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  • 1.
    Abalo, Ernesto
    School of Education and Communication, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Through Eurocentric logics: The construction of difference in foreign news discourse on Venezuela2016In: Journal of Language and Politics, ISSN 1569-2159, E-ISSN 1569-9862, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 94-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to explore the construction of difference in foreign news discourse on culturally similar but politically different non-Western subjects. Applying critical discourse analysis (CDA) together with a critique of Eurocentrism, the study examines difference in newspaper constructions of government supporters and oppositional groups in Venezuela. Discursive differences are evident in the strategies used for constructing the two groups with regard to political rationality and violence. Government supporters are associated with social justice, Venezuela's poor, dogmatic behavior, and the use of political violence. The opposition, in contrast, is constructed as following a Western democratic rationale that stresses anti-authoritarianism. This group is primarily associated with victims of violence. While the opposition is conveyed as being compatible with Eurocentric values and practices, government supporters to great extent deviate from these norms. Such constructions serve to legitimize politico-ideological undercurrents of Eurocentrism, as the defense of liberalism.

  • 2.
    Ekström, Mats
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Power and affiliation in presidential press conferences: A study on interruptions, jokes and laughter2009In: Journal of Language and Politics, ISSN 1569-2159, E-ISSN 1569-9862, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 386-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Presidential press conference is an enduring form for public interrogations. Interaction in this context regulates and symbolizes relations of power, autonomy and affiliation between the President and the journalists. A general argument is that we have to study sequences of interaction in order to understand the roles and relations established in press conferences. The article investigates interruptions, and jokes and laughter. The study is based on Conversation Analysis and the data encompasses 19 press conferences held by George W Bush from 2005-2007. The analysis shows how the President uses interruptions in order to control the allocation of turns, disagree and reject criticism, demonstrate certainty and conviction, and makes joke with the journalists. Sequences of jokes and laughter strengthen the interactive power of the President, create affiliations, and questioning the expected neutrality of journalism.

  • 3.
    Eriksson, Göran
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Humour, ridicule and the de-legitmization of the working class in Swedish Reality Television2016In: Journal of Language and Politics, ISSN 1569-2159, E-ISSN 1569-9862, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 304-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on tools from Multimodal Critical Discourse Analysis this paper analyses the editing techniques in a Swedish docu-soap showing that humour is used to ridicule the working-class participants, representing them as slow, inflexible, undynamic and unstylish. The paper places this within broader discursive shifts in Sweden where the rise of neoliberalism requires a dismantling of the welfare state, legitimized partly though establishing the lower social economic groups as morally flawed and themselves responsible for their increasingly disadvantaged situation as social inequalities increase.

  • 4.
    Karlsson, Martin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Åström, Joachim
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Social media and political communication: Innovation and normalisation in parallel2018In: Journal of Language and Politics, ISSN 1569-2159, E-ISSN 1569-9862, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 305-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the Internet has come to play a greater role in politics, there has been a growing scholarly interest in how digital and social media are changing politics. The competition between the innovation and normalization hypotheses has been at the center of the debate. This article sets out to identify evidence of innovation and normalization in terms of how politicians communicate in- and the level of influence they are attaining within the political blogosphere. The analyses conducted show paradoxical results as we find that those groups of politicians who are utilizing political communication in the blogosphere in more innovative and progressive ways – mirroring the hopes and expectations about how social media might influence politicians and political communication – have weaker positions within the blog network compared to other politicians. 

  • 5.
    Kroon Lundell, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The fragility of visuals: How politicians manage their mediated visibility in the press2010In: Journal of Language and Politics, ISSN 1569-2159, E-ISSN 1569-9862, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 219-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims at understanding how politicians of both genders who are constantly in the media relate to, and manage, their mediated visibility. I assume that politicians who are constantly subject to visual exposure need to manage their experienced lack of control by developing various strategies in order to feel more empowered than perhaps is possible given the media's power of framing their political personas. Six Swedish politicians in prominent positions were interviewed qualitatively using open-ended questions relating to their views on press photographers, the role of visuals and personal experiences of being visualised in the press. It was found that the politicians develop both manifest counter-strategies as well as more latent, reflexive ones which all imply an unwillingness to submit to the media's visual framing power.

  • 6.
    Kroon, Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Angus, Daniel
    School of Communication and Arts, School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, University of Queensland, Brisbane QLD, Australia.
    Microphone pokes as prank or political action?: Challenges to politicians' visibility in the age of web TV2018In: Journal of Language and Politics, ISSN 1569-2159, E-ISSN 1569-9862, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 222-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The production of political talk is changing in response to ongoing changes in the overall media ecology. The rise of web TV challenges the previously dominant mediated politics of traditional broadcasting. In this paper we examine the practices of the mediatization of politics in the web TV environment via a humorous encounter between a self-declared “prankster” posing as a web TV broadcaster, and several Swedish politicians. The discussion reflects on various data emanating from this encounter to reveal how Web TV challenges traditional broadcasting norms, and offers fresh challenges for politicians who are continuously adapting to new media logics for exposure.

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  • 7.
    Krzyzanowski, Michal
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    International leadership re-/constructed?: Ambivalence and heterogeneity of identity discourses in European Union’s policy on climate change2015In: Journal of Language and Politics, ISSN 1569-2159, E-ISSN 1569-9862, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 110-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses European Union policy discourses on climate change from the point of view of constructions of identity. Articulated in a variety of policy-related genres, the EU rhetoric on climate change is approached as example of the Union’s international discourse, which, contrary to other areas of EU policy-making, relies strongly on discursive frameworks of international and global politics of climate change. As the article shows, the EU’s peculiar international – or even global – leadership in tackling the climate change is constructed in an ambivalent and highly heterogeneous discourse that runs along several vectors. While it on the one hand follows the more recent, inward-looking constructions of Europe known from the EU policy and political discourses of the 1990s and 2000s, it also revives some of the older discursive logics of international competition known from the earlier stages of the European integration. In the analysis, the article draws on the methodological apparatus of the Discourse-Historical Approach (DHA) in Critical Discourse Studies. Furthering the DHA studies of EU policy and political discourses, the article emphasises the viability of the discourse-historical methodology applied in the combined analysis of EU identity and policy discourses.

  • 8.
    Krzyzanowski, Michal
    Department of Linguistics and English Language, Lancaster University, UK.
    "My European feelings are not only based on the fact that I live in Europe": On the new mechanisms in European and national identification patterns emerging under the influence of EU Enlargement2003In: Journal of Language and Politics, ISSN 1569-2159, E-ISSN 1569-9862, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 175-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identity has recently become one of the most frequently theorised and explored topics within various sub-branches of social sciences. Collective identities in general, and their ancestry and construction in particular, are being perceived in different ways by historians, anthropologists, sociologists, political scientists and, last but not least, discourse-analysts. This article aims at shedding a new light on the concept of European identity, which, so far, has been most frequently analysed within the context of the European Union and its political and economic impact on European space. Despite drawing theoretically on some well-grounded traditions of research on European identity, such as, e.g., analysis of its contradiction and suplementariness with national identities, or, its interconnection with such concepts as European citizenship or European integration, the analysis of European identity presented here is put in the context of globally understood identification processes. Empirically, the article draws on the analysis of TV talk show thematically bound by the topics concerning European Union’s impact on national identities.

  • 9.
    Krzyzanowski, Michal
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Social media in/and the politics of the European Union: Politico-organizational communication, institutional cultures, and self-inflicted elitism2018In: Journal of Language and Politics, ISSN 1569-2159, E-ISSN 1569-9862, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 281-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper looks at how social/online media - using the example of Twitter - are used in the politico-organizational communication of the European Union at a time when it faces multiple crises and is in acute need of effectively communicating its politics to the European demos. Proposing a critical discourse framework for the analysis of the politico-organizational use of Twitter, the paper shows that while, to some extent, bringing change or 'modernization' to EU political communication patterns, social/online media help in sustaining some of the deep-seated dispositions in EU communicative and organizational practices as well as political discourses. As deployed by the EU's - and specifically the European Commission's - spokesperson service, social/online help in solidifying some of the controversial patterns in EU political communication. They also bring in other, more contemporary, challenges as regards using Twitter and social media as parts of political and institutional/organizational communication.

  • 10.
    Krzyzanowski, Michal
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Department of Communication and Media, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Ledin, Per
    Dept. of Culture and Learning, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Uncivility on the web: Populism in/and the borderline discourses of exclusion2017In: Journal of Language and Politics, ISSN 1569-2159, E-ISSN 1569-9862, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 566-581Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the connection between the rise of new types of online uncivil discourses and the recent success of populism. While discussions on the upsurge of populism have centred on institutionalised politics and politicians, only limited attention has been paid to how the success of the former and the latter was propelled by developments outside of the political realm narrowly conceived. Our interest is therefore in the rise of uncivil society, especially on the web, and in its 'borderline discourse' at the verge of civil and uncivil ideas, ideologies and norms. Those discourses - showcased here on the example of the language on immigration/refugees in Austria and Sweden - have been using civil-to- uncivil shifts in the discursive representations of society and politics. They have progressively 'normalised' the anti- pluralist views across many European public spheres on a par with nativist and exclusionary views now widely propagated by right-wing populist politics in Europe and beyond.

  • 11.
    Krzyzanowski, Michal
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Tucker, Joshua A.
    New York University, New York, USA.
    Re/constructing politics through social & online media: Discourses, ideologies, and mediated political practices2018In: Journal of Language and Politics, ISSN 1569-2159, E-ISSN 1569-9862, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 141-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, the connection between online and in particular social media and politics has become one of the central ones in contemporary societies, and has been explored very widely in political research and media and communication studies. Against such growing body of research, this Special Issue foregrounds the role of language as a key carrier of political ideologies and practices on social and online media. It aims to advance the scholarly understanding of contemporary political and democratic dynamics by postulating the need for a broader, problem-driven look at how political practices and ideologies are articulated on social and online media. It illustrates the value of a cross-disciplinary take that allows overcoming both the classic (e.g. qualitative vs. quantitative) and the more recent (e.g. small vs. big data) divides in explorations of the language of online and politics.

  • 12.
    Ledin, Per
    et al.
    School of Culture and Learning, Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Machin, David
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Strategic diagrams and the technologization of culture2016In: Journal of Language and Politics, ISSN 1569-2159, E-ISSN 1569-9862, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 322-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Strategic diagrams are becoming ubiquitous across all forms of social practices, used to map out core elements and processes in private and public institutions and also for more localized and individual activities - where, for example, so that it reads: where, for example, early years school children can manage attitudinal goals. These are easy to produce with cheap software providing templates and tools to do so. This paper shows how these diagrams must be placed in the ideological shift to neoliberal governance with its emphasis on the market, flexibility and competition. All things and processes, however intangible, are viewed as assets with simple cause-effect relations, to be converted into tangible outcomes and maximised outputs. Taking a multimodal critical discourse analysis approach, we analyse two cases, from a university and an early-years school.

  • 13.
    Machin, David
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Van Leeuwen, Theo
    Department of Language and Communication, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
    Multimodality, politics and ideology2016In: Journal of Language and Politics, ISSN 1569-2159, E-ISSN 1569-9862, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 243-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This journal's editorial statement is clear that political discourse should be studied not only as regards parliamentary type politics. In this introduction we argue precisely for the need to pay increasing attention to the way that political ideologies are infused into culture more widely, in entertainments media, software, administrative processes, children's apps, healthcare and even office furniture design. We point to the way that there have been massive shifts away from traditional state forms of politics to the rule of neoliberalism and the power of the corporation which, like the former regime of power, requires meanings and identities which can hold them in place. We explain the processes by which critical multimodal discourse analysis can best draw out this ideology as it is realized through different semiotics resources.

  • 14.
    Moberg, Ulla
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Eriksson, Göran
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Managing ideological differences in joint political press conferences: a study of the strategic use of the personal pronoun 'we'2013In: Journal of Language and Politics, ISSN 1569-2159, E-ISSN 1569-9862, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 315-334Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Wodak, Ruth
    et al.
    Department of Linguistics and English, Lancaster University, County College South, Lancaster, United Kingdom.
    Krzyzanowski, Michal
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Department of Communication and Media, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom.
    Right-wing populism in Europe & USA: Contesting politics & discourse beyond ‘Orbanism’ and ‘Trumpism’2017In: Journal of Language and Politics, ISSN 1569-2159, E-ISSN 1569-9862, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 471-484Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years and months, new information about the rise of right-wing populist parties (RWPs) in Europe and the USA has dominated the news and caused an election scare among mainstream institutions and politicians. The unpredictable successes of populists (e.g. Donald Trump in the USA in 2016) have by now transformed anxieties into legitimate apprehension and fear. This Special Issue addresses the recent sudden upsurge of right- wing populism. It responds to many recent challenges and a variety of ' discursive shifts and wider dynamics of media and public discourses that have taken place as a result of the upswing of right- wing populism (RWP) across Europe and beyond. We examine not only the nature or the state-of-the-art of contemporary RWP but also point to its ontology within and beyond the field of politics and argue that the rise and success of RWP is certainly not a recent or a momentary phenomenon.

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