oru.sePublikationer
Change search
Refine search result
12345 1 - 50 of 242
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1. Aita, J. F.
    et al.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Smith, S.
    Hahn, F.
    White, V.
    Hereditary ataxia and multiple scleros1988Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2. Aita, J.
    et al.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Smith, S.
    Cranial CT and olivopontocerebellar atrophy1987Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3. Anniko, Matti
    et al.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Bagger-Sjöbäck, Dan
    Berggren, Diana
    Jonsson, Lars
    Mercke, Ulf
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Pyykkö, Ilmari
    Rosenhall, Ulf
    Örat2001In: Öron, näs- och halssjukdomar, huvud- och halskirurgi / [ed] Anniko, Matti, Stockholm: Liber , 2001, 2, 9-103 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4. Astuto, L. M.
    et al.
    Bork, J. M.
    Weston, M. D.
    Askew, J. W.
    Fields, R. R.
    Orten, D. J.
    Ohlinger, S. J.
    Riazuddin, S.
    Morell, R. J.
    Khan, S.
    Kremer, H.
    van Hauwe, P.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Cremers, C. W.
    Ayuso, C.
    Heckenlively, J. R.
    Rohrschneider, K.
    Spandau, U.
    Greenberg, J.
    Ramesar, R.
    Reardon, W.
    Bitoun, P.
    Millan, J.
    Legge, R.
    Friedman, T. B.
    Kimberling, W.
    CDH23 mutation and phenotype heterogeneity: a profile of 107 diverse families with Usher syndrome and nonsyndromic deafness2002In: American Journal of Human Genetics, ISSN 0002-9297, E-ISSN 1537-6605, Vol. 71, no 2, 262-275 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Usher syndrome type I is characterized by congenital hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and variable vestibular areflexia. Usher syndrome type ID, one of seven Usher syndrome type I genetic localizations, have been mapped to a chromosomal interval that overlaps with a nonsyndromic-deafness localization, DFNB12. Mutations in CDH23, a gene that encodes a putative cell-adhesion protein with multiple cadherin-like domains, are responsible for both Usher syndrome and DFNB12 nonsyndromic deafness. Specific CDH23 mutational defects have been identified that differentiate these two phenotypes. Only missense mutations of CDH23 have been observed in families with nonsyndromic deafness, whereas nonsense, frameshift, splice-site, and missense mutations have been identified in families with Usher syndrome. In the present study, a panel of 69 probands with Usher syndrome and 38 probands with recessive nonsyndromic deafness were screened for the presence of mutations in the entire coding region of CDH23, by heteroduplex, single-strand conformation polymorphism, and direct sequence analyses. A total of 36 different CDH23 mutations were detected in 45 families; 33 of these mutations were novel, including 18 missense, 3 nonsense, 5 splicing defects, 5 microdeletions, and 2 insertions. A total of seven mutations were common to more than one family. Numerous exonic and intronic polymorphisms also were detected. Results of ophthalmologic examinations of the patients with nonsyndromic deafness have found asymptomatic RP-like manifestations, indicating that missense mutations may have a subtle effect in the retina. Furthermore, patients with mutations in CDH23 display a wide range of hearing loss and RP phenotypes, differing in severity, age at onset, type, and the presence or absence of vestibular areflexia.

  • 5. Astuto, Lisa M.
    et al.
    Weston, Michael D.
    Carney, Carol A.
    Hoover, Denise M.
    Cremers, Cor W. R. J.
    Wagenaar, Mariette
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Smith, Richard J. H.
    Pieke-Dahl, Sandra
    Greenberg, Jacquie
    Ramesar, Raj
    Jacobson, Samuel G.
    Ayuso, Carmen
    Heckenlively, John R.
    Tamayo, Marta
    Gorin, Michael B.
    Reardon, Willie
    Kimberling, William J.
    Genetic heterogeneity of Usher syndrome: analysis of 151 families with Usher type 12000In: American Journal of Human Genetics, ISSN 0002-9297, E-ISSN 1537-6605, Vol. 67, no 6, 1569-1574 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Usher syndrome type I is an autosomal recessive disorder marked by hearing loss, vestibular areflexia, and retinitis pigmentosa. Six Usher I genetic subtypes at loci USH1A-USH1F have been reported. The MYO7A gene is responsible for USH1B, the most common subtype. In our analysis, 151 families with Usher I were screened by linkage and mutation analysis. MYO7A mutations were identified in 64 families with Usher I. Of the remaining 87 families, who were negative for MYO7A mutations, 54 were informative for linkage analysis and were screened with the remaining USH1 loci markers. Results of linkage and heterogeneity analyses showed no evidence of Usher types Ia or Ie. However, one maximum LOD score was observed lying within the USH1D region. Two lesser peak LOD scores were observed outside and between the putative regions for USH1D and USH1F, on chromosome 10. A HOMOG chi(2)((1)) plot shows evidence of heterogeneity across the USH1D, USH1F, and intervening regions. These results provide conclusive evidence that the second-most-common subtype of Usher I is due to genes on chromosome 10, and they confirm the existence of one Usher I gene in the previously defined USH1D region, as well as providing evidence for a second, and possibly a third, gene in the 10p/q region.

  • 6. Bagger-Sjöbäck, Dan
    et al.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Berggren, Diana
    Jonsson, Lars
    Mercke, Ulf
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Rosenhall, Ulf
    Örat2006In: Öron, näs- och halssjukdomar, huvud- och halskirurgi / [ed] Anniko, Matti, Stockholm: Liber , 2006, 3, 9-97 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7. Bjerlemo, Berit
    et al.
    Kollén, Lena
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Boderos, Inger
    Kreuter, Margareta
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Recovery after early vestibular rehabilitation in patients with acute unilateral vestibular loss2006In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 4, no 3, 117-123 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this study were to follow the recovery process, and explore the disease impact on sick leave in patients with acute unilateral vestibular loss (AUVL). Another aim was to investigate whether initial signs of nystagmus, caloric response, and subjective symptoms of vertigo could predict the return to work. Recovery was followed through the reduction in spontaneous and head-shaking nystagmus, evaluated by Video-Frenzel examination, and by caloric response/asymmetry and spontaneous nystagmus, evaluated by bithermal binaural caloric testing. Information regarding employment, sick leave and subjective symptoms of vertigo was collected using a questionnaire. Twenty-seven patients with AUVL participated in a physiotherapy training programme, starting within 48 h of disease onset. Four assessments were performed: at disease onset, in the acute stage, and after one and six months. In most patients a very rapid cessation of spontaneous nystagmus could be observed (14/27 at a median time of two days after disease onset, a further 10 patients after one month and the remaining three patients after six months). A more prolonged persistence of head shaking nystagmus was observed (24/27, 14/27 and 5/21 of the patients showed head-shaking nystagmus at the three assessments). Caloric asymmetry was normalized after six months in 11/27 patients. A positive and significant correlation was observed between long-lasting sick leave and caloric asymmetry, sense of unsteadiness when standing and walking and older age. Unsteadiness when standing and walking, as well as existence of spontaneous nystagmus, were also positively and significantly correlated with the degree of caloric asymmetry. Spontaneous or head-shaking nystagmus, caloric asymmetry and subjective vertigo at disease onset did not, however, predict sick leave after one or six months. Recovery was excellent in most of the patients.

  • 8.
    Bruder, Carl E. G.
    et al.
    Department of Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hirvelä, Carina
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Tapia-Paez, Isabel
    Department of Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fransson, Ingegerd
    Department of Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Segraves, Richard
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, UCSF Cancer Center, San Fancisco, USA.
    Hamilton, Greg
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, UCSF Cancer Center, San Fancisco, USA.
    Zhang, Xiao Xiao
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, UCSF Cancer Center, San Fancisco, USA.
    Evans, D. Gareth
    Department of Medical Genetics, St Mary Hospital, Manchester, UK.
    Wallace, Andrew J.
    Department of Medical Genetics, St Mary Hospital, Manchester, UK.
    Baser, Michael E.
    Los Angeles, USA.
    Zucman-Rossi, Jessica
    Laboratorie de Geneticque des Tumeurs, Paris, France.
    Hergersberg, Martin
    Institute of Medical Genetics, University of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland.
    Boltshauser, Eugene
    Division of Pediatric Neurology, Children Hospital, Zürich, Switzerland .
    Papi, Laura
    Medical Genetics Unit, Department of Physiopathology, University of Florence, Florence, Italy.
    Rouleau, Guy A.
    Centre for Research in Neuroscience, Montreal General Hospital, Quebec, Canada.
    Poptodorov, George
    Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Jordanova, Albena
    Laboratory of Molecular Pathology, Sofia, Bulgaria.
    Rask-Andersen, Helge
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kluwe, Lan
    Department of Neurology, Klinikum Nord Ochenzoll, Hamburg, Germany.
    Mautner, Victor
    Department of Neurology, Klinikum Nord Ochenzoll, Hamburg, Germany.
    Sainio, Markku
    Department of Pathology, University of Helsinki, Haartman Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
    Hung, Gene
    House Ear Institute, Los Angeles, USA.
    Mathiesen, Tiit
    Department of Neurosurgery, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Department of Audiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Pulst, Stefan M.
    Division of Neurology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles USA.
    Harder, Henrik
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Heiberg, Arvid
    Department of Medical Genetics, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway.
    Honda, Mariko
    Department of Dermatology, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
    Niimura, Michihito
    Department of Dermatology, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
    Sahlén, Sigrid
    Department of Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Blennow, Elisabeth
    Department of Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Albertson, Donna G.
    Cancer Research Institute, UCSF Cancer Center, San Francisco, USA.
    Pinkel, David
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, UCSF Cancer Center, San Fancisco, USA.
    Dumanski, Jan P.
    Department of Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    High resolution deletion analysis of conctitutional DNA from neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) patients using microarray-CGH2001In: Human Molecular Genetics, ISSN 0964-6906, E-ISSN 1460-2083, Vol. 10, no 3, 271-282 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is an autosomal dominant disorder whose hallmark is bilateral vestibular schwannoma. It displays a pronounced clinical heterogeneity with mild to severe forms. The NF2 tumor suppressor (merlin/schwannomin) has been cloned and extensively analyzed for mutations in patients with different clinical variants of the disease. Correlation between the type of the NF2 gene mutation and the patient phenotype has been suggested to exist. However, several independent studies have shown that a fraction of NF2 patients with various phenotypes have constitutional deletions that partly or entirely remove one copy of the NF2 gene. The purpose of this study was to examine a 7 Mb interval in the vicinity of the NF2 gene in a large series of NF2 patients in order to determine the frequency and extent of deletions. A total of 116 NF2 patients were analyzed using high-resolution array-comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) on an array covering at least 90% of this region of 22q around the NF2 locus. Deletions, which remove one copy of the entire gene or are predicted to truncate the schwannomin protein, were detected in 8 severe, 10 moderate and 6 mild patients. This result does not support the correlation between the type of mutation affecting the NF2 gene and the disease phenotype. This work also demonstrates the general usefulness of the array-CON methodology for rapid and comprehensive detection of small (down to 40 kb) heterozygous and/or homozygous deletions occurring in constitutional or tumor-derived DNA.

  • 9. Bynke, O.
    et al.
    Daugard-Larsen, O.
    Harder,
    Hillman, J.
    Magnusson, B.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Westergren, H.
    Ödkvist, L.
    Otoneurological evaluation using ENG and dynamic posturography in patients operated on for cerebellopontine tumours1992In: Acoustic neuroma: Proceedings of the First International Conference on Acoustic Neuroma, Copenhagen, Denmark, August 25-29, 1991 / [ed] M. Tos, J Thomsen, Amsterdam: Kugler Publications , 1992, 49-53 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Båsjö, Sara
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; HEAD Graduate School, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Widén, Stephen
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Jutengran, Göran
    School of Health Sciences, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Kähäri, Kim
    Division of Audiology, Sahlgrens’ Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hearing thresholds, tinnitus, and headphone listening habits in nine-year-old children2016In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 55, no 10, 587-596 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Investigate hearing function and headphone listening habits in nine-year-old Swedish children. Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted and included otoscopy, tympanometry, pure-tone audiometry, and spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAE). A questionnaire was used to evaluate headphone listening habits, tinnitus, and hyperacusis. Study sample: A total of 415 children aged nine years.

    Results: The prevalence of a hearing threshold 20 dB HL at one or several frequencies was 53%, and the hearing thresholds at 6 and 8 kHz were higher than those at the low and mid frequencies. SOAEs were observed in 35% of the children, and the prevalence of tinnitus was 5.3%. No significant relationship between SOAE and tinnitus was found. Pure-tone audiometry showed poorer hearing thresholds in children with tinnitus and in children who regularly listened with headphones.

    Conclusion: The present study of hearing, listening habits, and tinnitus in nine-year old children is, to our knowledge, the largest study so far. The main findings were that hearing thresholds in the right ear were poorer in children who used headphones than in children not using them, which could be interpreted as headphone listening may have negative consequences to children’s hearing. Children with tinnitus showed poorer hearing thresholds compared to children without tinnitus.

  • 11.
    Carlsson, Per-Inge
    et al.
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Central Hospital, Karlstad, Sweden; Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Karltorp, Eva
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Carlsson-Hansén, Eva
    Department of Audiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Åhlman, Henrik
    Centre for Inherited Metabolic Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Otorhinolaryngology Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    von Döbeln, Ulrika
    Centre for Inherited Metabolic Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    GJB2 (Connexin 26) gene mutations among hearing-impaired persons in a Swedish cohort2012In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251, Vol. 132, no 12, 1301-1305 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conclusion: The most common mutation in the Swedish population was Connexin 26 (C×26) 35delG, which indicates that the percentage of Swedish persons with C×26 mutations and polymorphisms in the GJB2 gene among non-syndromic hearing-impaired (HI) persons is comparable to the rest of Europe. The results strongly support a Swedish policy to offer all children with diagnosed hearing impairment genetic tests for the C×26 35delG mutation.

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to search for mutations in the GBJ2 gene among Swedish persons with non-syndromic hearing impairment to further clarify how common these mutations are in Sweden, one of the northernmost countries in Europe.

    Methods: Seventy-nine patients with non-syndromic hearing impairment participated in the study. For 87% of the participants, a pure tone audiogram showed a severe or profound hearing impairment. Dried blood spots on filter paper, taken at 3-5 days of age in the Swedish nationwide neonatal screening programme for congenital disorders and saved in a biobank, were used for the molecular genetic analyses.

    Results: The total number of subjects with one or two pathologic mutations or a mutation of unknown consequence found in the GJB2 gene was 28 of 79 (35%). Nineteen (19) persons (24%) were homozygotes for the 35delG mutation.

  • 12. Cyr, D. G.
    et al.
    Moore, G. F.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Clinical application of computerized dynamic posturography1988In: ENTechnology, ISSN 0145-5613, no Sep, 36-47 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Cyr, D.
    et al.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Rationale for the assessment of vestibular function in children1988In: The Hearing Journal®, ISSN 0745-7472, no nov, 38-49 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14. Cyr, David
    et al.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Case report: Meningioma1988In: The Hearing Journal®, ISSN 0745-7472, no Nov, 50-53 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15. Cyr, David
    et al.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Moore, Gary Floyd
    Clinical experience with the low-frequency rotary chair test1989In: Seminars in Hearing, ISSN 0734-0451, Vol. 10, no 2, 172-190 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary strength of the CRC test appears to be its sensitivity to monitor change within the vestibular system, particularly in the early detection of a bilateral, peripheral weakness. Although disagreement continues about the low-frequency rotary chair's ability to monitor physiological compensation following a sudden, unilateral vestibular insult, some points are worth reviewing. For example, in an acute, unilateral vestibular weakness, an asymmetry will usually be present in the direction of the spontaneous nystagmus. In addition, gain may be depressed (primarily in the low frequencies) and a large phase lead should be seen.As central compensation occurs, the degree of asymmetry will reportedly decrease or resolve completely (probably secondary to a decrease in the spontaneous nystagmus), and gain may improve as well. In contrast, the low-frequency phase lead appears to persist in most patients. Recall that the symmetry measure is likely a representation of a spontaneous nystagmus or directional preponderance, whereas gain can be affected by patient alertness and other extravestibular factors during low-frequency acceleration. For these reasons, the clinical significance of gain and symmetry change following low-frequency rotation remains somewhat obscure. Because the rotary chair is extremely sensitive to bilateral, peripheral vestibular lesions, it seems ideal for monitoring the effects of vestibulotoxic medications. If patient alertness is maintained, both low-frequency phase and gain can be used to monitor vestibular change, as is illustrated in case study 1. Another effective application of the CRC test is its use with special populations, especially infants and young children in whom caloric testing cannot be done. The test is easy to administer, takes a minimal amount of time, and is not adversive to most patients, unless claustrophobia is present. Even though the low-frequency rotary chair test has specific limitations (such as inability to identify consistently site of lesion or side of involvement in unilateral, peripheral vestibular disease), it has demonstrated a significant clinical usefulness, as described previously. It must be stressed, however, that the CRC results should be treated with a degree of caution. Our knowledge of the visual and vestibular systems is limited, and the low-frequency CRC test monitors only a fraction of the VOR. We must take into account other fctors, such as the otolith organs, the other semicircular canals, the brainstem integration of the response, and the cognitive processes, such as prediction, that may also affect the rest results. As is appropriate with all clinical assessments, the rotary chair results should always be interpreted in light of the history, symptoms, and other test findings. Future advances in stimulus presentation and response measurement however, should solidify the role of the CRC test in the evaluation of the patient with dizziness.

  • 16. Dahlin Redfors, Ylva
    et al.
    Hellgren, Johan
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital.
    Hearing-aid use and benefit: a long-term follow-up in patients undergoing surgery for otosclerosis2013In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 52, no 3, 194-199 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aims of the study were to assess hearing-aid uptake in patients with otosclerosis 28-30 years after stapedectomy and to evaluate hearing-aid benefit to users.

    Design: A retrospective study was performed; it included a review of medical records and follow-up 28-30 years after surgery, including audiometry, clinical examination, structured interview, and a validated questionnaire, IOI-HA.

    Study sample: Sixty-five patients, who had undergone stapedectomy at a tertiary referral center in 1977-79. Results: In 95% of the subjects there was a theoretical need for hearing-aid amplification at follow-up; 46% of the subjects had no hearing aids, while 26% had unilateral and 28% bilateral hearing aids. Hearing sensitivity in the best ear predicted hearing-aid uptake. Of the subjects with a hearing aid, 94% were everyday users and 54% were full-time users (> 8 hours/day). The subjects reported a high level of satisfaction (mean 4.5) and benefit (mean 4.2), but also residual activity limitations (mean 3.1).

    Conclusions: The study shows that there is an unmet need for long-term hearing rehabilitation among patients previously undergoing surgery for otosclerosis. The patients who were using hearing aids were generally very satisfied with their hearing aids, but they still reported residual activity limitations.

  • 17. Dahlin Redfors, Ylva
    et al.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Otosclerosis: thirty-year follow-up after surgery2011In: Annals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology, ISSN 0003-4894, E-ISSN 1943-572X, Vol. 9, no 120, 608-614 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aims of this study were to evaluate the hearing outcomes 28 to 30 years after stapedectomy in patients with surgically confirmed otosclerosis, and to evaluate inner ear involvement.

    Methods: A retrospective clinical study was performed. Sixty-five consecutive patients who underwent stapedectomy at a tertiary referral center between 1977 and 1979 were included in the study. Medical records, including preoperative and postoperative audiograms, were reviewed, and a long-term follow-up clinical examination and pure tone audiometry were performed. The hearing outcome was compared with that of a reference population (ISO 7029) in terms of age and gender.

    Results: Thirty years after stapedectomy, 66% of the patients’ ears studied showed a moderate to profound hearing loss. The deterioration was mainly caused by a sensory hearing loss. The hearing loss was significantly greater than that in the reference population for both air and bone conduction thresholds at the early and late stages of the disease. A large majority of the patients (88%) had bilateral otosclerosis.

    Conclusions: Patients with otosclerosis have a sensorineural hearing loss that cannot be explained by age. Otosclerosis should be regarded as a middle and inner ear disease. Almost all patients with otosclerosis are in need of ongoing audiological rehabilitation and hearing aids.

  • 18.
    Dahlin Redfors, Ylva
    et al.
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Clinical Science, Sahl grenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olaison, Sara
    Audiological Research Center, Örebro University Hospital, School of Medicine and Health Science, Örebro University/Swedish Institute of Disability Research, Örebro, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Örebro University Hospital. Centre for Health Care Sciences Örebro University Hospital, School of Medicine and Health Science, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden .
    Hellgren, Johan
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Clinical Science, Sahl grenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Center.
    Hearing-related, health-related quality of life in patients who have undergone otosclerosis surgery: a long-term follow-up study2015In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, no 2, 63-69 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aims of the study were to assess health-related quality of life and hearing-related disability in subjects with otosclerosis 30 years after surgery.

    Design: An observational study was performed. Medical records were reviewed, a clinical examination as well as audiometric assessments were performed. Generic health-related quality of life was assessed by the SF-36v2 and hearing disability by a shortened version of SSQ (speech spatial and qualities of hearing scale).

    Study sample: Sixty-fi ve individuals, who had undergone stapedectomy in 1977-79 at a tertiary referral center.

    Results: Generic health-related quality of life according to SF-36 subscale scores was comparable to that of an age- and sex-matched reference population. The SF-36 mental component summary score (MCS) was, however, significantly better than that of the reference population. The mental and physical summary component scores correlated significantly to hearing disability measured by the SSQ but not to hearing impairment. Hearing disability was displayed in all SSQ sub-scores, especially in more complex listening situations and in the localization of sounds.

    Conclusions: This study shows that individuals with otosclerosis, 30 years after surgery, have a good generic health-related quality of life, despite moderate to severe hearing loss and significant hearing disabilities.

  • 19.
    Dahlin-Redfors, Ylva
    et al.
    Departments of Otolaryngology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Jönköping, Sweden; Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gotheburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gröndahl, H. G.
    Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden; Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hellgren, Johan
    Departments of Otolaryngology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Jönköping, Sweden; Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindfors, N.
    Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden; Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsson, I.
    Department of Neuroradiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg. Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Audiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Otosclerosis: anatomy and pathology in the temporal bone assessed by multi-slice and cone-beam CT2012In: Otology and Neurotology, ISSN 1531-7129, E-ISSN 1537-4505, Vol. 33, no 6, 922-927 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To assess the use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) compared with multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) in otosclerosis, with special emphasis on middle-and inner-ear anatomy.

    Study Design: Prospective study.

    Patients: Twenty patients who underwent a stapedectomy 30 years ago were selected on the basis of bone conduction threshold values. Their mean age was 65 years (range, 48-76 yr).

    Intervention: All patients underwent CBCT and MSCT with a slice thickness of 0.5 to 0.6 mm.

    Main Outcome Measures: Sixteen middle-and inner-ear anatomic structures and stapedial prostheses were analyzed by visual grading analysis. To assess critical reproduction and thereby the clinical applicability of CBCT, a dichotomization was made. Assessment of otosclerotic foci was performed using a grading system dividing the lesions in; 1) sole fenestral lesions, 2) retrofenestral lesions with or without fenestral lesions and 3) severe retrofenestral lesions.

    Results: The 16 anatomic structures were clearly reproduced by both imaging techniques. However, there was an interobserver variation in judging the superiority of 1 method in favor of the other. Otosclerotic lesions were diagnosed in 80/95% using MSCT and 50/85% using CBCT (evaluators 1 and 2, respectively). Retrofenestral lesions were diagnosed in 5 of 10 of ears with severe-to-profound hearing loss, whereas no retrofenestral lesions were diagnosed in the 10 ears with mild-to-moderate hearing loss. The stapedial prostheses were adequately or very well reproduced by both methods.

    Conclusion: CBCT is a new imaging technique with a considerably lower radiation dose than conventional MSCT. Our study indicates that CBCT is suitable and, in many ways, equivalent to MSCT, for temporal bone imaging in otosclerosis.

  • 20.
    Danermark, Berth
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Cieza, Alarcos
    Univ Munich, Inst Hlth & Rehabil Sci, ICF Res Branch, WHO CC FIC, Munich, Germany.
    Gangé, Jean-Pierre
    Univ Montreal, Inst Univ Geriatrie Montreal, Ecole Orthophonie & Audiol, Montreal, PQ, Canada.
    Gimigliano, Francesca
    Univ Naples 2, Dept Audiol & Speech Sci, Naples, Italy.
    Granberg, Sarah
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Hickson, Louise
    Univ Queensland, Sch Hlth & Rehabil Sci, Commun Disabil Ctr, Brisbane, Qld 4072, Australia.
    Kramer, Sophia
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Dept ENT Audiol, EMGO Inst Hlth & Care Res, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    McPherson, Bradley
    Univ Hong Kong, Ctr Commun Disorders, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Möller, Claes
    The University Hospital, Centre for Audiological Research, Örebro, Sweden.
    Russo, Ieda
    Pontificia Univ Catolica Sao Paulo, Programa Estudos Posgrad Fonoaudiol, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Strömgren, Jan Peter
    Univ Lucerne, Nottwil & Seminar Hlth Sci & Hlth Policy, Luzern, Switzerland.
    Stucki, Gerold
    Univ Lucerne, Nottwil & Seminar Hlth Sci & Hlth Policy, Luzern, Switzerland.
    Swanepoel, DeWet
    Univ Pretoria, Dept Commun Pathol, ZA-0002 Pretoria, South Africa; Univ Texas Dallas, Callier Ctr Commun Disorders, Dallas, TX 75235 USA.
    International classification of functioning, disability, and health core sets for hearing loss: A discussion paper and invitation2010In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 49, no 4, 256-262 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) has adopted a multifactorial understanding of functioning and disability, merging a biomedical paradigm with a social paradigm into a wider understanding of human functioning. Altogether there are more than 1400 ICF-categories describing different aspects of human functioning and there is a need to developing short lists of ICF categories to facilitate use of the classification scheme in clinical practice. To our knowledge, there is currently no such standard measuring instrument to facilitate a common validated way of assessing the effects of hearing loss on the lives of adults. The aim of the project is the development of an internationally accepted, evidence-based, reliable, comprehensive and valid ICF Core Sets for Hearing Loss. The processes involved in this project are described in detail and the authors invite stakeholders, clinical experts and persons with hearing loss to actively participate in the development process.

  • 21.
    Danermark, Berth
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro Univ Hosp, Audiol Res Ctr, Örebro, Sweden.
    Granberg, Sarah
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiol Res Ctr ; Linköping Univ, HEAD Hearing & Deafness Res Sch, Linköping, Sweden .
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Selb, Melissa
    WHO, Int Classificat Functioning Disabil & Hlth ICF, Res Branch cooperat, Collaborating Ctr Family Int Classificat Germany, Nottwil, Switzerland ; Swiss Parapleg Res, Nottwil, Switzerland .
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiol Res Ctr.
    The Creation of a Comprehensive and a Brief Core Set for Hearing Loss Using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health2013In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 22, no 2, 323-328 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: In May 2001, to integrate biological, psychological, and social aspects of human functioning, the World Health Assembly endorsed the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). The aim of this article is to describe the creation of Comprehensive and Brief ICF Core Sets for Hearing Loss. The core sets consist of the most relevant ICF categories for hearing loss. Method and Results: Four preparatory studies were carried out and presented at a consensus conference, resulting in a Comprehensive ICF Core Set for Hearing Loss, consisting of 117 ICF categories, and a Brief ICF Core Set for Hearing Loss, consisting of 27 categories (of the 117). Conclusion: The Comprehensive ICF Core Set for Hearing Loss can be a user-friendly tool for conducting comprehensive, multidisciplinary assessments. The Brief ICF Core Set can be used for many purposes, such as research and population studies. However, its most common use is by individuals seeking to provide a brief description and assessment of functioning of a person with hearing loss.

  • 22.
    Darvish, Bijan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Anesthesiology, Surgical Services and Intensive Care Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dahlgren, G.
    Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Capio St Görans Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Irestedt, L.
    Department of Anesthesiology, Surgical Services and Intensive Care Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Magnuson, A.
    Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Swedish Institute of Disability Research, Örebro, Sweden.
    Gupta, Anil
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Anesthesiology, Surgical Services and Intensive Care Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Auditory function following post-dural puncture headache treated with epidural blood patch: a long-term follow-up2015In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 59, no 10, 1340-1354 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Epidural analgesia is commonly used for pain management during labor. Sometimes, accidental dural puncture (ADP) occurs causing severely debilitating headache, which may be associated with transient hearing loss. We investigated if auditory function may be impaired several years after ADP treated with epidural blood patch (EBP).

    Methods: Sixty women (ADP group) without documented hearing disability, who received EBP following ADP during labor between the years 2005-2011 were investigated in 2013 for auditory function using the following tests: otoscopic examination, tympanometry, pure tone audiometry, and transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions. Additionally, they responded to a questionnaire, the Speech, Spatial and Qualities (SSQ) of hearing, concerning perceived hearing impairment. The results were compared to a control group of 20 healthy, non-pregnant women in the same age group.

    Results: The audiometric test battery was performed 5.2 (1.9)years after delivery. No significant differences were found between the ADP and the control groups in tympanometry or otoacoustic emissions. Pure tone audiometry revealed a significant but small (<5dB) difference between the ADP and control groups (P<0.05). The ability to hear speech in noise as measured by SSQ was significantly reduced in the ADP group compared to the control group (P<0.05).

    Conclusions: A minor hearing loss was detected in the ADP group compared to the control group in pure tone audiometry in some women and during speech-in-noise component several years after accidental dural puncture treated with an epidural blood patch. This small residual hearing loss has minor clinical significance.

  • 23.
    Darvish, Bijan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dahlgren, G.
    Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Capio St Görans Hospital, Stockholm.
    Irestedt, L.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Magnuson, A
    Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro university.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Gupta, Anil
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University.
    The effect of Epidural Blood Patch on Auditory Function following Accidental Dural Puncture in the Parturient: a prospective cohort studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Darvish, Bijan
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
    Dahlgren, Gunnar
    Capio St Görans Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Irestedt, Lars
    Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Örebro university, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    School of Medicine and Health Science, Institute of Disability Research, Solna, Sweden.
    Gupta, Anil
    Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
    Auditory function following post dural puncture headache treated with epidural blood patch A long-term follow-up of parturients2015In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 59, 24-25 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25. Davenport, S.
    et al.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Biscone-Halterman, K.
    Kimberling, W.
    Early diagnosis of Usher syndrome1988Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26. Dige, N.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Å.
    Flodin, U.
    Persson, B.
    Tondel, M.
    Bengtsson, H.
    Ekberg, K.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Niklasson, M.
    Ödkvist, L.
    Thuomas, K. Å.
    Utvärdering av psykometriska metoder för diagnostik av kronisk toxisk encefalopati1996Report (Other academic)
  • 27. Dreyer, Bo
    et al.
    Brox, Vigdis
    Tranebjaerg, Lisbeth
    Rosenberg, Thomas
    Sadeghi, Andrè M.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Nilssen, Öivind
    Spectrum of USH2A mutations in Scandinavian patients with Usher Syndrome type II2008In: Human Mutation, ISSN 1059-7794, E-ISSN 1098-1004, Vol. 29, no 3, 451-451 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Usher syndrome type II (USH2) is an autosomal recessive disorder, characterised by moderate to severe high-frequency hearing impairment, normal balance function and progressive visual impairment due to retinitis pigmentosa. Usher syndrome type IIa, the most common subtype, is defined by mutations in the USH2A gene encoding a short and a recently discovered long usherin isoform comprising 21 and 73 exons, respectively. More than 120 different disease-causing mutations have been reported, however, most of the previous reports concern mutations restricted to exons 1-21 of the USH2A gene. To explore the spectrum of USH2A disease-causing mutations among Scandinavian USH2 cases, patients from 118 unrelated families of which 27 previously had been found to carry mutations in exons 1-21 were subjected to extensive DNA sequence analysis of the full size USH2A gene. Altogether, 122 USH2A DNA sequence alterations were identified of which 57 were predicted to be disease-causing, 7 were considered to be of uncertain pathogenicity and 58 were predicted to be benign variants. Of 36 novel pathogenic USH2A mutations 31 were located in exons 22-73, specific to the long isoform. USH2A mutations were identified in 89/118 (75.4%) families. In 79/89 (88.8%) of these families two pathogenic mutations were identified whereas in 10/89 (11.2%) families the second mutation remained unidentified. In 5/118 (4.2%) families the USH phenotype could be explained by mutations in the USH3A gene. The results presented here provide a comprehensive picture of the genetic aetiology of Usher syndrome type IIA in Scandinavia as it is known to date.

  • 28. Dreyer, Bo
    et al.
    Tranebjaerg, Lisbeth
    Brox, Vigdis
    Rosenberg, Thomas
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Beneyto, Magdalena
    Weston, Michael D.
    Kimberling, William J.
    Cremers, Cor W. R. J.
    Liu, Xue-Zhong
    Nilssen, Öivind
    A common ancestral origin of the frequent and widespread 2299delG USH2A mutation2001In: American Journal of Human Genetics, ISSN 0002-9297, E-ISSN 1537-6605, Vol. 69, no 1, 228-234 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Ehn, Mattias
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital, Audiological Research Centre, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital, Audiological Research Centre, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital, Audiological Research Centre, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital, Audiological Research Centre, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    The relationship between work and health in persons with Usher syndrome type 22016In: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, ISSN 0145-482X, E-ISSN 1559-1476, Vol. 110, no 4, 233-244 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Persons with deafblindness may have additional physical and psychological health problems. In this study we have focused on health from a work-life perspective in persons with Usher syndrome type 2 (USH2), a disorder with sensorineural hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between work and disability pension and physical and psychological health in persons with USH2.

    Methods: Participants were recruited from the Swedish Usher database. Eighty-four persons (aged 18 to 65 years) received a health-related questionnaire and 67 (36 women and 31 men) agreed to participate. The participants formed two groups (working group, n = 34; disability pension group, n = 33). A Swedish Health on Equal Terms questionnaire comprising questions on psychological and physical health, living conditions, work activity, and social relationships was used. A chi-square test of significance was used with a significance level of p < 0.05.

    Results: The two groups did not differ in terms of age, gender, degree of hearing loss, visual acuity, or visual field loss. The working group had statistically significant better health compared to the disability pension group in areas such as being overweight, handling problems, concentration, feeling unhappy, depressive symptoms, and feelings of worthlessness. Suicidal thoughts and attempts were significantly more common in the disability pension group.

    Discussion: Persons with USH2 generally reported very poor physical and psychological health, with significant differences between persons who were working and those who were not. This study highlights the need for early rehabilitation, vocational training, and opportunities to access the labor market. Implications for practitioners: It is important that persons with USH2 receive vocational support from an early age and that professionals in the field of rehabilitation always include work activity as a key element of interventions.

  • 30. Ekblad, S.
    et al.
    Bergendal, A.
    Enler, P.
    Ledin, T.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Hammar, M.
    Disturbances in postural balance are common in postmenopausal women with vasomotor symptoms2000In: Climacteric, ISSN 1369-7137, E-ISSN 1473-0804, Vol. 3, no 3, 192-198 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES:

    To establish the prevalence of unsteadiness and rotatory vertigo in peri- and postmenopausal women, and whether balance disturbances are more common in women with vasomotor symptoms and without hormone replacement therapy (HRT).

    METHOD:

    A validated questionnaire was sent to all 1523 women aged 54 or 55 years in Linköping, Sweden.

    RESULTS:

    Daily or weekly unsteadiness was reported by 5%, and daily or weekly rotatory vertigo by 4% of all women. The frequency of vasomotor symptoms correlated with reported unsteadiness (rs = 0.23, p < 0.001). Fourteen per cent of women with daily vasomotor symptoms reported weekly or daily unsteadiness, compared with 3% of those without vasomotor symptoms (odds ratio (OR) 7.58, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.72-15.45). The frequency of vasomotor symptoms correlated with rotatory vertigo (rs = 0.19, p < 0.001). Ten per cent of women with daily vasomotor symptoms reported weekly or daily rotatory vertigo, compared with 2% of women without vasomotor symptoms (OR 5.21, 95% CI 1.07-25.52). No correlation was seen between vasomotor symptoms and falls. Users of HRT had the same prevalence of balance disturbances as non-users.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Women with frequent vasomotor symptoms seem to run a greater risk of unsteadiness and rotatory vertigo than do women without symptoms. This association may not be explained by means of a cross-sectional study, but there might exist a causal connection between vasomotor symptoms and balance disturbances.

  • 31. Eudy, James D.
    et al.
    Weston, Michael D.
    Yao, SuFang
    Hoover, Denise M.
    Rehm, Heidi L.
    Ma-Edmonds, Manling
    Yan, Denise
    Ahmad, Iqbal
    Cheng, Jason J.
    Ayuso, Carmen
    Cremers, Cor
    Davenport, Sandra
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Talmadge, Catherine B.
    Beisel, Kirk W.
    Tamayo, Marta
    Morton, Cynthia C.
    Swaroop, Anand
    Kimberling, William J.
    Sumegi, Janos
    Mutation of a gene encoding a protein with extracellular matrix motifs in Usher syndrome type IIa1998In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, Vol. 280, no 5370, 1753-1757 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Usher syndrome type IIa (OMIM 276901), an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by moderate to severe sensorineural hearing loss and progressive retinitis pigmentosa, maps to the long arm of human chromosome 1q41 between markers AFM268ZD1 and AFM144XF2. Three biologically important mutations in Usher syndrome type IIa patients were identified in a gene (USH2A) isolated from this critical region. The USH2A gene encodes a protein with a predicted size of 171.5 kilodaltons that has laminin epidermal growth factor and fibronectin type III motifs; these motifs are most commonly observed in proteins comprising components of the basal lamina and extracellular matrixes and in cell adhesion molecules.

  • 32. Fields, Randall R.
    et al.
    Zhou, Guimei
    Huang, Dali
    Davis, Jack R.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Jacobsen, Samuel G.
    Kimberling, William J.
    Sumegi, Janos
    Usher syndrome type III: revised genomic structure of the USH3 gene and identification of novel mutations2002In: American Journal of Human Genetics, ISSN 0002-9297, E-ISSN 1537-6605, Vol. 71, no 3, 607-617 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Usher syndrome type III is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by progressive sensorineural hearing loss, vestibular dysfunction, and retinitis pigmentosa. The disease gene was localized to 3q25 and recently was identified by positional cloning. In the present study, we have revised the structure of the USH3 gene, including a new translation start site, 5′ untranslated region, and a transcript encoding a 232–amino acid protein. The mature form of the protein is predicted to contain three transmembrane domains and 204 residues. We have found four new disease-causing mutations, including one that appears to be relatively common in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. We have also identified mouse (chromosome 3) and rat (chromosome 2) orthologues, as well as two human paralogues on chromosomes 4 and 10.

  • 33.
    Flynn, Traci
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Audiol, Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp, Gothenburg, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Dept Audiol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lohmander, Anette
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Tech, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital.
    Magnusson, Lennart
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Audiol, Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp, Gothenburg, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Dept Audiol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A longitudinal study of hearing and middle ear status in adolescents with cleft lip and palate2013In: The Laryngoscope, ISSN 0023-852X, E-ISSN 1531-4995, Vol. 123, no 6, 1374-1380 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives/Hypothesis:

    To study longitudinal prevalence of otitis media with effusion (OME) in children between 7 and 16 years of age by cleft group, and hearing sensitivity across time and across frequencies.

    Study Design:

    Retrospective and longitudinal.

    Methods:

    All children with cleft palate born from 1991 to 1993 were included in the study (n = 58). Audiological and otological data were reviewed at 7, 10, 13, and 16 years of age. The group was divided by cleft type (24 unilateral cleft lip and palate, 23 cleft palate only, and 11 bilateral cleft lip and palate).

    Results:

    The prevalence of abnormal middle ear status decreased significantly with age. When comparing cleft types, the isolated cleft palate group presented with a significantly lower prevalence of abnormal middle ear status than the other groups at 7 and 16 years of age (21% as compared to 32% in the unilateral group and 38% in the bilateral group). The pure-tone average improved with age, while the high-frequency pure-tone average did not. When cleft types were compared, the bilateral group demonstrated significantly poorer hearing in the high frequencies than the other groups.

    Conclusion:

    Children with cleft palate need regular audiological and otological follow-up to ensure management is appropriate and timely. The increased hearing thresholds in the high frequencies may be due to the increased episodes of OME.

  • 34. Flynn, Traci
    et al.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Jönsson, Radoslava
    Lohmander, Anette
    The high prevalence of otitis media with effusion in children with cleft lip and palate as compared to children without clefts2009In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 73, no 10, 1441-1446 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Children with cleft lip and palate universally present with otitis media with effusion. This prevalence has not been systematically studied. The purpose of the present study was to examine and compare the prevalence of otitis media with effusion, hearing sensitivity, and audiometry method utilised for assessment in children with and without clefts. METHODS: Two groups of children (children with unilateral cleft lip and palate, N=22, and children without clefts, N=20) were followed prospectively and longitudinally from 1 to 5 years of age. Data were collected at four points (1, 1.5, 3, and 5 years of age). Assessments at each of the four points included: (1) otomicroscopy, (2) tympanometry, and (3) hearing assessment. RESULTS: Overall the children with unilateral cleft lip and palate demonstrated a significantly higher prevalence of otitis media with effusion (121 ears, 74.7%) than children without clefts (31 ears, 19.4%) (p<0.001). This higher prevalence was also significant at 1, 1.5, 3, and 5 years of age (p<0.001). Of those ears with otitis media with effusion, 83.1% of the ears exhibited a hearing loss (PTA >20dB), with this loss more prevalent in the cleft group (89.7% UCLP and 70.0% non-cleft). The hearing loss was significantly more pronounced in the cleft (group 35.71dB HL UCLP and 26.41dB HL non-cleft group). Children with unilateral cleft lip and palate utilised a lower age-appropriate audiometry testing method than age-matched children with no cleft at 1, 1.5, and 3 years of age. CONCLUSIONS: Children with unilateral cleft lip and palate present with a significantly higher prevalence of otitis media with effusion than children without cleft. Also, the hearing loss associated with otitis media with effusion is demonstrated in this study. Furthermore, the method of audiometry has been examined and children with unilateral cleft lip and palate had to be assessed with a lower level of method than children without cleft.

  • 35.
    Flynn, Tracy
    et al.
    Department of Audiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; 2Department of Audiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden .
    Lohmander, A.
    4Division of Speech and Language Pathology, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technique, Karolinska Institute and Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Magnusson, L.
    Department of Audiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; 2Department of Audiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hearing and otitis media with effusion in young adults with cleft lip and palate2012In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251, Vol. 132, no 9, 959-966 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conclusions: Speech recognition in noise is affected when otitis media with effusion (OME) is present in young adults with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Objective: The objective of this study was to describe the hearing and performance on auditory tasks of young adults with unilateral cleft lip and palate as compared to young adults without cleft lip and palate.

    Methods: Twenty-six young adults with unilateral cleft lip and palate and 23 young adults without cleft lip and palate participated in the study. Pure tone audiometry, tympanometry, speech recognition in noise at the word and sentence level, and masking level difference were examined.

    Results: Results revealed elevated hearing thresholds in the young adults with cleft lip and palate as compared with young adults without cleft lip and palate. No differences concerning speech recognition in noise and binaural processing were observed between the young adults with cleft lip and palate and those without. However, there was poorer speech recognition performance in those adults with unilateral cleft lip and palate and OME on the day of testing as compared with young adults with unilateral cleft lip and palate without OME on the day of testing.

  • 36.
    Flynn, Tracy
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Dept Speech Language Pathol, Stockholm, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Div Audiol, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Persson, Christina
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Div Speech & Language Pathol, Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Speech Language Pathol, Gothenburg, Swedenmöller.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital.
    Lohmander, Anette
    Karolinska Inst, Div Speech & Language Pathol, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Lennart
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Audiol, Gothenburg, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Div Audiol, Inst Neurosci,Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A Longitudinal Study of Hearing and Middle Ear Status of Individuals With Cleft Palate With and Without Additional Malformations/Syndromes2014In: The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal, ISSN 1055-6656, E-ISSN 1545-1569, Vol. 51, no 5, 94-101 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To describe and compare the middle ear status and hearing sensitivity in adolescence with isolated cleft palate plus additional malformations and/or syndromes with those with only an isolated cleft palate.

    Design: Retrospective and longitudinal. Two groups of individuals with isolated cleft palate were compared.

    Participants: A cohort of individuals born over 4 years in the western region of Sweden. The cohort was divided into one group with isolated cleft palate (n = 31; ICP) and one group with isolated cleft palate plus additional malformations and/or syndromes (n = 37; ICP+).

    Methods: Middle ear status and hearing thresholds were collected from the medical records at 7, 10, 13, and 16 years of age, examined, and compared within and between groups over time.

    Results: The ICP+ group demonstrated a significantly higher prevalence of abnormal middle ear status and elevated hearing thresholds as compared with the ICP group. As the individuals aged, the prevalence of abnormal middle ear status decreased. The hearing levels in both groups decreased in the low to middle frequencies as individuals aged; however, the hearing in the high frequencies did not.

    Conclusions: Individuals with cleft palate need to be followed routinely for middle ear status and hearing thresholds to ensure optimal audiological rehabilitation, with particular attention to those with additional malformations and/or syndromes.

  • 37. Folkestad, Lena
    et al.
    Lindgren, Gun
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Granström, Gösta
    Diplopia in orbital fractures: a simple method to evaluate eye motility2007In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, Vol. 127, no 2, 156-166 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conclusion. This study on eye motility demonstrates a new application of electro-oculography which proved to have a high potential for establishing and diagnosing the cause of diplopia in orbital floor fractures. Electro-oculography is objective and easy to perform even when the restricted eye is covered. The ‘uninjured’ eye can be used as the reference. Any motility difference between the left and the right eye was easily detected. Objective. It is essential in orbital floor fractures to distinguish entrapment from other causes of diplopia. We investigated whether vertical eye motility and restricted elevation can be detected and characterized by means of electro-oculography. Materials and methods. Electronystagmography equipment used for vestibular testing in daily ENT practice was used in a different context. Unilateral mechanical restriction was generated in the test subjects through fixation of one eye bulb. The velocity and range of eye motility of both eyes were measured and compared in 12 healthy test subjects and 7 patients with long-term vertical diplopia after orbital floor fractures. Results. Simulated entrapment was easily detected as a distinct difference between right and left eye motility recordings (p<0.001). Recordings of patients with diplopia differed significantly from those of healthy test subjects with respect to velocity (p<0.05) and range of motility (p<0.05).

  • 38.
    Frölander, Hans Erik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro Audiological Research Centre, Örebro, Sweden; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; The Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Linköping, Sweden; Research on Hearing and Deafness (HEAD) Graduate School, Linköping, Sweden .
    Lyxell, Björn
    Department of Behavioral Science and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; The Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Linköping, Sweden.
    Marshall, Jan D
    Jackson laboratory, Bar Harbor, Maine, ME, USA; Alstrom Syndrome international, Mt. Desert, Maine, ME, USA.
    Piacentini, Heather
    Alstrom Syndrome international, Mt. Desert, Maine, ME, USA.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro Audiological Research Centre, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Audiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Sweden; The Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Linköping, Sweden.
    Theory-of-mind in young adults with Alström syndrome is affected by social relationshipsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Frölander, Hans-Erik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiologiskt Forskningscentrum, Örebro Universitetssjukhus, Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital; Swedish Inst Disabil Res, Linköping, Sweden; Grad Sch, Res Hearing & Deafness HEAD, Linköping, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiologiskt forskningscentrum; Audiological Research Centre; Swedish Inst Disabil Res, Linköping, Sweden; Linnaeus Ctr HEAD, Linköping, Sweden.
    Marshall, Jan D.
    The Jackson laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME USA.
    Sundqvist, Annette
    Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Behavioral Science and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Linnaeus Ctr HEAD, Linköping, Sweden.
    Rönnåsen, Berit
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiologiskt Forskningscentrum, Örebro Universitetssjukhus, Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Inst Disabil Res, Linköping, Sweden.
    Falkensson, Lil
    Nationellt expertteam för diagnosticering av dövblindhet, Nationellt kunskapscenter för dövblindfrågor, The Swedish National Expert Team for the Diagnoses of Deafblindness, National Resource Centre, Lund, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Institutionen för beteendevetenskap och lärande, Linköpings universitet, Departmenof Behavioral Science and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Linnaeus Ctr HEAD, Linköping, Sweden.
    Theory-of-mind in adolescents and young adults with Alström Syndrome2014In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 78, no 3, 530-537 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The study focuses on theory-of-mind in adolescents and young adults with Alström syndrome (ALMS). ALMS, an autosomal recessive syndrome causes juvenile blindness, sensorineural hearing loss, cardiomyopathy, endocrinological disorders and metabolic dysfunction. Theory-of-mind (ToM) refers to the ability to impute mental states to one self and to others. Clinical observations have revealed an increased occurence of deviances in mental state understanding in ALMS. In the present study ToM will be examined and related to working memory (WM), verbal ability and sensory loss.

    Methods: Twelve young individuals (16-37 years) with ALMS and 24 nondisabled individuals matched on age, gender and educational level participated. ToM was assessed by means of a multiple task that taxes the ability to understand thoughts and feelings of story chraracters´. WM was examined by means of a reading span task and verbal ability by means of a vocabulary test.

    Results: The ALMS group performed at significantly lower levels in ToM tasks and displayed a higher variability in performance than the control group. Individuals with ALMS and a relatively poor level performance provided fewer correct mental state inferences in ToM tasks than ALMS individuals with relatively higher performance levels. ALMS individuals with relatively high performance levels made as many correct inferences in ToM tasks as the control group, but their inferences were more often incomplete. Vocabulary skills and educational level, but not WM-capacity predicted ToM performance. Degree of deafblindness did not have an impact on ToM. Age of onset of visual loss but not hearing loss related to ToM.

    Conclusions: The individuals with ALMS display a high degree of heterogeneity in terms of ToM, where some individuals reached performance levels comparable to nondisabled individuals. The results are discussed with respect to how cognitive and verbal abilities and factors related to the disability affect ToM.

  • 40.
    Frölander, Hans-Erik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Linköping, Sweden; Research on Hearing and Deafness (HEAD) graduate School, Linköping, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Audiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Rudner, Mary
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Mishra, Sushmit
    Institute of Health Sciences, Utkal University, Bhubaneswar, India.
    Marshall, Jan D.
    Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME, USA; Alstrom Syndrome International, Mount Desert, ME, USA.
    Piacentini, Heather
    Alstrom Syndrome International, Mount Desert, ME, USA.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Theory-of-mind in individuals with Alström syndrome is related to executive functions, and verbal ability2015In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 6, 1426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study focuses on cognitive prerequisites for the development of theory-of-mind (ToM), the ability to impute mental states to self and others in young adults with Alström syndrome (AS). AS is a rare and quite recently described recessively inherited ciliopathic disorder which causes progressive sensorineural hearing loss and juvenile blindness, as well as many other organ dysfunctions. Two cognitive abilities were considered; Phonological working memory (WM) and executive functions (EF), both of importance in speech development.                                                                                              

    Methods: Ten individuals (18–37 years) diagnosed with AS, and 20 individuals with no known impairment matched for age, gender, and educational level participated. Sensory functions were measured. Information about motor functions and communicative skills was obtained from responses to a questionnaire. ToM was assessed using Happés strange stories, verbal ability by a vocabulary test, phonological WM by means of an auditory presented non-word serial recall task and EF by tests of updating and inhibition.                                           

    Results: The AS group performed at a significantly lower level than the control group in both the ToM task and the EF tasks. A significant correlation was observed between recall of non-words and EF in the AS group. Updating, but not inhibition, correlated significantly with verbal ability, whereas both updating and inhibition were significantly related to the ability to initiate and sustain communication. Poorer performance in the ToM and EF tasks were related to language perseverance and motor mannerisms.                                                     

    Conclusion: The AS group displayed a delayed ToM as well as reduced phonological WM, EF, and verbal ability. A significant association between ToM and EF, suggests a compensatory role of EF. This association may reflect the importance of EF to perceive and process input from the social environment when the social interaction is challenged by dual sensory loss. We argue that limitations in EF capacity in individuals with AS, to some extent, may be related to early blindness and progressive hearing loss, but maybe also to gene specific abnormalities.

  • 41. Grahn-Kronhed, A.
    et al.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Olsson, B.
    Möller, M.
    The effect of short-term balance training on community-dwelling older adults2001In: Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, ISSN 1063-8652, Vol. 9, no 1, 19-31 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study evaluated a balance-training program's influence in healthy older adults. Fifteen community-dwelling participants aged 70Ð75 years were randomized to an exercise group, and 15 gender- and age-matched participants, to a control group. The 9-week training program comprised ordinary-life balance, vestibular-habituation, and ball exercises and station training. Clinical balance tests were conducted before and after training. Tests that showed significant improvement in the exercise group after the intervention included standing on the right leg with eyes closed, standing on the right leg and the left leg while turning the head and walking 30 m. Significant between-group differences were found at posttest. A significant decrease was seen in the control group in the walking-forward test, and this change was significantly different between groups. The study indicates that balance performance in healthy older adults might be improved by balance training including exercises that stimulate multiple sensory systems and their central integration.

  • 42.
    Granberg, Sarah
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Centre, Swedish Institute for Disability Research; Linköping University, HEAD Graduate School, Linköping,.
    Dahlström, Jennie
    Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, School of Health and Medical Sciences/Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Centre, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro.
    Kähäri, Kim
    Division of Audiology, Institution for Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrens ’ Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, School of Health and Medical Sciences/Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro.
    The ICF Core Sets for hearing loss - researcher perspective. Part I: Systematic review of outcome measures identified in audiological research2014In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 2, 65-76 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To review the literature in order to identify outcome measures used in research on adults with hearing loss (HL) as part of the ICF Core Sets development project, and to describe study and population characteristics of the reviewed studies.

    Design: A systematic review methodology was applied using multiple databases. A comprehensive search was conducted and two search pools were created, pool I and pool II.

    Study sample: The study population included adults (>= 18 years of age) with HL and oral language as the primary mode of communication.

    Results: 122 studies were included. Outcome measures were distinguished by 'instrument type', and 10 types were identified. In total, 246 (pool I) and 122 (pool II) different measures were identified, and only approximately 20% were extracted twice or more. Most measures were related to speech recognition. Fifty-one different questionnaires were identified. Many studies used small sample sizes, and the sex of participants was not revealed in several studies.

    Conclusion: The low prevalence of identified measures reflects a lack of consensus regarding the optimal outcome measures to use in audiology. Reflections and discussions are made in relation to small sample sizes and the lack of sex differentiation/descriptions within the included articles.

  • 43.
    Granberg, Sarah
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Centre, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro; Linköping University, HEAD Graduate School, Linköping.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, School of Health and Medical Sciences/Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro.
    Skagerstrand, Asa
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, School of Health and Medical Sciences/Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro; Linköping University, HEAD Graduate School, Linköping.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Centre, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, School of Health and Medical Sciences/Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro.
    The ICF Core Sets for hearing loss: researcher perspective, Part II: Linking outcome measures to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF)2014In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 2, 77-87 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To link outcome measures used in audiological research to the ICF classification and thereby describe audiological research from the ICF perspective.

    Design: Through a peer-reviewed or a joint linking procedure, link outcome measures to the ICF classification system using standardized ICF linking rules. Additional linking rules were developed in combination with the established rules to overcome difficulties when connecting audiological data to ICF. Absolute and relative frequencies of ICF categories were reported.

    Study sample: The identified outcome measures from the previous study (Part I) constituted the empirical material. Results: In total, 285 ICF categories were identified. The most prevalent categories were related to listening, hearing functions, auditory perceptions, emotions and the physical environment, such as noise and hearing aids. Categories related to communication showed lower relative frequencies, as did categories related to the social and attitudinal environment.

    Conclusions: Based on the linked outcome measures, communication as a research topic is subordinated to other research topics. The same conclusion can be drawn for research targeting the social and attitudinal environment of adults with HL. Difficulties in the linking procedure were highlighted and discussed, and suggestions for future revisions of the ICF from the audiological perspective were described.

  • 44.
    Granberg, Sarah
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Centre, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, ÖRebro; HEAD Graduate School, Linköping University, Linköping.
    Pronk, Marieke
    Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Audiology Section, VU University Medical Center, EMGO, Institute for Health and Care Research, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Swanepoel, De Wet
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa; Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Australia; Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, Australia.
    Kramer, Sophia E
    Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Audiology Section, VU University Medical Center, EMGO, Institute for Health and Care Research, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Hagsten, Hanna
    Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, School of Health and Medical Sciences / Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro.
    Hjaldahl, Jennie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, School of Health and Medical Sciences / Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Centre, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, School of Health and Medical Sciences / Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro.
    The ICF core sets for hearing loss project: Functioning and disability from the patient perspective2014In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 11, 777-786 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore areas of functioning, disability, and environmental factors of adults with hearing loss (HL) by using the ICF classification as a tool to determine and document each element. Design: A qualitative study applying mainly focus-group methodology was applied.

    Study sample: Thirty-six Dutch and South African adults (18 years of age) with HL (20–95 dB HL) who used oral communication as first communication. Summative content analysis was performed on the transcripts by linkage to appropriate ICF categories.

    Results: 143 ICF categories were identified, most of which belonged to the Activities & Participation (d) component, closely followed by the Environmental factors component. Participants specifically mentioned categories related to oral communication and interaction. Assistive technology (such as hearing aids), noise, and support by and attitudes of others in the environment of the participants were considered highly influential for functioning and disability.

    Conclusions: The present study illustrates the complex and encompassing nature of aspects involved in functioning and disability of adults with HL. Findings highlight the necessity of using a multidimensional tool, such as the ICF, to map functioning and disability with hearing loss, allowing consideration and evaluation of aspects that are both internal and external.

  • 45.
    Granberg, Sarah
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Centre; Linköping Univ, HEAD Grad Sch, Linköping, Sweden.
    Swanepoel, De Wet
    University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa; University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Australia; Ear Sci Inst Australia, Subiaco, WA, Australia.
    Englund, Ulrica
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Centre.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre.
    The ICF core sets for hearing loss project: International expert survey on functioning and disability of adults with hearing loss using the International classification of functioning, disability, and health (ICF)2014In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 8, 497-506 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To identify relevant aspects of functioning, disability, and contextual factors for adults with hearing loss (HL) from hearing health professional perspective summarized using the ICF classification as reference tool.

    Design: Internet-based cross-sectional survey using open-ended questions. Responses were analysed using a simplified content analysis approach to link concept to ICF categories according to linking rules.

    Study sample: Hearing health professionals (experts) recruited through e-mail distribution lists of professional organizations and personal networks of ICF core set for hearing loss steering committee members. Stratified sampling according to profession and world region enhanced the international and professional representation.

    Results: Sixty-three experts constituted the stratified sample used in the analysis. A total of 1726 meaningful concepts were identified in this study, resulting in 209 distinctive ICF categories, with 106 mentioned by 5% or more of respondents. Most categories in the activities & participation component related to communication, while the most frequent environmental factors related to the physical environment such as hearing aids or noise. Mental functions, such as confidence or emotional functions were also frequently highlighted.

    Conclusions: More than half (53.3%) of the entire ICF classification categories were included in the expert survey results. This emphasizes the importance of a multidimensional tool, such as the ICF, for assessing persons with hearing loss.

  • 46. Gustafsson, A.-S.
    et al.
    Noaksson, L.
    Kronhed, A-C. G.
    Möller, M.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Changes in balance performance in physically active elderly people aged 73-802000In: Scandinavian Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 0036-5505, Vol. 32, no 4, 168-172 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In our hospital in 1989 a series of 30 healthy elderly people participated in a study to evaluate the effect of physical training on improving balance. Thereafter, the majority of the people in this group continued with some kind of balance training. Seven years later we followed up 17 of the people who had participated in the original study. We wanted to evaluate the balance performance of these physically active elderly people (mean age 80.5 years) and compare it with their balance performance 7 years previously. Balance was found to be significantly impaired compared with 1989 in four out of six static balance tests. The time required to walk 30 m had increased significantly. The subjective ratings of vertigo and balance problems had not changed significantly, neither had the number of correct steps when walking forwards on one line and backwards between two lines. In dynamic posturography, the test with sway-referenced visual cues showed improved postural control, but no change in sway was seen in the other five sensory conditions. When sudden backward translations of the platform occurred, increased latencies of force response were seen.

  • 47. Hammar, M. L.
    et al.
    Lindgren, R.
    Berg, G. E.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Niklasson, M. K.
    Effects of hormonal replacement therapy on the postural balance among postmenopausal women1996In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 0029-7844, E-ISSN 1873-233X, Vol. 88, no 6, 955-960 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To establish whether hormone replacement therapy affects postural balance in postmenopausal women.

    METHODS:

    Nineteen healthy postmenopausal women with vasomotor symptoms were included. Median age was 54 years, median time since menopause was 3 years. They underwent dynamic posturography before and after 4 and 12 weeks of transdermal estrogen treatment (17 beta-estradiol 50 micrograms/day) as well as after 2 additional weeks of combined estrogen-progestagen treatment. The dynamic posturography method quantifies the amplitude, frequency, and pattern of body sway and tests the visual, vestibular, and somatosensory systems, which together maintain balance. The two most difficult tests either cancel visual and distort somatosensory inputs or give distorted information from both the visual and somatosensory systems.

    RESULTS:

    Hormone replacement therapy increased static balance performance assessed by dynamic posturography. A highly significant improvement was seen in the two most difficult tests between the pretreatment test and the test performed after 4 weeks of estrogen therapy (P < .01, P < .001, respectively). This improvement was sustained after 12 weeks and also during the 14th week, with the women on combined estrogen-progestagen treatment.

    CONCLUSION:

    Estrogen treatment increased balance performance measured by dynamic posturography, indicating that the beneficial effects from estrogens on postmenopausal fracture risk may include central nervous system effects on balance. Two weeks' addition of gestagen to the treatment regimen did not counteract the estrogen effects.

  • 48.
    Hartel, Bas P.
    et al.
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands; Radboud Institute for Health Sciences, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
    Löfgren, Maria
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research (SIDR) Linköping, Sweden; Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital Örebro, Sweden; School of Medicine and Health, Örebro University Örebro, Sweden.
    Huygen, Patrick L. M.
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands; Radboud Institute for Health Sciences, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
    Guchelaar, Iris
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands; Radboud Institute for Health Sciences, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
    Lo-A-Njoe Kort, Nicole
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands; Radboud Institute for Health Sciences, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
    Sadeghi, Andre M.
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Audiology, Göteborg, Sweden; Hearing and deafness activities organization, Habilitation & Health, Göteborg, Sweden.
    van Wijk, Erwin
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head, and Neck Surgery, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Tranebjærg, Lisbeth
    Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery and Audiology, Bispebjerg Hospital/Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kremer, Hannie
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head, and Neck Surgery, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Department of Human Genetics, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Kimberling, William J.
    Department of Otolaryngology, Molecular Otolaryngology, and Renal Research Laboratories, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, United States of America.
    Cremers, Cor W. R. J.
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands; Radboud Institute for Health Sciences, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Swedish Institute for Disability Research (SIDR) Linköping, Sweden; Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital Örebro, Sweden; Department of Otolaryngology, Molecular Otolaryngology, and Renal Research Laboratories, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA .
    Pennings, Ronald J. E.
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Department of Otolaryngology, Molecular Otolaryngology, and Renal Research Laboratories, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA.
    A combination of two truncating mutations in USH2A causes more severe and progressive hearing impairment in Usher syndrome type IIa2016In: Hearing Research, ISSN 0378-5955, E-ISSN 1878-5891, Vol. 339, 60-68 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Usher syndrome is an inherited disorder that is characterized by hearing impairment (HI), retinitis pigmentosa, and in some cases vestibular dysfunction. Usher syndrome type IIa is caused by mutations in USH2A. HI in these patients is highly heterogeneous and the present study evaluates the effects of different types of USH2A mutations on the audiometric phenotype. Data from two large centres of expertise on Usher Syndrome in the Netherlands and Sweden were combined in order to create a large combined sample of patients to identify possible genotype-phenotype correlations.

    Design: A retrospective study on HI in 110 patients (65 Dutch and 45 Swedish) genetically diagnosed with Usher syndrome type IIa. We used methods especially designed for characterizing and testing differences in audiological phenotype between patient subgroups. These methods included Age Related Typical Audiograms (ARTA) and a method to evaluate the difference in the degree of HI developed throughout life between subgroups.

    Results: Cross-sectional linear regression analysis of last-visit audiograms for the best hearing ear demonstrated a gradual decline of hearing over decades. The congenital level of HI was in the range of 16-33 dB at 0.25-0.5 kHz, and in the range of 51-60 dB at 1-8 kHz. The annual threshold deterioration was in the range of 0.4-0.5 dB/year at 0.25-2 kHz and in the range of 0.7-0.8 dB/year at 4-8 kHz. Patients with two truncating mutations, including homozygotes for the common c.2299delG mutation, developed significantly more severe HI throughout life than patients with one truncating mutation combined with one nontruncating mutation, and patients with two nontruncating mutations.

    Conclusions: The results have direct implications for patient counselling in terms of prognosis of hearing and may serve as baseline measures for future (genetic) therapeutic interventions.

  • 49. Hederstierna, Christina
    et al.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Åhlman, Henrik
    Lundberg, Rebecca
    von Döbeln, Ulrika
    The prevalence of Connexin 26 mutations in the Swedish population2005In: Audiological Medicine, ISSN 1651-386X, E-ISSN 1651-3835, Vol. 3, no 3, 154-158 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mutations in GJB2, the gene encoding the protein Connexin 26, have been shown to account for as much as 50% of autosomal recessive, non-syndromic childhood hearing loss (ARNSHL). Early, correct diagnosis and intervention have greatly improved the possibilities for these children in learning and developing language skills. In recent years, many reports from varied parts of the world have described the local scene of mutations in Connexin 26. The prevalence differs with geographic location and assessment procedures. Mutations in Connexin 26 have until recently been identified in very few cases in Sweden, Norway and Denmark, and nationwide population samples have not been studied in the Scandinavian countries. In this study we present the results of a large nationwide and a regional study of the prevalence of the 35delG, L90P and 167delT mutations of the GJB2 gene in Sweden. A total of 2052 samples (dried blood spots) were analysed. 1501 samples were collected representing all of Sweden and 551 samples from northern Sweden. The allele frequencies in Sweden were found to be 35delG, 0.83%; L90P, 0.30%; and 167delT, 0%. The prevalence of mutations in Connexin 26 in Sweden seems to be comparable to that in other northern European countries.

  • 50.
    Henricson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping university.
    Frölander, Hans Erik
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro Audiological Research Centre, Örebro SE 701 85, Sweden; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; The Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Linköping, Sweden; Research on Hearing and Deafness (HEAD) Graduate School, Linköping, Sweden .
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro Audiological Research Centre, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Audiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping university.
    Theory of mind and cognitive function in adults with Usher or Alström syndromeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
12345 1 - 50 of 242
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf