrate how, despite differing levels of authority, the coaches', gymnasts', and parts of her own identity and behaviors are shaped by a dominant gymnastics model. This ideal coerces the coaches and gymnasts to regulate their selves and behaviors according to its dominant characteristics. Although potentially beneficial and satisfactory, the training model's discourses and practices can have debilitating effects.

  • 13.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker, DeanDepartment of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sustainability in high performance sport: current practices - future directions2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Success in high performance sport is highly valued in today's world, with lucrative contracts, sponsorship deals, and opportunities for celebrity status balanced against substantial investments of time and energy, and high chances of failure. With pressure mounting on athletes and coaches to make the most of athletic investments, the temptation to make health-related or ethical compromises is growing.

    Sustainability in High Performance Sport examines the pressures faced by coaches and athletes, and considers how sustainable science can offer alternative pathways to sporting excellence. By applying principles relating to carrying capacities, complexity and uncertainty, production and consumption, and ethics, this unique book provides new ways of thinking about both enduring and emerging challenges. With a scope that includes themes such as coaching practices, coach-athlete relationships, over-training and injuries, the development of sporting expertise, and doping, Sustainability in High Performance Sport is the most comprehensive exploration of sustainability in elite sport available.It is an invaluable resource for anybody with an interest in achieving long-term success in high performance sport. This book was originally published as a special issue of Reflective Practice.

  • 14.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker, Dean
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Annerstedt, Claes
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Techno-rational knowing and phronesis: the professional practice of one middle-distance running coach2014In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 53-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sport coaching has traditionally been seen as a techno-rational activity. In recent years, there has been a 'subjective turn'. Intuitive, as well as situation-specific interpretations are today perceived as necessary to handle complex, dynamic and often unpredictable sport environments. While a considerable body of research has attempted to understand coaching practice, research on intuitive and situation-dependent praxis is only emerging. Phronesis - mostly defined as practical wisdom or practical rationality - has been put forward as a useful theoretical concept to frame such coaching practice. In this contribution, we employ phronesis as part of sustainability science to consider the coaching of one top-level middle-distance running coach. Observations, informal talks and semi-structured interviews produced the empirical materials for this analysis. The results suggest that the coach's practice was guided by both techno-rational and phronetic knowledge. While techno-rational knowledge manifested itself in a focus on time and control, the latter was reflected in a concern for impact, focus on community, authenticity and modesty. From a phronetic perspective, these characteristics can be seen as morally just and important precursors for sustainable sport.

  • 15.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker, Dean
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rynne, Steven B.
    School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
    Lee, Jessica
    School of Medicine, Griffith University, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
    Learning cultures and cultural learning in high-performance sport: opportunities for sport pedagogues2016In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker, Dean
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rynne, Steven
    School of Human Movement Studies, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
    Lee, Jessica
    School of Public Health, Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia.
    'One door closes, a next door opens up somewhere': The learning of one Olympic synchronised swimmer2012In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 373-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although training in sport is necessary to reach Olympic status, a conditioned body is not the only outcome. Athletes also learn how to be Olympians. This learning involves taking on certain ways of acting, thinking and valuing. Such learning has implications beyond competition, as athletes eventually retire from elite sport and devote their time to other activities. This paper examines processes of learning and transition using the case of Amelia, a former Olympic synchronised swimmer. Through two in-depth interviews, empirical material was generated which focused on the learning that took place during this athlete's career and after, during her transition to paid employment. A cultural view of learning was used as the theoretical frame to understand the athlete's experiences. Our reading suggests that the athlete learned in various ways to be productive. Some of these ways of being were useful after retirement; others were less compatible. In fact, Amelia used a two-year period after retirement to reconstruct herself. Key to her eventual successful transition was to distance herself from the sport and to critically reflect upon her sporting experiences. We thus recommend that those involved with high-performance athletes foster a more balanced perspective that acknowledges and promotes ways of being beyond athletic involvement.

  • 17.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker, Dean
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sattler, Simone
    Lucerne School of Social Work, Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Lucerne, Switzerland.
    Gerber, Markus
    Department of Sport, Exercise and Health, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Pühse, Uwe
    Department of Sport, Exercise and Health, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Second Generation Immigrant Girls’ Negotiations of Cultural Proximity in Switzerland: A Foucauldian Reading2015In: Journal of International Migration and Integration, ISSN 1488-3473, E-ISSN 1874-6365, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 1213-1229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although overtly racist political discourse in Switzerland has receded, culturalist discourses continue to construct ideal immigrants. Policies define immigrants in terms of “cultural proximity” and contain an implicit distinction between “distant” and “proximal” foreigners. Culturally, distant immigrants have been stereotyped as aggressive and/or lacking interest in education and professional success and while scholars have examined immigrants from Switzerland’s “culturally-near” regions, the experiences of second generation immigrant populations from perceived culturally distant countries have largely escaped attention. Knowledge about girls and women is particularly scarce. Against this backdrop, this paper provides an examination of how six teenage girls living in a German-speaking Swiss city negotiate their perceived cultural distance. By combining interview material with elements of Foucauldian theory, the paper provides insight into (1) the diasporic experiences of girls with second generation immigration backgrounds and (2) the operation and influence of culturalist discourses. Foucault’s notion of dispositive—the discourses, institutions, laws, and scientific findings that, through various means of distribution (e.g., media texts, policies, education curricula), act as an apparatus that constructs and supports normative ideals—provides a generative analytic tool for this task. The analysis suggests that the ways girls learn to understand their social worlds is a collective process of discipline that places mechanisms of social control within each individual. This process involves the homogenisation and marginalisation of the immigrant population and is circular in nature in that the girls strengthen and maintain the power of existing culturalist knowledge that works negatively on them. The paper concludes with a consideration of how this situation might be challenged.

  • 18.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker, Dean
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sattler, Simone
    Institute of Cultural Studies, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Gerber, Markus
    Institute of Exercise and Health Sciences, University of Basel, Switzerland.
    Pühse, Uwe
    Institute of Exercise and Health Sciences, University of Basel, Switzerland.
    Sport-'It's Just Healthy': Locating Healthism within Discourses of Social Integration2013In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 759-772Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Immigration discourses in Switzerland have developed out of a fear of 'over-foreignisation'. Central to this development are discourses of difference in which Swiss culture is centred and foreign ones are marginalised. At present, Eastern and South-East European cultures are particularly affected. In this article, we challenge perceived cultural incommensurability by examining the socialisation of second-generation girls of immigrant background, through data generated from semi-structured interviews with them. The girls draw on a tightly defined discursive range of linguistic resources to construct the meanings of sport, health and the body. Specifically, the girls refer to healthism, within which sport is seen to provide a means to achieve good health and a slim and feminine body. These references reflect a set of knowledge and discourses important to Western cultures. Alternative discursive resources exist, yet were not utilised. We argue that the girls' adoption of healthist ideas is used to counter cultural narratives-such as the uncultured, and thus non-integrated, immigrant-and that this adoption supports and maintains white healthist ideas, 'othering' the (foreign) other.

  • 19.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Grahn, Karin
    Department of Food and Nutrition, Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Annerstedt, Claes
    Department of Food and Nutrition, Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Moving towards inclusion: An analysis of photographs from the 1926 Women's Games in Gothenburg2013In: International Journal of the History of Sport, ISSN 0952-3367, E-ISSN 1743-9035, Vol. 30, no 8, p. 871-891Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 1920s was characterised by a struggle over the social acceptance and inclusion of women's track and field disciplines into international organisations. The debate was particularly heated between Alice Milliat, the then president of the Fédération Sportive Féminine Internationale, and the members of the International Athletic Federation and International Olympic Committee. Underlying the debate were differing assumptions about gender ideals and the role of women in society. While Milliat's efforts have been crucial and recognised in developing women's track and field, little research has examined how visual representations of track and field athletes related to gender norms. In this paper, we examine a corpus of professional sports photographs taken during the 1926 Women's Games in Gothenburg to gain understanding of how female athletes' media representations were part of negotiations over gender ideals. Placing the material within the notion of gender dispositive, our analyses reveal a process of negotiation between the new woman ideal that included characteristics such as autonomy and self-control, as well as the mechanisation of women's bodies and traditional notions of femininity.

  • 20.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Grahn, Karin
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Shifting, crossing and transforming gender boundaries in physical cultures2016In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 615-625Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At the 2013 conference “Gender in Physical Culture” of the ‘Transnational Working Group for the Study of Gender and Sport’, held at the University of Gothenburg, a number of presentations related to how individuals, groups of individuals and organizations challenge and change dominant gender discourses and practices. Several of these presentations have come to form this volume on ‘Gender in Physical Culture: Crossing Boundaries – Reconstituting Cultures’. To begin the volume, the following article outlines how the seven contributions are connected. We present Lamont and Molnàr’s (2002) idea of ‘boundaries’, which they consider as visible and invisible socially constructed borders that create social differences. Such boundaries are, however, malleable. We propose that this flexibility means that ‘gender boundaries in physical cultures’ can be shifted, crossed and transformed. The case studies included in this edition present concrete examples of how this is possible.

  • 21.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Tourism, Sport and Society, Lincoln University, Christchurch, New Zealand.
    Kerr, Roslyn
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Tourism, Sport and Society, Lincoln University, Christchurch, New Zealand.
    Schubring, Astrid
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Cervin, Georgia
    School of Humanities, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
    Nunomura, Myrian
    School of Physical Education and Sport of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil.
    “Gymnasts Are Like Wine, They Get Better With Age”: Becoming and Developing Adult Women’s Artistic Gymnasts2017In: Quest (National Association for Physical Education in Higher Education), ISSN 0033-6297, E-ISSN 1543-2750, Vol. 69, no 3, p. 348-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women’s artistic gymnastics is commonly understood to require early entrance and intense training during childhood. Most gymnasts retire before reaching adulthood. In recent years, the gymnast population at the highest level has “aged.” In this article, we adopt a socio-pedagogical perspective to explore the training contexts, pubertal development, and associated learning 10 older elite gymnasts reported. We develop a cultural perspective of gymnast development and show that transitioning through puberty allowed the gymnasts to extend their careers. Support from their coaches and parents, self-reflective time, and genetic predispositions facilitated the transitioning. Through this, gymnasts gained control over self, body, relationships, and performance. In conclusion, we provide implications for gymnast development practice.

  • 22.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Schubring, Astrid
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Moving into and out of high-performance sport: the cultural learning of an artistic gymnast2016In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 69-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: High-performance sport has been described as a formative environment through which athletes learn sporting skills but also develop athletic selves. Within this process, career movements related to selection for and de-selection from representative teams constitute critical moments. Further, retirement from sport can be problematic as the athletic self becomes ‘obsolete’. This dilemma is acute in sports that demand an early entry, extreme time investments and a high risk of retirement before adulthood. Women's artistic gymnastics (WAG) is such a sport.

    Purpose and scope: This article considers an artistic gymnast's (Marie) experiences of movement into and out of this sport. Marie's construction and reconstruction of her athletic self when she entered gymnastics at the age of six, relocated to a different city in order to train with the national team at the age of 15, and retired from the sport one year later receives particular attention.

    Method and theoretical perspective: An in-depth biographical interview was conducted with Marie. Further, the first author's personal knowledge of this gymnast's career experiences was used for contextualisation. The analysis of data involved the identification of learning outcomes during her time in high-performance WAG and post-retirement. Storied accounts surrounding the key learning experiences were compiled. In order to understand Marie's learning, cultural perspective of learning developed by education scholars and the respective metaphors of ‘learning as becoming’ and ‘horizons for action’ and ‘horizons of learning’ are employed.

    Findings: Marie's choice of relocating to train with the national team involved her assuming a temporary orientation towards the requirements of the high-performance WAG context she entered. To achieve this, Marie suppressed the dispositions she had brought to this setting and adjusted her training philosophy, relationship with her coach, diet and socialising. Further, despite Marie intending to only momentarily adjust to the practices of the high-performance context, her learning was deep. Upon retiring from gymnastics, she could not leave the high-performance gymnastics self behind. The subsequent process to adjust to life without gymnastics was difficult and testing, and could only be realised with professional treatment.

    Conclusion: Learning in sport is not limited to athletic skills. Athletes’ selves are formed in interaction with sporting contexts and actors. This embodiment can become durable and cause significant conflict when moving out of sport. To handle life without sport, adjustment may be challenging and lengthy.

    Recommendations: Sporting cultures should allow for more interactive learning and athlete diversity. Coaching practices that allow athletes to voice difficulties should be provided. Athletes should be encouraged to reflect upon their sporting experiences and upon leaving high-performance sport, should be (professionally) supported.

  • 23.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Sciencec, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Schubring, Astrid
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Sciencec, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    People in contexts2017In: Routledge Handbook of Physical Cultural Studies / [ed] Michael L. Silk, David L. Andrews & Holly Thorpe, Routledge, 2017, p. 495-504Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter talks about the complex social, embodied and relational process of researching people in physical cultural contexts. It focuses on the contexts researchers and research participants are situated in, how these backgrounds shape research situations, and finally, how they constitute a rich analytic potential. The chapter outlines two cultural studies terms that relate to researching people in contexts, namely 'research meeting' and 'research dialogue'. It presents an exemplary research encounter the author experienced as part of her research into women's artistic gymnastics (WAG). In so doing, the chapter illustrates how researchers and researched influence scientific work, how during such work, methodological contingencies occur, and lastly, how the capturing of and reflection on such incidents can generate valuable analytic potential. The chapter finally outlines earlier that spatial and temporal factors represent knowledge and discursive forces that are dominant at one particular time and that refer to researchers' and research participants' previous life experiences, socio-historical and cultural subjectification and practical factors.

  • 24.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Schubring, Astrid
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Aarresola, Outi
    Research Institute for Olympic Sport, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Kerr, Roslyn
    Department of Tourism, Sport and Society, Lincoln University, Lincoln, New Zealand.
    Grahn, Karin
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    McMahon, Jenny
    Faculty of Education, University of Tasmania, Launceston, Australia.
    Producing success: A critical analysis of athlete development governance in six countries2018In: International Journal of Sport Policy and Politics, ISSN 1940-6940, E-ISSN 1940-6959, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 215-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to analyse and compare athlete development governance in Australia, Finland, Germany, New Zealand, Sweden and Switzerland. We adopt a Foucauldian framework to theorise athlete development governance as shaped by and based on distinct ‘government mentalities’ and ‘modes of governance’. Qualitative procedures were used to collect and analyse 58 documents related to the 6 countries’ athlete development governance and to conduct 14 informal interviews with national elite sport system experts. Our results confirm other scholars’ findings that sport governance is moving towards managerialist government mentalities. Specific modes of governance that are being implemented to systematise athlete development include targeted forms of funding and the modelling of athlete development. However, the results also highlight how athlete development governance is a site of negotiation, arising from (a) historical events, (b) sociopolitical contexts, (c) financial conditions, (d) government mentalities and (e) sport science knowledge. Our examination demonstrates how these factors not only problematise athlete development governance but also allow for distinctive local athlete development government discursivities and/or sport-specific adjustments such as less result-driven and more holistic interpretations of athlete development. We conclude by outlining implications intended to support stakeholders’ (e.g. coaches’, sport directors’) engagement in conceptualising, implementing and/or revising athlete development frameworks.

  • 25.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Schubring, Astrid
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Anna, Post
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Stefan
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    An elite athlete’s storying of injuries and non-qualification for an Olympic Games: A socio-narratological case study2019In: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, ISSN 2159-676X, E-ISSN 2159-6778Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we present and examine the case of one elite athlete – 28-year old Mark (pseudonym), who during a 10-month lead-up to the 2016 Rio OG qualification deadline, aimed to achieve his NGB/NOC’s qualification standards, but sustained several injuries and was forced to give up his qualification attempt. Adopting a socio-narratological framework, we aim to understand how Mark storied the qualification period; how socio-cultural, organisational, and biographical contexts complicated his qualification and how he handled these complications; and how he made sense of not qualifying. Based on data produced through a longitudinal prospective study that included a background questionnaire, three semi-structured interviews, a weekly web survey, a training observation, and a compilation of competition results, our socio-narratological interpretations evidence that Mark aligned his athletic life to the ‘sport performance investment narrative’, but that this narrative provided limited resources to story poor competitive results and injuries. Instead, as Mark faced unexpected disruptions, he adopted a number of restitution strategies (e.g. alternative training/competition plans; positive thinking; rehabilitation) to re-align to the performance narrative. In so doing, Mark compromised injury recovery to worsen his performance and further injure his body, which eventually stopped his qualification process. After a directionless period and personal suffering, Mark again intended to follow the performance investment narrative. We propose that coaches, support staff and sport organisations recognise the pressurised nature of a qualification phase and provide support strategies to moderate instability and possible non-qualification.

  • 26.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    et al.
    Institute of Exercise and Health Sciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
    Tinning, Richard
    School of Human Movement Studies, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; School of Critical Studies in Education, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Foucault in leotards: Corporeal discipline in women's artistic gymnastics2010In: Sociology of Sport Journal, ISSN 0741-1235, E-ISSN 1543-2785, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 229-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women's artistic gymnastics is an Olympic sport that involves intricate acrobatic and rhythmic activities. This kinesthetic proficiency demands muscular strength and courage, which have been argued to serve its athletes as a source of empowerment. Various scholars question the positive effects of sport participation. This article builds on these doubts through a feminist Foucauldian study of WAG. An essayistic research story, compiled from data gained in an ethnographic study, serves as the basis for our analyses. The results demonstrate the complexity of WAG experiences and illustrate that gymnasts' athletic proficiency is only possible through an extensive and elaborate process of corporeal discipline.

  • 27.
    Cervin, Georgia
    et al.
    History Discipline, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Australia.
    Kerr, Roslyn
    Department of Tourism Sport and Society, Lincoln University, Lincoln, New Zealand.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Department of Food and Nutrition and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Schubring, Astrid
    Department of Food and Nutrition and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nunomura, Myrian
    School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Growing up and speaking out: female gymnasts’ rights in an ageing sport2017In: Annals of Leisure Research, ISSN 1174-5398, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 317-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research examines the experiences of ‘older’ elite gymnasts competing in Women's Artistic Gymnastics in Australia, through the framework of athlete rights. Using a qualitative approach interviews were conducted with elite or former elite gymnasts who were at least 20 years old during their active career, and coaches and judges who worked with such athletes. This paper focuses on three key themes that emerged from the data. First was the relationship with the maturing body, which, combined with new coach policies toward athlete health, lessened gymnasts' risk of abuse in the form of weight control. Second, the changing coach–athlete relationship prolonged careers, although gymnasts had to demand their rights as adults. Finally, financial support provided a basis for continued participation for some, while others were excluded through economic discrimination. Such research should guide coaches and federations towards best practice when working with (adult) athletes.

  • 28.
    Dohlsten, J.
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
    Lindgren, E-C.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Caring as sustainable coaching in elite athletics: Benefits and challenges2018In: Sport Coaching Review, ISSN 2164-0629, p. 1-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coaches in elite sport must ensure a balance between performance, high pressure and well-being. A caring approach, based on a coach’s commitment to caring for athletes, has the potential to create such a balance and sustainability. The aim of this study was to identify coaches’ caring and problematise their ethics of care in relation to sustainability. We draw on and integrate the theoretical concept of caring into a conception of (un-) sustainable sport. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with seven Swedish elite athletics coaches. Results show that coaches’ ethics of care is important for creating sustainable elite athletics practices, but that caring also conflicts with sustainability thinking if coaches do not base their actions on practical wisdom and moral and ethical dilemmas.

  • 29.
    Haman, Linn
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Department of Food and Nutrition and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Patriksson, Göran
    Department of Food and Nutrition and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    Department of Food and Nutrition and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Orthorexia nervosa: An integrative literature review of a lifestyle syndrome2015In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 26799Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bratman first proposed orthorexia nervosa in the late 1990s, defining it an obsession with eating healthy food to achieve, for instance, improved health. Today, in the Swedish media, excessive exercising plays a central role in relation to orthorexia. A few review articles on orthorexia have been conducted; however, these have not focused on aspects of food and eating, sport, exercise, or a societal perspective. The overall aim of this study was to provide an overview and synthesis of what philosophies of science approaches form the current academic framework of orthorexia. Key questions were: What aspects of food and eating are related to orthorexia? What role do exercise and sports play in relation to orthorexia? In what ways are orthorexia contextualized? Consequently, the concept of healthism was used to discuss and contextualize orthorexia. The method used was an integrative literature review; the material covered 19 empirical and theoretical articles published in peer-reviewed journals. This review demonstrates a multifaceted nature of orthorexia research; this field has been examined from four different philosophies of science approaches (i.e., empirical-atomistic, empirical-atomistic with elements of empirical-holistic, empirical-holistic, and rational-holistic) on individual, social, and societal levels. The majority of the articles followed an empirical-atomistic approach that focused on orthorexia as an individual issue, which was discussed using healthism. Our analysis indicates a need for (a) more empirical-holistic research that applies interpretive qualitative methods and uses a social perspective of health, e.g., healthism and (b) examining the role of sports and exercise in relation to orthorexia that takes the problematizing of "orthorexic behaviours" within the sports context into account.

  • 30.
    Hausken, Solveig E. S.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Schubring, Astrid
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Grau, Stefan
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Injury-free children and adolescents: Towards better practice in Swedish football (FIT project)2018In: Research Ideas and Outcomes, ISSN 2367-7163, Vol. 4, p. 1-16, article id e30729Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This interdisciplinary research project will produce evidence-based recommendations on how injuries in Swedish youth football (soccer) can be prevented. Fewer injuries will positively impact athlete health, performance and career longevity and have the potential to promote life-long physical activity and wellbeing. Injury pattern research demonstrates that injuries are a significant problem in (Swedish) youth sport. Football has a higher traumatic and overuse injury rate than many contact/ collision sports (e.g., field hockey, basketball). In research on youth football, the incidence of overuse training injuries was measured as high as 15.4 injuries per 1000 training hours, and the incidence of traumatic and overuse match injuries was 47.5 injuries per 1000 match hours. The injury frequency is alarming and applies to the 54% of children aged 7-14 and the 39% of youths aged 15-19 years who participate in Swedish organised sports. A large body of research identifies injury risk factors and preventative strategies; however, as the recent IOC consensus statement on youth athletic development points out, the existing, mostly bio-medical knowledge does not provide effective evidence-based injury prevention strategies. To address this deficit, interdisciplinary and context-driven knowledge on injury development in youth sport is needed.

    The proposed project will produce scientific evidence through four consecutive studies: a) Questionnaire to register the types, frequency and management of injuries; b) Laboratory testing of biomechanical, clinical and training-specific parameters to establish individual physical and sport-specific dispositions; c) Observation of sporting contexts to understand sporting cultures, coaching methods and coach-athlete relationships; and d) Interviews with coaches and players to recognize knowledge that shapes coaching and training. The sample of youth players will be recruited from Sweden’s most popular and injury-prone sport: football. Each of the four studies will conduct its own data production and analyses, and a collective analysis will produce integrated evidence. Concrete recommendations for best sporting practice will be developed, which will serve sporting federations, sport education institutions, coaches, sport support staff and players.

  • 31.
    Håman, Linn
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Patriksson, Göran
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Orthorexia is framed as exercise dependence in Swedish daily newspapers2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Håman, Linn
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Patriksson, Göran
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The framing of orthorexia nervosa in Swedish daily newspapers: A longitudinal qualitative content analysis2016In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, Vol. 7, p. 27-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored and elucidated how orthorexia is framed in Swedish daily newspapers with a focus on characteristics of orthorexia. Key questions include: 1) how do the newspaper articles connect exercise with orthorexia? and 2) what trends in depicting exercise in relation to orthorexia do the newspaper articles represent over time? The method used was a longitudinal qualitative content analysis guided by the framing theory. We analyzed 166 articles published between 1998 and 2013. Our analysis revealed that orthorexia originally was framed as an eating disorder and subsequently included unhealthy exercise. Two trend shifts could be identified: in 2004, exercise was added as an element and in 2013 extreme exercise trends were described to influence the increase of orthorexia. The findings indicate that Swedish newspapers extend Bratman’s definition and depict orthorexia indiscriminately to describe a range of different behavioral characteristics. These results are discussed in terms of the idea of “healthism” and general health trends in society.

  • 33.
    Håman (née Eriksson), Linn
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Patriksson, Göran
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Research ethics within the study: Fitness professionals’ talk of health and orthorexia nervosa2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Fitness center activities have gained popularity. One central role fitness staff members have is to help participants to become or maintain health and fitness. In recent years, a new phenomenon – orthorexia nervosa, which M.D. Bratman coined in the late 1990s – has emerged. He termed orthorexia as "a fixation on eating healthy food". Research has mentioned that participants in sports and fitness activities may be at higher risk of becoming orthorexic. Since the late 1990s, orthorexia has been noticed, also in Swedish newspaper articles. In so doing, the 'condition' has evolved to include fanatic exercise and eating behaviours. Fitness professionals might thus work with individuals that are considered to suffering from orthorexia. The purpose of this presentation is to elucidate and problematize ethical issues that are raised during the research that deals with personal trainers and group fitness instructors talk of health and orthorexia. The material will consist of four focus groups with 18 fitness professionals that work in Swedish fitness centers. It will be carried out as a qualitative study. This study raises ethical issues, including for instance: a) by focusing and giving attention to orthorexia, the study may contribute to categorizing "the problem", as well as enlarge it. This paradoxical situation as the aim is to contribute scientific knowledge that can problematize orthorexia; b) the challenge to manage and balance a critical approach without causing harm (e.g. introduce orthorexia to fitness professionals who might have an erroneous perspective of and/or have little knowledge about orthorexia) (cf. Halse & Honey, 2005).

  • 34.
    Håman (née Eriksson), Linn
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Patriksson, Göran
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Disordered eating outside the sport setting: Contextualizing representations of orthorexia nervosa in Swedish daily newspapers2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the late 1990s, Bratman coined the term orthorexia nervosa to mean an unhealthy obsession of only eating healthy foods (Bratman & Knight, 2000). The research is limited and orthorexia has rarely been researched in sport settings (e.g. Eriksson et al., 2008; Segura-García et al., 2012). At this stage, this concept is considered under establishment and negotiation – a process of formation where it is not clear what orthorexia is. How orthorexia is contextualized and represented influences the establishment and understanding of the condition and concept. The aim of this study is to analyze representations of orthorexia in articles printed in Swedish newspapers, with a special view on how the articles refer to sport as a social setting. Notions of healthy and disordered eating are influenced by cultural ideas in society. The language is central in this process as it creates and organizes beliefs about social reality. Perceptions and knowledge about orthorexia are created through, for example, newspaper texts. The material included in this study was limited to national, regional and local Swedish daily newspaper articles published between January 2004 and June 2011. A total of 102 articles were included as they explicitly dealt with orthorexia. The articles were analyzed using a discourse analytical approach through a qualitative content analysis. The articles represented orthorexia in different ways: a) (un)controlled and obsessive patterns of behavior; b) sacrificing social situations; c) an eating disorder in new clothes; d) a painful existence; and e) an invisible problem. Within the last category, the way orthorexia is represented in relation to sport points to how different norms and values apply in and outside this setting. Orthorexia is only considered as disordered eating in non-sport settings. In sport, orthorexic behaviours are considered standard practice. These findings thus further problematize disordered eating in and outside sport settings.

  • 35.
    Håman (née Eriksson), Linn
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för hälsa och välfärd, Centrum för forskning om välfärd, hälsa och idrott (CVHI), Centrum för idrott och hälsoforskning (CIHF), Halmstad, Sverige; Institutionen för kost- och idrottsvetenskap, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Patriksson, Göran
    Institutionen för kost- och idrottsvetenskap, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Institutionen för kost- och idrottsvetenskap, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    Institutionen för kost- och idrottsvetenskap, Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    “Men do not want to be associated with medical conditions that are perceived women-only issues”: gendered constructions of orthorexia nervosa in Swedish daily newspapers2012In: Perspektiv på idrottens prestationssystem – från debut till avslut: Abstracts: SVEBI 2012, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Kerr, Roslyn
    et al.
    Lincoln University, Christchurch, New Zealand.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Women’s artistic gymnastics in Australia and New Zealand: A foucauldian examination of the relationship between sport governance and consumption2015In: Journal of Sport and Social Issues, ISSN 0193-7235, E-ISSN 1552-7638, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 396-411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article relates the Australian and New Zealand women’s artistic gymnastics governance systems to the micro-level conduct of coaches, gymnasts, and parents. Two ethnographic studies conducted in these countries examined how gymnasts, parents, and coaches reacted to and produced training realities. We employ a Foucauldian perspective of consumption to analyze the data. The results demonstrate different types of consumer mentalities. In Australia, where governance is driven by pressure to return investment, coaches, gymnasts, and parents disciplined their selves and consumption to fulfill prescribed expectations. In New Zealand, where gymnastics does not receive financial support and thus the National Sporting Organisation cannot prescribe particular performance results, gymnasts and parents negotiated their consumption.

  • 37.
    Kerr, Roslyn
    et al.
    Lincoln University, Lincoln, New Zealand.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nunomura, Myrian
    University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Cervin, Georgia
    University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
    Schubring, Astrid
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The role of setting in the field: The positioning of older bodies in the field of elite women’s gymnastics2018In: Sociology, ISSN 0038-0385, E-ISSN 1469-8684, Vol. 52, no 4, p. 727-743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The last decade has seen an increase in the age of elite women’s gymnasts. This article examines the older gymnastic body within the field of elite women’s gymnastics, and how gymnasts, over the age of 20, and their coaches and judges, reconstruct the field in interview accounts. While participants contested the value of differently aged and sized bodies, they also made distinctions between the capitals that were valuable in different settings such as the competition setting, a gymnast’s usual training setting or a national training camp. In order to account for these differences, we combine the work of Pierre Bourdieu with that of Erving Goffman. We argue that Goffman’s emphasis on setting adds a level of specificity to Bourdieu’s claim that fields always exist as sites of struggle through providing a way to differentiate between different value systems that may co-exist within the same field.

  • 38.
    Kuhlin, Fanny
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stewart, Carly
    Department of Sport and Physical Activity, Bournemouth University, Bournemouth, UK.
    Long-term impact of the coach-athlete relationship on development, health, and wellbeing: stories from a figure skater2019In: Sports Coaching Review, ISSN 2164-0629Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coaches have been shown to detriment athletes’ health, well-being and development. Knowledge of this long-term effect and what it means for athletes to live with such stories is under-explored. Using self-narrative, we examine the long-lasting impact of the coach-athlete relationship in the stories of a former figure skater, Fanny. Guided by Arthur Frank’s dialogical analysis, we present creative non-fictional stories to show how Fanny made sense of her figure skating experiences, which were framed by a sport investment narrative and a career-wrecking injury that terminated her dream of becoming a professional figure skater. We suggest that if handled as an act of self-care, storytelling can re-configure the dominant coach-athlete relationship and sport investment narrative and help athletes to understand and reconstruct their stories. Finally, we reflect upon the impact of Fanny’s story on her advisers and consider the pedagogical implications of such narrative work in sport coaching and sport education.

  • 39.
    Lindgren, Eva-Carin
    et al.
    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden; Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Balancing performance-based expectations with a holistic perspective on coaching: a qualitative study of Swedish women's national football team coaches' practice experiences2017In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 1358580Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore how an exclusive sample of women's national football team coaches described how they implement careful coaching while facing social and organizational pressure to win medals.

    Method: To consider coaches' negotiations, we drew on Noddings' concept of caring. Using an interpretive research paradigm, we conducted in-depth interviews with five Swedish women's national football team coaches. An abductive approach was used to simultaneously process the theoretical framework of "ethics of care" and the empirical data.

    Results: The coaches unanimously adopted a holistic perspective to coaching. The coaching strategies they described included promoting players' development, well-being, and sustainable elite performance; listening to the players' voices and engaging in dialogue; and creating a positive environment and promoting fair play.

    Conclusions: These findings demonstrate that the women coaches, despite performance pressure, adopt caring coaching in the form of Noddings' pedagogical modelling, dialogue, and confirmation strategies, and provide an example of how coaches can adopt caring, holistic, and athlete-centred coaching while working at the highest level of competitive sport and achieving competitive success.

  • 40.
    McMahon, Jenny
    et al.
    Faculty of Education, University of Tasmania, Launceston, TAS, Australia.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Assimilating to a boy’s body shape for the sake of performance: three female athletes’ body experiences in a sporting culture2017In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 157-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores three female swimmers’ relationships with their male coaches and the body practices they were exposed to within Australian swimming. Particular attention is given to how the relationships and practices might relate to gender. Additionally, the article examines how (if at all) the conduct contributed to the social construction of an accepted female swimmer body. Through narrative accounts, the three adolescent female athletes articulate hierarchical male coach–female athlete relationships and specific body encounters they were exposed to and/or engaged with. Their experiences reveal how a sexually maturing body (growing breasts, female body shape and menstruating) was deemed unsuitable for performance and the swimmers were thus encouraged to transform their bodies and behaviours towards that of the boys. Using a feminist Foucauldian perspective, these accounts points to how the three swimmers came to regulate their diet, training and appearance in order to fulfil expectations. This self-regulation is problematic in two ways: first, no scientific evidence shows that a boy like physique is essential for best performance. Second, the stress from being pressured to achieve a particular body, as well as the shame that resulted from being unable to achieve the idealised physique, eventually caused the swimmers to develop an unhealthy relationship with their developing bodies. We highlight how those immersed in sporting contexts should recognise the serious implications of gender practices and power relations underpinning the male coach–female athlete dynamic in competitive sport.

  • 41.
    McMahon, Jenny
    et al.
    Faculty of Education, University of Tasmania, Launceston, , Australia.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The media’s role in transmitting a cultural ideology and the effect on the general public2016In: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, ISSN 2159-676X, E-ISSN 2159-6778, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 131-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research investigating Australian swimming culture revealed a deeply entrenched ‘slim to win’ ideology, a notion that is centred on the swimmer body needing to be lean in order to achieve competitive performance. While previous research revealed that ‘slim to win’ was occurring in situ, this study examines how media representations might come to be possible contributors to this ideology being proliferated to outsiders of the culture. Specifically, three professional sports photographs are examined for materiality criteria. Further, an affect perspective is employed through Foucault’s idea of ‘dispositive’ to consider how the messages provided by the images, their captions and the titles of the news items they were included in, were consumed. We argue that the media representations included in this investigation are highly problematic because they reinforce the ‘slim to win’ ideology. Further, we argue that many people who contributed to the online forums relating to these media representations reproduced and to a certain extent negotiated ‘slim to win’ through their comments. This latter point occurred via the representations which provided a platform for critical interpretation.

  • 42.
    Myrian, Nunomura
    et al.
    University of São Paulo, Ribeirão, Brazil.
    Kerr, Roslyn
    Lincoln University, Department of Tourism, Sport and Society, Lincoln Canterbury, New Zealand.
    Cervin, Georgia
    University of Western Australia, History Discipline Group, Crawley, Australia.
    Schubring, Astrid
    University of Gothenburg, Department of Food and Nutrition and Sport Science, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. University of Gothenburg, Department of Food and Nutrition and Sport Science, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    THE CODE OF POINTS AND THE CAREER DEVELOPMENT IN WOMEN ' S ARTISTIC GYMNASTICS2019In: Science of Gymnastics Journal, ISSN 1855-7171, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 5-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The premise of this article is that the rules of Women's Artistic Gymnastics (WAG) as outlined in the Code of Points significantly affect the experiences of older gymnasts in both positive and negative ways. The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of gymnasts, coaches, and judges on the WAG rules and the body ideals, age and career length in Brazil. We draw on qualitative interviews with a sample of two coaches and seven gymnasts from the Brazilian national team, and four judges with international experience. Both coaches and gymnasts perceived younger bodies to be more responsive to the actual rules requirements regarding difficulty and training demands. On the other hand, older gymnasts were felt to be advantaged due to being able to perform more artistically and with less mistakes. Results will allow both the FIG and the Brazilian Gymnastics Federation to reflect on the way the demands of the Code of Points affect the experiences of gymnasts. As our article finds both the rules and the established WAG culture affect gymnasts, both needs to be considered in order to keep healthy gymnasts in the sport longer.

  • 43.
    Neves, Clara Mockdece
    et al.
    Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, Brazil.
    Filgueiras Meireles, Juliana Fernandes
    Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, Brazil.
    Berbert de Carvalho, Pedro Henrique
    Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Governador Valadares, Brazil.
    Schubring, Astrid
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Caputo Ferreira, Maria Elisa
    Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, Brazil.
    Body dissatisfaction in women’s artistic gymnastics: A longitudinal study of psychosocial indicators2017In: Journal of Sports Sciences, ISSN 0264-0414, E-ISSN 1466-447X, Vol. 35, no 17, p. 1745-1751Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Body dissatisfaction is prevalent in women’s artistic gymnastics (WAG). Cross-sectional research points to social and individual risk factors, however it does not account for potential changes in body dissatisfaction during an athletic season. This study aimed to determine how gymnasts’ body dissatisfaction, risk factors for eating disorders, media internalisation, perfectionism and mood state change during pre-competition, competition and post-competition seasons and to identify how these psychosocial indicators impact on body dissatisfaction during the athletic year. The sample consisted of 20 Brazilian elite women’s artistic gymnasts aged 10–16 years. Data were obtained from a 9-month study using: Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ); Eating Attitude Test-26; Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire-3 (SATAQ-3); Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (MPS); Brunel Mood Scale (BRUMS) and triceps and subscapular skinfolds. Body dissatisfaction was higher during the competition season and disordered eating, perfectionism and vigour values were higher in the pre-competition season. Disordered eating has been found as the strongest predictor of body dissatisfaction during all seasons, and mood state partly contributed to body dissatisfaction in the competitive season. Stakeholders should understand that body dissatisfaction and the prevalence of disordered eating may change over time.

  • 44.
    Nunomura, Myrian
    et al.
    School Of Physical Education And Sport, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Kerr, Roslyn
    Ssprts, Lincoln University, Lincoln, New Zealand.
    Cervin, Georgia
    School Of Humanities, History Discipline, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
    Schubring, Astrid
    Department Of Food And Nutrition, And Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Older gymnasts in women’s artistic gymnastics: Moving beyond a bodily focus2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Nunomura, Myrian
    et al.
    University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Schubring, Astrid
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kerr, Roslyn
    Lincoln University, Lincoln, New Zealand.
    Cervin, Georgia
    University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
    Marques, Renato Francisco Rodrigues
    University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Coming of Age in Women Artistic Gymnastics: The influence of rules on career development2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Age has long been debated in women’s artistic gymnastics (WAG). Since the 1970s, young gymnasts with pre-pubescent physiques and extreme levels of performance tend to dominate the sport. Growing critique of the problematic side-effects of this trend led the International Gymnastics Federation (FIG) to introduce the minimum age limit of 16 for international competitions in 1996. Since then, the FIG has implemented further changes through their rules book the Code of Points, which have implications for gymnasts’ career development. In drawing on results from an interview study with more than 20 internationally successful gymnasts who are/were over the age of 20 when competing, as well as coaches and judges, this presentation discusses the impact of the Code of Points on career development. The findings demonstrate that on the one hand, stakeholders spoke of how the Code of Points related to gymnasts extending their career into their twenties. In particular, the changes towards artistry are important criteria that interviewees related to career continuation. On the other hand, the increased difficulty requirements since the beginning of 2000 continue to place enormous pressures on gymnasts to train intensely from a young age. The physical demands and the risk for injuries detriment gymnasts’ career prolongation. We conclude that although the FIG has made some efforts to encourage the presence of older gymnasts, these have only been semi-successful, with a younger, pre-pubescent body still viewed as ideal for WAG.

  • 46.
    Pinheiro, Claudia
    et al.
    University Institute of Maia, Maia, Portugal; Research Center in Sports Sciences, Health Sciences & Human Development, CIDESD, Vila Real, Portugal.
    Stewart, Carly
    Bournemouth University, Bournemouth, England.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Schubring, Astrid
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Smits, Froukje
    Stichting Hogeschool, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Springboard: An interactive education tool to prevent gender-based violence against girls in gymnastics2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Gymnastics is a highly gendered sporting environment (Weber & Barker-Ruchti, 2012) with a history of documented violence in all its forms (Mountjoy et al., 2016) against the girl child who represents over 75% 10 million gymnasts in Europe. Girl gymnasts are at high risk of violence and denied basic child rights. There is compelling evidence of the psychological and physical effects of violence on girl gymnasts which include disordered self-image and body dissatisfaction (Neves et al., 2017), self-harming (Ryan, 1995), disordered eating (Stewart, Schiavon, & Bellotto, 2017), stunted growth and puberty, life-long debilitation and death. Tolerance, normalisation and silencing of violent coaching models have been attributed as causes of violence inflicted on girl gymnasts and there is a strong bystander effect amongst adults (Jacobs, Smits, & Knoppers, 2016; Smits, Jacobs, & Knoppers, 2017). The main goals of the project are: To prevent genderbased violence (GBV) in all its forms against girls in gymnastics by creating, implementing, evaluating and sustaining an effective online education tool; to change social norms and behaviour and empower girls in gymnastics to stand up and call out against GBV; to increase bystander intervention and reporting of GBV in gymnastics; to provide any European country with a scalable, effective and sustainable primary intervention tool.  

    METHODS: The methodology consists on the creation, implementation, evaluation and sustainability of Springboard, a website with interactive tools to achieve behavioural levers or solutions, for girls in gymnastics (target audience) and bystanders (target group). Education packages will be created and pre-tested. Springboard will also contain a self-audit tool in the form of an interactive digital quiz. Springboard will use a multitrack storytelling approach and will contain a resource of gymnasts’ stories in the form of short films created and produced through a digital storytelling methodology. A mixed method pre-post testing design to evaluate Springboard intervention and measure behaviour outcomes will be adopted. Baseline and end line data will be collected in the form of an interactive survey corresponding to attitudes, social norms and behaviours. Qualitative data on attitudes, social norms and behaviours will also be collected via focus groups.  

    EXPECTED RESULTS: Increased knowledge of GBV and reduction of tolerant attitudes towards violence in gymnastics; increased knowledge that violent relationships and practices are wrong and reduction in the social norm that bystanders should not intervene; increased feelings of empowerment to challenge and report violence; increased awareness of reporting pathways and reporting.  

    Funding: Project submitted to the REC-AG Action Grants of the European Commission. Call for proposals for action grants under 2018 Rights, Equality and Citizenship Work Programme; Topic: REC-RDAP-GBV-AG-2018; Type of action: REC-AG

    References:

    • Jacobs, F., Smits, F., & Knoppers, A. (2016). You don’t realize what you see!: The    institutional context of emotional abuse in elite youth sport. Sport in Society, 20(1), 1–18.
    • Mountjoy, M., Brackenridge, C., Arrington, M., Blauwer, C., Carska-Sheppard, A., Fasting, K., … Budgett, R. (2016). The IOC consensus statement: harassment and abuse (non-accidental violence) in sport. Br J Sports Medicine, 50(17), 1019–1029.
    • Neves, C., Meireles, J., Berbert de Carvalho, P., Schubring, A., Barker-Ruchti, N., & Ferreira, M. E. (2017). Body dissatisfaction in women’s artistic gymnastics: A longitudinal study of psychosocial indicators. Journal of Sports Sciences, 35(17), 1–7.
    • Ryan, J. (1995). Little girls in pretty boxes: The making and breaking of elite gymnasts and figure skaters. New York: Doubleday.
    • Smits, F., Jacobs, F., & Knoppers, A. (2017). Everything revolves around gymnastics: How elite athletes and their parents make sense of practices in women’s gymnastics that challenges a positive pedagogical culture. Sport in Society, 20(1), 66–83.
    • Stewart, C., Schiavon, L. M., & Bellotto, M. L. (2017). Knowledge, nutrition and coaching pedagogy: a perspective from female Brazilian Olympic gymnasts. Sport, Education and Society, 22(4), 511–527. https://doi.org/10.1080/13573322.2015.1046428
    • Weber, J., & Barker-Ruchti, N. (2012). Bending, floating, flirting, flying: A critical analysis of 1970s gymnastics photographs. Sociology of Sport, 29(1), 22–41.
  • 47.
    Rodrigues Marques, Renato Francisco
    et al.
    University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Schubring, Astrid
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    dos Anjos Januário, Jessica
    University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Pombo Menezes, Rafael
    University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
    Nunomura, Myrian
    University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
    The familial cultural inheritance of Brazilian men elite futsal players: an influential factor on sport career.2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Sattler, Simone
    et al.
    Lucerne School of Social Work, Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Lucerne, Switzerland.
    Barker, Dean
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Zur Basler SSINC-Studie - ein Mixed Method-Projekt: Befunde aus den qualitativen Interviews2017In: Sport, Migration und soziale Integration: Eine empirische Studie zur Bedeutung des Sports bei Jugendlichen / [ed] Markus Gerber, Uwe Pühse, Zürich: Seismo , 2017Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Schubring, Astrid
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Aarresola, Outi
    Research Institute for Olympic Sport, Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Grahn, Karin
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kerr, Roslyn
    Lincoln University, Lincoln, New Zealand.
    McMahon, Jennifer
    University of Tasmania, Tasmania, Australia.
    Centralising, Negotiating or Delegating?: An International Comparison of Athlete Development Governance2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Schubring, Astrid
    et al.
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Barker-Ruchti, Natalie
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kerr, Roslyn
    Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Coming of Age: The interaction of factors that prolong high-performance gymnastics careers2015Conference paper (Other academic)
12 1 - 50 of 59
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