oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 43 of 43
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Barni, Daniela
    et al.
    Department of Human Sciences, LUMSA University of Rome, Rome, Italy.
    Vieno, Alessio
    Department of Developmental and Social Psychology, University of Padua, Padua, Italy.
    Roccato, Michele
    Department of Psychology, University of Turin, Turin, Italy.
    Russo, Silvia
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Basic Personal Values, the Country's Crime Rate and the Fear of Crime2016In: Social Indicators Research, ISSN 0303-8300, E-ISSN 1573-0921, Vol. 129, no 3, p. 1057-1074Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the relations between basic personal values, drawn on Schwartz's value theory, and the expression of the individual fear of crime by analysing the moderating role of contextual cues (i.e., crime rates). We performed a multinational, multilevel study using the 2008 European Social Survey dataset (N = 53,692, nested in 27 European countries). The fear of crime, which is a generalised insecurity about personal safety, showed a positive association with conservation (i.e., tradition, conformity and security) and a negative association with openness to change (i.e., hedonism, stimulation and self-direction) and self-transcendence values (i.e., benevolence and universalism). With the exception of self-transcendence, all the associations between basic values and the fear of crime were amplified by the country's crime rate: the higher the crime rate, the stronger the relation between values and the fear of crime. The implications and limitations of these results and possible further research directions are discussed.

  • 2.
    Kim, Yunhwan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Russo, Silvia
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Amnå, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The longitudinal relation between online and offline political participation among youth at two different developmental stages2017In: New Media and Society, ISSN 1461-4448, E-ISSN 1461-7315, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 899-917Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role played by the Internet in young people’s political lives has received great research attention. However, two gaps in the literature hinder the drawing of conclusions on how online political participation is related to its offline counterpart. First, although there are multiple hypotheses on the nature of the relationship, they have not been compared in any single study. Second, although the relation may differ according to developmental stage, age differences have not been examined. We address these gaps using longitudinal data from two samples of youth at different developmental stages, and test four hypotheses for each sample. It was found, among late adolescents, that online participation serves as a gateway to offline participation. However, among young adults, offline participation spills over into online participation. These findings indicate the positive potential of online political participation in youth’s political lives, and highlight the need to focus on their developmental stages.

  • 3.
    Mannarini, Terri
    et al.
    Department of History, Society and Human Studies, University of Salento, Lecce, Italy .
    Roccato, Michele
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy .
    Russo, Silvia
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    The false consensus effect: a trigger of radicalization in locally unwanted land uses conflicts?2015In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 42, p. 76-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We tackled conflicts over locally unwanted land use (LULU) focusing on the false consensus effect (FCE). Through a secondary analysis of data from a representative sample of residents in the district of Turin, Italy, where a high-speed railway (HSR) is to be sited (. N=1785), we tested whether the FCE mediated the relationship between perceived threat to the location and mobilization against the HSR. Participants tended to overestimate the number of people holding their same opinion. Among opponents of the HSR (. n=305), the tendency to be liable to the FCE was higher for those who perceived the project as a threat to the location. Moreover, the perception of an alleged consensus based on their own opinion mobilized them to defend their position. Our study suggests that standard approaches to LULU conflicts may benefit from the use of socio-cognitive variables.

  • 4.
    Manzi, Claudia
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milano, Italy.
    Roccato, Michele
    Department of Psychology, Università degli Studi di Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Paderi, Fabio
    Department of Psychology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milano, Italy.
    Vitrotti, Sara
    Department of Psychology, Università degli Studi di Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Russo, Silvia
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    The social development of right-wing authoritarianism: The interaction between parental autonomy support and societal threat to safety2017In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 109, p. 1-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We tested the hypothesis that parental support for autonomy moderates the effects of societal threat to safety on the development of right-wing authoritarianism (RWA). In a quasi-experimental study performed on 241 Italian university students, societal threat to safety fostered RWA only among participants who reported low levels of parental support for autonomy.

  • 5.
    Manzi, Claudia
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milano, Italy.
    Roccato, Michele
    Department of Psychology, Università degli Studi di Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Russo, Silvia
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Meaning buffers right-wing authoritarian responses to societal threat via the mediation of loss of perceived control2015In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 83, no Sept, p. 117-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature shows that exposure to societal threat stemming from criminality can elicit an increase in right-wing authoritarianism (RWA) via the mediation of the loss of perceived control. In this study, we investigated whether the perception of meaning can act as a buffering factor for such process, performing an experiment with 316 Italian university students (67.8% women; mean age = 25.81, SD = 9.18). A moderated mediation model showed that the loss of perceived control mediated the relation between societal threat stemming from criminality and RWA, but that the second link was significant only among people low in meaning. Limitations, implications and possible developments of this research are discussed.

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved

  • 6.
    Mirisola, Alberto
    et al.
    Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto per le Tecnologie Didattiche, Palermo, Italy .
    Roccato, Michele
    University of Torino, Torino, Italy .
    Russo, Silvia
    University of Torino, Torino, Italy .
    Spagna, Giulia
    University of Torino, Torino, Italy .
    Vieno, Alessio
    University of Padova, Padova, Italy .
    Societal threat to safety, compensatory control, and right-wing authoritarianism2014In: Political Psychology, ISSN 0162-895X, E-ISSN 1467-9221, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 795-812Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyzed directly and indirectly the relationships between societal threat to safety, perceived control, and the increase in right-wing authoritarianism (RWA) in two studies. In Study 1 (national sample of the Italian population, N=1,169), we performed a longitudinal analysis structured into three waves (January 2003, September 2004, and January 2005). A moderated regression analysis showed that RWA increased from 2003 to 2005 as a function of perceived societal threat to safety more among low- than among high RWA scorers. In experimental Study 2 (Italian university students, N=131) a moderated mediation model showed loss of perceived control to mediate the relation between societal threat to safety and the increase in RWA, but among low authoritarians only. Limitations, implications, and possible developments of this research are discussed.

  • 7.
    Montanari, Paola
    et al.
    Department of Health, Life and Environmental Sciences, University of L’Aquila, L’Aquila, Italy.
    Petrucci, Cristina
    Department of Health, Life and Environmental Sciences, University of L’Aquila, L’Aquila, Italy.
    Russo, Silvia
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Murray, Ian
    School of Nursing, Midwifery and Health, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, UK.
    Dimonte, Valerio
    Department of Public Health and Pediatric Sciences, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Lancia, Loreto
    Department of Health, Life and Environmental Sciences, University of L’Aquila, L’Aquila, Italy.
    Psychometric properties of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy-Health Professional Student's version: An Italian validation study with nursing students2015In: Nursing and Health Sciences, ISSN 1441-0745, E-ISSN 1442-2018, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 483-491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This methodological study was conducted to test the psychometric properties of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy-Health Professional Student's version (JSE-HPS), in a convenience sample of 797 Italian nursing students and to describe their empathic engagement. Data were subjected to exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, test-retest, correlation analysis, t-test, and analysis of variance method. Principal component factor extraction with Oblimin rotation on the first half of the sample was conducted. The analysis suggested a three-factor solution for 14 items: compassionate care/emotional engagement, perspective-taking, and standing in the patient's shoes. Confirmatory factor analysis on the second half of the sample showed good fit indexes for the 14-item solution, indicated by the exploratory factor analysis, and the 20 item solution of the scale, with the exception of one item. Test-retest correlation was 0.50 (P<0.001) for the overall scale. Results from group comparisons and correlations are also provided and discussed. The Italian version of the JSE-HPS is a psychometrically sound tool. The translated 20-item solution is also suitable to carry out cross-cultural comparisons.

  • 8.
    Mosso, Cristina
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Turin, Italy .
    Briante, Giovanni
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Turin, Italy .
    Aiello, Antonio
    University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy .
    Russo, Silvia
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Turin, Italy .
    The role of legitimizing ideologies as predictors of ambivalent sexism in young people: evidence from Italy and the USA2013In: Social Justice Research, ISSN 0885-7466, E-ISSN 1573-6725, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The studies presented here focus on the relationship between legitimizing ideologies and ambivalent sexism. 544 Italian students (Study 1) and 297 US students (Study 2) completed several scales: social dominance orientation (SDO), system justification (SJ), political orientation, religiosity, and the Glick and Fiske (J Pers Soc Psychol 70(3):491-512, 1996) Ambivalent Sexism Inventory. Zero-order correlations revealed all facets of ideological attitudes to be positively related to each other and correlated with ambivalent sexism. In particular, the SDO was related to both ideology components of SJ and political orientation and to ambivalent sexism (hostile and benevolent). Moderated regressions revealed that SDO has a positive impact on hostile sexism for men only, while SJ has a positive impact on hostile sexism for women only. While the first result was stable across the two studies, the last moderated effect has been detected only in Study 1. We discuss the results with respect to different facets of social ideologies and cultural differences between the two countries.

  • 9.
    Pacilli, Maria Giuseppina
    et al.
    University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
    Roccato, Michele
    University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Pagliaro, Stefano
    Seconda Università di Napoli Aversa, Napoli, Italy.
    Russo, Silvia
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    From political opponents to enemies?: the role of perceived morality distance in the animalistic dehumanization of the political outgroup2016In: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, ISSN 1368-4302, E-ISSN 1461-7188, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 360-373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we analyzed the relationships among political identity, the perception of moral distance between the political ingroup and the political outgroup, and outgroup animalistic dehumanization. One correlational and one experimental study revealed a positive correlation of ingroup identification (Study 1, N = 99) and salience of ingroup membership (Study 2, N = 96) with the degree to which participants dehumanized the outgroup. This relationship was mediated by the perceived moral distance between the ingroup and the outgroup. The limitations, implications, and possible developments derived from the present findings are discussed.

  • 10.
    Roccato, Michele
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino TO, Italy .
    Rosato, Rosalba
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino TO, Italy .
    Mosso, Cristina
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino TO, Italy .
    Russo, Silvia
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Measurement properties of the system justification scale: a Rasch analysis2014In: TPM - Testing, Psychometrics, Methodology in Applied Psychology, ISSN 1972-6325, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 467-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, we analyzed the measurement properties of the general version of the System Justification Scale in Italy using the Partial Credit Model with a sample of 544 youths (182 males, Mage = 17.47, SD = 1.59). The scale was unidimensional and showed acceptable measurement properties. However, its format should be reduced from seven to four categories. Moreover, the scale was able to discriminate people with intermediate system justification scores, while it did not discriminate those with extreme scores. Directions for future research are discussed in light of the present findings.

  • 11.
    Roccato, Michele
    et al.
    University of Torino, Torino, Italy .
    Russo, Silvia
    University of Torino, Torino, Italy .
    Insicurezza e criminalità: psicologia sociale della paura del crimine2012Book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Roccato, Michele
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Russo, Silvia
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Right-wing authoritarianism, societal threat to safety, and psychological distress2017In: European Journal of Social Psychology, ISSN 0046-2772, E-ISSN 1099-0992, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 600-610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In two quasi-experimental vignette studies, we have analyzed how societal threat to safety moderates the relation between right-wing authoritarianism (RWA) and psychological distress. In Study 1 (Italian community sample, N=343), we focused on depressive symptoms (measured with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and the General Health Questionnaire). Two moderated regressions showed that the relation between RWA and both measures of depressive symptoms was positive and significant only among people exposed to a socially threatening scenario. In Study 2 (Italian student sample, N=219), we focused on state anxiety and replicated Study 1's results. The findings indicated that, in conditions of societal threat to safety, RWA is a risk factor for psychological distress. Strengths, limitations, and possible developments of this research are discussed.

  • 13.
    Roccato, Michele
    et al.
    University of Torino, Torino, Italy .
    Russo, Silvia
    University of Torino, Torino, Italy .
    Senestro, Silvia
    Adult attachment styles, life experiences, right-wing authoritarianism, and social dominance orientation2013In: Psicologia Sociale, ISSN 1827-2517, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 249-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a sample composed of 427 Italian undergraduates we analyzed the relations between adult attachment style on the one hand and right-wing authoritarianism (RWA) and social dominance orientation (SDO) on the other hand, through the mediation of life experiences. A structural equations model with latent variables showed that the avoidant and the ambivalent-merger attachment styles positively influenced RWA and SDO through the mediation of the evaluation of the experiences one has had, while the ambivalent-worry style did so via the mediation of a low inclination to richly experiencing life.

  • 14.
    Roccato, Michele
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy .
    Russo, Silvia
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy .
    Vieno, Alessio
    University of Padova, Padova, Italy .
    Perceived community disorder moderates the relation between victimization and fear of crime2011In: Journal of community psychology (Print), ISSN 0090-4392, E-ISSN 1520-6629, Vol. 39, no 7, p. 884-888Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a representative sample of the Italian population (N=2,002), surveyed in January 2008, we studied the direct and interactive effects exerted on fear of crime by direct and indirect victimization, on the one hand, and perceived level of disorder of participants' community, on the other hand. Indirect victimization fostered fear of crime among participants reporting high levels of social disorder in their community. However, direct and indirect victimization did not influence fear of crime among participants reporting not living in a disordered community. Implications and limitations of this work and possible further research directions are discussed.

  • 15.
    Roccato, Michele
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Vieno, Alessio
    Department of Deve lopmental and Social Psychology, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.
    Russo, Silvia
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Criminal victimisation fosters conservatism among people living in areas with high unemployment rates: a multilevel longitudinal study2013In: European Journal of Social Psychology, ISSN 0046-2772, E-ISSN 1099-0992, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 585-592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a multilevel, longitudinal model, we tested the mugging thesis, which states that ‘a conservative is a liberal who has been mugged’, in a national sample of Italians (N = 457, nested in 54 counties) surveyed four times between October 2002 and January 2007. We predicted participants' increase in conservatism as a function of the cross-level interactions between criminal victimisation on the one hand and the unemployment and the crime rates for their areas of residence on the other. Conservatism increased among victimised participants living in areas characterised by high unemployment rates, but not among those living in areas with low unemployment rates. The cross-level interaction between victimisation and crime rate did not influence our dependent variable. The strengths, implications and limitations of this research are discussed.

  • 16.
    Roccato, Michele
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Turin, Italy.
    Vieno, Alessio
    Department of Developmental and Social Psychology, University of Padova, Padua, Italy.
    Russo, Silvia
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Turin, Italy.
    The country’s crime rate moderates the relation between authoritarian predispositions and the manifestations of authoritarianism: a multilevel, multinational study2014In: European Journal of Personality, ISSN 0890-2070, E-ISSN 1099-0984, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 14-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We performed a multilevel, multinational test of Stenner’s model on authoritarianism using the 2008 European Values Survey dataset (N=55199, nested in 38 nations). We focussed on the effects exerted on four authoritarian manifestations (racial intolerance, political intolerance, negative attitudes towards immigrants, and moral intolerance) by the cross-level interaction between participants’ authoritarian predispositions (assessed in terms of childrearing values) and their country’s crime rate. Associations between authoritarian predispositions and racial intolerance, political intolerance, negative attitudes towards immigrants, and moral intolerance were significantly stronger among participants living in countries characterised by high crime rates than those among participants living in countries with low crime rates. Limitations, implications, and future directions of this study are discussed.

  • 17.
    Russo, Silvia
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Explaining the effects of exposure to negative campaigning: The mediating role of emotions2016In: Psicologia sociale, ISSN 1827-2517, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 307-317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    I analyzed the role of emotional reactions to negative campaigning as mediators of the link between exposure to negative messages, evaluations of candidates, and voting behavior. In an experimental study (N = 103) I found that exposure to issue-based negative messages from the outparty provoked anxiety, which increased selective exposure to political information that, in turn, improved the outparty evaluation; and exposure to person-based negative messages from the inparty provoked aversion, which negatively influenced inparty evaluation. Finally, the evaluations of candidates significantly predicted vote choices.

  • 18.
    Russo, Silvia
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Le emozioni suscitate dai messaggi elettorali negativi2011In: Psicologia Sociale, ISSN 1827-2517, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 225-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a sample composed of 176 left-wing students we analyzed experimentally (23 factorial design) emotional reactions to negative campaign messages as a function of political ir/relevance of the content, in/civility of the tone, and source’s political affiliation). We found a tri-dimensional structure of emotional responses (enthusiasm, anxiety, and aversion). Messages stemming from an ingroup source elicited enthusiasm when relevant and aversion when irrelevant, while messages stemming from an outgroup source elicited anxiety.

  • 19.
    Russo, Silvia
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino (TO), Italyy.
    LULU conflicts and reactions to perceived injustice: an Italian case study2009In: Psicología Política, ISSN 1138-0853, E-ISSN 2340-3810, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 47-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Local resistance to controversial land uses is a common phenomenon occurring with increasing regularity in all democ-ratic countries. However, little is known at present about cognitive reactions to perceived injustice in such conflicts. Using as case study the Italian movement against the High Speed Railway (HSR), I performed two qualitative studies. In Study 1 content analysis revealed that ac-tivists perceived as unfair the outcomes, the procedures and the interactions with the decision-making agents and showed dietrological information processes. In Study 2 the results from Study 1 were confirmed and paranoid-like modes of misperception and misjudgement were identified. Limits and implications of this research are discussed.

  • 20.
    Russo, Silvia
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    The subjective group dynamics in negative campaigns2017In: Journal of Applied Social Psychology, ISSN 0021-9029, E-ISSN 1559-1816, Vol. 47, no 8, p. 415-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    I relied on the subjective group dynamics framework to analyse the derogation of inparty candidates involved in negative campaigns. In an experimental study (dynamic simulation of an electoral campaign, N=118), I found that participants downgraded the inparty candidate (both in terms of evaluation and vote choice) more when he ran a person-based negative campaign than when he ran an issue-based negative campaign. This effect was significant for participants with high levels of political identification only. Overall, the findings revealed that political candidates, as members of significant social groups, are not exempt from the forms of extremity in evaluations typically observed in other social groups.

  • 21.
    Russo, Silvia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Amnå, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The personality divide: do personality traits differentially predict online political engagement?2016In: Social science computer review, ISSN 0894-4393, E-ISSN 1552-8286, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 259-277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Personality traits are considered efficient predictors of offline political participation. However, the effects of personality traits on online political engagement have been largely understudied. The main goal of this cross-sectional research (N = 1134, sample of young adults) was to investigate the relationships between personality traits, as measured by the Big Five Inventory, and online political engagement. As dependent variables, we took three dimensions of online political engagement: e-targeted, e-expressive, and e-news. A latent variables structural equation model showed that personality traits directly and indirectly predict modes of online political engagement via the mediation of political attitudes and the proneness to use Internet. On the whole, we found that people open to experience and extraverts take part in online political actions, whereas agreeable and conscientious tend to avoid them. The findings provide insights on the differences between traditional form (i.e. offline) and the new online modes of political engagement by showing that, to some extent, the latter appeal to different personality profiles. In sum online engagement seems to be marked by a personality divide. 

  • 22.
    Russo, Silvia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Amnå, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    When political talk translates into political action: The role of personality traits2016In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 100, p. 126-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Discussing politics in everyday life is quite common but it is not clear how talking politics should prompt the desire to become politically active. We compared two ideas: Information gain, i.e., political talk translates into action when people receive information about activities and organizations; and social influence, i.e., political talk translates into action when people perceive their friends as politically active. Our main goal was to address the role played by two personality traits – Openness to Experience and Agreeableness – within these processes.  Adopting a longitudinal design (N = 895, sample of youths surveyed twice), we found that political talk promotes political participation over time when people perceive their discussion partners as politically active and that this effect is especially pronounced for agreeable people. Findings from this study provided support to the idea that political talk translates into political action under the condition of social influence and for people who are particularly susceptible to social conformity.

  • 23.
    Russo, Silvia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Manzi, Claudia
    Catholic University of Milan, Milan, Italy.
    Roccato, Michele
    University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Self-concept clarity buffers the impact of societal threat to safety on right-wing authoritarianism2017In: Journal of Social Psychology, ISSN 0022-4545, E-ISSN 1940-1183, Vol. 157, no 4, p. 513-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exposure to societal threat can elicit an increase in right-wing authoritarianism (RWA). In this study, using a quasi-experimental vignette design (Italian community sample, N = 86), we tested the moderating role of self-concept clarity (SCC). A moderated regression showed that manipulated societal threat to safety fostered RWA only among low SCC scorers. It is concluded that SCC is an important resource for individuals facing threat conditions.

  • 24.
    Russo, Silvia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Mirisola, Alberto
    University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy .
    Roccato, Michele
    University of Torino, Torino, Italy .
    Symbolic threat fosters right-wing authoritarianism only among low authoritarians2014In: TPM - Testing, Psychometrics, Methodology in Applied Psychology, ISSN 1972-6325, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 197-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a sample of 95 U.S. undergraduates (49.5% women, Mage = 20.99 years, SD = 3.48), we analyzed the effects of symbolic threat on right-wing authoritarianism (RWA). We used data from an experimental study in which negative political attacks on one’s own favorite candidate were considered as symbolic threats. A hierarchic moderated regression showed that, as with societal threat, symbolic threat fostered an increase in RWA only among participants with low initial scores on RWA. This increase did not depend on the persuasive effect of being exposed to negative campaigning. The implications, limitations, and possible developments of the research are discussed.

  • 25.
    Russo, Silvia
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Roccato, Michele
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Does right-wing authoritarianism reduce fear?: an experimental study2013In: Psychology of fear: new developments / [ed] Marta N. Purcella, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2013, p. 69-82Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Russo, Silvia
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Roccato, Michele
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    How long does victimization foster fear of crime?: a longitudinal study2010In: Journal of community psychology (Print), ISSN 0090-4392, E-ISSN 1520-6629, Vol. 38, no 8, p. 960-974Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied the relationship between victimization and fear of crime longitudinally, analyzing data from the Observatory of the North-West (Italian national sample, N51,701, two waves: January 2006 and January 2007). We modeled fear of crime at T2 using as independent variables: (a) the main sociodemographic variables and fear of crime, as assessed at T1; (b) direct victimization; and (c) indirect victimization. Recent direct victimization was the most effective victimization predictor of both concrete and abstract fears, followed by multiple or repeat direct victimization. On the other hand, direct victimization occurring in the 12 months before the first wave did not influence fear. Recent indirect victimization and, above all, multiple or repeat indirect victimization influenced concrete, but not abstract, fear of crime, while direct victimization occurring in the 12 months before the first wave did not foster fear. We discuss the limits of this work and possible further directions.

  • 27.
    Russo, Silvia
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Roccato, Michele
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Values and fear of crime2009In: Social psychology: new research / [ed] Ellen P. Lamont, New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2009, p. 267-282Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Russo, Silvia
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Roccato, Michele
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Vieno, Alessio
    University of Padova, Padova, Italy.
    “A conservative is a liberal urban dweller who has been mugged”: a longitudinal study on the links between victimization and voting preferences2012In: Psychology of victimization / [ed] Audrey N. Hutcherson, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2012, p. 193-204Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Russo, Silvia
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Turin, Italy .
    Roccato, Michele
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Turin, Italy .
    Vieno, Alessio
    Department of Developmental and Social Psychology, University of Padova, Padua, Italy .
    Criminal victimization and crime risk perception: a multilevel longitudinal study2013In: Social Indicators Research, ISSN 0303-8300, E-ISSN 1573-0921, Vol. 112, no 3, p. 535-548Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a national sample of the Italian population, surveyed four times between October 2002 and January 2007 (N = 2,008), we performed a multilevel longitudinal study aimed at predicting the increase in crime risk perception as a function of three families of independent variables, respectively lying at the within individual level (direct victimization and indirect victimization), at the between-individuals level (being a woman, being an older person, being a poorly educated person and size of area of residence) and at the ecological level (county's crime rate, unemployment rate and immigration rate). Direct and indirect victimization, being a woman, being an older person, living in a large town and in a context characterized by high crime and unemployment rates positively influenced the change in crime risk perception, while the other individual and ecological predictors we used in our predictive model did not. Strengths, limitations, implications and future developments of this research are discussed.

  • 30.
    Russo, Silvia
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Turin, Italy .
    Roccato, Michele
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Turin, Italy .
    Vieno, Alessio
    Department of Developmental and Social Psychology, University of Padova, Padova, Italy .
    Predicting perceived risk of crime: a multilevel study2011In: American Journal of Community Psychology, ISSN 0091-0562, E-ISSN 1573-2770, Vol. 48, no 3-4, p. 384-394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With a sample of Italians selected from 71 Italian counties (N = 1,868), we performed two multilevel analyses aimed at predicting the perceived risk of crime at local (i. e., in the participants' county of residence) and at societal (i. e., in the context of Italian society) levels. A significant proportion of the variation in local risk perception was at the county level. The following individual variables predicted higher levels of this variable: indirect victimization, the perception of social and physical disorder, being a woman, being poorly educated, and being an older person. Among the ecological predictors, the crime rate and unemployment rate predicted higher levels of local crime risk perception, while the immigrant rate did not. Perceived risk of crime at the societal level did not show significant variation at the county level. Education, being a man, trusting people, and adhesion to post-materialistic values predicted lower levels of societal crime risk perception, while number of sons/daughters and exposure to television news increased it. The limitations and possible development of this study are discussed.

  • 31.
    Russo, Silvia
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Rutto, Filippo
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Mosso, Cristina
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Benevolent sexism toward men: its social legitimation and preference for male candidates2014In: Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, ISSN 1368-4302, E-ISSN 1461-7188, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 465-473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present research investigated the relationship between system justification beliefs and the endorsement of ambivalent sexist attitudes toward men. In Study 1 (web-based questionnaire, N = 220) we explored the relationship between system justification (SJ), and hostile and benevolent attitudes toward men (HM and BM). Results showed that SJ was positively related to BM but not to HM. In Study 2 (paper-and-pencil questionnaire, N = 158), we tested the mediating role played by BM and HM in the relationship between SJ and the preference for male candidates. We replicated Study 1 results and showed that BM, but not HM, was positively related to the dependent variable; moreover SJ exerted an indirect and positive effect on the preference for male candidates as mediated by BM. Finally, supplementary analyses showed that the relationship between SJ and BM was positive and significant for women only. Results are discussed in light of system justification theory and of BM as an additional form of legitimization and maintenance of the status quo.

  • 32.
    Russo, Silvia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Youth & Society.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work. Center for Developmental Research.
    Self-determination theory and the role of political interest in adolescents' sociopolitical development2017In: Journal of applied developmental psychology, ISSN 0193-3973, E-ISSN 1873-7900, Vol. 50, p. 71-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we adopted an agentic perspective and used self-determination theory to analyze the role of political interest in youth's sociopolitical development. Inspired by this theoretical framework, we identified indicators of the needs for autonomy, relatedness, and competence within the political sphere. We followed two age cohorts (Swedish 13- and 16-year-olds) over one year, with a total of 1992 adolescents, who are at a crucial age for sociopolitical development. Results from autoregressive structural cross-lagged models indicated that political interest predicted significant increases in autonomy, relatedness, and competence over one year, but these psychological needs did not predict a change in political interest over the same time period. The findings speak in favor of an agentic perspective, suggesting that political interest can serve as a basis for youth's political development.

  • 33.
    Russo, Silvia
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stattin, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Stability and Change in Youths’ Political Interest2017In: Social Indicators Research, ISSN 0303-8300, E-ISSN 1573-0921, Vol. 132, no 2, p. 643-658Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Political interest is a key for the survival and development of democracies. Therefore, it is important to establish when political interest develops. We examined changes in political interest—when and in which directions—among youths between 13 and 28 years of age. We followed five age groups of Swedish youths over 2 years, with a total of 2621 participants. Analysis of stability coefficients supported the idea that political interest becomes more stable with age. From their early twenties, youths’ political interest was found to be as stable as has been earlier reported for adults. Among adolescents, the lowest stability rate was observed in the youngest cohort (ages 13–15). The results also showed that, when taking the increase in political interest into account, the proportion of youths losing their interest in politics corresponded to the proportion of youths gaining interest over time. On the whole, this study brings new insights on the development of political interest over time. It provides empirical evidence on when political interest is most susceptible to change and on how it is likely to change. Implications for research and intervention are discussed.

  • 34.
    Russo, Silvia
    et al.
    University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Vieno, Alessio
    University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Roccato, Michele
    University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Predicting concrete and abstract fear of crime using individual and environmental variables: a multilevel analysis2010In: Environmental psychology: new developments / [ed] Jorge Valentín and Lucila Gamez, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2010, p. 211-225Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Rutto, Filippo
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Turin, Italy.
    Russo, Silvia
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Turin, Italy.
    Mosso, Cristina
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Turin, Italy.
    Development and validation of a democratic system justification scale2014In: Social Indicators Research, ISSN 0303-8300, E-ISSN 1573-0921, Vol. 118, no 2, p. 645-655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social psychologists have explored the multiple forms of status quo legitimization mainly in regard to the social and economic system. This study aimed to explore the tendency to legitimize the political system by developing and validating a scale of democratic system justification (DSJ). We administered a scale composed of 8 items, mainly derived from the extant system justification scales (Jost and Thompson in J Exp Soc Psychol, 3: 209-232, 2000; Kay and Jost in J Pers Soc Psychol, 85: 823-837, 2003; Jost and Kay in J Pers Soc Psychol, 88: 498-509, 2005; Jost et al. in Dubois Rev Soc Sci Race, 6: 103-124, 2009) to an Italian sample of 205 participants. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses indicated that the scale has a one-dimensional structure. Results also showed that internal reliability of the scale was good; moreover, correlational analyses and group comparisons confirmed the convergent and discriminant validity of the scale. Implications for the assessment of the DSJ and future directions of research on this topic are discussed.

  • 36. Selvestrel, Linda
    et al.
    Russo, Silvia
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Turin, Italy.
    Roccato, Michele
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Turin, Italy.
    Mosso, Cristina
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Turin, Italy.
    Has conservatism genetic origins?2013In: Psicologia sociale, ISSN 1827-2517, Vol. 3, p. 313-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this review we have discussed the psycho-social literature on the relations between genetics and conservatism. After describing the ACE model, i.e. the main theoretical and methodological approach in this research field, and the main dependent variables used in the studies on this issue, we have presented some classic and some recent research showing that, in spite of a number of methodological limitations, conservatism is, at least in part, influenced by genetics. The main theoretical and political conclusions stemming from this research corpus are discussed.

  • 37.
    Spagna, Giulia
    et al.
    University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Russo, Silvia
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Roccato, Michele
    University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Necessarily positive?: coping and its individual and social consequences2014In: Psicologia Sociale, ISSN 1827-2517, Vol. 1, p. 3-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we have discussed the psychosocial literature about coping. First of all, we reviewed the leading models on coping, categorizing them according to their general approach (discriminating between models based on an individualistic and on a transactional approach) and their focus (discriminating between models focalized on problems, on emotions, on approach, on avoidance, and on meaning). Second, we discussed the main studies showing the positive and negative consequences of coping. Third, we focused on the literature on the fear of crime, in order to illustrate the complexity of the consequences of specific coping strategies both at individual and societal level.

  • 38.
    Stattin, Håkan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Hussein, Oula
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Özdemir, Metin
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Russo, Silvia
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Why do some adolescents encounter everyday events that increase their civic interest whereas others do not?2017In: Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0012-1649, E-ISSN 1939-0599, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 306-318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a longitudinal design, we asked 2 age cohorts of adolescents (15- and 18-year-olds) whether they, during the last year, had experienced events that had increased their civic interest and about details of their experiences. Based on self-determination theory, we predicted that the adolescents who reported having experienced events of this kind had already been more interested and had had more positive feelings about politics much earlier in time, and that this original interest would have increased more over time, than that of other adolescents. Second, we proposed that the adolescents who had encountered events that triggered their civic interest would have been engaged in behaviors that reflected their needs for autonomy, relatedness, and competence, much earlier in time, and that, over time, they would have increased these behaviors more than other adolescents. These 2 predictions were largely confirmed. As for the content of the events the adolescents reported, many of them concerned national and international issues experienced as threatening, and that challenged the adolescents' beliefs and morality. Overall, a previous interest in politics and engagement in exploratory behaviors that reflect the adolescents' psychological needs seem to play crucial roles in understanding why adolescents in their everyday life encounter events that trigger their civic interest. Further, the findings show that having had everyday experiences that trigger the adolescents' civic interests are associated with a later increase in political interest more broadly.

  • 39.
    Vieno, Alessio
    et al.
    Department of Developmental and Social Psychology, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.
    Lenzi, Michela
    Department of Developmental and Social Psychology, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.
    Roccato, Michele
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Russo, Silvia
    Örebro University, School of Law, Psychology and Social Work.
    Monaci, Maria Grazia
    Department of Human and Social Sciences, University of Valle d'Aosta, Aosta, Italy.
    Scacchi, Luca
    Department of Human and Social Sciences, University of Valle d'Aosta, Aosta, Italy.
    Social Capital and Fear of Crime in Adolescence: A Multilevel Study2016In: American Journal of Community Psychology, ISSN 0091-0562, E-ISSN 1573-2770, Vol. 58, no 1-2, p. 100-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hierarchical linear modeling was used to examine the relationships between social capital (at the individual, the neighborhood, and the regional levels) and adolescents' fear of crime, while controlling for the main individual (sociodemographics, television viewing, and bullying victimization), neighborhood (neighborhood size and aggregated victimization), and regional (crime rate and level of urbanization) variables. Data were analyzed using a three-level model based on 22,639 15.7-year-old (SD = 0.67) students nested within 1081 neighborhoods and 19 Italian regions. The findings revealed that individual and contextual measures of social capital, modeled at the individual, neighborhood, and regional levels simultaneously, showed negative associations with adolescents' fear of crime. Males and participants with higher family affluence were less likely to feel fear of crime, whereas victimization, both at the individual and neighborhood levels, had a positive association with fear of crime. Strengths, limitations, and potential applications of the study are discussed.

  • 40.
    Vieno, Alessio
    et al.
    Department of Developmental and Social Psychology, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.
    Roccato, Michele
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Turin, Italy.
    Russo, Silvia
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Turin, Italy.
    Is fear of crime social and economic insecurity in disguise: a multilevel multinational analysis2013In: Journal of Community and Applied Social Phychology, ISSN 1052-9284, E-ISSN 1099-1298, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 519-535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using the 2006 Eurobarometer data (representative sample of the European population, N=16306, 27 countries), we performed a multilevel analysis aimed at predicting fear of crime. A significant proportion of the variation in fear of crime was at country level. Of the individual predictors included, being a woman, being poorly educated, being unemployed, and being an urban dweller showed positive relations with fear of crime. Fear was highest among people who considered themselves to be socially marginal, among people with negative expectations regarding themselves and their country's future, and among people who considered their nation's welfare system to be unsatisfactory. Among the ecological predictors we took into consideration, nations' degree of economic inequality and low expenditure on education and on social protection showed a positive association with fear of crime, whereas the crime, immigration, and employment rates did not. Implications and limitations of this research are discussed.

  • 41.
    Vieno, Alessio
    et al.
    University of Padova, Padova, Italy.
    Roccato, Michele
    University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Russo, Silvia
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    La grande paura del crimine2012In: Psicologia Contemporanea, ISSN 0390-346X, Vol. 229, p. 62-66Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 42.
    Vieno, Alessio
    et al.
    University of Padova, Padova, Italy.
    Russo, Silvia
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    Roccato, Michele
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
    The unemployment rate moderates the relation between victimization and fear of crime2011In: Psicologia Sociale, ISSN 1827-2517, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 377-386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We aimed at explaining the «fear-victimization paradox» (the less victimized social categories show the highest levels of fear) applying multilevel analysis on an Italian national sample (N = 1.868; mean age = 41.38, SD = 16.21; 56.5% women). A crosslevel interaction highlighted that indirect victimization influenced fear of crime just for people living in high unemployment rated communities.

  • 43.
    Viola, Erica
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Turin, Italy.
    Mosso, Cristina
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Turin, Italy.
    Rutto, Filippo
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Turin, Italy.
    Russo, Silvia
    Department of Psychology, University of Torino, Turin, Italy.
    La relazione tra infraumanizzazione e ideologie sociali nei bambini: il ruolo della giustificazione del sistema2013In: InMind, ISSN 2240-2454, Vol. 4, p. 27-31Article in journal (Other academic)
1 - 43 of 43
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf