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  • 1.
    Asp, Filip
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Cochlear Implants M43, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of ENT-Head Neck Surgery, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Karltorp, Eva
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Cochlear Implants M43, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Harder, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of ENT-Head Neck Surgery, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hergils, Leif
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of ENT-Head Neck Surgery, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Eskilsson, Gunnar
    Department of Cochlear Implants, M43, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    A longitudinal study of the bilateral benefit in children with bilateral cochlear implants2015In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 77-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To study the development of the bilateral benefit in children using bilateral cochlear implants by measurements of speech recognition and sound localization.

    DESIGN: Bilateral and unilateral speech recognition in quiet, in multi-source noise, and horizontal sound localization was measured at three occasions during a two-year period, without controlling for age or implant experience. Longitudinal and cross-sectional analyses were performed. Results were compared to cross-sectional data from children with normal hearing.

    STUDY SAMPLE: Seventy-eight children aged 5.1-11.9 years, with a mean bilateral cochlear implant experience of 3.3 years and a mean age of 7.8 years, at inclusion in the study. Thirty children with normal hearing aged 4.8-9.0 years provided normative data.

    RESULTS: For children with cochlear implants, bilateral and unilateral speech recognition in quiet was comparable whereas a bilateral benefit for speech recognition in noise and sound localization was found at all three test occasions. Absolute performance was lower than in children with normal hearing. Early bilateral implantation facilitated sound localization.

    CONCLUSIONS: A bilateral benefit for speech recognition in noise and sound localization continues to exist over time for children with bilateral cochlear implants, but no relative improvement is found after three years of bilateral cochlear implant experience.

  • 2.
    Bergemalm, Per-Olof
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Nursing and Caring Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Appearances are deceptive?: Long-term cognitive and central auditory sequelae from closed head injury2005In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 39-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present study was to examine possible signs of long-term cognitive and/or central auditory sequelae seven to eleven years after a closed head injury (CHI) of sufficient severity to cause scull fracture and/or brain contusion. Another purpose was that this investigation should be carried out in a group of recovered trauma victims with, to the individual, no known or minimal sequelae. A computer-based set of five cognitive tests and three central auditory tests were used in a group of formerly brain-injured patients who considered themselves as well recovered. Most of the participants did not report any signs of cognitive or auditory impairment. Tests of working memory capacity, verbal information processing speed, phonological processing and verbal inference-making ability were used. Auditory brain response (ABR), distorted speech audiometry (interrupted speech), and phase audiometry were used to test central auditory function. The initial severity of brain damage, i.e. status when the patient arrived at the emergency ward, was estimated with Swedish Reaction Level Scale (RLS). Cognitive shortcomings after CHI were demonstrated in a high percentage (59%, 13/22) of the cases seven to eleven years after the injury. Central auditory processing disorders (APD) were also demonstrated in a fairly high percentage (58%, 11/19) of the subjects. None of the correlations between RLS and the results on cognitive and central auditory tests reached statistical significance. However, there was a correlation between cognitive performance and the results on the central auditory tests used in this investigation. Eighty percent (8/10) of those participants with pathologies on ABR and/or phase audiometry and/or IS also failed on one or more of the cognitive tasks, compared to 44% (4/9) among those with no signs of APD. It is possible, many years after CHI, to observe cognitive shortcomings and APD in a relatively high percentage of CHI cases that are subjectively considered to be fairly well recovered. The cognitive tasks used in the study have proved to be a sensitive method to discover cognitive impairments. Long-term cognitive sequelae and APD could not be predicted from RLS scores.

  • 3.
    Borg, Erik
    et al.
    Audiol Res Ctr, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Borg, Birgitta
    Audiol Res Ctr, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    New perspectives on counselling in audiological habilitation/rehabilitation2015In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 11-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To develop and apply a pedagogical method focusing on Empowerment, Empathy, Competence, and Counselling: the EC programme, and to present an initial evaluation. Design: The EC programme was gradually developed within a study circle framework and in dialogue with study circle leaders and participants (clients) with hearing impairment (HI). An evaluation was carried out with the study circle leaders. Study sample : Seventeen upper secondary school students with HI took part in the development of the programme. Eighteen study circle leaders responded to a questionnaire. Results: The EC programme developed consisted of films, CD, and DVD productions to increase insight into one's own hearing ability, to demonstrate for others what HI means, strategies to evaluate situations, and help to act constructively in social situations. The study circle leaders found most of the course material appropriate and easy to use, as a whole or in parts. The leaders' evaluations indicated that the clients had increased their knowledge about how the HI affected themselves and others. The clients had improved their self-confidence and their empathic view of others. Conclusion: The EC programme can be used in its entirety or in part. Participation may lead to increased empowerment, empathy, competence and counselling ability.

  • 4. Borg, Erik
    et al.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Borg, Birgitta
    Behavioural awareness, interaction and counselling education in audiological rehabilitation: development of methods and application in a pilot study2002In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 308-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In conventional audiological rehabilitation, the hearing therapist interacts with the hearing-impaired person and with significant others. In order to strengthen the personality and self-confidence of the hearing-impaired individual, a different strategy was designed and implemented whereby the pedagogic interaction was directed only towards the hearing-impaired individual, who in turn worked as a tutor/aid/counsellor to the communication partner. On the basis of an interactive communication model, new methods for rehabilitation of subjects with moderate hearing impairment were developed and evaluated in a pilot study on 13 men with noise-induced hearing loss. A course programme was developed with three main active components: (1) increased insight and knowledge; (2) education as counsellors with the ability to focus on the problems of the communication partner; and (3) motivation to change through group discussion and reflexive conversation. Increased insight and knowledge were obtained through test and training experiences in a sound environmental chamber, tutorials and discussions. The pedagogic training focused on helping the hearing-impaired subjects to become able communication counsellors in relation to their interlocutors. An act-react, offensive-defensive paradigm was used in conjunction with transactional analysis. Results of the pilot study were evaluated using questionnaires, interviews and a method of dialogue analysis. The results were evaluated for the hearing-impaired and the partner and in recordings of conversations in the home environment. There were clearly positive cognitive and emotional effects seen in the inquiries and interviews. The observations from the dialogue analysis indicated only small effects, with the exception of the two individuals with the most pronounced functional impairment, for whom dialogue was improved after the course. It was concluded that these new methods could contribute new possibilities in rehabilitation programmes, emphasizing the shared responsibility for communication and the unique competence and abilities of the hearing-impaired person.

  • 5.
    Brunnberg, Elinor
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Linden Boström, Margareta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Berglund, Mats
    Tinnitus and hearing loss in 15-16-year-old students: mental health symptoms, substance use, and exposure in school2008In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 47, no 11, p. 688-694Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study assessed the responses from a survey titled ”Life and Health – Young People 2005”, completed by 2.878 15-16 year-old adolescents in mainstream schools in the county of Örebro, Sweden. Thirty-nine percent of students with hearing loss (slight, mild, or moderate) and 6% of students with normal hearing reported tinnitus often or always during the past three months. Almost no gender difference was observed among students with normal hearing reporting tinnitus (boys 6.3%, girls 5.6%); however, a gender difference was noticed among hard-of-hearing (HH) students (boys 50%, girls 28%). Adolescents with both hearing loss and tinnitus reported considerably higher scores for mental symptoms, substance use, and school problems than other students. Anxiety in the past three months, male gender, and alcohol consumption in the past year were associated with tinnitus in HH students; irritation and anxiety in the past three months, disability, use of illicit drugs, and truancy predicted tinnitus in the normal hearing group. Consequently, students with a hearing loss and tinnitus are at high risk and should be monitored for subsequent problems.

  • 6. Brännström, Jonas
    et al.
    Båsjö, Sara
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Larsson, Josefina
    Lood, Sofie
    Lundå, Stefan
    Notsten, Margareta
    Turunen Taheri, Satu
    Psychosocial work environment among Swedish audiologists2013In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 151-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The study examined the self-reported psychosocial work environment for audiologists working in three practice types (public, completely private, and private but publicly funded).

    Design: A cross-sectional e-mail survey using the demand-control-support questionnaire, a short version of the effort-reward imbalance (ERI) questionnaire, and descriptive data.

    Study sample: Five-hundred Swedish licensed audiologists.

    Results: Overall, the results indicate differences in psychosocial work environment pertaining to the practice types. These differences are small and the type explains few percent of the variability accounted in the measures of psychosocial work environment. Social support seems important for the psychosocial work environment and is considered a reward in itself. Using the demand-control model, 29% of the audiologists reported working in a high-stress psychosocial work environment. Using the ERI-ratio to estimate the imbalance between effort and reward it was shown that that 86% of the participants experienced an unfavorable work situation where the rewards do not correspond to the efforts made.

    Conclusions: The organizational framework has minor effect on self-reported psychosocial work environment for Swedish licensed audiologists. The percentage of unfavorable ERI-ratios seen in Swedish audiologists seems conspicuously high compared to other working populations in general, but also compared to other health service workers.

  • 7.
    Båsjö, Sara
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; HEAD Graduate School, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Widén, Stephen
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Jutengran, Göran
    School of Health Sciences, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Kähäri, Kim
    Division of Audiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Hearing thresholds, tinnitus, and headphone listening habits in nine-year-old children2016In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 55, no 10, p. 587-596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Investigate hearing function and headphone listening habits in nine-year-old Swedish children. Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted and included otoscopy, tympanometry, pure-tone audiometry, and spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAE). A questionnaire was used to evaluate headphone listening habits, tinnitus, and hyperacusis. Study sample: A total of 415 children aged nine years.

    Results: The prevalence of a hearing threshold 20 dB HL at one or several frequencies was 53%, and the hearing thresholds at 6 and 8 kHz were higher than those at the low and mid frequencies. SOAEs were observed in 35% of the children, and the prevalence of tinnitus was 5.3%. No significant relationship between SOAE and tinnitus was found. Pure-tone audiometry showed poorer hearing thresholds in children with tinnitus and in children who regularly listened with headphones.

    Conclusion: The present study of hearing, listening habits, and tinnitus in nine-year old children is, to our knowledge, the largest study so far. The main findings were that hearing thresholds in the right ear were poorer in children who used headphones than in children not using them, which could be interpreted as headphone listening may have negative consequences to children’s hearing. Children with tinnitus showed poorer hearing thresholds compared to children without tinnitus.

  • 8.
    Carlsson, Per-Inge
    et al.
    ENT-clinic, Central Hospital, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Hall, Malin
    Lind, Karl-Johan
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Quality of life, psychosocial consequences and audiological rehabilitation after sudden sensorineural hearing loss2011In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 139-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) is characterized by a rapid loss of hearing, most often of cochlear origin. Very little attention has been paid in the literature to quality of life (QoL), psychosocial consequences and audiological rehabilitation after SSHL.

    DESIGN:

    We studied how level of hearing loss, hearing recovery, tinnitus and vertigo affect QoL after SSHL and the psychosocial consequences of SSHL in terms of sick leave. Furthermore, the audiological rehabilitation given to patients in connection with SSHL and the benefit of the rehabilitation were studied.

    STUDY SAMPLE:

    Three hundred and sixty-nine (369) patients with SSHL were analysed in the present study.

    RESULTS:

    Annoying tinnitus and remaining vertigo after SSHL were the strongest predictors of negative effects on QoL.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The study indicates that patients with SSHL require extended audiological rehabilitation including a multi-disciplinary rehabilitation approach (medical, social and psychological) to cope with the complex issues that can arise after SSHL.

  • 9. Dahlin Redfors, Ylva
    et al.
    Hellgren, Johan
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital.
    Hearing-aid use and benefit: a long-term follow-up in patients undergoing surgery for otosclerosis2013In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 194-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aims of the study were to assess hearing-aid uptake in patients with otosclerosis 28-30 years after stapedectomy and to evaluate hearing-aid benefit to users.

    Design: A retrospective study was performed; it included a review of medical records and follow-up 28-30 years after surgery, including audiometry, clinical examination, structured interview, and a validated questionnaire, IOI-HA.

    Study sample: Sixty-five patients, who had undergone stapedectomy at a tertiary referral center in 1977-79. Results: In 95% of the subjects there was a theoretical need for hearing-aid amplification at follow-up; 46% of the subjects had no hearing aids, while 26% had unilateral and 28% bilateral hearing aids. Hearing sensitivity in the best ear predicted hearing-aid uptake. Of the subjects with a hearing aid, 94% were everyday users and 54% were full-time users (> 8 hours/day). The subjects reported a high level of satisfaction (mean 4.5) and benefit (mean 4.2), but also residual activity limitations (mean 3.1).

    Conclusions: The study shows that there is an unmet need for long-term hearing rehabilitation among patients previously undergoing surgery for otosclerosis. The patients who were using hearing aids were generally very satisfied with their hearing aids, but they still reported residual activity limitations.

  • 10.
    Dahlin Redfors, Ylva
    et al.
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Clinical Science, Sahl grenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olaison, Sara
    Audiological Research Center, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; School of Medicine and Health Science, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute of Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Örebro University Hospital. Centre for Health Care Sciences Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; School of Medicine and Health Science, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden .
    Hellgren, Johan
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Clinical Science, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hearing-related, health-related quality of life in patients who have undergone otosclerosis surgery: a long-term follow-up study2015In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 63-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aims of the study were to assess health-related quality of life and hearing-related disability in subjects with otosclerosis 30 years after surgery.

    Design: An observational study was performed. Medical records were reviewed, a clinical examination as well as audiometric assessments were performed. Generic health-related quality of life was assessed by the SF-36v2 and hearing disability by a shortened version of SSQ (speech spatial and qualities of hearing scale).

    Study sample: Sixty-fi ve individuals, who had undergone stapedectomy in 1977-79 at a tertiary referral center.

    Results: Generic health-related quality of life according to SF-36 subscale scores was comparable to that of an age- and sex-matched reference population. The SF-36 mental component summary score (MCS) was, however, significantly better than that of the reference population. The mental and physical summary component scores correlated significantly to hearing disability measured by the SSQ but not to hearing impairment. Hearing disability was displayed in all SSQ sub-scores, especially in more complex listening situations and in the localization of sounds.

    Conclusions: This study shows that individuals with otosclerosis, 30 years after surgery, have a good generic health-related quality of life, despite moderate to severe hearing loss and significant hearing disabilities.

  • 11.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Different approaches in the assessment of audiological rehabilitation: a meta-theoretical perspective2003In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 42, no Suppl 1, p. S112-S117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to highlight some elements (e.g. the view on truth, causality, context and methods) in three different meta-theoretical approaches to assessment and to discuss their implications: external realism, critical realism, and anti-realism. Although there are many differences between external realism and anti-realism, their main shortcoming is the failure to answer one of the basic questions in assessment research: 'What works for whom in what circumstances?' In order to answer this question, one needs a deep-structure ontology and a theory including mechanisms and contexts, which one finds in critical realism. An adequate approach to an evaluation process can be described as follows. The point of departure is a theory describing how mechanisms work in context and what the expected outcomes are. Hypotheses are formulated suggesting answers to the question 'What might work for whom in what circumstances? Data are collected in order to answer the question. Different methods are used which can shed light on the phenomenon. The outcome of the evaluation process is to find the conditions under which a specific outcome is produced.

  • 12.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Institutet för Handikappvetenskap.
    The role of communication partners in the audiological rehabilitation2018In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 57, p. 558-559Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Danermark, Berth
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Cieza, Alarcos
    Inst Hlth & Rehabil Sci, ICF Res Branch, WHO CC FIC, Univ Munich, Munich, Germany.
    Gangé, Jean-Pierre
    Inst Univ Geriatrie Montreal, Ecole Orthophonie & Audiol, Univ Montreal, Montreal PQ, Canada.
    Gimigliano, Francesca
    Dept Audiol & Speech Sci, Univ Naples 2, Naples, Italy.
    Granberg, Sarah
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Hickson, Louise
    Sch Hlth & Rehabil Sci, Commun Disabil Ctr, Univ Queensland, Brisbane Qld, Australia.
    Kramer, Sophia
    Med Ctr, Dept ENT Audiol, EMGO Inst Hlth & Care Res, Vrije, Univ Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    McPherson, Bradley
    Ctr Commun Disorders, Univ Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Möller, Claes
    Centre for Audiological Research, The University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Russo, Ieda
    Programa Estudos Posgrad Fonoaudiol, Pontificia Univ Catolica Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Strömgren, Jan Peter
    Nottwil & Seminar Hlth Sci & Hlth Policy, Univ Lucerne, Luzern, Switzerland.
    Stucki, Gerold
    Nottwil & Seminar Hlth Sci & Hlth Policy, Univ Lucerne, Luzern, Switzerland.
    Swanepoel, DeWet
    Dept Commun Pathol, Univ Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa; Callier Ctr Commun Disorders, Univ Texas Dallas, Dallas TX, USA.
    International classification of functioning, disability, and health core sets for hearing loss: A discussion paper and invitation2010In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 256-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) has adopted a multifactorial understanding of functioning and disability, merging a biomedical paradigm with a social paradigm into a wider understanding of human functioning. Altogether there are more than 1400 ICF-categories describing different aspects of human functioning and there is a need to developing short lists of ICF categories to facilitate use of the classification scheme in clinical practice. To our knowledge, there is currently no such standard measuring instrument to facilitate a common validated way of assessing the effects of hearing loss on the lives of adults. The aim of the project is the development of an internationally accepted, evidence-based, reliable, comprehensive and valid ICF Core Sets for Hearing Loss. The processes involved in this project are described in detail and the authors invite stakeholders, clinical experts and persons with hearing loss to actively participate in the development process.

  • 14.
    Danermark, Berth D.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Deafblindness, ontological security, and social recognition2008In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 47, no s2, p. s119-s123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trust, ontological security, and social recognition are discussed in relation to self-identity among people with acquired deafblindness. To date the phenomenon has not been elaborated in the context of deafblindness. When a person with deafblindness interacts with the social and material environment, the reliability, constancy, and predictability of his or her relations is crucial for maintaining or achieving ontological security or a general and fairly persistent feeling of well-being. When these relations fundamentally change, the impact on ontological security will be very negative. The construction of social recognition through the interaction between the self and others is embodied across three dimensions: at the individual level, at the legal systems level, and at the normative or value level. The relationship between trust and ontological security on the one hand and social recognition on the other hand is discussed. It is argued that these basic processes affecting personality development have to be identified and acknowledged in the interactions people with deafblindness experience. Some implications for the rehabilitation of people with acquired deafblindness are presented and illustrated.

  • 15.
    Danermark, Berth
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Gellerstedt, Lotta
    Psychosocial work environment, hearing impairment and health2004In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 43, no 7, p. 383-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article summarizes results from a study of hearingimpaired men and women in the labour force in Sweden. A questionnaire about psychosocial work environment (in accordance with the Demand-Control Model), health and wellbeing was sent out and answered by 445 hearingimpaired people, 20-64 years of age. A large reference group had previously answered the same questionnaire. The results indicate that imbalances between demand and control (i.e. high demand and low control, so-called high stress work type) is more common among hearingimpaired people than in the reference group. The outcome of the combination high demand and low control among hearing-impaired people is (much) worse than among hearing-impaired people with other work types ( passive, active, low stress). Hearing-impaired people with the high-stress work type more frequently report bad physical health status and psychological wellbeing regarding a number of indicators. There is, moreover, a tendency for women to be worse off than men. Our data suggest that those involved in audiological rehabilitation should pay great attention to hearing-impaired people with jobs that can be characterized as high stress.

  • 16.
    Germundsson, Per
    et al.
    The Department of Social Work, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX, USA; Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning , Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; Audiology India, Mysore, India; Department of Speech and Hearing, School of Allied Health Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal, India.
    Ratinaud, Pierre
    LERASS Laboratory, University of Toulouse, Toulouse, France.
    Tympas, Aristotle
    Department of History and Philosophy of Science, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Patterns in the social representation of "hearing loss" across countries: how do demographic factors influence this representation?2018In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 57, no 12, p. 925-932Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to understand patterns in the social representation of hearing loss reported by adults across different countries and explore the impact of different demographic factors on response patterns. The study used a cross-sectional survey design. Data were collected using a free association task and analysed using qualitative content analysis, cluster analysis and chi-square analysis. The study sample included 404 adults (18 years and over) in the general population from four countries (India, Iran, Portugal and UK). The cluster analysis included 380 responses out of 404 (94.06%) and resulted in five clusters. The clusters were named: (1) individual aspects; (2) aetiology; (3) the surrounding society; (4) limitations and (5) exposed. Various demographic factors (age, occupation type, education and country) showed an association with different clusters, although country of origin seemed to be associated with most clusters. The study results suggest that how hearing loss is represented in adults in general population varies and is mainly related to country of origin. These findings strengthen the argument about cross-cultural differences in perception of hearing loss, which calls for a need to make necessary accommodations while developing public health strategies about hearing loss.

  • 17.
    Granberg, Sarah
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Centre, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; HEAD Graduate School, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Jennie
    Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Kähäri, Kim
    Division of Audiology, Institution for Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    The ICF Core Sets for hearing loss - researcher perspective. Part I: Systematic review of outcome measures identified in audiological research2014In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 65-76Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To review the literature in order to identify outcome measures used in research on adults with hearing loss (HL) as part of the ICF Core Sets development project, and to describe study and population characteristics of the reviewed studies.

    Design: A systematic review methodology was applied using multiple databases. A comprehensive search was conducted and two search pools were created, pool I and pool II.

    Study sample: The study population included adults (>= 18 years of age) with HL and oral language as the primary mode of communication.

    Results: 122 studies were included. Outcome measures were distinguished by 'instrument type', and 10 types were identified. In total, 246 (pool I) and 122 (pool II) different measures were identified, and only approximately 20% were extracted twice or more. Most measures were related to speech recognition. Fifty-one different questionnaires were identified. Many studies used small sample sizes, and the sex of participants was not revealed in several studies.

    Conclusion: The low prevalence of identified measures reflects a lack of consensus regarding the optimal outcome measures to use in audiology. Reflections and discussions are made in relation to small sample sizes and the lack of sex differentiation/descriptions within the included articles.

  • 18.
    Granberg, Sarah
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Centre, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; HEAD Graduate School, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Skagerstrand, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; HEAD Graduate School, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Centre, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    The ICF Core Sets for hearing loss: researcher perspective, Part II: Linking outcome measures to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF)2014In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 77-87Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To link outcome measures used in audiological research to the ICF classification and thereby describe audiological research from the ICF perspective.

    Design: Through a peer-reviewed or a joint linking procedure, link outcome measures to the ICF classification system using standardized ICF linking rules. Additional linking rules were developed in combination with the established rules to overcome difficulties when connecting audiological data to ICF. Absolute and relative frequencies of ICF categories were reported.

    Study sample: The identified outcome measures from the previous study (Part I) constituted the empirical material. Results: In total, 285 ICF categories were identified. The most prevalent categories were related to listening, hearing functions, auditory perceptions, emotions and the physical environment, such as noise and hearing aids. Categories related to communication showed lower relative frequencies, as did categories related to the social and attitudinal environment.

    Conclusions: Based on the linked outcome measures, communication as a research topic is subordinated to other research topics. The same conclusion can be drawn for research targeting the social and attitudinal environment of adults with HL. Difficulties in the linking procedure were highlighted and discussed, and suggestions for future revisions of the ICF from the audiological perspective were described.

  • 19.
    Granberg, Sarah
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; HEAD Graduate School, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Pronk, Marieke
    Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Audiology Section, Vrije University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Swanepoel, De Wet
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa; Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia; Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, Australia.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Audiology Section, Vrije University Medical Center, EMGO, Institute for Health and Care Research, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Hagsten, Hanna
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hjaldahl, Jennie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    The ICF core sets for hearing loss project: Functioning and disability from the patient perspective2014In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 11, p. 777-786Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore areas of functioning, disability, and environmental factors of adults with hearing loss (HL) by using the ICF classification as a tool to determine and document each element. Design: A qualitative study applying mainly focus-group methodology was applied.

    Study sample: Thirty-six Dutch and South African adults (18 years of age) with HL (20–95 dB HL) who used oral communication as first communication. Summative content analysis was performed on the transcripts by linkage to appropriate ICF categories.

    Results: 143 ICF categories were identified, most of which belonged to the Activities & Participation (d) component, closely followed by the Environmental factors component. Participants specifically mentioned categories related to oral communication and interaction. Assistive technology (such as hearing aids), noise, and support by and attitudes of others in the environment of the participants were considered highly influential for functioning and disability.

    Conclusions: The present study illustrates the complex and encompassing nature of aspects involved in functioning and disability of adults with HL. Findings highlight the necessity of using a multidimensional tool, such as the ICF, to map functioning and disability with hearing loss, allowing consideration and evaluation of aspects that are both internal and external.

  • 20.
    Granberg, Sarah
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; HEAD Grad Sch, Linköping Univ, Linköping, Sweden.
    Swanepoel, De Wet
    University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa; University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Australia; Ear Sci Inst Australia, Subiaco WA, Australia.
    Englund, Ulrika
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    The ICF core sets for hearing loss project: International expert survey on functioning and disability of adults with hearing loss using the International classification of functioning, disability, and health (ICF)2014In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 497-506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To identify relevant aspects of functioning, disability, and contextual factors for adults with hearing loss (HL) from hearing health professional perspective summarized using the ICF classification as reference tool.

    Design: Internet-based cross-sectional survey using open-ended questions. Responses were analysed using a simplified content analysis approach to link concept to ICF categories according to linking rules.

    Study sample: Hearing health professionals (experts) recruited through e-mail distribution lists of professional organizations and personal networks of ICF core set for hearing loss steering committee members. Stratified sampling according to profession and world region enhanced the international and professional representation.

    Results: Sixty-three experts constituted the stratified sample used in the analysis. A total of 1726 meaningful concepts were identified in this study, resulting in 209 distinctive ICF categories, with 106 mentioned by 5% or more of respondents. Most categories in the activities & participation component related to communication, while the most frequent environmental factors related to the physical environment such as hearing aids or noise. Mental functions, such as confidence or emotional functions were also frequently highlighted.

    Conclusions: More than half (53.3%) of the entire ICF classification categories were included in the expert survey results. This emphasizes the importance of a multidimensional tool, such as the ICF, for assessing persons with hearing loss.

  • 21.
    Hannula, Samuli
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Medicine, Otorhinolaryngology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Bloigu, Risto
    Medical Informatics Group, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Majamaa, Kari
    Department of Clinical Medicine, Neurology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Sorri, Martti
    Department of Clinical Medicine, Otorhinolaryngology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Clinical Medicine, Otorhinolaryngology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland; Department of Clinical Medicine, Otorhinolaryngology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Audiogram configurations among older adults: prevalence and relation to self-reported hearing problems2011In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 50, no 11, p. 793-801Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: There are only a few population-based epidemiological studies on audiogram configurations among adults. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of different audiogram configurations among older adults. In addition, audiogram configurations among subjects reporting hearing problems were examined.

    DESIGN: Cross-sectional, population-based, unscreened epidemiological study among older adults.

    STUDY SAMPLE: The subjects (n = 850), aged 54-66 years, were randomly sampled from the population register. A questionnaire survey, an otological examination, and pure-tone audiometry were performed.

    RESULTS: The most prevalent audiogram configuration among men was high-frequency steeply sloping (65.3% left ear, 51.2% right ear) and among women, high-frequency gently sloping (33.0% left ear, 31.5% right ear). There were significantly more flat configurations among women than among men. Unclassified audiograms were common especially among women (17.5%). Subjects reporting hearing difficulties, difficulties in following conversation in noise, or tinnitus, more often had a high-frequency steeply sloping configuration than those not reporting.

    CONCLUSIONS: High-frequency sloping audiogram configurations were common among older adults, and a high-frequency steeply sloping configuration was common among those reporting hearing problems.

  • 22.
    Hannula, Samuli
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Medicine, Otorhinolaryngology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Bloigu, Risto
    Medical Informatics Group, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Majamaa, Kari
    Department of Clinical Medicine, Neurology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Sorri, Martti
    Department of Clinical Medicine, Otorhinolaryngology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Clinical Medicine, Otorhinolaryngology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland; Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine/Technical Audiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of ENT-Head Neck Surgery UHL, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ear diseases and other risk factors for hearing impairment among adults: an epidemiological study2012In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 51, no 11, p. 833-840Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of ear diseases, other otological risk factors potentially affecting hearing, and noise exposure among adults. Furthermore, subject-related factors possibly associated with hearing impairment (HI), i.e. handedness, eye color, and susceptibility to sunburn, were studied.

    DESIGN: A cross-sectional, unscreened, population-based, epidemiological study among adults.

    STUDY SAMPLE: The subjects (n = 850), aged 54-66 years, were randomly sampled from the population register. A questionnaire survey, an otological examination, and pure-tone audiometry were performed.

    RESULTS: Chronic middle-ear disease (both active and inactive) was the most common ear disease with a prevalence of 5.3%, while the prevalence of otosclerosis was 1.3%, and that of Ménière's disease, 0.7%. Noise exposure was reported by 46% of the subjects, and it had no effect on hearing among those with no ear disease or other otological risk factors for HI. Dark eye color and non-susceptibility to sunburn were associated with HI among noise-exposed subjects.

    CONCLUSIONS: Common ear diseases and other otological risk factors constitute a major part of the etiologies of HI among adults. Contrary to previous studies, noise exposure turned out to have only marginal effect on hearing among those with no otological risk factors.

  • 23.
    Hannula, Samuli
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Medicine, Otorhinolaryngology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Clinical Medicine, Otorhinolaryngology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland; Department of Clinical and Experimental, Medicine/Technical Audiology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Majamaa, Kari
    Department of Clinical Medicine, Neurology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Sorri, Martti
    Department of Clinical Medicine, Otorhinolaryngology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Hearing in a 54- to 66-year-old population in northern Finland.2010In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 49, no 12, p. 920-927Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are only a few large, population-based epidemiological studies on hearing impairment (HI) in adults. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of HI and possible differences between ears in older adults. The subjects (n = 850), aged 54-66 years, were randomly sampled from the population register. A questionnaire survey, an otological examination, and pure-tone audiometry were performed. Another questionnaire was mailed to collect information on non-participants. The prevalence of HI averaged over the frequencies of 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz for the better ear ≥20 dB HL was 26.7% (men: 36.8%, women: 18.4%). There was no difference between left and right ear pure-tone averages over the frequencies 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz (PTA(0.5-4 kHz)), but a significant difference of -0.8 dB HL was found for the low frequencies 0.125, 0.25, and 0.5 kHz (PTA(0.125-0.5 kHz)), and 4.4 dB HL for the high frequencies over 4, 6, and 8 kHz (PTA(4-8 kHz)). In conclusion, HI was a highly prevalent finding in this age group.

  • 24.
    Hesser, Hugo
    et al.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Andersson, G.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The role of anxiety sensitivity and behavioral avoidance in tinnitus disability2009In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 295-299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of anxiety sensitivity and behavioral avoidance in tinnitus distress and functioning. A cross-sectional sample of 283 individuals experiencing tinnitus was obtained from an epidemiological national survey study on hearing loss, dizziness, and tinnitus. The subjects completed a series of questionnaires measuring anxiety sensitivity, anxiety, and depression. They also answered questions regarding tinnitus distress, functioning, and avoidance. Results revealed a positive significant correlation between anxiety sensitivity and tinnitus distress. This relationship was not better explained by anxiety and depression symptoms. In addition, the findings provided support for a model where behavioral avoidance fully mediated the relationship between anxiety sensitivity and tinnitus functioning, and partially mediated the relationship between anxiety sensitivity and tinnitus distress. Implications for the role of anxiety sensitivity and behavioral avoidance in tinnitus research are discussed.

  • 25.
    Hua, Håkan
    et al.
    Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Anderzén-Carlsson, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Widén, Stephen
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Conceptions of working life among employees with mild-moderate aided hearing impairment: A phenomenographic study2015In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, no 11, p. 874-880Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim was to explore the conceptions of working life among employees with mild-moderate aided hearing impairment (HI).

    Design: This study has a descriptive design, in which data was collected by means of semi-structured interviews. All interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The text was analysed in accordance with the phenomenographic approach.

    Study sample: Fifteen participants with mild-moderate aided HI were recruited to the current study.

    Results: The analysis of the interviews resulted in four main categories describing the participants’ conceptions of working life: (1) diffiiculties in daily work, (2) communication strategies, (3) facilitating factors in work environment, and (4) impact on daily life. The four identified descriptive categories show that the effects of HI on the lives of working adults generate far-reaching psychosocial consequences for the individual.

    Conclusions: This study demonstrates that difficulties and impact of having a HI interact with strategies used by the individual and contextual facilitators made in the work environment. We argue that there is a need for extensive services in aural rehabilitation for this population. This includes identifying the need of assistive listening devices, teaching the individual with HI about communication strategies and informing stakeholders about the consequence of having a HI.

  • 26. Hua, Håkan
    et al.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Widén, Stephen
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Quality of life, effort and disturbance perceived in noise: a comparison between employees with aided hearing impairment and normal hearing2013In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 52, no 9, p. 642-649Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aims were to compare health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and hearing handicap between two groups of employees with normal hearing and aided hearing impairment (HI). HRQOL was also compared to a normative population. The second aim was to compare perceived effort (PE) and disturbance after completing a task in office noise between the two study groups. Design: A Swedish version of the short form-36 (SF-36) and the hearing handicap inventory for adults (HHIA) was used to determine HRQOL and hearing handicap. The Borg-CR 10 scale was used to measure PE and disturbance. Study sample: Hearing impaired (n = 20) and normally hearing (n = 20) participants. The normative sample comprised of 597 matched respondents. Results: Hearing-impaired employees report relatively good HRQOL in relation to the normative population, but significantly lower physical functioning and higher PE than their normally-hearing peers in noise. Results from the HHIA showed mild self-perceived hearing handicap. Conclusions: The current results demonstrate that physical health status can be negatively affected even at a mild-moderate severity of HI, and that a higher PE is reported from this group when performing a task in noise, despite the regular use of hearing aids.

  • 27. Kähäri, Kim
    et al.
    Zachau, Gunilla
    Eklöf, Mats
    Sandsjö, Leif
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Assessment of hearing and hearing disorders in rock/jazz musicians: Evaluación de la audición y de los problemas auditivos en músicos de rock y jazz 2003In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 279-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to assess hearing and hearing disorders among rock/jazz musicians. One hundred and thirty-nine (43 women and 96 men) musicians participated. The results are based on pure-tone audiometry and questionnaire responses. According to our definition of hearing loss, tinnitus, hyperacusis, distortion and/ or diplacusis as hearing disorders, we found disorders in 74% of the rock/jazz musicians studied. Hearing loss, tinnitus and hyperacusis were most common, and the latter two were found significantly more frequently than in different reference populations. The women showed bilateral, significantly better hearing thresholds at 3-6 kHz than the men. Hyperacusis, and the combination of both hyperacusis and tinnitus, were found to be significantly more frequent among women than among men. Hearing loss and tinnitus were significantly more common among men than among women. It is important to evaluate all kinds of hearing problems (other than hearing loss) in musicians, since they represent an occupational group especially dependent on optimal, functional hearing. On the basis of our results, we suggest that hearing problems such as tinnitus, hyperacusis, distortion and/ or diplacusis should, in addition to hearing loss, be defined as hearing disorders.

  • 28.
    Lohi, Venla
    et al.
    Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland; Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
    Hannula, Samuli
    Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland; Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
    Ohtonen, Pasi
    Departments of Surgery and Anesthesiology, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
    Sorri, Martti
    Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland; Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine/Technical Audiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hearing impairment among adults: the impact of cardiovascular diseases and cardiovascular risk factors2015In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 265-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of cardiovascular diseases on hearing impairment (HI) among adults. Furthermore, to seek other potential risk factors for HI, such as smoking, obesity, and socioeconomic class.

    DESIGN: A cross-sectional, unscreened, population-based, epidemiological study among adults.

    STUDY SAMPLE: The subjects (n = 850), aged 54-66 years, were randomly sampled from the population register. A questionnaire survey, an otological examination, and pure-tone audiometry were performed.

    RESULTS: Cardiovascular diseases did not increase the risk for HI in a propensity-score adjusted logistic regression model: OR 1.24, 95% CI 0.79 to 1.96 for HI defined by better ear hearing level (BEHL), and OR 1.48, 95% CI 0.96 to 2.28 for HI defined by worse ear hearing level (WEHL), in the 0.5-4 kHz frequency range. Heavy smoking is a risk factor for HI among men (BEHL: OR 1.96, WEHL: OR 1.88) and women (WEHL: OR 2.4). Among men, obesity (BEHL, OR 1.85) and lower socioeconomic class (BEHL: OR 2.79, WEHL: OR 2.28) are also risk factors for HI.

    CONCLUSION: No significant association between cardiovascular disease and HI was found.

  • 29.
    Lyxell, Björn
    et al.
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Behavioural Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Behavioural Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Wass, Malin
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Behavioural Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden;.
    Ibertsson, Tina
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Larsby, Birgitta
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hällgren, Mathias
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Behavioural Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Cognitive development in children with cochlear implants: relations to reading and communication2008In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 47, no Suppl 2, p. S47-S52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present article is to present an overview of a set of studies conducted in our own laboratory on cognitive and communicative development in children with cochlear implants (CI). The results demonstrate that children with CIs perform at significantly lower levels on the majority of the cognitive tasks. The exceptions to this trend are tasks with relatively lower demands on phonological processing. A fairly high proportion of the children can reach a level of reading comprehension that matches hearing children, despite the fact that they have relatively poor phonological skills. General working memory capacity is further correlated with the type of questions asked in a referential communication task. The results are discussed with respect to issues related to education and rehabilitation.

  • 30.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    et al.
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX, USA; Department of Speech and Hearing, School of Allied Health Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal, India; Audiology India, Mysore, India.
    Granberg, Sarah
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Audiological Research Center, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Grover, Vibhu
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX, USA.
    Saunders, Gabrielle H.
    Eriksholm Research Center, Snekkersten, Denmark.
    Ann Hall, Deborah
    NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK; Hearing Sciences, Division of Clinical Neuroscience School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK; Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Nottingham, UK; University of Nottingham Malaysia, Semenyih, Malaysia.
    Content validity and readability of patient-reported questionnaire instruments of hearing disability2019In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 58, no 9, p. 565-575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: This study evaluates the content validity (i.e. domains assessed) and readability levels of patient-reported questionnaire instruments using internationally recognised procedures and tools.

    DESIGN: A review of the literature to identify candidate instruments and a synthesis of information including mapping extracted items onto the World Health Organisation's - International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (WHO-ICF) and estimating readability.

    STUDY SAMPLE: 14 patient-reported questionnaire instruments.

    RESULTS: In general, item content focussed on body function and on activity limitations and participation restrictions, with less emphasis on environmental and personal factors and with different emphases across instruments. Many items did not clearly map onto any of the WHO-ICF categories (i.e. not coded items ranged from 3.7 to 39.1% across the 14 questionnaires). All 14 instruments exceeded the sixth-grade reading level when calculated according to the FORCAST formula which is appropriate for assessing a non-narrative text.

    CONCLUSIONS: Clinical assessment of hearing disability is only as comprehensive as the items covered by the chosen measurement instrument. Our findings confirmed the diversity of domains covered by hearing disability instruments and gaps in assessment. Some concern is raised about whether the item content is appropriate for those respondents with poor literacy.

  • 31.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    et al.
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont TX, USA; Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Audiology India, Mysore, India.
    Zhao, Fei
    Centre for Speech Language Therapy and Hearing Science, Cardiff Metropolitan University, Cardiff, Wales, UK; Department of Hearing and Speech Science, Xinhua College, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China.
    Widén, Stephen
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Auzenne, Jasmin
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont TX, USA.
    Beukes, Eldré W.
    Department of Vision and Hearing Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK.
    Ahmadi, Tayebeh
    Department of Audiology, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Tomé, David
    Department of Audiology, School of Allied Health Sciences, Polytechnic Institute of Porto, Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal.
    Deepthi, Mahadeva
    St. John’s Medical College, Bangalore, India.
    Rajalakshmi, Krishna
    Audiology India, Mysore, India; All India Institute of Speech and Hearing, University of Mysore, Mysore, India.
    Germundsson, Per
    The Department of Health and Welfare Studies, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Social representation of "music" in young adults: A cross-cultural study2017In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 24-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The present study was aimed to explore perceptions of and reactions to music in young adults (18-25 years) using the theory of social representations (TSR).

    Design: The study used a cross-sectional survey design and included participants from India, Iran, Portugal, United States, and United Kingdom. Data were analyzed using various qualitative and quantitative methods.

    Study sample: The study sample included 534 young adults.

    Results: The Chi-square analysis showed significant differences between the countries regarding the informants’ perception of music. The most positive connotations about music were found in the responses obtained from Iranian participants (82.2%), followed by Portuguese participants (80.6%), while the most negative connotations about music were found in the responses obtained from Indian participants (18.2%), followed by Iranian participants (7.3%). The participants’ responses fell into 19 main categories based on their meaning; however, not all categories were found in all five countries. The co-occurrence analysis results generally indicate that the category “positive emotions or actions” was the most frequent category occurring in all five countries.

    Conclusions: The results indicate that music is generally considered to bring positive emotions for people within these societies, although a small percentage of responses indicate some negative consequences of music.

  • 32.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Deafblindness: a challenge for assessment - is the ICF a useful tool?2003In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 42, no Supplement 1, p. S140-S142Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Ranjbar, Parivash
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Borg, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Philipson, Lennart
    Stranneby, Dag
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Auditive identification of signal-processed environmental sounds: monitoring the environment2008In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 47, no 12, p. 724-736Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of the present study was to compare six transposing signal-processing algorithms based on different principles (Fourier-based and modulation based), and to choose the algorithm that best enables identification of environmental sounds, i.e. improves the ability to monitor events in the surroundings. Ten children (12-15 years) and 10 adults (21-33 years) with normal hearing listened to 45 representative environmental (events) sounds processed using the six algorithms, and identified them in three different listening experiments involving an increasing degree of experience. The sounds were selected based on their importance for normal hearing and deaf-blind subjects. Results showed that the algorithm based on transposition of 1/3 octaves (fixed frequencies) with large bandwidth was better (p<0.015) than algorithms based on modulation. There was also a significant effect of experience (p<0.001). Adults were significantly (p<0.05) better than children for two algorithms. No clear gender difference was observed. It is concluded that the algorithm based on transposition with large bandwidth and fixed frequencies is the most promising for development of hearing aids to monitor environmental sounds.

  • 34.
    Rosenhall, Ulf
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital.
    Hederstierna, Christina
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hearing of 75-year old persons over three decades: Has hearing changed?2013In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 52, no 11, p. 731-739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The state of hearing in 75-year old persons was measured in a population based epidemiological study with the aim of studying if hearing had changed during a time span of 29 years. Design: An epidemiological study of generational effects in three age cohorts. Study sample: Three age cohorts were included: cohort 1 (n: 267) born in 1976-77, cohort 4 (n: 197) in 1990-91, and cohort 6 (n: 570) in 2005. The same test procedures using pure-tone audiometry and a short questionnaire were applied to the three cohorts of 75-year old residents in the same city. Results: The hearing was essentially unchanged during the span of the investigation-almost three decades. Low-frequency hearing was up to about 10 dB poorer in the most recently studied cohort compared to the previously studied cohorts. The reason for this difference is considered to depend on methodological factors. Self-assessed hearing and tinnitus was mainly unchanged, or had minor changes both to the better and to the worse. Conclusions: The hearing, both measured with pure-tone audiometry and with a short questionnaire, of 75-year old persons has not changed at all, or only marginally, over three decades.

  • 35.
    Sadeghi, Andre M.
    et al.
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Cohn, Edward S.
    Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, USA.
    Kimberling, William J.
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA.
    Halvarsson, Glenn
    Siemens AB, Upplands Väsby, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital.
    Expressivity of hearing loss in cases with Usher syndrome type IIA2013In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 52, no 12, p. 832-837Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the genotype/ phenotype relationship between siblings with identical USH2A pathologic mutations and the consequent audiologic phenotypes, in particular degree of hearing loss (HL). Decade audiograms were also compared among two groups of affected subjects with different mutations of USH2A.

    Design: DNA samples from patients with Usher syndrome type II were analysed. The audiological features of patients and affected siblings with USH2A mutations were also examined to identify genotype-phenotype correlations.

    Study sample : Genetic and audiometric examinations were performed in 18 subjects from nine families with Usher syndrome type IIA.

    Results: Three different USH2A mutations were identified in the affected subjects. Both similarities and differences of the auditory phenotype were seen in families with several affected siblings. A variable degree of hearing loss, ranging from mild to profound, was observed among affected subjects. No significant differences in hearing thresholds were found the group of affected subjects with different pathological mutations.

    Conclusions: Our results indicate that mutations in the USH2A gene and the resulting phenotype are probably modulated by other variables, such as modifying genes, epigenetics or environmental factors which may be of importance for better understanding the etiology of Usher syndrome.

  • 36. Sadeghi, Mehdi
    et al.
    Cohn, Edward S.
    Kelly, William J.
    Kimberling, William J.
    Tranebjoerg, Lisbeth
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Audiological findings in Usher syndrome types IIa and II (non-IIa)2004In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 136-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to define the natural history of hearing lossin Usher syndrome type IIa compared to non-IIa. Peoplewith Usher syndrome type II show moderate-to-severehearing loss, normal balance and retinitis pigmentosa.Several genes cause Usher syndrome type II. Our subjectsformed two genetic groups: (1) subjects with Usher syndrometype IIa with a mutation and/or linkage to theUsher IIa gene; (2) subjects with the Usher II phenotypewith no mutation and/or linkage to the Usher IIa gene.Four hundred and two audiograms of 80 Usher IIa subjectswere compared with 435 audiograms of 87 non-IIasubjects. Serial audiograms with intervals of ≥5 yearswere examined for progression in 109 individuals. Thosewith Usher syndrome type IIa had significantly worsehearing thresholds than those with non-IIa Usher syndromeafter the second decade. The hearing loss in Ushersyndrome type IIa was found to be more progressive, andthe progression started earlier than in non-IIa Usher syndrome.This suggests an auditory phenotype for Ushersyndrome type IIa that is different from that of other typesof Usher syndrome II. Thus, this is to our knowledgeone of the first studies showing a genotype-phenotypeauditory correlation.

  • 37. Sadeghi, Mehdi
    et al.
    Cohn, Edward S.
    Kimberling, William J.
    Tranebjaerg, Lisbeth
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Audiological and vestibular features in affected subjects with USH3: a genotype/phenotype correlation2005In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 307-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims were to compare the genotype/phenotype relationship between USH3 mutations and the consequent hearing and vestibular phenotype; and to compare hearing loss (HL) progression between Usher syndrome types IB, IIA and USH3. Genetic, audiometric and vestibular examinations were performed in 28 subjects with USH3. Five different mutations in USH3 were identified. Severe HL was present from an early age (4 to 6 years) in 35% of subjects with USH3. Progression of HL begins in the first decade, and approximately 50% of subjects with USH3 become profoundly deaf by age 40. Various vestibular abnormalities were found in about half (10/22) of the tested subjects with USH3. Depending on the severity of HL, subjects with USH3 might be misdiagnosed as either Usher type IB or IIA. The results from this study can be used as discriminatory features in differential diagnosis of this syndrome.

  • 38.
    Skagerstrand, Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Audiological Research Centre, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Örebro, Sweden.
    Köbler, Susanne
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Audiological Research Centre, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Örebro, Sweden.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Loudness and annoyance of disturbing sounds: perception by normal hearing subjects2017In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 56, no 10, p. 775-783Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Sounds in the daily environment may cause loudness and annoyance. The present study investigated the perception of loudness and annoyance for eight different sounds present in a daily sound environment and at nine different levels varying by ±20 dB around the recorded level. The outcomes were related to tests of participants' auditory and cognitive abilities.

    DESIGN: The participants undertook auditory and working memory (WM) tests prior to ratings of everyday sounds previously shown to be disturbing for persons with hearing impairment (hearing aid users).

    STUDY SAMPLE: Twenty-one participants aged between 24 and 71 years, with normal hearing threshold levels.

    RESULTS: Both perceived loudness and annoyance were primarily driven by the sound level. Sounds emitted from paper were rated as having greater loudness and being more annoying than the other sound sources at the same sound level. Auditory and cognitive abilities did not influence the perception of loudness and annoyance.

    CONCLUSIONS: Loudness and annoyance ratings were mainly driven by sound level. Expectations of a sound seemed to influence the assessment of loudness and annoyance while auditory performance and WM capacity showed no influence on the ratings.

  • 39.
    Skagerstrand, Åsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Stenfelt, Stefan
    Dept Clin & Expt Med, Div Tech Audiol, Linköping Univ, Linköping, Sweden ; Linnaeus Ctr HEAD, Swedish Inst Disabil Res, Dept Behav Sci & Learning, Linköping Univ, Linköping, Sweden.
    Arlinger, Stig
    Dept Clin & Expt Med, Div Tech Audiol, Linköping Univ, Linköping, Sweden ; Linnaeus Ctr HEAD, Swedish Inst Disabil Res, Dept Behav Sci & Learning, Linköping Univ, Linköping, Sweden.
    Wikström, Joel
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Sounds perceived as annoying by hearing-aid users in their daily soundscape2014In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 259-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The noises in modern soundscapes continue to increase and are a major origin for annoyance. For a hearing-impaired person, a hearing aid is often beneficial, but noise and annoying sounds can result in non-use of the hearing aid, temporary or permanently.

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify annoying sounds in a daily soundscape for hearing-aid users.

    Design: A diary was used to collect data where the participants answered four questions per day about annoying sounds in the daily soundscape over a two-week period.

    Study sample: Sixty adult hearing-aid users. Results: Of the 60 participants 91% experienced annoying sounds daily when using hearing aids. The annoying sound mentioned by most users, was verbal human sounds, followed by other daily sound sources categorized into 17 groups such as TV/radio, vehicles, and machine tools. When the hearing-aid users were grouped in relation to age, hearing loss, gender, hearing-aid experience, and type of signal processing used in their hearing aids, small and only few significant differences were found when comparing their experience of annoying sounds.

    Conclusions: The results indicate that hearing-aid users often experience annoying sounds and improved clinical fitting routines may reduce the problem.

  • 40.
    Weise, C.
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Division of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Philipps-University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany; Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Andersson, G.
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nyenhuis, N.
    Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany .
    Zastrutzki, S.
    Clinic for Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany .
    Kröner-Herwig, B.
    Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany .
    Jäger, B.
    Clinic for Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany .
    The role of catastrophizing in recent onset tinnitus: Its nature and association with tinnitus distress and medical utilization2013In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 177-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Persistent tinnitus affects 10 to 15% of adults. Little is understood about why only a small percentage of patients become severely affected. Catastrophic thinking has been suggested as one potentially relevant factor that might influence a patient's coping behavior, and thus tinnitus habituation. The current study investigates the concept of tinnitus catastrophizing and its relation with distress and medical utilization in recent onset tinnitus.

    Design: Participants were administered a survey assessing catastrophizing, tinnitus distress, medical utilization, coping, and mood disturbance. Regression analyses investigated the nature of tinnitus catastrophizing and its contributions to distress and health care utilization.

    Study sample: 278 subjects with tinnitus for less than six months were recruited from Ear-Nose-Throat units, through the internet, and newspaper articles.

    Results: Controlling for background variables, high subjective tinnitus loudness, low behavioral coping, and depressive symptoms were significantly associated with tinnitus catastrophizing. Furthermore, greater tinnitus catastrophizing was related to higher distress and more frequent medical visits.

    Conclusions: Tinnitus catastrophizing appears to be pivotal already at an early stage of tinnitus experience. Addressing catastrophizing by specific prevention and intervention programs might reduce the development of distress and medical utilization in the long term. Longitudinal studies are required to clarify cause-effect relations.

  • 41.
    Widén, Stephen
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    A suggested model for decision-making regarding hearing conservation: towards a systems theory approach2013In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 57-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to investigate potential health promotion variables associated with adolescents' hearing protection use at concerts.

    STUDY SAMPLE: The sample consisted of 242 upper secondary school students aged 15-19 years.

    DESIGN: Variables defined by the theory of planned behaviour (TBP) and health belief model were tested in this quantitative study.

    RESULTS: Fifty-three percent of the adolescents reported that they used hearing protection at concerts to some degree, and 33 individuals (14%) reported that they used hearing protection in 50% of cases or more. The average degree of hearing protection use was reported to be 17% of the visits at concerts. Norms, perceived control, barriers, and noise sensitivity were associated with attitudes towards loud music. In addition, norms, barriers, permanent tinnitus, and noise sensitivity were significantly correlated with hearing protection use. However, intention was not significantly correlated with hearing protection use.

    CONCLUSIONS: From a systems theoretical approach it can be suggested that preventive strategies must consider more levels than just the individual, in order to achieve long lasting behavioural changes in adolescents' listening habits. To be able to get useful knowledge about preventive strategies, it is necessary to add context-specific variables into generic models such as TPB.

  • 42.
    Widén, Stephen
    et al.
    Department of Psychology and Organisational Studies, Institution of Social and Behavioural Studies, University of Trollhättan/Uddevalla, Vänersborg; Department of Psychology, Göteborg University, Göteborg.
    Holmes, Alice
    Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Florida, USA .
    Erlandsson, Soly
    Department of Psychology and Organisational Studies, Institution of Social and Behavioural Studies, University of Trollhättan/Uddevalla, Vänersborg.
    Reported Hearing Protection Use in Young Adults from Sweden and the USA: Effects of Attitude and Gender2006In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 273-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates differences between a Swedish and an American sample of young students regarding attitudes towards noise and the use of hearing protection at concerts. The study population was comprised of 179 participants from Sweden and 203 participants from the United States, who ranged in age from 17 to 21 years. Questionnaires were used to gather information on hearing symptoms and attitudes towards noise (Youth Attitude to Noise Scale). Multivariate analysis of variance revealed that attitudes towards noise differed significantly due to gender and country. Men had slightly more positive attitude towards noise than women, and men from the USA had more positive attitudes than men from Sweden. Least positive were the women from Sweden (except regarding attitudes towards the ability to concentrate in noisy environments). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to examine the influence of attitudes towards noise and country on young people’s use of hearing protection at concerts. The results indicated that attitudes and country explained 50% of the variance in use of hearing protection.

  • 43.
    Widén, Stephen
    et al.
    Department of Psychology and Organisational Studies, Institution of Social and Behavioural Studies, University West, Trollhättan.
    Holmes, Alice
    Department of Communicative disorders, University of Florida, Gainsville, USA.
    Johnson, Ted
    Elmira College, Elmira, New York, USA.
    Bohlin, Margareta
    Department of Psychology and Organisational Studies, Institution of Social and Behavioural Studies, University West, Trollhättan.
    Erlandsson, Soly
    Department of Psychology and Organisational Studies, Institution of Social and Behavioural Studies, University West, Trollhättan.
    Hearing, hearing-related risk-taking behavior andattitudes towards noise among young American adults2009In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 48, no 8, p. 537-545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate possible associations between college students’ attitudes, risk-taking behaviour related to noisy activities, and hearing problems such as threshold shifts or self-experienced hearing symptoms. The sample included 258 students aged between 17 and 21 enrolled at the University of Pennsylvania, USA. A questionnaire measuring attitudes towards noise, use of hearing protection, and selfreported hearing symptoms was distributed among the students. After completing the questionnaire a hearing screening, including pure-tone audiometry and tympanometry, was conducted. The result revealed that 26% had thresholds poorer than the screening level of 20 dBHL. Attitudes were significantly related to self-experienced hearing symptoms, but not to threshold shifts. Attitudes and noise sensitivity was, significantly related to use of hearing protection. Hearing protection use was found in activities such as using firearms, mowing lawns, and when using noisy tools but was less reported for concerts and discotheques. It can be concluded that the young adults in this study expose themselves to hearing risks, since the use of hearing protection is in general very low.

  • 44.
    Widén, Stephen
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro, Sweden; Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Kähäri, Kim
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology Departments of Audiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Headphone listening habits, hearing thresholds and listening levels in Swedish adolescents with severe to profound HL and adolescents with normal hearing2018In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 57, no 10, p. 730-736Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Research has minimally focussed on the music listening habits and preferred sound volumes among adolescents with severe to profound congenital HL. Listening to music played at loud sound volumes and for a long duration of time could imply risks of worsening the HL. Therefore, it is important to investigate the listening habits in adolescents with HL. The aim of the present study was to describe the use of personal music devices, subjective estimated sound levels, measured sound levels, listening habits, and hearing symptoms in adolescents with severe to profound hearing loss compared with adolescents with normal hearing.

    DESIGN: The study was conducted in two steps. First, a questionnaire was given to students with or without hearing loss. In step two, hearing and sound level measurements were made in a subsample from both groups.

    STUDY SAMPLE: The study sample were based on 112 seventeen-year-old students with severe to profound hearing loss and 279 adolescents with normal hearing. Hearing thresholds and listening levels was measured on two subsamples based on 29 adolescents with severe to profound hearing loss and 50 adolescents from the group with normal hearing.

    RESULTS: The results showed that adolescents with severe to profound hearing loss listened to significantly louder sound levels for longer periods. For both groups, those listening at louder sound levels had poorer hearing thresholds. This finding is especially alarming for subjects with hearing loss. Among those listening above 85 dB per occasion, the sound level ranged between 85.8 dB up to 109 dB for those with hearing loss, whereas the sound level ranged between 85.5 dB and 100 dB for those with normal hearing.

    CONCLUSIONS: Adolescents with congenital hearing loss used portable music devices in the same manner as adolescents with normal hearing. However, adolescents with hearing loss listened to louder sound volumes most likely to compensate for their hearing loss, which significantly increases the risk of further damage to their hearing. From a hearing rehabilitation perspective it could be concluded that aspect of music listening habits should be focussed in order to prevent noise induced hearing loss among individuals with congenital hearing loss.

  • 45.
    Zhao, Fei
    et al.
    Department of Hearing and Speech Science, Xinhua College, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont TX, United States; Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Audiology India, Mysore, India.
    St Claire, Lindsay
    Department of Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Jones, Lesley
    Hull-York Medical School, University of York, York, United Kingdom.
    Brandreth, Marian
    National Institute for Health Research, National Hearing Biomedical Research Unit, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.
    Krishna, Rajalakshmi
    All India Institute of Speech and Hearing, University of Mysore, Mysore, India.
    Goodwin, Robin
    School of Social Sciences, Brunel University, Uxbridge, United Kingdom.
    Exploring the influence of culture on hearing help-seeking and hearing-aid uptake2015In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, no 7, p. 435-443Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The purpose of this paper was to highlight the importance of cultural influence in understanding hearing-help seeking and hearing-aid uptake.

    Design: Information on audiological services in different countries and 'theories related to cross-culture' is presented, followed by a general discussion.

    Study sample: Twenty-seven relevant literature reviews on hearing impairment, cross-cultural studies, and the health psychology model and others as secondary resources.

    Results: Despite the adverse consequences of hearing impairment and the significant potential benefits of audiological rehabilitation, only a small number of those with hearing impairment seek professional help and take up appropriate rehabilitation. Therefore, hearing help-seeking and hearing-aid uptake has recently become the hot topic for clinicians and researchers. Previous research has identified many contributing factors for hearing help-seeking with self-reported hearing disability being one of the main factors. Although significant differences in help-seeking and hearing-aid adoption rates have been reported across countries in population studies, limited literature on the influence of cross-cultural factors in this area calls for an immediate need for research.

    Conclusions: This paper highlights the importance of psychological models and cross-cultural research in the area of hearing help-seeking and hearing-aid uptake, and consequently some directions for future research are proposed.

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