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  • 1.
    Arneback, Emma
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Solbrekke, Tone Dyrdal
    Oslo University, Department of Education, Oslo, Norway.
    Achieving a professional identity through writing2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Arneback, Emma
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Solbrekke, Tone Dyrdal
    Oslo University, Department of Education, Oslo, Norway.
    Achieving a professional identity through writing2017In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 284-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In what way might writing of different kinds contribute to the development of a professional identity? By analytically distinguishing three discourses of communication, everyday, professional and academic, applied to three preschool student teachers’ conceptions of writing during their education and in their initial phase at work as preschool teachers, we attempt to understand the role of writing in their development of professional identities. What we have found is that the professional discourse which all three have achieved is something each of them creates and develops in very different forms. Their independent final projects show that all three have a mastery of academic discourse, but only in exceptional cases do they make use of that discourse in contexts other than this specific piece of work and to some extent earlier papers written as part of their teacher education. However, judging from our interviews and their responses to our questions, it seems as if they have acquired modes of expression quite close to an academic discourse, but have primarily developed and use different variants of a professional discourse. This professional discourse also seems to be an important element in their development of a professional identity.

  • 3.
    Arneback, Emma
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Solbrekke, Tone Dyrdal
    Institutet för pedagogik, Oslo universitet, Oslo, Norway.
    Att skriva sig till professionell identitet - tre förskollärarstudenter2017In: Kampen om texten: examensarbetet i lärarutbildningen / [ed] Per-Olof Erixson & Olle Josephson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2017, 1, p. 55-79Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Arneback, Emma
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Solbrekke, Tone Dyrdal
    Department of Education, Oslo University, Oslo, Norway.
    On student teachers' experiences of writing in teacher education2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Arneback, Emma
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Solbrekke, Tone Dyrdal
    Department of Education, Oslo University, Oslo, Norway.
    Student teachers’ experiences of academic writing in teacher education - on moving between different diciplines2017In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 268-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on a selection of student teachers’experiences of academic writing in different disciplines in teacher education. By studying two different learning and writing environments at a Swedish university – teacher education for preschool teachers and for secondary school teachers – we distinguish different forms of writing ideals resulting from disciplinary shifts during the first two years of teacher education. In the preschool group, all the student teachers express the idea that writing ideals change during their education, as if they move between different worlds of writing. The student teachers specializing in secondary school education express the view that, overall, the writing ideal remains the same, and have a sense of staying in the same neighbourhood. These different experiences most likely create different barriers and possibilities in their formation as writers and future teachers. The results also indicate that, in their writing during the first two years, the participating students’ focus is on becoming students and adapting to different disciplines in higher education.

  • 6.
    Bergh, Andreas
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Pettersson, Daniel
    University College of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden; Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Solbrekke, Tone Dyrdal
    University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Governing and professionalism: Challenges and opportunities for policy makers, researchers and practitioners in education2019In: Nordic Education in a Democratically Troublesome time: Threats and Opportunities: A conference report / [ed] Erik Amnå, Örebro, Sweden: Örebro University , 2019, p. 61-64Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, there has been an increased societal and political debate about how the governing of welfare institutions can be best organized in order to serve the public and uphold democracy. In education, positively loaded key concepts such as equivalence, quality and legal security have dominated the debate. Simultaneously, governance ideas implied in NPM-policies, in particular the increased development of quality assurance systems and accountability regimes, have been criticized for its unintended consequences and possible narrowing of the societal mandate for education. Concerns have been raised about a need for revitalizing trust in professionals, at the same time as ensuring a certain amount of control. But how can such a balance be found?

    By introducing and raising critical questions on dominant governance discourses in education, including issues about professionalism and quality, this seminar invites deliberations among policy makers, researchers and practitioners on how we may seek new ways of making welfare institutions sustainable in democratic societies. A core issue is how education constructively can contribute to the promotion and upholding of democracy.

    The four presenters will provide brief introductions with different, yet related, perspectives on the theme “Governing and Professionalism”. Thereafter all participants are invited to a shared discussion on the opportunities and challenges for collaboration among policy makers, researchers and practitioners to ensure education that serve the public good in a democratically troublesome time.

  • 7.
    Bergh, Andreas
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Pettersson, Daniel
    Högskolan i Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Solbrekke, Tone Dyrdal
    Oslo universitet, Oslo, Norway.
    Governing and professionalism: Challenges and opportunities for policy makers, researchers and practitioners in education2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, there has been increased societal andpolitical debate about how the governance of welfare institutions can best be organized to serve the public and uphold democracy. In education, positively charged key concepts such as equivalence, quality, and legal security have dominated the debate. Simultaneously, governance ideas embedded in new public management (NPM) policies, particularly the increased development of quality assurance systems and accountability regimes, have been criticized for creating unintentional consequences and narrowing the societal mandate of education. Concerns have been raised about a need to revitalize trust in professionals, while ensuring a certain amount of control. How can such a balance be found? By introducing and raising critical questions about the dominant governance discourses in education, including issues of professionalism and quality, we argue that there is a need for deliberations among policymakers, researchers, and practitioners on how to seek new ways of making welfare institutions sustainable in democratic societies. A core issue is how education can contribute constructivelyto the promotion and upholding of democracy.

  • 8.
    Bergh, Andreas
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Sugrue, Ciaran
    University College, Dublin, Ireland.
    Solbrekke, Tone Dyrdal
    University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Fossland, Trine
    Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Sutphen, Molly
    University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA.
    Institutional Leaders’ Perspectives on the Contribution of Academic Developers to Institutional and Academic Formation2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Bergh, Andreas
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Sugrue, Ciaran
    University College of Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Solbrekke, Tone Dyrdal
    Oslo University, Oslo, Norway.
    Sutphen, Molly
    The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA.
    Fossland, Trine
    University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway.
    Leading Universities: Senior leaders’ perspectives on the contributions of academic developers?2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Fremstad, Ester
    et al.
    epartment of Education, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Bergh, Andreas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Solbrekke, Tone Dyrdal
    Department of Education, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Fossland, Trine
    Resource Center for Teaching, Learning and Technology, University of Tromsø-The Arctic university of Norway.
    Deliberative academic development: The potential and challenge of agency2019In: International journal for academic development, ISSN 1360-144X, E-ISSN 1470-1324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we explore possibilities and challenges for deliberative academic development. Deliberative academic development refers to a practice that engages members of the university in dialogue about its purposes, ways of organizing and leading higher education, as well as teaching and learning. The paper critically analyses data from focus group interviews with academic developers from four universities within two national contexts. Combining sociological conceptualizations of agency and the framework of ‘epistemic living spaces’, the paper offers insights into challenges and opportunities for deliberative academic development, as well as a framework for studying agency in other contexts.

  • 11.
    Sandvoll, Ragnhild
    et al.
    Universitetet i Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway.
    Bergh, Andreas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Solbrekke, Tone Dyrdal
    University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Supporting the development of professional responsibility in higher education: Studying the interface between odontology and education2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Solbrekke, Tone Dyrdal
    et al.
    School of Education, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Fossland, Trine
    Centre for Teaching and Learning, University of Tromsö, Tromsö, Norway.
    Bergh, Andreas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Sutphen, Molly
    University of North Carolina (Unch-Ch), Chapel Hill, United States.
    Institutional leaders' perspectives on the contributions of academic developers to institutional and academic formation2017In: Learning and education– material conditions and consequences: NERA 2017 Abstracts, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Sugrue, Ciaran
    et al.
    School of Education, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Department of Education.
    Solbrekke, Tone Dyrdal
    Department of Education, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Fossland, Trine
    Centre for Teaching and Learning, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway.
    Trends in the practices of academic developers: trajectories of higher education?2018In: Studies in Higher Education, ISSN 0307-5079, E-ISSN 1470-174X, Vol. 43, no 12, p. 2336-2353Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amidst the rapidly evolving Higher Education (HE) landscape, this paper provides a systematic review of Academic Development (AD) work, the roles and responsibilities of Academic Developers (ADs) in HE. Beginning from the perspective that HE institutions, as publicly funded organisations, have responsibility to contribute to the public good, more than 100 peer-reviewed papers (1995-2015) are interrogated under five themes. These are: a review of reviews, technology and AD work, their status and identity, assessment of AD work and impact, and the leadership roles of ADs and their impact on institutional leadership. Critical to the evolution of their work has been a more mainstream and public contribution. Their emerging responsibilities in collaboration with institutional leaders, as 'brokers' and 'bridge-builders' position them more strategically within institutions - with potential to be compromised in terms of their espoused values and dispositions while potentially more influential in shaping the futures of their organisations.

  • 14.
    Sugrue, Ciaran
    et al.
    University College Dublin, Ireland.
    Solbrekke, Tone Dyrdal
    University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Bergh, Andreas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Sutphen, Molly
    University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Fossland, Trine
    University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway.
    University leaders’ talk about institutional missions and academic developers’ contributions2019In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 743-759Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are increasing external pressures on 21st-century universities to be engines of economic recovery and growth. In this rapidly altering landscape, how university senior leaders articulate the purpose of university education and the contribution of academic developers to fulfil these education purposes is a matter of empirical interest. Senior leaders and academic developers have particular responsibilities since they impact educational quality at an institutional level. Senior leaders are responsible for orienting their institutions, giving direction to colleagues in the process, while their implicit leadership theories animate effort and interactions. Academic developers are employed to provide educational programmes for academics to develop their pedagogical competence, and are increasingly deployed by university leaders to implement new quality assurance systems. Such responsibilities strongly suggest agency and relative autonomy to forge new alliances and collaborative networks where these did not previously exist; they are simultaneously required to be leaders and followers. Consequently, the portfolios of academic developers have expanded exponentially, strategically walking a tightrope between the potentially coercive message of strategic missions and the relative autonomy of academic staff, brokering new horizons of university education in a collegial, collaborative and horizontal manner. The paper captures the dynamics of leading education in four universities: the brokering responsibilities of academic developers.

1 - 14 of 14
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