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  • 1.
    Golovchanova, Nadezhda
    Örebro University, School of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Older and Feeling Unsafe? Unravelling the Role of Perceived Unsafety in the Well-being of Older Adults Residing in Senior Apartments2023Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Feeling safe in one’s place of residence is important for the well-being of older adults when ageing in place; in contrast, feeling unsafe is likely to have negative consequences for well-being while ageing. Although substantial knowledge of perceived unsafety has been accumulated within various disciplines, there are certain knowledge gaps related to perceived unsafety in older age. What perceived reasons for feeling unsafe are the most central to older adults? Can emotion regulation strengthen or buffer the negative effects of perceived unsafety on the well-being of older people? What differences exist among older adults regarding why they feel unsafe?

    This dissertation aimed to address these questions while investigating perceived unsafety and its associations with well-being in the context of ageing, focusing on senior apartment residents. This dissertation adopted an interdisciplinary approach integrating knowledge of perceived unsafety from psychology, gerontology, and criminology. The findings suggest that perceived unsafety in advanced age is a multifaceted phenomenon. Specifically, perceived unsafety could be explained by different perceived reasons (i.e., fear of crime, unattractive social climate in the neighbourhood, and inconvenient infrastructure at home; Study I). Furthermore, maladaptive cognitive emotion regulation strategies were associated with fear of crime and strengthened its negative association with life satisfaction (Study II). Moreover, distinct profiles of older adults could be identified based on compromises in their key life domains. Older adults belonging to different profiles differed in their perceived unsafety and well-being (Study III).

    Overall, this dissertation findings indicate that feeling unsafe is associated with being less satisfied with life, experiencing more anxiety and depressive feelings, and relying on more maladaptive emotion regulation strategies. Therefore, safety-promotion efforts are considered an important investment in the quality of life of older adults living in senior apartments.

    List of papers
    1. Perceived reasons of unsafety among independently living older adults in Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceived reasons of unsafety among independently living older adults in Sweden
    2022 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Criminology, ISSN 2578-983X, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 44-60Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Feeling safe is important for quality of life in advanced age. The current study aimed to investigate whether different perceived reasons for unsafety uniquely contribute to the feelings of unsafety in the neighbourhood and at home while ageing. Data from a cross- sectional survey study on older adults living independently in Sweden were analysed (N = 622, age range 64–106 years, 60.6% female). Binary logistic regressions revealed unique associations between fear of crime, unattractive social climate in the neighbour-hood, and inconvenient infrastructure at home with experienced feelings of unsafety, while controlling for socio-demographic fac-tors. When distinguishing between reasons for feeling unsafe in the neighbourhood and at home, different associations with socio- demographic factors emerged. Higher age was positively asso-ciated with health-related unsafety both in the neighbourhood and at home and was not related to fear of crime neither in the neighbourhood nor at home. Female gender was associated with both health-related unsafety and fear of crime in the neighbour-hood and with health-related unsafety at home. Overall, the find-ings highlight the presence of a range of perceived reasons of unsafety relevant for older adults and the importance to consider these subjective unsafety reasons in further research and practice.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Taylor & Francis, 2022
    Keywords
    Feelings of unsafety, fear of crime, neighbourhood, ageing, older adults
    National Category
    Psychology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-91800 (URN)10.1080/2578983X.2021.1920756 (DOI)2-s2.0-85105995513 (Scopus ID)
    Funder
    EU, Horizon 2020, 754285
    Available from: 2021-05-17 Created: 2021-05-17 Last updated: 2023-01-26Bibliographically approved
    2. Affective Fear of Crime and Its Association with Depressive Feelings and Life Satisfaction in Advanced Age: Cognitive Emotion Regulation as a Moderator?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Affective Fear of Crime and Its Association with Depressive Feelings and Life Satisfaction in Advanced Age: Cognitive Emotion Regulation as a Moderator?
    2021 (Swedish)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 18, no 9, article id 4727Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Fear of crime is a substantial problem for older adults and is associated with reduced subjective well-being. However, less is known about factors that could moderate the associations between fear of crime and mental health problems and well-being in advanced age. Cognitive emotion regulation could serve as a potentially buffering factor for adverse health outcomes related to fear of crime due to its potential importance in managing feelings when facing threatening situations. The current study investigated the associations between affective fear of crime with depressive feelings and life satisfaction and examined whether adaptive and maladaptive cognitive emotion regulation strategies moderated these associations in a sample of older adults (age 64–106) in Sweden (N = 622). The results showed that affective fear of crime was associated with more depressive feelings, less life satisfaction, and more frequent use of such maladaptive cognitive emotion regulation strategies as rumination, catastrophizing, and blaming others. Moreover, rumination and self-blame moderated the associations between affective fear of crime and life satisfaction. Adaptive emotion regulation strategies were not associated with affective fear of crime and did not decrease the strength of its association with depressive feelings and with life satisfaction. These findings allow us to conclude that maladaptive emotion regulation could be considered a vulnerability factor in the association of fear of crime with life satisfaction.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    MDPI, 2021
    Keywords
    Fear of crime, mental health, depressive feelings, emotion regulation, well-being, life satisfaction
    National Category
    Psychology Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-91532 (URN)10.3390/ijerph18094727 (DOI)000650265200001 ()33946732 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85105495446 (Scopus ID)
    Funder
    EU, Horizon 2020, 754285
    Available from: 2021-04-30 Created: 2021-04-30 Last updated: 2023-01-26Bibliographically approved
    3. Older and feeling unsafe? Differences in underlying vulnerability, anxiety, and life satisfaction among older adults
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Older and feeling unsafe? Differences in underlying vulnerability, anxiety, and life satisfaction among older adults
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-102782 (URN)
    Available from: 2022-12-19 Created: 2022-12-19 Last updated: 2022-12-19Bibliographically approved
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    Older and Feeling Unsafe? Unravelling the Role of Perceived Unsafety in the Well-being of Older Adults Residing in Senior Apartments
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  • 2.
    Golovchanova, Nadezhda
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Unsafety feelings among older adults: Considering the context of ageing2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Golovchanova, Nadezhda
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Andershed, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Boersma, Katja
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Hellfeldt, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Feelings of unsafety and well-being in advanced age2021Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Golovchanova, Nadezhda
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Andershed, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Boersma, Katja
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Hellfeldt, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Perceived reasons of unsafety among independently living older adults in Sweden2022In: Nordic Journal of Criminology, ISSN 2578-983X, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 44-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Feeling safe is important for quality of life in advanced age. The current study aimed to investigate whether different perceived reasons for unsafety uniquely contribute to the feelings of unsafety in the neighbourhood and at home while ageing. Data from a cross- sectional survey study on older adults living independently in Sweden were analysed (N = 622, age range 64–106 years, 60.6% female). Binary logistic regressions revealed unique associations between fear of crime, unattractive social climate in the neighbour-hood, and inconvenient infrastructure at home with experienced feelings of unsafety, while controlling for socio-demographic fac-tors. When distinguishing between reasons for feeling unsafe in the neighbourhood and at home, different associations with socio- demographic factors emerged. Higher age was positively asso-ciated with health-related unsafety both in the neighbourhood and at home and was not related to fear of crime neither in the neighbourhood nor at home. Female gender was associated with both health-related unsafety and fear of crime in the neighbour-hood and with health-related unsafety at home. Overall, the find-ings highlight the presence of a range of perceived reasons of unsafety relevant for older adults and the importance to consider these subjective unsafety reasons in further research and practice.

  • 5.
    Golovchanova, Nadezhda
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Andershed, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Hellfeldt, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    The +65 and Safe Study: Feelings of unsafety and fear of crime in advanced age2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Golovchanova, Nadezhda
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Boersma, Katja
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Andershed, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Hellfeldt, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Affective Fear of Crime and Its Association with Depressive Feelings and Life Satisfaction in Advanced Age: Cognitive Emotion Regulation as a Moderator?2021In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 18, no 9, article id 4727Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fear of crime is a substantial problem for older adults and is associated with reduced subjective well-being. However, less is known about factors that could moderate the associations between fear of crime and mental health problems and well-being in advanced age. Cognitive emotion regulation could serve as a potentially buffering factor for adverse health outcomes related to fear of crime due to its potential importance in managing feelings when facing threatening situations. The current study investigated the associations between affective fear of crime with depressive feelings and life satisfaction and examined whether adaptive and maladaptive cognitive emotion regulation strategies moderated these associations in a sample of older adults (age 64–106) in Sweden (N = 622). The results showed that affective fear of crime was associated with more depressive feelings, less life satisfaction, and more frequent use of such maladaptive cognitive emotion regulation strategies as rumination, catastrophizing, and blaming others. Moreover, rumination and self-blame moderated the associations between affective fear of crime and life satisfaction. Adaptive emotion regulation strategies were not associated with affective fear of crime and did not decrease the strength of its association with depressive feelings and with life satisfaction. These findings allow us to conclude that maladaptive emotion regulation could be considered a vulnerability factor in the association of fear of crime with life satisfaction.

  • 7.
    Golovchanova, Nadezhda
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Boersma, Katja
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Andershed, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Hellfeldt, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Affective fear of crime and its associations with depressive feelings and life satisfaction in older adults: Cognitive emotion regulation as a moderator?2021In: The Stockholm Criminology Symposium: Program & Abstracts, The Swedish National Council for Crime Prevention (Brå) , 2021, p. 29-29Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Golovchanova, Nadezhda
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Dezutter, Jessie
    Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Research Unit of School Psychology and Development in Context, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Vanhooren, Siebrecht
    Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Research Group Clinical Psychology, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Meaning profiles and the perception of the working alliance at the start of outpatient person‐centered, experiential, and existential psychotherapies2021In: Journal of Clinical Psychology, ISSN 0021-9762, E-ISSN 1097-4679, Vol. 77, no 3, p. 770-781Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective(s): Quantitative research on meaning in life in the context of psychotherapy is relatively limited. The current study aims to investigate the profiles of the meaning of clients and their perception of the working alliance and initial symptomatology at the start of therapy.

    Design: In a sample of 145 clients (62.1% female; mean age, 34.77) who started person‐centered psychotherapy, the relationship between meaning, search for meaning, symptomatology, and the working alliance was analyzed. The assessment took place after the second session.

    Results: Cluster analysis revealed four profiles: Low Presence High Search, High Presence Low Search, High Presence High Search, and Low Presence Low Search. These meaning profiles are distinguished in terms of symptomatology but not in terms of the working alliance perception. However, the experience of meaning is significantly associated with the working alliance.

    Conclusions: Results show the relevance of meaning‐related questions for certain groups of clients at the start of therapy.

  • 9.
    Golovchanova, Nadezhda
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Dezutter, Jessie
    KU Leuven, Belgium.
    Vanhooren, Siebrecht
    KU Leuven, Belgium.
    Meaning profiles at the start of therapy2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Golovchanova, Nadezhda
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Evans, Brittany
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Hellfeldt, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Andershed, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Boersma, Katja
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Older and feeling unsafe? Differences in underlying vulnerability, anxiety, and life satisfaction among older adultsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Golovchanova, Nadezhda
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Evans, Brittany
    Örebro University, School of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Hellfeldt, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Andershed, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Boersma, Katja
    Örebro University, School of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Older and feeling unsafe? Differences in underlying vulnerability, anxiety and life satisfaction among older adults2023In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 27, no 8, p. 1636-1643Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Feeling safe in the daily environment is important in late life. However, research on configuration of vulnerability factors for perceived unsafety in older adults is scarce. The current study aimed to identify latent subgroups of older adults based on their vulnerability for perceived unsafety.

    Method: We analyzed the data from a cross-sectional survey of residents in senior apartments in a mid-sized Swedish municipality (N = 622).

    Results: The results of the latent profile analysis based on frailty, fear of falling, social support, perceived neighborhood problems, and trust in others in the neighborhood indicated the presence of three profiles. These profiles were labelled as compromised body and social networks (7.2%), compromised context (17.9%) and non-vulnerable (74.9%). Profile membership was statistically predicted by age, gender, and family status and profiles differed in perceived unsafety, anxiety and life satisfaction.

    Conclusion: Overall, the study findings suggested the existence of latent subgroups of older people based on patterns of vulnerability.

  • 12.
    Golovchanova, Nadezhda
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Evans, Brittany
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Hellfeldt, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Andershed, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Boersma, Katja
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Vulnerability for perceived unsafety among older adults: A latent profile analysis2022Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Golovchanova, Nadezhda
    et al.
    Yaroslavl regional gerontology center, Yaroslavl, Russian Federation.
    Kuin, Yolande
    Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Depressive feelings as presented in primary care in the Netherlands2014In: Medical Psychology in Russia: Scientific Web Journal, E-ISSN 2219-8245, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The article presents results of the study carried out in 2012—2013 and aimed at describing current primary care psychology in the Netherlands. Special attention was paid to diagnostics and treatment approaches to depression in primary care. Depression is currently ranked highly in the disease burden worldwide, and the problems of underdiagnostics of depression and the search for most effective treatment approaches are generally discussed. By means of literature analysis and interviews with practicing primary care psychologists we created a qualitative description of the process of recognition and approaching depressive complaints in primary care settings. The main findings on recognition of depression includedescribed behavioral patterns that can become evident during a consultation with health care providers. These descriptions extend the accepted criteria for depression diagnostics to directions for observation during a consultation. Specific suggestions on treatment of depression expressed in interviews that compliment the steps of Multidisciplinary Guidelines for Depression in the Netherlands include addressing specific areas in a client's life, helping clients to restore relationships, activating the client, helping to express the feelings, and considering the etiology of current problems. The ultimate goals of counseling perceived by the primary care psychologists are generally oriented to increasing autonomy, freedom, and choice in clients. These concepts are likely to represent the important societal values currently in the Netherlands.

  • 14.
    Golovchanova, Nadezhda
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Owiredua, Christiana
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Boersma, Katja
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Andershed, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Hellfeldt, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Presence of Meaning in Life in Older Men and Women: The Role of Dimensions of Frailty and Social Support2021In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 12, article id 730724Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Presence of meaning in life is an important component of eudemonic wellbeing while aging. While subjective health and interpersonal relationships are among important sources of meaning for older adults, less research has explored the gender differences in the potential contribution of these sources to the presence of meaning in late life. The current study aims to examine the associations of frailty dimensions (daily activities, health problems, and psychosocial functioning) and social support with the presence of meaning in late life, and whether these associations differ for older men and women. The study employs the data from the 65+ and Safe Study – a cross-sectional survey of residents of senior apartments. The data were collected in 2019 in a mid-sized Swedish municipality (N = 618; age range from 64 to 106 years, 60.5% female). Results showed significant associations of health problems, psychosocial functioning, and social support with the presence of meaning in life. Further, the results demonstrated no statistically significant gender differences in the associations between frailty dimensions, social support, and presence of meaning. However, since the interaction between health problems and gender approached statistical significance, this association was further explored indicating a more detrimental role of health problems in relation to the presence of meaning in life among older men than among older women. Overall, the study highlights the importance of physical and psychosocial health and social support for the presence of meaning in life among older adults and warrants further research on possible gender differences in the relation between health problems and meaning in late life.

  • 15.
    Golovchanova, Nadezhda
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Owiredua, Christiana
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Boersma, Katja
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Andershed, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Hellfeldt, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Presence Of Meaning In Older Men And Women: The Role Of Frailty Dimensions And Social Support2021Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Thauvoye, Evalyne
    et al.
    Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Granqvist, Pehr
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Golovchanova, Nadezhda
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Dezutter, Jessie
    Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Attachment to God, depression and loss in late life: a longitudinal study2018In: Mental Health, Religion & Culture, ISSN 1367-4676, E-ISSN 1469-9737, Vol. 21, no 8, p. 825-837Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prior research shows that being anxiously and avoidantly attached to God is associated with psychologically problematic outcomes including depressive feelings. However, a clear understanding of how these insecure attachments to God are associated with depressive feelings is still missing. Therefore, a longitudinal study among 329 nursing home residents aged 65-99 was set up to investigate the prospective relation between anxious and avoidant attachment to God and the experience of depressive feelings, as well as whether this relation is moderated by a loss experience. That is, the loss of close relatives can be particularly stressful in late life, challenging existing attachment relationships and placing older adults at risk for depression. Results confirm that insecure attachments to God are distinctly related to depressive feelings, but that this relation is not moderated by a loss experience. Our results also show that depressive feelings predicts attachment to God, instead of the other way around.

  • 17.
    Zetterberg, Hedvig
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences. Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Zhao, Xiang
    Örebro University, School of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences. Institute of Psychology, University of Klagenfurt, Klagenfurt am Wörthersee, Austria.
    Bergbom, Sofia
    Örebro University, School of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Golovchanova, Nadezhda
    Örebro University, School of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Flink, Ida
    Örebro University, School of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences. Department of Social and Psychological Studies, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Boersma, Katja
    Örebro University, School of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Understanding Work Ability in Employees with Pain and Stress-Related Ill-Health: An Explorative Network Analysis of Individual Characteristics and Psychosocial Work Environment2024In: Journal of occupational rehabilitation, ISSN 1053-0487, E-ISSN 1573-3688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: There is a wide range of individual and work environment factors that influence work ability among workers withpain and stress-related ill-health. The multiple interactions and overlap between these factors are insufficiently understood,and a network approach could mitigate limitations of previous research. This pilot study aimed to explore interactions betweenindividual characteristics and psychosocial work environment and potential links to long-term work ability.

    Methods: Prospective data from a prevention project was used. Individuals (N = 147) with pain and/or stress-related ill-health(95% women) at public sector workplaces filled out baseline questionnaires about a collection of individual and work environ-ment factors, which were used for constructing undirected networks. The model was run in three subsamples of workplaces.Finally, a separate model was established with work ability at 6-month follow-up as outcome variable. A shortest pathwayanalysis was calculated to identify mediators of work ability.

    Results: Symptom catastrophizing and perceived stress were the most influential factors in all network models. Symptomcatastrophizing and pain-disability risk were found to mediate the relation between perceived stress and long-term workability. Further, demand-control-support factors were interrelated, and patterns of interaction differed between differenttypes of workplaces.

    Conclusion: The findings support the importance of individual factors, specifically symptom catastrophizing in an individual’scoping with pain or stress-problems and its influence on long-term work ability. Catastrophizing might play a role in stress-related disorders which should be further investigated. Individual and work environment factors interact and vary acrosscontext, which needs to be taken into consideration to prevent pain and stress-related ill-health at work.

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