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  • 1.
    Andersson, Tommy
    et al.
    Örebro Univ Hospital, Dept Cardiology, Örebro, Sweden.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Örebro Univ Hosp, Unit Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss
    Örebro Univ Hospital, Dept. Occupational & Environmental Medicine, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fröbert, Ole
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Henriksson, Karin M.
    Lund Univ, Dept. Laboratory Medicine, Lund, Sweden; Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Edvardsson, Nils
    Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Poci, Dritan
    Örebro University Hospital.
    All-cause mortality in 272 186 patients hospitalized with incident atrial fibrillation 1995-2008: a Swedish nationwide long-term case-control study2013In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 34, no 14, 1061-1067 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims To evaluate long-term all-cause risk of mortality in women and men hospitalized for the first time with atrial fibrillation (AF) compared with matched controls. Methods and results A total of 272 186 patients (44% women) <= 85 years at the time of hospitalization with incidental AF 1995-2008 and 544 344 matched controls free of in-hospital diagnosis of AF were identified. Patients were followed via record linkage of the Swedish National Patient Registry and the Cause of Death Registry. Using Cox regression models, the long-term relative all-cause mortality risk, adjusted for concomitant diseases, in women vs. controls was 2.15, 1.72, and 1.44 (P < 0.001) in the age categories <= 65, 65-74, and 75-85 years, respectively. The corresponding figures for men were 1.76, 1.36, and 1.24 (P < 0.001). Among concomitant diseases, neoplasm, chronic renal failure, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease contributed most to the increased all-cause mortality vs. controls. In patients with AF as the primary diagnosis, the relative risk of mortality was 1.63, 1.46, and 1.28 (P < 0.001) in women and 1.45, 1.17, and 1.10 (P < 0.001) in men. Conclusion Atrial fibrillation was an independent risk factor of all-cause mortality in patients with incident AF. The concomitant diseases that contributed most were found outside the thromboembolic risk scores. The highest relative risk of mortality was seen in women and in the youngest patients compared with controls, and the differences between genders in each age category were statistically significant.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Tommy
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Örebro University Hospital. Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fröbert, Ole
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Karin M.
    Department of Medical Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Edvardsson, Nils
    Sahlgrenska Academy at Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Poci, Dritan
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Patients with atrial fibrillation and outcomes of cerebral infarction in those with treatment of warfarin versus no warfarin with references to CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score, age and sex: A Swedish nationwide observational study with 48 433 patients2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 5, e0176846Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: There is controversy in the guidelines as to whether patients with atrial fibrillation and a low risk of stroke should be treated with anticoagulation, especially those with a CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score of 1 point.

    Methods: In a retrospective, nationwide cohort study, we used the Swedish National Patient Registry, the National Prescribed Drugs Registry, the Swedish Registry of Education and the Population and Housing Census Registry. 48 433 patients were identified between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2008 with incident atrial fibrillation who were divided in age categories, sex and a CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score of 0, 1, 2 and >= 3 and they were included in a time-varying analysis of warfarin treatment versus no treatment. The primary end-point was cerebral infarction and stroke, and patients were followed until 31 December 2009.

    Results: Patients with 1 point from the CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score showed the following adjusted hazard ratios (HR) with a 95% confidence interval: men 65-74 years 0.46 (0.25-0.83), men < 65 years 1.11 (0.56-2.23) and women < 65 years 2.13 (0.94-4.82), where HR < 1 indicates protection with warfarin. In patients < 65 years and 2 points, HR in men was 0.35 (0.18-0.69) and in women 1.84 (0.86-3.94) while, in women with at least 3 points, HR was 0.31 (0.16-0.59). In patients 65-74 years and 2 points, HR in men was 0.37 (0.23-0.59) and in women 0.39 ( 0.21-0.73). Categories including age >= 65 years or >= 3 points showed a statistically significant protection from warfarin.

    Conclusions: Our results support that treatment with anticoagulation may be considered in all patients with an incident atrial fibrillation diagnosis and an age of 65 years and older, i.e. also when the CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score is 1.

  • 3. Andersson, Tommy
    et al.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Frøbert, Ole
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Cardiology, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Karin M.
    Department of Medical Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala and AstraZeneca R&D, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Edvardsson, Nils
    Sahlgrenska Academy at Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Poçi, Dritan
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Cardiology.
    Patients without comorbidities at the time of diagnosis of atrial fibrillation: causes of death during long-term follow-up compared to matched controls2017In: Clinical Cardiology, ISSN 0160-9289, E-ISSN 1932-8737Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about the long-term, cause-specific mortality risk in patients without comorbidities at the time of diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (AF).

    METHODS: From a nation-wide registry of patients hospitalized with incident AF between 1995 and 2008 we identified 9 519 patients with a first diagnosed AF and no comorbidities at the time of AF diagnosis. They were matched with 12 468 controls. The follow-up continued until December 2008. Causes of death were classified according to the ICD-10 codes.

    RESULTS: During follow-up, 11.1% of patients with AF and 8.3% of controls died. Cardiovascular diseases were the most common causes of death and the only diagnoses which showed significantly higher relative risk in patients with AF than controls (HR 2.0, 95% CI 1.8-2.3), and the relative risk was significantly higher in women than in men. Stroke was a more common cause among patients with AF, 13.1% versus 9.7% (HR 2.7, 95% CI 1.8-4.0), while cerebral hemorrhage was more common among controls, 4.7% versus 10.2% (HR 0.9, 95% CI 0.6-1.5). The time from AF diagnosis to death was 6.0 ± 3.1 years.

    CONCLUSIONS: In patients with incident AF and no known comorbidities at the time of AF diagnosis, only cardiovascular diseases were more often causes of death as compared to controls. Women carried a significantly higher relative risk than men.

  • 4.
    Björkenheim, Anna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Brandes, Axel
    Department of Cardiology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
    Andersson, Tommy
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics Unit, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Edvardsson, Nils
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Wandt, Birger
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Pedersen, Henriette Sloth
    Department of Cardiology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
    Poci, Dritan
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Dept Cardiol.
    Predictors of hospitalization for heart failure and of all-cause mortality after atrioventricular nodal ablation and right ventricular pacing for atrial fibrillation2014In: Europace, ISSN 1099-5129, E-ISSN 1532-2092, Vol. 16, no 12, 1772-1778 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Atrioventricular junction ablation (AVJA) is a highly effective treatment in patients with therapy refractory atrial fibrillation (AF) but renders the patient pacemaker dependent. We aimed to analyse the long-term incidence of hospitalization for heart failure (HF) and all-cause mortality in patients who underwent AVJA because of AF and to determine predictors for HF and mortality.

    Methods and results: We retrospectively enrolled 162 consecutive patients, mean age 67 +/- 9 years, 48% women, who underwent AVJA because of symptomatic AF refractory to pharmacological treatment (n = 117) or unsuccessful repeated pulmonary vein isolation (n = 45). Hospitalization for HF occurred in 32 (20%) patients and 35 (22%) patients died, representing a cumulative incidence for hospitalization for HF and mortality over the first 2 years after AVJA of 9.1 and 5.2%, respectively. Hospitalization for HF occurred to the same extent in patients who failed pharmacological treatment as in patients with repeated pulmonary vein isolation (PVI), although the mortality was slightly higher in the former group. QRS prolongation >= 120 ms and left atrial diameter were independent predictors of hospitalization for HF, while hypertension and previous HF were independent predictors of death.

    Conclusion: The long-term hospitalization rate for HF and all-cause mortality was low, which implies that long-term ventricular pacing was not harmful in this patient population, including patients with unsuccessful repeated PVI.

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