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  • 1.
    Jarl, Gustav M.
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Heinemann, Allen W
    Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago IL, United States; Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago IL, United States.
    Lindner, Helen Y
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Hermansson, Liselotte M N
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Cross-cultural validity and differential item functioning of the Orthotics and Prosthetics Users’ Survey with Swedish and American users of lower-limb prosthesis2015Inngår i: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0003-9993, E-ISSN 1532-821X, Vol. 96, nr 9, s. 1615-1626Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To investigate the cross-cultural validity of the Orthotics and Prosthetics Users’ Survey (OPUS), to evaluate differential item functioning (DIF) related to country, sex, age, amputation level, and amputated side (unilateral, bilateral), and to determine known-group validity of the OPUS.

    Design: Survey.

    Setting: Outpatient clinics.

    Participants: The sample (NZ321) consisted of Swedish (nZ195) and U.S. (nZ126) adults using lower-limb prostheses.

    Interventions: Not applicable.

    Main Outcome Measures: Four OPUS modules were used: lower extremity functional status, client satisfaction with device (CSD), client satisfaction with services (CSS), and health-related quality of life. Rasch analysis was used to calculate measures for persons and items.

    Results: The cross-cultural validity was satisfactory. Many items demonstrated DIF related to country and demographic characteristics, but the impact on mean person measures was negligible. The rating scales of CSD and CSS needed adjustments, and the unidimensionality of CSD and CSS was weak. The differences between the mean measures of known patient groups were statistically significant for 2 out of 6 comparisons.

    Conclusions: This study supports the validity of OPUS measure comparisons between Sweden and the United States and between subgroups with different demographic characteristics. Some of the country-related DIF may reflect the different health care financing systems. The findings demonstrate that the OPUS can discriminate between certain patient groups. The results also challenge some of our preconceptions about persons with bilateral amputation, indicating that we might know these persons less well than we think.

  • 2.
    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete. Region Örebro län. Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Zetterlund, Christina
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Low Vision Centre, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Richter, Hans O.
    Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Effects of Feldenkrais Method on Chronic Neck/Scapular Pain in People With Visual Impairment: A Randomized Controlled Trial With One-Year Follow-Up2014Inngår i: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0003-9993, E-ISSN 1532-821X, Vol. 95, nr 9, s. 1656-1661Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To determine whether the Feldenkrais method is an effective intervention for chronic neck/scapular pain in patients with visual impairment.

    Design: Randomized controlled trial with an untreated control group.

    Setting: Low vision center.

    Participants: Patients (N=61) with visual impairment (mean, 53.3y) and nonspecific chronic (mean, 23.8y) neck/scapular pain.

    Interventions: Participants were randomly assigned to the Feldenkrais method group (n=30) or untreated control group (n=31). Patients in the treatment group underwent one 2-hour Feldenkrais method session per week for 12 consecutive weeks.

    Main Outcome Measures: Blind assessment of perceived pain (visual analog scale [VAS]) during physical therapist palpation of the left and right occipital, upper trapezius, and levator scapulae muscle areas; self-assessed degree of pain on the Visual, Musculoskeletal, and Balance Complaints questionnaire; and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey bodily pain scale.

    Results: Patients undergoing FeldenIcrais method reported significantly less pain than the controls according to the VAS and Visual, Musculoskeletal, and Balance Complaints questionnaire ratings at posttreatment follow-up and 1-year follow-up. There were no significant differences regarding the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey bodily pain scale ratings.

    Conclusions: Feldenkrais method is an effective intervention for chronic neck/scapular pain in patients with visual impairment. (c) 2014 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine

  • 3.
    Nilsagård, Ylva
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Region Örebro län. Centre for Health Care Sciences, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    von Koch, Lena Kristina
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden; Department of Neurology, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Malin
    Rehabunit, Central Hospital Karlstad, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Forsberg, Anette
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Region Örebro län. Family Medicine Research Centre, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Balance exercise program reduced falls in people with multiple sclerosis: a single-group, pretest-posttest trial2014Inngår i: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0003-9993, E-ISSN 1532-821X, Vol. 95, nr 12, s. 2428-2434Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of a balance exercise program on falls in people with mild to moderate multiple sclerosis (MS).

    Design: Multicenter, single-blinded, single-group, pretest-posttest trial.

    Setting: Seven rehabilitation units within 5 county councils.

    Participants: Community-dwelling adults with MS (NZ32) able to walk 100m but unable to maintain 30-second tandem stance with armsalongside the body.

    Intervention: Seven weeks of twice-weekly, physiotherapist-led 60-minute sessions of group-based balance exercise targeting core stability, dualtasking, and sensory strategies (CoDuSe).

    Main Outcome Measures: Primary outcomes: number of prospectively reported falls and proportion of participants classified as fallers during 7preintervention weeks, intervention period, and 7 postintervention weeks. Secondary outcomes: balance performance on the Berg Balance Scale,Four Square Step Test, sit-to-stand test, timed Up and Go test (alone and with cognitive component), and Functional Gait Assessment Scale;perceived limitations in walking on the 12-item MS Walking Scale; and balance confidence on the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scalerated 7 weeks before intervention, directly after intervention, and 7 weeks later.

    Results: Number of falls (166 to 43;P.001) and proportion of fallers (17/32 to 10/32;P.039) decreased significantly between thepreintervention and postintervention periods. Balance performance improved significantly. No significant differences were detected forperceived limitations in walking, balance confidence, the timed Up and Go test, or sit-to-stand test.

    Conclusions: The CoDuSe program reduced falls and proportion of fallers and improved balance performance in people with mild to moderateMS but did not significantly alter perceived limitations in walking and balance confidence

  • 4.
    Postema, Sietke
    et al.
    University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.
    Bongers, Raoul M.
    University Medical Center Groningen, Center of Human Movement Sciences, University of Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.
    Brouwers, Michel A. H.
    Rehabilitation Center De Hoogstraat Revalidatie, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
    Burger, Helena
    Institute for Rehabilitation, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia; Medical Faculty, University of Ljubjama, Ljubjama, Slovenia.
    Hermansson, Liselotte M. N.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Reneman, Michiel F.
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.
    Dijkstra, Pieter U.
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.
    van der Sluis, Corry K.
    University Medical Centre Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.
    Upper limb absence: predictors of work participation and work productivity2016Inngår i: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0003-9993, E-ISSN 1532-821X, Vol. 97, nr 6, s. 892-899Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: to analyze work participation, work productivity and contributing factors, as well as physical work demands, in individuals with an upper limb defect (ULD).

    Design: cross-sectional study: postal survey (response rate: 53%).

    Setting: patients of twelve rehabilitation centers and orthopedic workshops in the Netherlands.

    Participants: 207 individuals with unilateral transversal upper limb reduction deficiency (ULRD) or amputation (ULA), at or proximal to the carpal level, between the ages of 18 and 65 years, and a convenience sample of 90 controls (matched on age and gender).

    Interventions: not applicable.

    Main outcome measures: employment status, self-reported work productivity and self-reported upper extremity work demands.

    Results: 74% of individuals with ULRD and 57% of the individuals with ULA were employed. Males, using a prosthesis, with medium or higher level of education and good general health were most often employed. Work productivity was similar to the control group. Higher work productivity was related to predominantly mentally demanding type of work and less MSC related pain. Upper extremity work demands were higher in individuals with ULD with predominantly mentally demanding work, compared to controls with this type of work.

    Conclusions: the outcome of work participation of individuals with ULRD is comparable to the general population in the Netherlands. Individuals with ULA had lower rates of employment. Work productivity was not associated to one-handedness.

  • 5.
    Postema, Sietke G.
    et al.
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Bongers, Raoul M.
    Center of Human Movement Sciences, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Brouwers, Michael A.
    Rehabilitation Center De Hoogstraat Revalidatie, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Burger, Helena
    University Rehabiltiation Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia; Medical Faculty, University of Ljubljama, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Norling-Hermansson, Liselotte M.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Reneman, Michiel F.
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Dijkstra, Pieter U.
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands; Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    van der Sluis, Corry K.
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Musculoskeletal Complaints in Transverse Upper Limb Reduction Deficiency and Amputation in The Netherlands: Prevalence, Predictors, and Effect on Health2016Inngår i: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0003-9993, E-ISSN 1532-821X, Vol. 97, nr 7, s. 1137-1145Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: (1) To determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints (MSCs) in individuals with upper limb absence in The Netherlands, (2) to assess the health status of individuals with upper limb absence in general and in relation to the presence of MSCs, and (3) to explore the predictors of development of MSCs and MSC-related disability in this population.

    Design: Cross-sectional study: national survey.

    Setting: Twelve rehabilitation centers and orthopedic workshops.

    Partiscipants: Individuals (n=263; mean age, 50.7±16.7y; 60% men) ≥18 years old, with transverse upper limb reduction deficiency (42%) or amputation (58%) at or proximal to the carpal level (response, 45%) and 108 individuals without upper limb reduction deficiency or amputation (n=108; mean age, 50.6±15.7y; 65% men) (N=371).

    Interventions: Not applicable.

    Main outcome measures: Point and year prevalence of MSCs, MSC-related disability (Pain Disability Index), and general health perception and mental health (RAND-36 subscales).

    Results: Point and year prevalence of MSCs were almost twice as high in individuals with upper limb absence (57% and 65%, respectively) compared with individuals without upper limb absence (27% and 34%, respectively) and were most often located in the nonaffected limb and upper back/neck. MSCs were associated with decreased general health perception and mental health and higher perceived upper extremity work demands. Prosthesis use was not related to presence of MSCs. Clinically relevant predictors of MSCs were middle age, being divorced/widowed, and lower mental health. Individuals with upper limb absence experienced more MSC-related disability than individuals without upper limb absence. Higher age, more pain, lower general and mental health, and not using a prosthesis were related to higher disability.

    Conclusions: Presence of MSCs is a frequent problem in individuals with upper limb absence and is associated with decreased general and mental health. Mental health and physical work demands should be taken into account when assessing such a patient. Clinicians should note that MSC-related disability increases with age.

  • 6.
    Shaw, William S.
    et al.
    Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety, Hopkinton MA, USA; University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester MA, USA.
    Hartvigsen, Jan
    Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; Nordic Institute of Chiropractic and Clinical Biomechanics, Odense, Denmark.
    Woiszwillo, Mary J.
    Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety, Hopkinton MA, USA.
    Linton, Steven J.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete.
    Reme, Silje E.
    Harvard School of Public Health, Boston MA, USA; Uni Research Health, Bergen, Norway.
    Psychological Distress in Acute Low Back Pain: A Review of Measurement Scales and Levels of Distress Reported in the First 2 Months After Pain Onset2016Inngår i: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0003-9993, E-ISSN 1532-821X, Vol. 97, nr 9, s. 1573-1587Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To characterize the measurement scales and levels of psychological distress reported among published studies of acute low back pain (LBP) in the scientific literature.

    Data Sources: Peer-reviewed scientific literature found in 8 citation index search engines (CINAHL, Embase, MANTIS, PsycINFO, PubMed, Web of Science, AMED, and Academic Search Premier) for the period from January 1, 1966, to April 30, 2015, in English, Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish languages.

    Study Selection: Cross-sectional, case-control, cohort, or randomized controlled trials assessing psychological distress and including participants drawn from patients and workers (or an identifiable subset) with acute LBP (<8wk). Three researchers independently screened titles, abstracts, and full-length articles to identify peer-reviewed studies according to established eligibility criteria.

    Data Extraction: Descriptive data (study populations, definitions of LBP, distress measures) were systematically extracted and reviewed for risk of bias. Distress measures were described, and data were pooled in cases of identical measures. Reported levels of distress were contextualized using available population norms, clinical comparison groups, and established clinical cutoff scores.

    Data Synthesis: Of 10,876 unique records, 23 articles (17 studies) were included. The most common measures were the Beck Depression Inventory, the modified version of the Zung Self-Rated Depression Scale, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale, and the Medical Outcomes Study 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey and Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey. Pooled results for these scales showed consistent elevations in depression, but not anxiety, and reduced mental health status in comparison with the general population.

    Conclusions: Based on the high consistency across studies using valid measures with a low to moderate risk of bias, there is strong evidence that psychological distress is elevated in acute LBP.

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