oru.sePublikationer
Change search
Refine search result
123 1 - 50 of 102
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Adlitzer, Helena
    et al.
    Regionalt cancercentrum Stockholm Gotland.
    Andershed, Birgitta
    Ersta Sköndal Högskola.
    Axelsson, Bertil
    Östersunds sjukhus; Umeå universitet.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Fridegren, Inger
    Nacka Närsjukhus.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Palliativt kompetenscentrum Östergötland, Vrinnevisjukhuset; Linköpings Universitet .
    Fürst, Carl-Johan
    Palliativt utvecklingscentrum, Lunds universitet och Region Skåne.
    Heedman, Per-Anders
    Palliativt kompetenscentrum i Östergötland.
    Henoch, Ingela
    Sahlgrenska akademin; Göteborgs universitet.
    Kenne Sarenmalm, Elisabeth
    FoU Centrum, Skaraborgs sjukhus, Skövde.
    Löfdahl, Elisabet
    Palliativa sektionen SU/Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhuset.
    Melin-Johansson, Christina
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Molander, Ulla
    Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg.
    Persson, Hans
    Danderyds sjukhus.
    Pessah-Rasmussen, Hélène
    Skånes Universitetssjukhus (SUS).
    Rasmussen, Birgit H
    Lunds universitet och Region Skåne.
    Schaufelberger, Maria
    Sahlgrenska universitetssjukhuset.
    Seiger Cronfalk, Berit
    Ersta Sköndal Högskola; Karolinska Institutet.
    Silk, Gerd
    Kvalitets- och utvecklingsenheten Region Gotland.
    Strang, Peter
    Karolinska Institutet och Stockholms Sjukhem, Stockholm.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköpings universitetssjukhus.
    Tavemark, Sofia
    Örebro kommun.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal Högskola, Stockholm.
    Wennman-Larsen, Agneta
    Sophiahemmet Högskola; Karolinska Institutet.
    Wikström, Gerhard
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Österlind, Jane
    Ersta Sköndal högskola.
    Palliativ vård i livets slutskede: Nationellt vårdprogram2016Report (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Albrow, Rebecca
    et al.
    Univ Manchester, Sch Canc & Enabling Sci, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Kitchener, Henry
    Univ Manchester, Sch Canc & Enabling Sci, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Brabin, Loretta
    Univ Manchester, Sch Canc & Enabling Sci, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Patnick, Julietta
    NHS Canc Screening Programmes, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England.
    Tishelman, Carol
    Karolinska Inst, Med Management Ctr, Dept Learning Informat Management & Eth, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Törnberg, Sven
    Reg Canc Ctr, Dept Canc Screening, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sparen, Par
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Widmark, Catarina
    Karolinska Inst, Med Management Ctr, Dept Learning Informat Management & Eth, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Qual & Patient Safety, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Interventions to improve cervical cancer screening uptake amongst young women: A systematic review2014In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 53, no 4, 445-451 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. In view of declining screening uptake in young women, this review aims to summarise the available evidence relating to interventions designed to increase cervical screening uptake amongst women aged <= 35 years.

    Methods. Electronic databases were searched and further articles located by manual searches. Study designs employing a valid comparison group and including women aged <= 35 years published through 2012 were considered. Data was extracted on the uptake from either screening programme statistics or as reported by the study subjects. A narrative synthesis was undertaken for each category of interventions identified.

    Results. Ninety-two records were screened with 36 articles retrieved for further assessment. Four studies met the inclusion criteria, two of which evaluated more than one intervention. One of the studies evaluated the use of a modified invitation letter and reported no significant increase in uptake compared to a standard invitation. Three studies investigated the use of a reminder letter, with two reporting a positive effect on screening uptake in women aged 24-34. Three studies were included which supported the use of physician and telephone reminders. One study on HPV self-sampling reported a positive effect when compared with a reminder letter.

    Conclusions. There is a lack of randomised controlled trials designed to specifically address falling cervical screening uptake in amongst young women. Cervical screening programmes need to look beyond the use of invitation/reminders letters in this group of women to develop interventions which attempt to overcome as many barriers to uptake as possible.

  • 3.
    Algilani, Samal
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Langius-Eklöf, Ann
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Individualised care with modern technology: Usability and Feasibility of an E-health platform including a Health measure, Self-Care advices and Alarms2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Algilani, Samal
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Langius-Ekelöf, Ann
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    An interactive ICT-platform for early assessment and management of patient-reported concerns among older adults living in Ordinary Housing: Development and FeasibilityManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Algilani, Samal
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Langius-Eklöf, Ann
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    An interactive ICT-platform for early assessment and management of patient-reported concerns among older adults living in ordinary housing: development and feasibility2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 11-12, 1575-1583 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim and objectives: To develop and test feasibility and acceptability of an interactive ICT-platform integrated in a tablet for collecting and managing patient reported concerns of older adults in home care.

    Background: Using different ICT-applications, e.g. interactive tablets for self-assessment of health and health issues, based on health monitoring as well as other somatic and psychiatric monitoring systems may improve quality of life, staff and patient communication and feelings of being reassured. The European Commission hypothesize that introduction of ICT-applications to the older population will enable improved health. However, evidence-based and user-based applications are scarce.

    Design: The design is underpinned by the Medical Research Council's complex intervention evaluation framework. A mixed-method approach was used combining interviews with older adults and healthcare professionals, and logged quantitative data.

    Methods: In cooperation with a health management company, a platform operated by an interactive application for reporting and managing health related problems in real time was developed. Eight older adults receiving home care were recruited to test feasibility. They were equipped with the application and reported three times weekly over four weeks, and afterwards interviewed about their experiences. Three nurses caring for them were interviewed. The logged data was extracted as a coded file.

    Results: The older adults reported as instructed, in total 107 reports (mean 13). The most frequent concerns were pain, fatigue and dizziness. The older adults experienced the application as meaningful with overall positive effects as well as potential benefits for the nurses involved.

    Conclusions The overall findings in this study indicated high feasibility among older adults using the ICT-platform. The study's results support further development of the platform, as well as tests in full-scale studies and in other populations.

    Relevance to practice: An ICT-platform increased the older adults' perception of involvement and facilitated communication between the patient and nurses.

  • 6.
    Algilani, Samal
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Langius-Eklöf, Ann
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Can assessment of health on a ICT-platform improve optimal functionality and lead to participatory care among older adults?2014In: eTELEMED 2014, The Sixth International Conference on eHealth, Telemedicine and Social Medicine, 2014, 201-204 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of people reaching old age is increasing rapidly, challenging the society and healthcare to promote healthy and meaningful aging. There is, and has been for a few years, a big interest in collecting patient reported outcomes (PROs) as a base for clinical management. Information and communication technology (ICT) and assistive technology in elderly care increase and may facilitate the care of older adults as they are moved from nursing homes to private homes. An ICT-platform for reporting health issues with immediate access to self-care advice and direct communication with healthcare professionals has been developed. The overall aim of this project is to evaluate the effects of the interactive ICT-platform regarding optimal functionality and participatory care. The project will be conducted in three phases: development of the ICT-platform, evaluating feasibility and evaluation of effects. The platform is unique by integrating interactive components for direct clinical management and needs to be thoroughly evaluated before implementation in daily practice. It is hypothesized that by using an interactive ICT-platform, it will promote participatory care and enhance the communication between older adults and their professional carers. The platform will be further developed, as well as test in a full-scale study.

  • 7.
    Algilani, Samal
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Nutrition and Physical Activity Research Centre.
    Östlund-Lagerström, Lina
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Nutrition and Physical Activity Research Centre; Nutrition Gut Brain Interactions Research Centre.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Nutrition and Physical Activity Research Centre.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Nutrition and Physical Activity Research Centre.
    Brummer, Robert Jan
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Nutrition and Physical Activity Research Centre; Nutrition Gut Brain Interactions Research Centre.
    Schoultz, Ida
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Nutrition and Physical Activity Research Centre; Nutrition Gut Brain Interactions Research Centre.
    Exploring the concept of optimal functionality in old age2014In: Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, ISSN 1178-2390, E-ISSN 1178-2390, Vol. 7, 69-79 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Aging is characterized by loss of function and represents a perspective that puts the focus on the negative aspects of aging. Thus, it is fundamental to shift the focus from loss of function to maintaining good health and personal satisfaction through life; in other words, to promote optimal functionality at a level appropriate for older adults. However, it is not yet known what constitutes optimal functionality from the older adult's own perspective.

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the concept of optimal functionality in old age from the older adult's perspective (ie, people over 65 years of age) in industrialized Western countries.

    METHODS: We undertook a scoping review and searched two electronic databases (PubMed and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature [CINAHL]) from January 2002 to July 2013 for scientific studies, using the key search term personal satisfaction. In total, 25 scientific studies were analyzed.

    RESULTS: Only six of the included articles applied a qualitative methodology. By analyzing the results of these articles, three major themes were identified as cornerstones in the concept of optimal functionality at old age: 1) self-related factors (eg, mental well-being); 2) body-related factors (eg, physical well-being); and 3) external factors equal to demographic and environmental factors.

    CONCLUSION: There is a lack of qualitative studies in the current literature, and hence of what constitutes optimal functionality from the older adult's perspective. The results outlined in this review identify three cornerstones (self-related factors, body-related factors, and external factors) of what constitutes optimal functionality at old age. However, it is vital that these findings are taken further and are evaluated through qualitative studies to reflect older adults' opinions.

  • 8.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Sundler Johansson, Annelie
    Skövde högskola, Skövde, Sweden.
    Kullén Engström, Agneta
    Borås högskola, Borås, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Ulla
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Margareta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Vårdorganisation och sjuksköterskestudenters värdering av lärandemiljö2012In: Verksamhetsförlagd utbildning i högskolans vårdutbildningar – möjligheter och utmaningar, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Från inbjudan till uppföljning: kvinnors erfarenheter av att delta eller inte delta i cervixcancerscreening2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Population-based cervical cancer screening programs (PCCSPs) were introduced in Stockholm in the 1960s; today all women residents aged 23-60 are invited to a cost-free Pap smear at regular intervals. A shift in scientific knowledge has occurred, with clarification of the link between human papilloma virus (HPV) and cervical cancer (CC), and the introduction of HPV-vaccines for primary prevention of CC. While there is a large body of research on CC screening, fewer studies address screening experiences of women in different phases of life with different screening histories. The aim of this thesis was to explore how women reason about CC, its causes, prevention and participation in CC screening. Method: These studies were guided by the inductive approach interpretive description . Sub-study I is based on qualitative analysis of 12 telephone interviews and 86 fax messages sent to the screening organisation by women who actively chose not to participate in PCCSP. Sub-study II is based on longitudinal interview data from 30 women, who underwent medical follow-up of an abnormal Pap smear. Sub-studies III and IV are based on data from 30-year old women with varied screening background and experiences, derived from 9 face-to-face focus group discussions (FGD) (sub-studies III, IV) and 30 internet-based FGDs (sub-study IV). Results: Women s ways of conceptualizing health, illness, and risk for disease in general impacted on their decision-making about attending PCCSP. Matters related to sickness, including CC and its prevention, were generally described as distant and unprioritized by many women. The manner 30-year old women self-defined themselves in the transition between youth and adulthood appears to strongly influence their reasoning not only about PCCSP, but also about other forms of health maintenance and disease prevention. How women defined and conceptualized distinctions between, and roles and responsibilities of, the private and the public was also found to be central in explanations of decision-making, especially among women who actively chose not to take a Pap smear. Women described a wide range of factors which could motivate them to participate in PCCSP, related to all aspects of the program, from invitation through follow-up, and a need for different types and forms of information. Many suggestions were related to individualization of the PCCSP; a need to understand the relationship between HPV and CC also was addressed. We also found that medical follow-up of an abnormal Pap smear involved an experience of both having and being a body, which changed over time. The conceptualization of bodily boundaries appeared to change, e.g. through vaginal discharges and bleeding, as well as linkages to the bodies of women in their extended families through the generations. Conclusion: All facets of the PCCSP and social marketing were found to influence women s experiences of and decisions about screening attendance. Women s views of the PCCSP as a comprehensive system suggest a need for increased collaboration among the many professionals with direct and indirect involvement in the PCCSP. These studies suggest that coordination with and information about PCCSP is an important implication for when initiating HPV vaccination programs, as a means of aiding women in integration of different types of knowledge and information.

    List of papers
    1. How do women who choose not to participate in population-based cervical cancer screening reason about their decision?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>How do women who choose not to participate in population-based cervical cancer screening reason about their decision?
    2008 (English)In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 17, no 6, 561-569 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In Stockholm, Sweden, women are invited to a cost-free population-based cervical cancer screening programme (PCCSP) at regular intervals. Despite this, many women choose not to attend screening at all or to take opportunistic tests instead. This study explores bow women who actively declined participation in the PCCSP reasoned about their choice. Qualitative telephone interviews and fax, messages from women who actively declined participation in the PCCSP were analysed inductively. The manner in which women defined and conceptualized distinctions between, and the roles and responsibilities of, both private and public spheres were found to be central in explanations of decision making. Factors related to women's decisions not to participate in screening at all include a lack of confidence in the benefits of screening, previous negative health care and preventive experiences, a belief in one's own ability to discern health changes or a belief that one was not at risk for cervical cancer, as well as a number of unconventional standpoints on social and political issues. Women who chose not to participate in the organized PCCSP, but who did use private opportunistic screening, generally motivated this with direct or indirect criticism of the screening programme itself. Not only was the examination itself sensitive but also all facets of the PCCSP, from invitation letter on, were found to influence women's decisions. Using Jepson et A's ethical framework to peruse the evidence-base underlying women's 'informed decision-making' about CCS is suggested to be more constructive than discussing potential participants' knowledge versus lack of knowledge.

    National Category
    Nursing
    Research subject
    Nursing Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-19558 (URN)10.1002/pon.1270 (DOI)000257874100006 ()
    Available from: 2011-10-12 Created: 2011-10-06 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
    2. From 'silent' to 'heard': professional mediation, manipulation and women's experiences of their body after an abnormal Pap smear
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>From 'silent' to 'heard': professional mediation, manipulation and women's experiences of their body after an abnormal Pap smear
    2009 (English)In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 68, no 3, 479-486 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    While there is a large body of research on cervical cancer screening, fewer studies address the experiences of women receiving abnormal Pap smear results after routine screening. Those studies highlighting such experiences tend to concentrate on resulting psychosocial distress, with an absence in the literature about women's experiences of their bodies during medical follow-up for dysplasia, and no studies were found that explore such experiences over time. In this article, we focus on bodily experiences over time during medical follow-up of an abnormal Pap smear among a group of women in Sweden. This qualitative analysis is based on interview data from a total of 30 women, and with in-depth analysis of the content of 34 transcribed interviews with nine women who were followed longitudinally. We found that medical follow-up involved an experience of both "having" and "being" a body, which changed over time. Women described a process that ranged from having a cervix that was neither felt, 'heard', nor seen, to having a body that became known to them first indirectly through professional mediation and later through direct experience after professional manipulation. The conceptualization of bodily boundaries appeared to change, e.g. through visualization of the previously unfamiliar cervix, pain, vaginal discharge, and bleeding, as well as linkages to the bodies of women in their extended families through the generations. Thus, bodily experiences appear to be an intrinsic part of medical follow-up of an abnormal Pap smear through which health, disease, and risks in the past, present, and future were reconceptualised. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    National Category
    Nursing
    Research subject
    Nursing Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-19293 (URN)10.1016/j.socscimed.2008.11.007 (DOI)000263424600012 ()
    Available from: 2011-10-05 Created: 2011-10-04 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
    3. Between youth and adulthood: focus group discussions with 30-year-old women about cervical cancer and its prevention in urban Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Between youth and adulthood: focus group discussions with 30-year-old women about cervical cancer and its prevention in urban Sweden
    Show others...
    2011 (English)In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 34, no 3, e11-e20 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although there is a significant amount of research on cervical cancer screening (CCS), few studies address screening experiences of women related to reasoning about health maintenance and disease prevention in general. Research tends to neglect experiences in different phases of life and experiences of women with different screening histories. Recent literature primarily focuses on adolescents targeted for human papilloma virus vaccinations, whereas perspectives of women who need continued CCS are lacking.

    Objective: The aim of the study was to explore how 30-year-old women reason about health, ill health, health maintenance, and disease prevention, in relation to cervical cancer, its prevention, and screening.

    Methods: Through a population-based CCS registry, we randomly sampled women to attend focus group discussions stratified by previous patterns in screening history and test results. Data from 38 attendees were inductively analyzed.

    Results: Women’s discussions encompassed temporal aspects of the past and the future, with youth in the rearview mirror and the demands of adulthood ahead. Matters related to sickness, including cancer and its prevention, were described as distant and not prioritized in this phase of life. This situation was compounded by lack of relevant information about cervical cancer and screening.

    Conclusions: The manner 30-year-old women self-defined themselves in the transition between youth and adulthood appears to strongly influence their reasoning about CCS and other forms of health maintenance and disease prevention.

    Implications for Practice: Cervical cancer screening programs are challenged to adapt both information and organizations to new cohorts of women with different needs and life situations.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2011
    Keyword
    Cervical cancer, Cervical smear, Focus group, Health, Prevention, Screening, Transition, Women, Young adult
    National Category
    Nursing
    Research subject
    Nursing Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-17069 (URN)10.1097/NCC.0b013e3181f70f83 (DOI)000289772200002 ()20890134 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-79955566503 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2011-09-06 Created: 2011-09-02 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
    4. How can young women be encouraged to attend cervical cancer screening?: Suggestions from face-to-face and internet focus group discussions with 30-year-old women in Stockholm, Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>How can young women be encouraged to attend cervical cancer screening?: Suggestions from face-to-face and internet focus group discussions with 30-year-old women in Stockholm, Sweden
    Show others...
    2011 (English)In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 50, no 1, 112-120 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Cervical cancer screening (CCS) using Pap-smears has been carried out for decades and is still an essential tool for secondary cancer prevention. Focus has traditionally been on what hinders women's attendance, instead of researching this issue from a positive standpoint, i.e. what factors encourage women to take a Pap-smear? In this article, we therefore explore issues that 30-year-old women have addressed as encouraging CCS attendance, with particular focus on aspects susceptible to intervention. Material and methods. Through the population-based cervical cancer screening (PCCSP) registry in Stockholm, Sweden, a stratified random sampling technique was used to recruit women from the same birth cohort with varied CCS histories and results. Nine face-to-face focus groups discussions (FGDs) and 30 internet-based FGDs were conducted with a total of 138 women aged 30. Qualitative analysis was inspired by interpretative description, to generate clinically relevant and useful data. Results. In general, these women expressed positive views about the PCCSP as an existing service, regardless of screening history. They described a wide range of factors encompassing the entire screening trajectory from invitation through follow-up which could motivate young women to CCS participation, including social marketing. Many of the suggestions related to individualization of the PCCSP, as well as a need to understand the relationship between human papilloma virus (HPV) and cervical cancer. Discusssion. These results are discussed in terms of the inherent tension between population-based public health initiatives and individually-oriented health care provision. Many suggestions given are already incorporated into the existing Stockholm-Gotland screening program, although this information may not reach women who need it. New research should test whether systematic information on HPV may provide a missing link in motivating young women to attend CCS, and which of their suggestions can serve to increase CCS participation.

    National Category
    Nursing
    Research subject
    Nursing Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-18804 (URN)10.3109/0284186X.2010.528790 (DOI)000285554200014 ()
    Available from: 2011-09-29 Created: 2011-09-29 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
  • 10.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Allvin, Renée
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Ewertsson, Mona
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Margareta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Kullén Engström, Agneta
    Borås högskola, Borås, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Ulla
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Sundler Johansson, Annelie
    Skövde högskola, Skövde, Sweden.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstads universitet, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Clinical group supervision in nursing education for integrate ethical reasoning: students and supervisors’ view2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad University, Sweden; The Swedish Red Cross University College, Sweden.
    Clinical group supervision for integrating ethical reasoning: Views from students and supervisors2016In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 23, no 7, 761-769 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Clinical group supervision has existed for over 20 years in nursing. However, there is a lack of studies about the role of supervision in nursing students' education and especially the focus on ethical reasoning.

    Aim: The aim of this study was to explore and describe nursing students' ethical reasoning and their supervisors' experiences related to participation in clinical group supervision.

    Research design: The study is a qualitative interview study with interpretative description as an analysis approach.

    Participants and research context: A total of 17 interviews were conducted with nursing students (n = 12) who had participated in clinical group supervision in their first year of nursing education, and with their supervisors (n = 5).

    Ethical conciderations: The study was based on the ethical principles outlined in the Declaration of Helsinki, and permission was obtained from the Regional Ethical Review Board in Sweden.

    Findings: The analysis revealed that both the form and content of clinical group supervision stimulated reflection and discussion of handling of situations with ethical aspects. Unethical situations were identified, and the process uncovered underlying caring actions.

    Disscusion and conclusion: Clinical group supervision is a model that can be used in nursing education to train ethical reflection and to develop an ethical competence among nursing students. Outcomes from the model could also improve nursing education itself, as well as healthcare organizations, in terms of reducing moral blindness and unethical nursing practice.

  • 12.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad university, Dept Nursing, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Engström, Agneta Kullén
    Högskolan i Borås, Sch Hlth, Borås, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Ulla
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    Högskolan i Skövde, Sch Life Sci, Skövde, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Margareta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Swedish nursing students' experience of stress during clinical practice in relation to clinical setting characteristics and the organisation of the clinical education2014In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 23, no 15-16, 2264-2271 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To describe nursing students' experience of stress during clinical practice and evaluate the risk of stress in relation to the clinical setting characteristics and the organisation of the clinical education.

    BACKGROUND: Stress during clinical practice is well documented, but there is a lack of knowledge concerning whether the clinical setting characteristics and the organisation of the education make a difference.

    DESIGN: A cross-sectional study with evaluative design.

    METHODS: Data were collected by means of a numerical rating scale for the assessment of stress and questions about the clinical setting characteristics and the organisation of the education. One hundred and eighty-four students who had completed their final year on the nursing programme at three universities in Sweden were included.

    RESULTS: Nearly half of the students (43%) experienced high level of stress during clinical practice. Measured by decision in the tree analysis, the absolute risk of stress was 57% in students with placements in hospital departments, as compared to 13% in students with placements in other clinical settings. The risk of stress increased to 71% if the students with placement in a hospital took the national clinical final examination. Performance of practice in a hospital department overcrowded with patients was also associated with increased risk of stress. The organisation of supervision and number of students at the clinical placement had an effect on the experience of stress, but did not prove to be risk factors in the analysis.

    CONCLUSIONS: The risk of stress in nursing students during their clinical practice differs depending on clinical setting characteristics. The taking of the national clinical final examination could be a source of stress, but this requires further investigation.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: It is important that supervisors are aware that students in hospital departments overcrowded with patients are at risk of stress and may have increased need of support.

  • 13.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstads universitet, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Sundler Johansson, Annelie
    Skövde högskola, skövde, Sweden.
    Kullén Engström, Agneta
    Borås högskola, Borås, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Margareta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Riskfaktorer för stress hos sjuksköterskestudenter i verksamhetsförlagd utbildning2012In: Verksamhetsförlagd utbildning i högskolans vårdutbildningar: möjligheter och utmaningar, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Agneta Anderzén
    Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Hagberg, Lars
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. University Health Care Research Centre.
    Jonsson, Östen
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Paediatrics.
    Leissner, Lena
    Örebro University, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Department of Neurology, Örebro, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Quality of life and trust among young people with narcolepsy and their families, after the Pandemrix® vaccination: Protocol for a case-control study2017In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 17, no 1, 183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The extensive vaccination programme against swine flu resulted in an increased incidence of narcolepsy among children and adolescents. There is a need to explore if these young persons' experiences have affected their trust in healthcare, their willingness to participate in future prevention programmes, and their contacts with the healthcare system. The overall aim is to identify factors important for the life-situation of children and adolescents with narcolepsy and their families, and factors that correlate with trust in healthcare.

    METHODS/DESIGN: Data will be collected via questionnaires from all available children with narcolepsy following the vaccination and their families, as well as a control group of children with diabetes and their families. Longitudinal descriptive interviews will also be conducted with a selection of 20-25 children and their families. Techniques from media research will be used for Internet-based data collection and analysis of information relating to narcolepsy from social media.

    DISCUSSION: This project will use the situation of young persons with narcolepsy after the swine flu vaccination as a case to build a model that can be used in situations where trust in healthcare is essential. This model will be based on findings from the included studies on how trust is influenced by support, quality of life, burden of disease, impact on family, and use of social media. The model developed in this project will be beneficial in future situations where trust in healthcare is essential, such as new pandemic outbreaks but also for "everyday" adherence to health advice.

  • 15.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Nursing and Caring Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Dept of Nursing, Stockholm.
    Carol, Tishelman
    Karolinska Institutet, Dept of Nursing, Stockholm; Stockholms Sjukhem Foundation, Research & Development Unit, Stockholm.
    Britt-Marie, Ternestedt
    Örebro University, Department of Nursing and Caring Sciences. Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm.
    How do women reason about choosing not to participate in population-based cervical cancer screening in Sweden2005In: European Journal of Cancer Supplements, ISSN 1359-6349, Vol. 3, no 2, 451-451 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of the study is to investigate the manner in which women who choose not to participate in a population-based cervical cancer screening program (PCCSP) reason about their decision.

    Method: All women between 23 and 60 years of age, residing in Stockholm county council receive an invitation from the regional Oncological Center (OC) to attend PCCSP at regular intervals. Women who actively contacted OC to report that they do not wish to participate in PCCSP were the subjects for the study. Data was collected through unstructured telephone interviews with 11 women and fax messages from 86 women. Data analysis is inspired by interpretive description.

    Results: Preliminary analysis indicates that two salient themes are related to the division of responsibility for health maintenance between the individual and society, as well as the manner in which women described being able to 'know' one's own body. Descriptions include not wanting to know if one has cancer, previous negative experiences in relation to screening that led to feeling self-exposed and insulted, beliefs that a healthy lifestyle could protect one from cancer and a standpoint that the screening program represents undesired societal control of private issues. A relationship with one's own gynaecologist was described as important and as one reason for not attending PCCSE Reasoning was also influenced by conceptualizations of sexuality.

    Conclusion: Cervical cancer screening can be viewed as a relatively simple routine check-up, but for the individual woman it may also involve a sensitive situation, with both the risk of a life-threatening sickness and an intimate physical examination. In order to improve PCCSP, it is important to highlight different perspectives on screening, and perspectives from women who have chosen not to attend are essential.

  • 16.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Jonsson, Östen
    Leissner, Lena
    Trust and mistrust, quality-of-life and need for support: essons from narcolepsy-afflicted children and adolescents after the swine flu vaccination2015In: 3rd Nordic Symposium on Narcolepsy, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Forss, Anette
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Tishelman, Carol
    From 'silent' to 'heard': professional mediation, manipulation and women's experiences of their body after an abnormal Pap smear2009In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 68, no 3, 479-486 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While there is a large body of research on cervical cancer screening, fewer studies address the experiences of women receiving abnormal Pap smear results after routine screening. Those studies highlighting such experiences tend to concentrate on resulting psychosocial distress, with an absence in the literature about women's experiences of their bodies during medical follow-up for dysplasia, and no studies were found that explore such experiences over time. In this article, we focus on bodily experiences over time during medical follow-up of an abnormal Pap smear among a group of women in Sweden. This qualitative analysis is based on interview data from a total of 30 women, and with in-depth analysis of the content of 34 transcribed interviews with nine women who were followed longitudinally. We found that medical follow-up involved an experience of both "having" and "being" a body, which changed over time. Women described a process that ranged from having a cervix that was neither felt, 'heard', nor seen, to having a body that became known to them first indirectly through professional mediation and later through direct experience after professional manipulation. The conceptualization of bodily boundaries appeared to change, e.g. through visualization of the previously unfamiliar cervix, pain, vaginal discharge, and bleeding, as well as linkages to the bodies of women in their extended families through the generations. Thus, bodily experiences appear to be an intrinsic part of medical follow-up of an abnormal Pap smear through which health, disease, and risks in the past, present, and future were reconceptualised. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 18.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southampton, UK.
    Griffiths, Peter
    Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southampton, UK; National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (Wessex), UK.
    Wengström, Yvonne
    Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southampton, UK; Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    May, Carl
    Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southampton, UK; National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (Wessex), UK.
    Bridges, Jackie
    Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southampton, UK; National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (Wessex), UK.
    Interventions for compassionate nursing care: A systematic review2016In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 62, 137-155 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Compassion has been identified as an essential element of nursing and is increasingly under public scrutiny in the context of demands for high quality health care. While primary research on effectiveness of interventions to support compassionate nursing care has been reported, no rigorous critical overview exists.

    Objectives: To systematically identify, describe and analyse research studies that evaluate interventions for compassionate nursing care; assess the descriptions of the interventions for compassionate care, including design and delivery of the intervention and theoretical framework; and to evaluate evidence for the effectiveness of interventions.

    Review methods: Published international literature written in English up to June 2015 was identified from CINAHL, Medline and Cochrane Library databases. Primary research studies comparing outcomes of interventions to promote compassionate nursing care with a control condition were included. Studies were graded according to relative strength of methods and quality of description of intervention. Narrative description and analysis was undertaken supported by tabulation of key study data including study design, outcomes, intervention type and results.

    Results: 25 interventions reported in 24 studies were included in the review. Intervention types included staff training (n=10), care model (n=9) and staff support (n=6). Intervention description was generally weak, especially in relation to describing participants and facilitators, and the proposed mechanisms for change were often unclear. Most interventions were associated with improvements in patient-based, nurse-based and/or quality of care outcomes. However, overall methodological quality was low with most studies (n=16) conducted as uncontrolled before and after studies. The few higher quality studies were less likely to report positive results. No interventions were tested more than once.

    Conclusions: None of the studies reviewed reported intervention description in sufficient detail or presented sufficiently strong evidence of effectiveness to merit routine implementation of any of these interventions into practice. The positive outcomes reported suggest that further investigation of some interventions may be merited, but high caution must be exercised. Preference should be shown for further investigating interventions reported as effective in studies with a stronger design such as randomised controlled trials.

  • 19.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Ann-Kristin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Allvin, Renée
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Clinical Skills Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Department of Nursing, Karlstad University, Karlstad.
    Ewertsson, Mona
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Kullén Engström, Agneta
    School of Health, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Ulla
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    School of Life Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Margareta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Work stress among newly graduated nurses in relation to workplace and clinical group supervision2016In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 24, no 1, 80-87 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim was to investigate occupational stress among newly graduated nurses in relation to the workplace and clinical group supervision.

    Background: Being a newly graduated nurse is particularly stressful. What remains unclear is whether the workplace and clinical group supervision affect the stress.

    Method: A cross-sectional comparative study was performed in 2012. Data were collected by means of a numerical scale measuring occupational stress, questions about workplace and clinical group supervision. One hundred and thirteen nurses who had recently graduated from three Swedish universities were included in the study.

    Results: The stress was high among the newly graduated nurses but it differed significantly between workplaces, surgical departments generating the most stress. Nurses who had received clinical group supervision reported significantly less stress. The stress between workplaces remained significant also when participation in clinical group supervision was taken into account.

    Conclusions: Newly graduated nurses experience great stress and need support, especially those in surgical departments. Nurses participating in clinical group supervision reported significantly less stress.

    Implications for nursing management: It is important to develop strategies that help to adapt the work situation so as to give nurses the necessary support. Clinical group supervision should be considered as an option for reducing stress.

  • 20.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    James, Inger
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Meanings over time of working as a nurse in elderly care2013In: The open nursing journal, ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 7, 107-113 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Although registered nurses (RNs) play a central role in the care of older persons, their work in elderly care has historically been described as "low status" in nursing. This is especially problematic due to the global issue of RN turnover, but there is still little evidence of how to change this trend. Better understanding is needed of the reasons why RNs work in elderly care, as well as knowledge of whether these reasons have changed over time.

    AIM: The aim was to explore the meaning of working in elderly care, over time, from the perspective of RNs.

    METHOD: We interviewed thirteen RNs working in nursing homes, six of them in 2000 and the remaining seven in 2012, and analysed the resulting data using Interpretive Description.

    RESULTS: The results show similarities and differences over time in the RNs' reasoning about the meaning of their work with older persons, from a focus on obstacles to a view of opportunities.

    CONCLUSION: An RN's intention to continue working in elderly care might be based on their beliefs; their view of older people, and their experiences of being able to influence the care. Managing this knowledge could be an essential factor in reversing the historical trend of RN work in elderly care being seen as low status, and the increasing turnover in such nurses. Our results could stimulate reflection on daily care and beliefs about caring for older persons.

  • 21.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Ulla
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    James, Inger
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Views on leadership and competence among formal leaders in care of older adults: differences over time2013In: Journal of General Practice, ISSN 2329-9126, Vol. 1, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Leaders play an essential role in the health care of older adults. The leadership role has changed over the years because of new demands in providing care for older adults with multiple chronic conditions, as well as a lack of resources.

    Aim: The aim of this study was to describe formal leaders’ views over time on their leadership and the competence among staff in care of older adults.Method: Individual interviews and focus group discussions with leaders in care of older adults were conducted with a total of 46 formal leaders in 2000 (n=20) and 2011 (n=26). The analysis took a qualitative approach, using interpretative description.

    Results: The leaders’ descriptions of leadership encompassed two different views on leadership over time, from “I as a leader” to “We together”. The leaders interviewed in 2011 saw practical wisdom (phronesis) as a central aspect of staff competence. Throughout the interviews, a greater focus on personal characteristics was seen over time.

    Conclusions: Differences over time in views of the leaders’ role and staff competence, especially the increased focus on personal characteristics, may have an impact on the health care provided to older adults. This is particularly true if formal education is not prioritized. Strategies within organizations and continuing development and education must take these changes into consideration

  • 22.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Sahlberg-Blom, Eva
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Closeness and distance: a way of handling difficult situations in daily care2007In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, no 2, 244-254 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. The aim of this study was to describe how care team members caring for patients with advanced cancer describe how they handle difficult situations in daily care. In this paper 'difficult situations' refers to those situations team members themselves describe as difficult. Background. Serious illness and impending death involve great changes in a person's life. The care of patients with advanced cancer is complex and many different factors influence each care situation. This places demands on the way care team members handle problems and difficulties in daily care. Design. Qualitative descriptive study. Methods. The study is based on 16 focus group discussions with care team members who were caring for patients with advanced cancer at three different care units in two Swedish cities. The focus group discussions included 77 participants. The procedure for data analysis was inspired by the phenomenological method. Findings. The results show that care team members handled difficult situations by balancing between being close and distancing themselves. In most situations their choice of strategy seemed spontaneous rather than being a conscious decision, although it was sometimes described as a more conscious approach. Variations of closeness and distance that were identified were Identity, Meaning, Limit-setting and touching, Prioritization, the Team and the Organization. These could also be seen as tools that could facilitate or impede the use of closeness and distance. Conclusions. The results show that care team members have a need to reflect over daily care and to become aware of what governs different care actions. Relevance to clinical practice. If the experienced difficult situation is not handled in a way that is beneficial to the care team member, patient and relatives, it is assumed that this can result in stress, burnout and, above all, non-optimal care.

  • 23.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta sköndal högskola.
    Tishelman, Carol
    Karolinska Institutet.
    How do women who choose not to participate in population-based cervical cancer screening reason about their decision?2008In: 15th International Conference on Cancer Nursing, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marle
    Örebro University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Törnberg, Sven
    Tishelman, Carol
    How do women who choose not to participate in population-based cervical cancer screening reason about their decision?2008In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 17, no 6, 561-569 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Stockholm, Sweden, women are invited to a cost-free population-based cervical cancer screening programme (PCCSP) at regular intervals. Despite this, many women choose not to attend screening at all or to take opportunistic tests instead. This study explores bow women who actively declined participation in the PCCSP reasoned about their choice. Qualitative telephone interviews and fax, messages from women who actively declined participation in the PCCSP were analysed inductively. The manner in which women defined and conceptualized distinctions between, and the roles and responsibilities of, both private and public spheres were found to be central in explanations of decision making. Factors related to women's decisions not to participate in screening at all include a lack of confidence in the benefits of screening, previous negative health care and preventive experiences, a belief in one's own ability to discern health changes or a belief that one was not at risk for cervical cancer, as well as a number of unconventional standpoints on social and political issues. Women who chose not to participate in the organized PCCSP, but who did use private opportunistic screening, generally motivated this with direct or indirect criticism of the screening programme itself. Not only was the examination itself sensitive but also all facets of the PCCSP, from invitation letter on, were found to influence women's decisions. Using Jepson et A's ethical framework to peruse the evidence-base underlying women's 'informed decision-making' about CCS is suggested to be more constructive than discussing potential participants' knowledge versus lack of knowledge.

  • 25.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Nursing and Caring Sciences. Karolinska institutet.
    Tishelman, Carol
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Britt-Marie, Ternestedt
    Örebro University, Department of Nursing and Caring Sciences. Ersta Sköndal högskola.
    Tension between the Public and Private: How women who choose not to participate in population-based cervical cancer screening reason about their decision2006In: Psycho-Oncology, ISSN 1057-9249, E-ISSN 1099-1611, Vol. 15, no 2, 432- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Nursing and Caring Sciences.
    Tishelman, Carol
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal högskola.
    Women’s reasoning about not participate in population-based cervical cancer screening2005In: Advanced Health Sciences of Tomorrow, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Tishelman, Carol
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Törnberg, Sven
    Leval, Amy
    Widmark, Catarina
    How can young women be encouraged to attend cervical cancer screening?: Suggestions from face-to-face and internet focus group discussions with 30-year-old women in Stockholm, Sweden2011In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 50, no 1, 112-120 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Cervical cancer screening (CCS) using Pap-smears has been carried out for decades and is still an essential tool for secondary cancer prevention. Focus has traditionally been on what hinders women's attendance, instead of researching this issue from a positive standpoint, i.e. what factors encourage women to take a Pap-smear? In this article, we therefore explore issues that 30-year-old women have addressed as encouraging CCS attendance, with particular focus on aspects susceptible to intervention. Material and methods. Through the population-based cervical cancer screening (PCCSP) registry in Stockholm, Sweden, a stratified random sampling technique was used to recruit women from the same birth cohort with varied CCS histories and results. Nine face-to-face focus groups discussions (FGDs) and 30 internet-based FGDs were conducted with a total of 138 women aged 30. Qualitative analysis was inspired by interpretative description, to generate clinically relevant and useful data. Results. In general, these women expressed positive views about the PCCSP as an existing service, regardless of screening history. They described a wide range of factors encompassing the entire screening trajectory from invitation through follow-up which could motivate young women to CCS participation, including social marketing. Many of the suggestions related to individualization of the PCCSP, as well as a need to understand the relationship between human papilloma virus (HPV) and cervical cancer. Discusssion. These results are discussed in terms of the inherent tension between population-based public health initiatives and individually-oriented health care provision. Many suggestions given are already incorporated into the existing Stockholm-Gotland screening program, although this information may not reach women who need it. New research should test whether systematic information on HPV may provide a missing link in motivating young women to attend CCS, and which of their suggestions can serve to increase CCS participation.

  • 28.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Wengström, Yvonne
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department NVS, Section for Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sundberg, Kay
    Department NVS, Section for Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Browall, Maria
    Department NVS, Section for Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; School of Life Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Ann-Kristin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hälleberg Nyman, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Langius-Eklöf, Ann
    Department NVS, Section for Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Symptoms and self-care strategies during and six months after radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Scoping the perspectives of patients, professionals and literature2016In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 21, 139-145 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Under-diagnosed and uncontrolled symptoms in patients with prostate cancer during radiotherapy can have a negative impact on the individual's quality of life. An opportunity for patients to report their symptoms systematically, communicate these symptoms to cancer nurses and to receive self-care advice via an application in an Information and Communication Technology-platform could overcome this risk. The content in the application must precisely capture symptoms that are significant to both patients and health care professionals. Therefore, the aim of the study was to map and describe symptoms and self-care strategies identified by patients with prostate cancer undergoing radiotherapy, by health care professionals caring for these patients, and in the literature.

    Methods: The study combines data from interviews with patients (n ¼ 8) and health care professionals (n ¼ 10) and a scoping review of the literature (n ¼ 26) focusing on the period during and up to 6 months after radiotherapy.

    Results: There was a concordance between the patients, health care professionals, and the literature on symptoms during and after radiotherapy. Urinary symptoms, bowel problems, pain, sexual problems, fatigue, anxiety, depression, cognitive impairment and irregular symptoms were commonly described during the initial treatment period. Self-care strategies were rarely described in all three of the sources.

    Conclusions: The results show which symptoms to regularly assess using an Information and Communication Technology-platform for patients with newly-diagnosed prostate cancer during radiotherapy. The next step is to evaluate the efficacy of using the platform and the accuracy of the selected symptoms and self-care advice included in a smartphone application.

  • 29.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Werkander Harstäde, Carina
    Linnéuniversitetet, Sweden.
    Benzein, Eva
    Linnéuniversitetet, Sweden.
    Östlund, Ulrika
    Linnéuniversitetet, Sweden.
    Translation and adapting the Patient Dignity Inventory to a Swedish palliative care context2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Widmark, Catarina
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Törnberg, Sven
    Tishelman, Carol
    Between youth and adulthood: focus group discussions with 30-year-old women about cervical cancer and its prevention in urban Sweden2011In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 34, no 3, e11-e20 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although there is a significant amount of research on cervical cancer screening (CCS), few studies address screening experiences of women related to reasoning about health maintenance and disease prevention in general. Research tends to neglect experiences in different phases of life and experiences of women with different screening histories. Recent literature primarily focuses on adolescents targeted for human papilloma virus vaccinations, whereas perspectives of women who need continued CCS are lacking.

    Objective: The aim of the study was to explore how 30-year-old women reason about health, ill health, health maintenance, and disease prevention, in relation to cervical cancer, its prevention, and screening.

    Methods: Through a population-based CCS registry, we randomly sampled women to attend focus group discussions stratified by previous patterns in screening history and test results. Data from 38 attendees were inductively analyzed.

    Results: Women’s discussions encompassed temporal aspects of the past and the future, with youth in the rearview mirror and the demands of adulthood ahead. Matters related to sickness, including cancer and its prevention, were described as distant and not prioritized in this phase of life. This situation was compounded by lack of relevant information about cervical cancer and screening.

    Conclusions: The manner 30-year-old women self-defined themselves in the transition between youth and adulthood appears to strongly influence their reasoning about CCS and other forms of health maintenance and disease prevention.

    Implications for Practice: Cervical cancer screening programs are challenged to adapt both information and organizations to new cohorts of women with different needs and life situations.

  • 31.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Widmark, Catarina
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal högskola.
    Törnberg, Sven
    Karolinska sjukhuset.
    Tishelman, Carol
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Focus group discussions with 30-year old women about cervical cancer and its prevention in urban Sweden2010In: 16 th International Conference on Cancer Nursing, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
    Widmark, Catarina
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal högskola.
    Törnberg, Sven
    Karolinska sjukhuset.
    Tishelman, Carol
    Karolinska Institutet.
    How do young women reason about participation in cervical cancer screening in urban Sweden?2010In: 15th International Conference on Cancer Nursing, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Widmark, Catarina
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences. Ersta Sköndal Högskola.
    Törnberg, Sven
    Karolinska sjukhuset.
    Tishelman, Carol
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Young women's reasoning about cervical cancer, its causes, and prevention2008In: Gender Medicine, ISSN 1550-8579, Vol. 5, no 3, 342-343 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Brohede, Sabina
    et al.
    Unit of Medical Psychology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Paediatrics and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Gender and Medicine, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Unit of Medical Psychology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    'I will be at death's door and realize that I've wasted maybe half of my life on one body part': the experience of living with body dysmorphic disorder2016In: International journal of psychiatry in clinical practice (Print), ISSN 1365-1501, E-ISSN 1471-1788, Vol. 20, no 3, 191-198 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of patients living with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), including their experiences with the health care system.

    Methods: Fifteen individuals with BDD were interviewed, and interpretive description was used to analyse the interviews.

    Results: The following six themes were identified: being absorbed in time-consuming procedures, facing tension between one's own ideal and the perceived reality, becoming the disorder, being restricted in life, attempting to reduce one's problems and striving to receive care. The overarching concept derived from the themes was feeling imprisoned - struggling to become free and to no longer feel abnormal.

    Conclusions: Ideas of imprisonment and abnormality compose the entire experience of living with this disorder. Although the participants suffered greatly from their BDD, these patients encountered difficulties in accessing health care and had disappointing experiences during their encounters with the health care system. Therefore, it is important to increase awareness and knowledge of BDD among health care professionals to ensure that patients with BDD receive the appropriate care.

  • 35.
    Christiansen, Mats
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Langius-Eklöf, Ann
    Karolinska Institutet, sockholm, Sweden.
    Lindström, Veronica
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Hälleberg Nyman, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Wengström, Yvonne
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sundberg, Kay
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    High acceptability of a smartphone application for daily symptom reporting and management during radiotherapy for prostate cancer2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Ewertsson, Mona
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Allvin, Renee
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Clinical Skills Centre.
    Holmström, Inger K.
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden; Department of Public Health and Caring Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Walking the bridge: Nursing students' learning in clinical skill laboratories2015In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 15, no 4, 277-283 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite an increasing focus on simulation as a learning strategy in nursing education, there is limited evidence on the transfer of simulated skills into clinical practice. Therefore it's important to increase knowledge of how clinical skills laboratories (CSL) can optimize students' learning for development of professional knowledge and skills, necessary for quality nursing practice and for patient safety. Thus, the aim was to describe nursing students' experiences of learning in the CSL as a preparation for their clinical practice. Interviews with 16 students were analysed with content analysis. An overall theme was identified walking the bridge in which the CSL formed a bridge between the university and clinical settings, allowing students to integrate theory and practice and develop a reflective stance. The theme was based on categories: conditions for learning, strategies for learning, tension between learning in the skills laboratory and clinical settings, and development of professional and personal competence. The CSL prepared the students for clinical practice, but a negative tension between learning in CSL and clinical settings was experienced. However, this tension may create reflection. This provides a new perspective that can be used as a pedagogical approach to create opportunities for students to develop their critical thinking.

  • 37.
    Ewertsson, Mona
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Allvin, Renée
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Holmström, Inger
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Nurse students’ experiences of learning in clinical skills laboratory: the bridge between university and clinical settings2013In: Nordic Conference on Advances in Health Care Sciences Research 2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Ewertsson, Mona
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
    Jönköping University.
    Allvin, Renèe
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Tensions in learning professional identities: nursing students narratives and participation in practical skills during their clinical practiceManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Ewertsson, Mona
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
    Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Allvin, Renée
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Clinical Skills Centre.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Tensions in learning professional identities - nursing students' narratives and participation in practical skills during their clinical practice: an ethnographic study2017In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 16, 48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Clinical practice is a pivotal part of nursing education. It provides students with the opportunity to put the knowledge and skills they have acquired from lectures into practice with real patients, under the guidance of registered nurses. Clinical experience is also essential for shaping the nursing students' identity as future professional nurses. There is a lack of knowledge and understanding of the ways in which students learn practical skills and apply knowledge within and across different contexts, i.e. how they apply clinical skills, learnt in the laboratory in university settings, in the clinical setting. The aim of this study was therefore to explore how nursing students describe, and use, their prior experiences related to practical skills during their clinical practice.

    METHODS: An ethnographic case study design was used. Fieldwork included participant observations (82 h), informal conversations, and interviews (n = 7) that were conducted during nursing students' (n = 17) clinical practice at an emergency department at a university hospital in Sweden.

    RESULTS: The overarching theme identified was "Learning about professional identities with respect to situated power". This encompasses tensions in students' learning when they are socialized into practical skills in the nursing profession. This overarching theme consists of three sub-themes: "Embodied knowledge", "Divergent ways of assessing and evaluating knowledge" and "Balancing approaches".

    CONCLUSIONS: Nursing students do not automatically possess the ability to transfer knowledge from one setting to another; rather, their development is shaped by their experiences and interactions with others when they meet real patients. The study revealed different ways in which students navigated tensions related to power differentials. Reflecting on actions is a prerequisite for developing and learning practical skills and professional identities. This highlights the importance of both educators' and the preceptors' roles for socializing students in this process.

  • 40.
    Ewertsson, Mona
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
    School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Nursing students' socialisation into practical skills2017In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 27, 157-164 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Socialisation is a significant factor that shapes nursing students' learning in clinical settings. Little is known about the ways in which students learn practical skills during their clinical practice and how they are socialised into these skills. This knowledge is important for creating an optimal environment for ensuring a high standard of care and patient safety. This study aims to address this knowledge gap. An ethnographic approach was used. Data were collected by participant observations during nursing students' clinical practice in an emergency department at a university hospital in Sweden, and during informal conversations with students and their preceptors. In the analysis, four themes emerged: A reflective approach based on a theoretical framing; Multitasking situations; Shifts in an active role as a nursing student; and Styles of supervision. Students' socialisation into practical skills was shaped by several factors where preceptors played a key role. Teaching and learning styles and interactions between the preceptor and the student shaped the learning situations. A dominant discrepancy regarding whether and how reflections took place between preceptors and students was identified. This highlights the need for creating continuity between the ways that experiences are organised across the settings of learning (university-based and clinically based learning) to enhance nursing students' learning and socialisation into practical skills.

  • 41.
    Ewertsson, Mona
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Bagga-Gupta, Sangeeta
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Nursing students’ socialisation into practical skillsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Ewertsson, Mona
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Margareta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Holmström, Inger K.
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden; Department of Public Health and Caring Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Allvin, Renée
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Clinical Skills Centre.
    Use of technical skills and medical devices among new registered nurses: A questionnaire study2015In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 35, no 12, 1169-1174 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: One comprehensive part of nursing practice is performing technical skills and handling of medical equipment. This might be challenging for new registered nurses (RNs) to do in patient-safe way.

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe and compare the extent to which new RNs perform various technical skills and handle medical devices in different settings, and to investigate their possibility for continued learning in this respect. A further aim was to describe their perceptions of incident reporting related to technical skills and medical devices.

    Design: A cross-sectional study with descriptive and comparative design.

    Participants: RNs who recently graduated from a nursing programme at three Swedish universities and had worked as a RN for up to 1year were included in the study (n=113, response rate 57%).

    Method: Data were collected by means of a postal questionnaire.

    Results: Half of the RNs reported that they performed several of the listed tasks every day or every week, regardless of workplace. These tasks were most frequently performed in surgical departments. The majority of the participants (76%) stated a need of continued practical training. However, less than half of them (48%) had access to a training environment. Several participants (43%) had been involved in incidents related to technical skills or medical devices, which were not always reported. Nearly a third of the participants (31%) did not use the existing guidelines when performing technical skills, and reflection on performance was uncommon.

    Conclusions: This study highlights the importance of shared responsibilities between nurse educators and health care employers to provide learning opportunities for new RNs in technical skills, to maintain patient safety. To increase the safety culture where nursing students and new RNs understand the importance of using evidence-based guidelines and taking a reflective approach in the performance of technical tasks is needed.

  • 43.
    Ewertsson, Mona
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Gustavsson, Margareta
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Holmström, Inger
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Allvin, Renée
    Clinical Skills Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Use of technical skills and medical devices among new registered nurses: a questionnaire study. New registered nurses’ use of technical skills and possibility for continued learning2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Graaf [Olsson-Graaf], Tyra
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Kihlgren, Annika
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Ehnfors, Margareta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Communication patterns in coordinated care planning conferences with older patients2013In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 3, no 10, 35-49 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: When an older patient is discharged from a hospital in Sweden, a care plan in cooperation with the patient should be made through coordinated care planning (COCP). Previous research has described difficulties in the discharge process; consequently, it is important to develop additional knowledge and investigate both whether and how patients are given the opportunity to participate in COCP. The aim of the present study was to determine if older patients are given the opportunity to participate in COCP meetings, and if so, what characterizes these meetings.

    Method: This qualitative, descriptive study is based on non-participant observation of interactions between older patients and care staff at six COCP meetings. The data collected were analyzed using directed content analysis and critical discourse analysis (CDA).

    Results: The main findings indicate a lack of patient participation in all the COCP meetings held at the hospital. The dialogues in that context were less information intensive, and a professional perspective dominated. The situation in advanced home care (AHC) was the opposite; already from the outset, it was evident that the patient was the chief informant and that the patient’s perspective predominated during the dialogues.

    Conclusions: General differences in the way the dialogues were initiated and in how they progressed were observed between the hospital and AHC. Due to both shortage of time in health care today and financial issues, it is important to find solutions that incorporate the older patient’s experiences as well as professional knowledge.

  • 45.
    Gustafsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad universitet.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Kullén Engström, Agneta
    Högskolan i Borås.
    Ohlsson, Ulla
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Different nurse teacher models in the clinical practice of nursing students2013In: NET2013 24th International Networking for Healthcare Education Conference, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Gustafsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Holmefur, Marie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Test-retest reliability of the Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher (CLES + T) scale2015In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 15, no 4, 253-257 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher (CLES + T) scale evaluates the student nurses' perception of the learning environment and supervision within the clinical placement. It has never been tested in a replication study. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the test-retest reliability of the CLES + T scale. The CLES + T scale was administered twice to a group of 42 student nurses, with a one-week interval. Test-retest reliability was determined by calculations of Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICCs) and weighted Kappa coefficients. Standard Error of Measurements (SEM) and Smallest Detectable Difference (SDD) determined the precision of individual scores. Bland-Altman plots were created for analyses of systematic differences between the test occasions. The results of the study showed that the stability over time was good to excellent (ICC 0.88 - 0.96) in the sub-dimensions “Supervisory relationship”, “Pedagogical atmosphere on the ward” and “Role of the nurse teacher”. Measurements of “Premises of nursing on the ward” and “Leadership style of the manager” had lower but still acceptable stability (ICC 0.70 - 0.75). No systematic differences occurred between the test occasions. This study supports the usefulness of the CLES + T scale as a reliable measure of the student nurses’ perception of the learning environment within the clinical placement at a hospital.

  • 47.
    Gustafsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Windahl, Jenny
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Ten years follow-up of trauma-related psychological distress in a cohort of patients with acute traumatic hand injury2012In: International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing, ISSN 1878-1241, E-ISSN 1878-1292, Vol. 16, no 3, 128-135 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Though early psychological symptoms after an acute traumatic hand injury have been described, there remains a need for knowledge concerning the trajectory of the individual’s response over time to the traumatic event. The purpose of this study was to describe psychological distress related to the traumatic experience in a cohort of patients with acute traumatic hand injury in a 10-year perspective. Patients were recruited consecutively at a hand surgery department. Data were collected by means of mailed questionnaires one week, three months, one year and 10 years after the accident. Eighty-three patients participated in all four measurements. Their experience of psychological distress related to the trauma differed significantly during the 10 years (p < 0.001). A quarter of the patients had symptoms indicating a risk of a psychiatric disorder one week after the accident. Most of them recovered naturally during the first three months but 10% had more persistent high level of symptoms during the first year after the accident. A few patients developed symptoms at risk level at three months and still had symptoms 10 years after the accident. At three months it appears possible to identify hand-injured patients with more persistent psychological symptoms and probably in need of a psychiatric consultation.

  • 48.
    Göransson, Carina
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden .
    Wengström, Yvonne
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Langius-Eklöf, Ann
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Irene
    Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Perspectives of health and self-care among older persons: to be implemented in an interactive interactive information and communication technology-platform2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM AND OBJECTIVES: To acquire knowledge regarding the contents to be implemented in an interactive ICT-platform perceived to be relevant to health and self-care among older persons based on the literature, healthcare professionals and the older persons themselves.

    BACKGROUND: The growing ageing population places demands on the healthcare system to promote healthy ageing and to strengthen the older person's self-care ability. This requires innovative approaches to facilitate communication between the older person and healthcare professionals, and to increase the older person's participation in their care. An information and communication technology-platform (ICT-platform) could be used for this purpose, but the content needs to be relevant to both the older persons and the healthcare professionals.

    DESIGN: Descriptive qualitative design.

    METHODS: This study was based on three samplings: a scoping review of the literature (n=20 articles), interviews with healthcare professionals (n=5), and a secondary analysis of interviews with older persons (n=8) and nursing assistants (n=7). The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: Four areas were identified to be of relevance to older persons' perceived health: frame of mind, having relationships and social activities, physical ability and concerns, and maintaining self-care. Self-care was described in the literature and by the healthcare professionals more than by the older persons.

    CONCLUSIONS: The results show a concordance in the data samplings that give a clear indication of the areas relevant to older persons' health and self-care that can be integrated in an interactive ICT-platform for use in regular daily care assessments. Descriptions of self-care was limited indicating a possible gap in knowledge that requires further research.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Areas relevant to older persons' health and self-care could be used for regular assessment to support and promote healthy ageing. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 49.
    Göransson, Carina
    et al.
    School Of Social And Health Sciences, Halmstad university, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    School Of Social And Health Sciences, Halmstad university, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Wengström, Yvonne
    Department Of Neurobiology, Care Science And Society, Karolinska institutet, Huddinge, SWEDEN.
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Feasibility and acceptability of an interactive ICT-platform in older adults for participatory care2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The increasing ageing population puts demands on society and particularly on health care system to promote a health related quality of life. Thus, it is necessary to develop strategies that promote self-care among older adults that enable them to live in their own homes as long as possible and to make them feel safe and involved in their care. In order to encourage their participation in their care, new innovative solutions are needed. The market of information-and communication technology (ICT)-based platforms directed to the health care arena has exploded during recent years. Despite the large range of products few are developed with interactive components. In collaboration within a multicenter research group and a Swedish health care company (Health Navigator) an ICT-platform is developed for use in a mobile phone or tablet that includes an interactive mobile application for reporting problems and concerns. This platform is unique through the real-time communication enabling rapid management of earlydetected problems.

    Aim: The aim with the project is to evaluate an ICT-platform by older adults living in own homes with assistance from home care nurses in a community in Sweden.

    Method: The study is prospective and has a mixed methods approach advocated for the evaluation of new technologies within healthcare. This includes a quantitative approach to evaluate effects, qualitative methods such as interviews and focus group discussions to evaluate how patients and health care professionals perceive the intervention. The design is underpinned by the Medical Research Council’s complex intervention evaluation framework. Thirty older adults >65 years or above, living in their own homes, with assistance from home care nurses have through an application in a tablet reported health status twice a week and when needed during three months. They have continuous access to evidence based self-care advice directly related to their reported problems and concerns. The risk assessment model sends alarms to involved nurses via text messaging (SMS). This initiates an interaction between the nurse and the older adult who is contacted by telephone to discuss the reported problems. Furthermore, the nurses in charge can also log into a web-interface and view the reports of the participants. Individually interviews with the older adults and focus groups interviews with nurses are conducted after the study period. Questionnaires are given to the older adults before intervention, after the study´s completed and after six months with primarily main outcomes as self-care, health literacy and well-being. A control group with older adults 65 years and above is used as a comparison.

    Results: Preliminary results will be presented with focus on feasibility, acceptability and benefit of the ICT-platform from the perspective of older adults and home care nurses. Additional logged data on the frequency of symptom reports, alerts, and page views will also be presented.

    Summary: An interactive ICT-platform is developed and used by older adults to report problems and concerns which enabling rapid management of early-detected problems. This study aims to evaluate the ICT-platform by thirty older adults living in own home with assistance from home care nurses.

  • 50.
    Göransson, Carina
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    Wengström, Yvonne
    Kihlgren, Annica
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    The elderly persons´ experiences of reporting health status in an ICT-platform2015Conference paper (Refereed)
123 1 - 50 of 102
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf