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  • 1.
    Aaboen, Lise
    et al.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Industrial Economics and Technology Management, Trondheim, Norway.
    Laage-Hellman, Jens
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Technology Management and Economics, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lind, Frida
    Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Technology Management and Economics, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Shih, Tommy
    Lund University, Department of Business Administration, Lund, Sweden.
    Exploring the roles of university spin-offs in business networks2016In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 59, 157-166 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper identifies different university spin-off (USO) roles related to resource interaction among business parties. It does so by mapping how USOs become part of business networks in terms of their roles relative to other parties. The theoretical frame of reference focuses on roles and resource interaction based on an industrial network approach to business markets. The empirical research is based onfive cases of USOs representing a variety in terms of technology, degree of newness, sector, and area of application. As a result of the analysis, three different roles are identified: the USO as resource mediator, resource re-combiner and resource renewer. These roles reflect how USOs adapt resources to, or require changes among, business parties' resources. The paper also discusses the main resource interfaces associated with the three roles and related challenges. The paper contributes to previous research through illustrating USOs' roles relative to business parties from a resource interaction point of view, and by pointing to the establishment of new companies in business networks as a way of implementing innovation. Finally, the paper discusses the managerial implications of the research in terms of the USO's need to understand which role to take and how to develop it.

  • 2. AAboen, Lise
    et al.
    Laage-Hellman, Jens
    Chalmers University of technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lind, Frida
    Chalmers University of technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Shih, Tommy
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    University spin-offs and their roles in business networks2014In: IMP Conference, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Adams, Richard
    et al.
    University of Exeter Business School, Exeter, UK.
    Alexander, Allen
    University of Exeter Business School, Exeter, UK.
    Öberg, Christina
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Innovation management capabilities for start-ups and spin-offs: A literature review2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A firm’s ability to innovate is critical to retaining its competitiveness and even survival: in the long run it is the capability to generate a stream of product and process changes that matters. Consequently to secure their position into the future, firms need to be able to develop, maintain and renew their Innovation Management Capability (IMC). In order to improve their firm’s IMC, managers need to know which ‘levers’ to pull. An extensive and diverse body of literature exists that has sought to identify these important factors, and several attempts at synthesis have been made which imply that organisations successfully able to innovate exhibit a number of generic characteristics. The contingency perspective presents a challenge to these views and raises questions about their universal applicability, whether or not different contexts demand different IMCs and to what extent there is variation in generic factors across different contexts. This paper presents a literature review on innovation management capability in relation to firms that are at the early stages of development, whether they are starting out or spinning-off from other organisations. Start-ups and spin-outs (SUSOs) constitute important motors for industrial change, and their IMCs are therefore important considerations. The aim of this review is to assess the pertinence of the IMC construct for organisations in the early stages of their development and uncover any contextual contingencies. The paper indicates that SUSOs are heavily reliant on their linkages, networks and connectivity. This would seem intuitive as at the outset a firm can benefit from having mentors, partners and networks. In the open innovation paradigm, where connectivity and links are essential, this is reinforced. The paper also indicates that the IMC is described somewhat differently for SUSOs than in the general literature, a finding that emphasises how firm newness impacts IMC.

  • 4.
    Adams, Richard
    et al.
    University of Exeter Business School, Exeter, UK.
    Alexander, Allen
    University of Exeter Business School, Exeter, UK.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Innovation management capabilities for start-ups and spin-offs: A literature review2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Sweden.
    Dahlin, Peter
    Havila, Virpi
    Holtström, Johan
    Öberg, Christina
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Corporate restructuring and customers and suppliers2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Dahlin, Peter
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Havila, Virpi
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Holtström, Johan
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Including customers and suppliers in the understanding of mergers and acquisitions2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Dahlin, Peter
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Havila, Virpi
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Holtström, Johan
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    The Stake of Customers and Suppliers in Mergers and Acquisitions2016In: SMS 36th Annual Conference, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For a firm, customers and suppliers are important stakeholders in their business activities, including such strategic activities as mergers and acquisitions. But how has this been depicted in previous research? In this paper we review articles on mergers and acquisitions to find out in what way customers and suppliers are recognized in the research on mergers and acquisitions. The paper is a review of 1,632 articles. The analysis proposes six categories: customers and suppliers in vertical integration; customers as an aggregated market; customers and suppliers as resources; customers (and suppliers) being affected by changed market conditions; the merger or acquisition following from or leading to power imbalances in relationships to customers/suppliers; and customers and suppliers as actors or reactors.

  • 8.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Holtström, Johan
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Are Mergers or Acquisitions expected to affect customer and supplier relationships?: An Analysis of Decisions Taken by a Competition Authority2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies concerning corporate mergers and acquisitions are mainly focused on the merging companies. Recently though, there has been an increased interest concerning connected companies, e.g. those firms having customer, supplier or other business relationships with participants in a merger or acquisition. In many countries, there is a legal prerequisite to report intended business concentration to the national competition authority for investigation. This paper investigates decisions made by a competition authority and in addition looks at studies where connected companies are mentioned by the authorities in such decisions. In very few of the investigated decisions, 2.4%, is a third party identified. Our conclusion is that customers and suppliers, if at all effected, are seen as reactive rather than active partners in a concentration. And, the concept supplier or customer relationship is not used.

  • 9.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Holtström, Johan
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Connectedness in complementary acquisitions: Effects on customers and suppliers2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Jönköping International Business School , Jönköping , Sweden.
    Holtström, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering , Linköping , Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Lund University, Department of Industrial Management and Logistics , Lund , Sweden.
    Do competition authorities consider business relationships?2012In: Journal of Business-to-Business Marketing, ISSN 1051-712X, E-ISSN 1547-0628, Vol. 19, no 1, 67-92 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Companies engage in business relationships for a variety of reasons, including specialization, product development, and building competitive networks. Research has demonstrated that mergers and acquisitions (M&As) may challenge ongoing business relationships. The purpose of this article is to investigate whether and how competition authorities consider business relationships when evaluating M&As.

    Methodology: The article uses the documentation from 450 M&As reported to the Swedish competition authority to capture the way in which an authority evaluates M&As. The Swedish competition authority evaluation corresponds to other national and international evaluation procedures.

    Findings: The findings indicate that the competition authorities neglect an important aspect of business life, namely companies forming business relationships. The competition authorities evaluate M&As on the basis of risk for price increases, and consequently disregard such issues as heterogeneity in demand and offerings, and values built into existing business relationships.

    Originality/Value/Contribution: The article contributes to research on business relationships through exploring how a public authority deals with such relationships. It also contributes to research on mergers and acquisitions through examining how these activities are evaluated by competition authorities. Furthermore, the article contributes to competition research by reflecting on competition law concerning M&A regulations in relation to business relationships.

  • 11. Aramo-Immonen, Heli
    et al.
    Bessant, John
    Heinonen, Tarja
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Trifilova, Anna
    Meeting radical change: SMEs and innovation capabilities2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radically new ideas, or disruptive innovations, would expect to come from inside companies, or possibly in their collaboration with other parties. However, they may also be 'forced' on a company from outside, and then be so without necessarily bringing any solutions on how to deal with the new situation. The energy sector is bound to deal with major changes. For SMEs acting in the sector, their ability to take on, or even invent, new solutions to meet such pressures may be limited. The sector is marked by high investment costs and the sector is also highly regulated in terms of what to produce. In this study we explore how prepared SMEs are to meet radical change in the energy sector. Managers from ten SMEs in Finland completed an Innovation Fitness survey and were interviewed. The study indicates how the SME managers are unprepared for new external requirements and need to better orient themselves before actually being able to tackle arising issues. The paper points to the importance of actively searching the environment for changes. It contributes to the innovation literature through pointing to how innovation may be forced from the outside, and deal with fighting for its survival, rather than be seen as a competitive advantage from inside out.

  • 12.
    Bessant, John
    et al.
    University of Exeter Business School, Centre for Innovation and Service Research, United Kingdom.
    Öberg, Christina
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden; University of Exeter Business School, Centre for Innovation and Service Research, United Kingdom and Department of Business Administration,Exeter, UK.
    Trifilova, Anna
    University of Exeter Business School, Centre for Innovation and Service Research, United Kingdom and Faculty of Economics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, Russia.
    Framing problems in radical innovation2014In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 43, no 8, 1284-1292 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The challenge of managing radical innovation is partly about dealing with higher levels of uncertainty as organisations seek to extend their exploration into new technological and market spaces. Innovation management routines for dealing with this differ from those around incremental innovation — the well-established exploit/explore dilemma. But it can be argued that there is a second challenge associated with radical innovation under conditions of discontinuity — when new elements in the environment need to be brought into the organisation's frame for search, selection and implementation. Under these conditions existing routines fail and otherwise successful incumbents experience significant difficulties. This paper explores the challenge of such radical innovation through the lens of the ways in which innovation activity is framed and contributes to the theme of this Special Issue through discussing barriers and enabling routines associated with the search, selection, and implementation processes within organisations.

  • 13. Bhuanantanonoh, K.
    et al.
    Gibbons, Paul M.
    Hinthong, S.
    Manolis, D.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Sarvanidis, S.
    MRes Curriculum2005In: 1st Bath University Postgraduate Conference, Bath, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Björkman, Hans
    et al.
    WSP Analysis & Strategy, Sweden.
    Lindhult, Erik
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden; University of Exeter, Exeter, UK.
    Angels and demons: The religion of innovation?2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15. Chou, Hsin-Hui
    et al.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Shih, Tommy
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Strategizing in networks: a case study on different approaches and their consequences2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16. Chou, Hsin-Hui
    et al.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Shih, Tommy Tsung-Ying
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Strategies and network consequences in an interactive context2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17. Cooper, Cary
    et al.
    Öberg, Christina
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Tarba, Shlomo Yedidia
    Culture in M&As as intra-organizational and inter-organizational value systems2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Dahlin, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Fors, Jeanette
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Press releases, annual reports and newspaper articles: Using alternative data sources for studies on business network dynamics2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research according to the IMP-tradition has a strong foundation in case studies. These case studies are often built on interviews. Whereas interviews may capture the complexity of business relationships and networks, they are associated with weaknesses, especially if the interviews are meant to capture events that occurred in the past. In this paper we challenge the one-sided use of interviews through proposing alternative data sources for studies on business network dynamics. The purpose of this paper is to discuss and exemplify how press releases, newspaper articles and annual reports can be used systematically to study business network dynamics. Examples from three ongoing studies using these sources are presented to illustrate their use. These studies indicate that press releases, annual reports and newspaper articles enable both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies of business network dynamics, where the systematic use of data enables the capturing of a network at different times of its development without the risk of rationalisation or loss of memory effects.

  • 19. Dahlin, Peter
    et al.
    Pesämaa, Ossi
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Network embeddedness and the survival of start-ups: A census study of Swedish companies founded in 20072014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Dahlin, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Pesämaa, Ossi
    Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Network embeddedness as a factor for survival of start-ups2016In: 76th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Dahlin, Peter
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Sharing economy – For whom?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Gebert Persson, Sabine
    et al.
    Department of Business Studies, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Mattsson, Lars-Gunnar
    Department of Marketing and Strategy, Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Theories within the IMP approach: A study of the internationalization process2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Gebert-Persson, Sabine
    et al.
    Department of Business Studies, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Lars-Gunnar
    Department of Marketing and Strategy, Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Has research on the internationalization of firms from an IMP perspective resulted in a theory of internationalization?2015In: The IMP Journal, ISSN 2059-1403, E-ISSN 0809-7259, Vol. 9, no 2, 208-226 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Recently, increased interest has been devoted to discuss theory development in relation to business-to-business (B2B) marketing. The purpose of this paper is to explore these thoughts through describing and analyzing research on the internationalization of firms from an Industrial Marketing and Purchasing (IMP) perspective. The authors ask: to what extent have these studies resulted in a theory of internationalization?

    Design/methodology/approach: The paper is conceptual and frames research on the internationalization of firms by means of definitions, domains, relations of variables and predictions. It looks into research on internationalization based on an IMP-inspired network perspective to see to what extent research has resulted in theories of internationalization.

    Findings: While there have been substantial efforts on theorizing related to IMP-based internationalization studies, the research has not yet resulted in theory.

    Research limitations/implications: In this paper one phenomenon was selected that has already been addressed in IMP research, namely, the internationalization of firms. Had the authors chosen another phenomenon previously studied in IMP the findings might had turned out differently.

    Originality/value: The paper makes a contribution to understanding how ideas are developed, used and referenced in long-term research development for the specific phenomenon of internationalization. The paper contributes to the debate on theories within B2B research.

  • 24.
    Gebert-Persson, Sabine
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Lars-Gunnar
    Handelshögskolan, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    The network approach: a theoretical discussion2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Gebert-Persson, Sabine
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Lars-Gunnar
    Handelshögskolan, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Why is the network approach not a theory? Does it matter?2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Imitating Airbnb and Uber – On the Interconnectedness of Sharing Economy Platforms and Digital Business Ventures2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Geissinger, Andrea
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Laurell, Christofer
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Sandström, Christian
    Assessing the sustainability impact of the sharing economy2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28. Graham, Gary
    et al.
    Hennelly, Patrick
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Managing in smart cities: a network approach2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Smart cities refer to new city designs and solutions that use digital technologies to enhance performance and well-being, to reduce costs and resource consumption, and to engage more effectively and actively with its citizens. Key 'smart' sectors include transport, energy, health care, water and waste. A smart city should be able to respond faster to city and global challenges than one with a simple 'transactional' relationship with its citizens. While there has been a superficial use of the concept in the policy arena and the majority of the analysis on smart cities has been geared towards town planning, if these initiatives are to be operationally effective, it will require simple and workable network solutions. Smart city initiatives expect to radically change the interaction of firms and individuals, and also be based on changes among them. Therefore while research on smart cities has focused on the policy and strategic levels, so far there is a lack of operational detail on how non-ICT companies will act as part of such initiatives. Central to smart cities is the focus they have on ‘user-driven networks’ and ‘multiple stakeholders’. Therefore we suggest an IMP network approach would help to understand the actions of firms in smart cities. This paper discusses how companies could manage in industrial networks in a smart city context, while also playing a key role in shaping the development of a fully integrated smart city-network system. The paper contributes to previous research through connecting smart city descriptions to research on managing in networks. It points to how interaction among companies (and other organisations) would increasingly be determined by geographical location; how companies will grasp opportunities related to creating and offering solutions in line with smart city objectives; and how the ways business and interactions are formed, along with their new foci will impact and reshape smart city initiatives.

  • 29. Graham, Gary
    et al.
    Öberg, Christina
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Crime bridge and the science/science fiction behind it2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Grundström, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Rosenfall, Thomas
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Community interaction: Impact on innovation and open-source business models2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Grundström, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, Anna
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    View and management of innovativeness upon succession in family-owned SMEs2011In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 15, no 3, 617-640 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to provide insights into how the successors of family-owned manufacturing SMEs view and manage innovativeness. Research into company takeovers mainly focuses on large companies and little is known about innovativeness in research on family-owned businesses, often SMEs. This paper presents findings from ten company successions, five of which describe family successions and five external ones. The paper points to that there is little difference in how various types of successor view and manage innovativeness. A successor is chosen with care and this also influences the view and management of innovativeness; other criteria seem to apply in the succession and radical changes can only be introduced if a number of contextual factors are managed properly. The paper also indicates that while financial constraints may limit innovations, a strong financial situation is not an antecedent for innovativeness.

  • 32.
    Grundström, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Lund University, Department of Industrial Management and Logistics, Lund, Sweden.
    Öhrwall-Rönnbäck, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping, Sweden.
    Family-owned manufacturing SMEs and innovativeness: A comparison between within-family successions and external takeovers2012In: The Journal of Family Business Strategy, ISSN 1877-8585, E-ISSN 1877-8593, Vol. 3, no 3, 162-173 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to compare within-family successions and external-party takeovers in family-owned manufacturing SMEs to determine potential differences in how they are perceived and managed. This paper focuses on two long-term aspects of family businesses – their succession and their ability to innovate – defining innovativeness as an aspect of organisational culture. Based on ten case studies, the paper concludes that the values related to a firm's context, influenced by the divesting party as well as by the choice of successor, create inertia, to the extent that only minor changes in innovation orientation are possible. External owners may focus to a greater extent on growth and new ways of innovating, while family-succeeded firms diversify so as not to abandon previous businesses. Intermediating factors, such as customer involvement, type of SME, and the acquirers’ motives, influence the innovative organisational culture and create explanatory links to innovation intensity and methodologies of innovation.

  • 33.
    Grundström, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Öhrwall-Rönnbäck, Anna
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    View and management of innovativeness upon succession in family-owned SMEs2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34. Hallberg, Peter
    et al.
    Hasche, Nina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Kask, Johan
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Quality management systems and business networks2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Hasche, Nina
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Linton, Gabriel
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Trust in open innovation: the case of a med-tech start-up2017In: European Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1460-1060, E-ISSN 1758-7115, Vol. 20, no 1, 31-49 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The literature has shown great interest in open innovation, and also discussed its degree of openness based on, for example, the number of parties involved. Less is known, however, about what makes open innovation processes work. This paper describes and discusses the importance of trust in open innovation, and specifically focuses on a start-up company’s open innovation processes with collaboration parties. The paper points out how a lack of trust antecedents may disable such open innovation processes.

    Design/methodology/approach: The empirical part of the paper consists of a case study on a medical-technology start-up. Interviews and analyses of secondary sources made up the main data capturing methods. Each collaboration between the start-up and another party was analysed through three trust antecedents: contractual, competence-based, and goodwill.

    Findings: The paper shows how either party may have chosen to discontinue the collaboration based on the lack of competence or goodwill antecedents to trust. Specifically, the case indicates how the start-up discontinued the collaborations based on a perceived lack of goodwill, while the collaboration parties based their decisions on competence deficits by the start-up.

    Originality/value: The paper contributes to previous research through describing open innovation related to start-ups, and introducing trust antecedents as prerequisites for open innovation. To the literature on trust, trust mutuality makes a research contribution.

  • 36.
    Holtström, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Cross-border acquisitions: Effects on the aquired companies customers and suppliers2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Holtström, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hur nås höga kursutvärderingar?: En studie av korrelationen mellan kursutvärderingar, nedlagd tid och studenters resultat på kurser2009In: Ett år med Bologna - vad har hänt vid LiU? / [ed] E. Edvardsson Stiwne, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press , 2009, 91-103 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Kursutvärderingar har blivit allt viktigare. De fyller idag inte enbart en funktion av att utgöra underlag för förbättringar inom utbildningen, utan används även för att utvärdera lärarens insatser. I och med detta skulle det också kunna uppkomma intressen att försöka styra undervisningen för att uppnå höga kursutvärderingar. Diskussioner har bland annat handlat om att höga krav på studenterna påverkar kursutvärderingar negativt (se exempelvis Bjuremark, 2008) samt om det går att få bättre kursutvärderingar genom att ge studenter höga betyg. Syftet med detta papper är att undersöka sambanden mellan det betyg studenterna ger en kurs, deras studiearbetstid och det slutbetyg studenterna erhållit från kursen. Inom Linköpings universitet används det elektroniska kursutvärderingssystemet KURT där man bland annat frågar efter hur studenterna bedömer kursen som helhet på en femgradig skala och där studenterna ska ange genomsnittlig studiearbetstid under kursen. Genom att jämföra dessa värden med studenternas studieresultat avser pappret att besvara följande frågor: Finns det något samband mellan studenternas slutbetyg och det betyg de ger kursen?, Finns det något samband mellan nedlagd studietid och studenternas slutbetyg? Och, finns det något samband mellan nedlagd tid och det betyg studenterna ger kursen? Som underlag för undersökningen använder vi data från 230 kurser inom ekonomi på teknisk fakultet vid Linköpings Universitet. Vi drar slutsatsen att medan det inte finns någon signifikant korrelation mellan nedlagd tid och studieresultat eller mellan kursutvärdering och studieresultat, så finns positiv korrelation mellan nedlagd tid och kursutvärdering. Dessa slutsatser är intressanta att lyfta fram kopplat till diskussioner om kursutvärderingar och studieprestationer, då de indikerar att (i) det inte lönar sig att ge enkla kurser för att få en bra kursutvärdering, (ii) en hög arbetsinsats primärt premierar kursen, medan studenten faktiskt inte når en bättre prestation, och (iii) att ge höga betyg till studenter inte premierar kursutvärderingen.

  • 38.
    Holtström, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Många arbetstimmar för studenter ger höga kursutvärderingar!: Om korrelationen mellan kursutvärderingar, nedlagd tid och studenters resultat på kurser2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Huge-Brodin, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Björklund, Maria
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Delimiting the logistics system: a delicate problem in assessing environmental impact from transport2009In: Proceedings from the Annual NOFOMA conference : 11-12 June 2009, Jönköping. Jönköping : JIBS., 2009, -417 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the paper is to illustrate some of the difficulties associated with assessing the environmental performance of logistics systems. The paper focuses on the environmental effects of transports in the logistics system, and elaborates on the complexity of defining an adequate system. Design/methodology/approachThis conceptual paper builds on theory and literature on systems in general, and specifically logistics systems, and the environmental assessment of them. In addition, mini-cases are used to illustrate the analysis. The cases are from different sectors. Primary data was collected through interviews and secondary data through official internet pages and internal documentation.FindingsThe result of the paper is a set of  ”learning lessons” which aim at providing a deeper understanding of the system delimitation problem, specifically for the environmental assessment of logistics systems.Research limitations/implications (if applicable)The paper is conceptual, and provides mainly a basis for further research. The illustrations emanate from a limited number of sectors, although the system delimitation problem is of a general nature.What is original/value of paperThe problem of defining system limits is often overlooked, why this paper provides support for a better understanding of the problems of delimitations of a system.  The area of environmental assessment of logistics systems is still in its cradle, why this paper also contributes to that research field.

  • 40.
    Kask, Johan
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Network expansion and population trimming: the case of the global music industry2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Kollberg, Beata
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Explaining the development of new offerings in advertising industry2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Network pictures and resource integration: cognitive alignment in extended service offerings2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    La Rocca, Antonella
    et al.
    Health Services Research Centre, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway; Department of Innovation and Economic Organization, BI Norwegian Business School, Oslo, Norway.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Hoholm, Thomas
    Department of Innovation and Economic Organization, BI Norwegian Business School, Oslo, Norway .
    When Start Ups Shift Network: Notes on Start Up Journey2017In: Starting Up in Business Networks: Why Relationships Matter in Entrepreneurship / [ed] Aaboen, L., La Rocca, A., Lind, F., Perna, A., Shih, T., London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, 107-136 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Start-ups are often born in some kind of ‘hosting’ environment such as business and university incubators or science technology parks. For decades, this has been considered an important measure of enhancing academic entrepreneurship (Grimaldi, Kenney, Siegel, & Wright, 2011) and the beginning of a start-up’s journey towards becoming a full-grown business. In this chapter, we aim to examine the challenges that start-ups meet when they begin to acquire the shape of a business venture and attempt to develop commercially viable business relationships with customers and suppliers.

  • 44.
    Laage-Hellman, Jens
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lind, Frida
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Shih, Tommy
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Modes of interaction between university spin-offs and academia following commercialization2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Laage-Hellman, Jens
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lind, Frida
    Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Shih, Tommy
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Never look back?: Modes of interaction between university spin-offs and the academia following commercialization2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Lindhult, Erik
    et al.
    Mälardalens University, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Helena
    Mälardalens University, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Bessant, John
    University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom.
    Johansson, Peter E
    Mälardalens University, Sweden.
    Quality in innovation management auditing2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation management auditing (IMA) is valuable to assess innovation capability. A review of literature shows that research-based IMA-models are few and considerable variations in IMA-related research and models exist. Quality of different models is oftenunclear or limited. Purpose of this paper is to clarify the basis for valid and reliable auditing. Findings point to that there are different aims and purposes of IMA; measuring, learning about or changing innovation capability as well as improved business performance through capability enhancement. Different aims imply different focus and formulation of quality to be achieved through IMA-efforts. A quality framework for IMA is discussed and developed based on aims and the trustworthiness (validity, reliability and objectivity) in achieving respective aims. The framework is proposed as a way to assess quality of different models, as a guide to enhance quality through research, and for practitioners to use models and tools in a quality-conscious way.

  • 47.
    Linton, Gabriel
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Klaassen, Marcel
    Unda Maris BV, Netherlands.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    The Creation of Entrepreneurial Opportunities: The Case of Lake Resort Bergslagen2016In: Valuing and Evaluating Creativity for Sustainable Regional Development: Proceedings / [ed] Daniel Laven, Wilhelm Skoglund, 2016, 75-77 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48. Liu, Yipeng
    et al.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Tarba, Shlomo
    University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
    Xing, Yijun
    Brand management in mergers and acquisitions: Emerging market multinationals venturing into advanced economies2017In: International Marketing Review, ISSN 0265-1335, E-ISSN 1758-6763Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Lund, Ragnar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Diverse interests in profit/non-profit stakeholder settings: The case of the Swedish Royal Opera2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50. Nordberg, Petra
    et al.
    Öberg, Christina
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Övningsbok i marknadsföring2017Book (Refereed)
1234 1 - 50 of 165
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