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  • 101.
    Rasmussen, Joel
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    “Welcome to Twitter, @CIA. Better Late Than Never”: Communication Professionals’ Views of Social Media Humor and Implications for Organizational Identity2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Security and emergency authorities have traditionally used an official language style in public, but currently social media have become an outlet for informal posts and humor. This article uses positioning analysis (Bamberg, 2005) to discuss the challenges that uses of humor pose for the identity of public officials and organizations. Four dimensions of social media use and humor are suggested to factor into organizational identity construction. Particularly some forms of humor stands contrary to a bureaucratic ethos of impartiality and confidentiality. Thus, dilemmas arise for public authorities that want to remain “in character”. The article contributes to the literature on organizational identity by considering the hitherto overlooked immersion of the use of social media and humor with organizational identity formation.

  • 102.
    Rasmussen, Joel
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    ‘Welcome to Twitter, @CIA. Better late than never’: Communication professionals’ views of social media humour and implications for organizational identity2017In: Discourse & Communication, ISSN 1750-4813, E-ISSN 1750-4821, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 89-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public authorities have traditionally used an official language style in public, but currently social media have become an outlet for humour. This article uses positioning analysis to discuss challenges that use of humour poses for the identity of public organizations. Drawing on interviews with communications professionals working in the emergency services sector, the article suggests six evaluative themes that factor into organizational identity construction, such as the frequency and type of humour in social media posts. Indeed, while humour helps fashion more flexible and risk-taking organizational identities, it can also stand contrary to a bureaucratic ethos of public servantship and equal treatment. Dilemmas thus arise for public authorities that seek to adjust to the times and still remain ‘in character’. The article contributes to organizational identity research by considering the hitherto overlooked immersion of social media use, humour and organizational identity formation.

  • 103.
    Rasmussen, Joel
    et al.
    University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Ihlen, Øyvind
    University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Lessons from Norwegian emergency authorities’ use of social media2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Social media has evolved along with expectations that organizations, including public authorities, would create more dialogue with citizens. This policy brief argues for, first, the importance for public authorities to listen to, follow up on and use social media users’ responses and viewpoints to facilitate dialogue and organizational learning, and, second, the need to more systematically reflect on the causes, meaning, and consequences of the informal tone that some public authorities have come to use in social media.

  • 104.
    Rasmussen, Joel
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ihlen, Øyvind
    Risk, Crisis and Social Media: A Meta-Study of Six Years' Research2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature on social media use in risk and crisis communication is growing fast and it is time to take stock before looking forward. A review of 108 empirical studies in the area shows how the literature is indeed increasing and focusing on particular social media plat­forms, users, and phases from risk to crisis relief. However, although spanning 40 countries, a large part of the world’s social media users are under-represented in the research. In addition, little attention is given to the question of who is actually reached though social media and effects of the digital divide are rarely discussed. The paper suggests more attention is given questions of equal access to information and ICTs, complementary media channels, and cultural diversity.

  • 105.
    Rasmussen, Joel
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ihlen, Øyvind
    Department of Media and Communication, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Risk, crisis, and social media: A systematic review of seven years' research2017In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature on social media use in risk and crisis communication is growing fast, and it is time to take stock before looking forward. A review of 200 empirical studies in the area shows how the literature is indeed increasing and focusing on particular social media platforms, users, and phases from risk to crisis relief. However, although spanning 40 countries, a large proportion of the world’s social media users are under-represented in the research. In addition, little attention is given to the question of who is actually reached through social media, and the effects of the digital divide are rarely discussed. This article suggests that more attention is given to the questions of equal access to information and ICTs, complementary media channels, and cultural diversity. 

  • 106.
    Richardson, John
    et al.
    Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK.
    Krzyzanowski, MichalÖrebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.Machin, DavidÖrebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.Wodak, RuthLancaster University, Lancaster, UK.
    Advances in Critical Discourse Studies2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 107.
    Rönnhede, Hedvig
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    ”Dumt fel ska rättas till, men säg inte att det är ett strukturellt problem inom polisen helt plötsligt”: -     En studie av polisens externa kriskommunikation efter mörkläggningen av sexuellaofredanden under ”We Are Sthlm” festivalen.2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 108.
    Schmidt, Marcus
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Here too the gods are present: Ethos building on patreon.com2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay studies the rhetorical situation of the crowdfunding site Patreon.com, with a particular focus on the construction of ethos. Taking off from the conception of ethos as a discursive dwelling place, the study analyzes five Patreon pages and the self-promotional practices associated with each page. It concludes that there are different ways of negotiating the implicit and explicit expectations that go along with setting up and maintaining a presence on a crowdfunding site – not least with regards to the relationship between ethos and ethics.

  • 109.
    Schön, Joakim
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Tunberg, Kristofer
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Den nya reklampausen: En innehållsanalys av produktplaceringen i Solsidan och Saltön2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    As more and more people avoid the classic commercial breaks through technical innovations like zapping or play-services advertisers have to turn to new marketing channels. TV-series have come to be one of these new channels which is why our main purpose of this essay is to examine in what extent and how product placement appears in two swedish TV-series. We will also investigate the frequency of connecting major characters to specific brands. The method used in this study is a quantitative content analysis of two complete TV-series. Our results show that the amount of product placement varies largely upon the context of airing. The show produced for the commercial channel TV4 included the majority of placements whilst the other show, aired on the public service channel SVT, barely contained any product placements at all.

  • 110.
    Selimi, Liridona
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Saudiaffären 2015: - En argumentationsanalys och topikanalys av två ståndpunkter i frågan, för och emot ett fortsatt vapenavtal2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 111.
    Slotte, Nadja
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    ”Ja jag har mens, hurså?”: En retorisk studie om humorns betydelse för argumentationenkring ett tabubelagt ämne2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Det finns ett utbrett tabu kring menstruation i vårt samhälle. Det är något som ska döljas och inget det ska pratas om. En av de personer som tröttnat på tabut är Youtubern Clara Henry som har skrivit boken "Ja jag har mens, hurså?". Med den ger hon läsaren den kunskap om mens hon menar att vi borde fått lära oss i skolan men aldrig fick samt problematiserar tabut kring mens och uppmanar läsarna till att vara med och bryta det. Detta gör hon genom ett humoristiskt smyckat språk vilket bidrog till mitt val av humor som huvudteori för analysen samt stilfigurers påverkan på argumentationen. Genom de hermeneutiska metoderna kritisk retorikanalys, närläsning och stilanalys kom jag genom analysen fram till att Henry använder sig av många varierade stilfigurer som skapar en humoristisk argumentation kring mens och dess tabu vilket. Humorn kan bidra till en lättnad hos menstruerande personer samt nya sätt att prata om detta tabubelagda ämne.

  • 112.
    Stolz, Alexandra
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    "W om en can’ t m ake i t r i g ht "  : The ef f ec t of v i s ua l m edi a pr e s e n t a t i on of f e m a l e pol i t i c i a n ’ s c l ot h i n g on t he r ea der s ’ per c ept i on : th e cas e of A ngel a M er k el 2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 113.
    Tseronis, Assimakis
    Umiversity of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Argumentative functions of visuals: beyond claiming and justifying2013In: Virtues of argumentation: proceedings of the 10th International Conference of the Ontario Society for the Study of Argumentation (OSSA), 22-26 May 2013 Windsor, ON / [ed] Dima Mohammed; Marcin Lewinski, Ontario Society for the study of Argumentation (OSSA) , 2013, p. 1-17Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Up until now, the study of the argumentative role of visuals has been restricted to theformal concept of argument as product, consisting of premises and conclusion. In this paper, I adoptthe pragma-dialectical approach to argumentation as a social and discursive activity in order toexplore argumentative functions of visuals that go beyond claiming and justifying. To do this I payattention to the visual form and to the interaction between the verbal and the visual mode inargumentative discourse.

  • 114. Tseronis, Assimakis
    Christian Plantin: Dictionnaire de l’Argumentation. Une Introduction aux E´ tudes d’Argumentation. [Review]2017In: Argumentation: an international journal on reasoning, ISSN 0920-427X, E-ISSN 1572-8374, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 727-734Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 115.
    Tseronis, Assimakis
    University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Multimodal argumentation: Beyond the verbal/visual divide2018In: Semiotica, ISSN 0037-1998, E-ISSN 1613-3692, Vol. 2018, no 220, p. 41-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What would the consequences be for the interpretation and analysis of arguments if we were to accept that communication, within which arguments are produced and interpreted, involves the intricate use of more than just the verbal mode? In this paper, I discuss the shortcomings of the conception of argument as a purely verbal phenomenon and of the mere juxtaposition of the visual argument to the verbal, as suggested in the discourses of the sceptics and the advocates and of "visual" argument, respectively. Instead I propose a multimodal perspective on the analysis of argumentative discourse, according to which there is no a priori division of labor between the verbal and the visual mode, and attention is paid both to the (verbal and visual) content and to the (verbal and visual) style. In this view, argument is neither verbal nor visual, since argument is not to be defined on the basis of the verbal, visual or other semiotic means by which it is realized in communication. As a case in point, I analyze an ad campaign for the promotion of the British newspaper The Guardian in the United States. © 2018 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston 2018.

  • 116.
    Tseronis, Assimakis
    University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Multimodal argumentation in news magazine covers: A case study of front covers putting Greece on the spot of the European economic crisis2015In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966, Vol. 7, p. 18-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, front covers of news magazines are studied as a distinct multimodal genre that invites readers to buy the magazine not only by attracting their attention but also by assuming a position with respect to the particular cover story. In order to account for the argument that a front cover may convey in support of that position, an argumentative reconstruction is required that also needs to take seriously into account the way in which the verbal and the visual modes interact to create meaning. The study proposes a multimodal argumentation perspective on the systematic reconstruction of the arguments that front covers of news magazines put forward. As a case in point, six covers by two German weekly news magazines are analysed, featuring the role of Greece in the eurozone crisis in the period 2010-2012. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  • 117. Tseronis, Assimakis
    Qualifying Standpoints: Stance adverbs as a presentational device for managing the burden of proof2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A number of studies from pragmatics and discourse analysis have investigated the function of stance adverbs, such as clearly, fortunately, frankly, perhaps, and technically, when used to qualify utterances. Within the field of argumentation studies, scholars who have paid attention to these words have primarily focused on the so-called modal adverbs, and have not considered the insights that can be gained by treating the class of stance adverbs as the linguistic realisation of a certain move in an argumentative discussion. This study aims to fill this gap by investigating the strategic function of stance adverbs when qualifying an utterance that functions as a standpoint. In this study, stance adverbs are examined as a presentational device at the arguer’s disposal when putting forward a standpoint. The study is comprised of three parts. In the first part, the question ‘What is a qualified standpoint?’ is answered by combining illocutionary analysis of the move of advancing a standpoint with pragma-linguistic study of stance ad­verbs. In the second part, the question ‘Why would the protagonist qualify the standpoint?’ is answered based on the concept of burden of proof, which is es­sential to the move of advancing a standpoint. In the third part, the question ‘How does standpoint qualification function strategically in an argumentative discussion?’ is answered by postulating that the protagonist of a qualified standpoint is interested in managing the burden of proof, an assumption which builds on the results of the other two parts. The book is of interest to advanced students and scholars of argumentation and communication studies as well as those interested in an explanation of language use from an argumentative perspective.

  • 118.
    Tseronis, Assimakis
    University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    The Explicit/Implicit Distinction in Multimodal Argumentation: Comparing the Argumentative Use of Nano-Images in Scientific Journals and Science Magazines2018In: Argumentation and Inference: Proceedings of the 2nd European Conference on Argumentation, Fribourg 2017 Volume II / [ed] Steve Oswald & Didier Maillat, College Publications, 2018, p. 821-842Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The distinction between explicatures and implicatures as well as their varying degrees of strength acknowledged within Relevance Theory can help to capture the complex meaningmaking processes underlying the interpretation of multimoda ltexts as instances of argumentation. These pragmatic insights will be used to compare the ways in which arguments about the revolutionary character and societal impact of nanotechnology are constructed by computer-generated images of the nanoscale on the covers of scientific journals and science magazines.

  • 119.
    Tseronis, Assimakis
    et al.
    University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Forceville, Charles
    University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Arguing Against Corporate Claims Visually and Multimodally: The Genre of Subvertisements2017In: Multimodal Communication, ISSN 2230-6579, E-ISSN 2230-6587, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 143-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we describe the conditions under which the manipulation of the verbal and the visual elements or of the visual elements alone in the genre of subvertisements can be considered as an act of objecting or rebutting in an implicit argumentative discussion. We thus consider the cognitive and pragmatic aspects of communication while paying serious attention to the interaction of semiotic modes in order to analyse a number of images produced by anti-consumerist groups such as Adbusters. We identify four different ways in which image-text relations or the visuals alone can cue an incongruity between the message of the original ad and the message of the subvertisement in such a way that the latter functions as an objection or rebuttal of the claim advanced by the original advertisement.

  • 120.
    Unger, Johann
    et al.
    Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK.
    Krzyzanowski, Michal
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Wodak, Ruth
    Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK.
    Introduction: Encountering Multilingualism in Europe's Institutions2014In: Multilingual Encounters in Europe's Institutional Spaces / [ed] Johann W. Unger, Michal Krzyzanowski, Ruth Wodak, London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2014, 1, p. 1-12Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 121.
    Unger, Johann
    et al.
    Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK.
    Krzyzanowski, MichalÖrebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.Wodak, RuthLancaster University, Lancaster, UK.
    Multilingual Encounters in Europe's Institutional Spaces2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 122.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Bildtelefoni förr, nu och i framtiden2019Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 123.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Characteristics of interaction within the Swedish Video Relay Service2014Other (Other academic)
  • 124.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Characteristics of Interaction within the Video Relay Service2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 125.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Characteristics of interaction within the Video Relay Service2010Other (Other academic)
  • 126.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Characteristics of Interaction within the Video Relay Service (VRS)2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To communicate on a distance is now possible between people who use signed language and people who use spoken language, by means of the Video Relay Service (VRS). This technical development has had a big impact on the daily work of signed language interpreters. In the VRS, the interpreter facilitates interaction between people who use a visual/gestural signed language on a video phone and people who use a vocal/auditive language on a telephone. The interaction is mediated by the interpreter, who is the only person in the setting who is directly linked to the other primary participants, and all participants are physically separated from each other. The study is based on a corpus of thirteen authentic calls received at the regular service Bildtelefoni.net; the Swedish VRS, in Örebro, Sweden. The calls were recorded and have subsequently been analyzed applying a dialogical and conversation analytical (CA) approach to interaction; the latter being a theory as well as a set of methods to describe, analyze and understand talk as a constitutive feature of human social life. The study is also informed by discourse analysis in its attempt to approach the data on micro- as well as macro-levels. The analyses reveal how the interpreter in the VRS setting needs to position him/herself in different ways in order to make the interaction proceed. Thus, the interpreter plays a key-role in the interaction, administrating and co-ordinating the talk. The interpreter is a co-creator of the interaction; a part that relates dynamically, and makes the participants relate dynamically to the specific setting of the service. The characteristics of the VRS interaction, with a focus on the interpreters’ actual performance, will be the essence of this presentation.

  • 127.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Characteristics of Interaction within the Video Relay Service (VRS)2015Other (Other academic)
  • 128.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Characteristics of interaction within the Video Relay Service (VRS)2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 129.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Co-creation of Communicative Projects within the Swedish Video Relay Interpreting Service (VRI)2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish Video Relay Interpreting (VRI) Service is a facility that people who use a video phone can call in order to get in touch with people who use a telephone, or vice versa. The interlocutors have different access to the visual arena and the auditive space, and are physically separated from each other. The interpreters need to cope with this fact. In addition, the interpreter is the only one in the setting who attends the encounter as a professional representative of the service. Since “institutionality of an interaction may manifest itself in its overall structural organization” (Drew& Herritage 1992: 43), and the interaction in the VRI service follows several institutional principles, it is of interest to explicate what series of communicative projects occur, and the purposes they serve in this setting.

    The aim of this presentation is to shed light on what interactional features make the VRI Service structurally institutional, with a specific focus on how communicative projects are managed among all of the interlocutors.

    The study is based on twenty-five authentic calls from the regular Swedish VRI Service, Bildtelefoni.net. 15 interpreters are included in the study. Audio and video recordings were captured from the interpreters’ studio, and nobody except the interpreter was present in the studio during the recordings. The project was ethically approved by the Regional Ethical Board in Uppsala, Sweden. The analysis of the recordings is based on Conversation Analytical (CA) methodology (Sidnell & Stivers 2013), in combination with dialogical theory (Linell 1998), and focuses on what is manifested in the calls, i.e. what actually happens among the interlocutors on a moment-by-moment basis.

    The result of the current study shows that the calls are systematically laminated and institutional-specific for the setting.  Significant features are that the interpreter is the only one who attends the interaction as a professional, a representative of the service, whereas the other interlocutors primarily want to talk to each other through the service. In addition, the interpreter and the participant on the videophone have got visual access to each other, and the interpreter and the participant on the telephone have got audible access to each other. The communicative projects that emerge between participants are created in significant ways depended of who called the service and who is called, and depend both on the phases of the call, as well as on how the call is managed in terms of the media used (i.e. through videophone or telephone). The interpreter and the interlocutor who has called the service have got as one project of manage a call to the other interlocutor.  The interpreter and the interlocutor who is called, create a project of reaching a mutual understanding of what is going on, i.e. what the call is all about. Thus, the interaction is systematically laminated by the interlocutors’ establishment of more global and local communicative projects that are dependent on the contingencies of the VRI service, e.g. the different media used, the modalities of interaction (Swedish, and Swedish Sign Language), and the fact that participants are physically separated from each other. The interlocutors co-create the call in reflexive, interactive, and dynamic ways on different levels. This structural organization of laminated systems is what manifests the institutionality of the interaction within the VRI Service.

    Drew, P. & Heritage, J. (Eds.) (1992). Talk at work: interaction in institutional settings. Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press.

    Linell, P. (1998). Approaching dialogue: talk, interaction and contexts in dialogical perspectives. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

    Sidnell, J. & Stivers, T. (Eds.) (2013). The handbook of conversation analysis. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.

  • 130.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Det tolkade bildtelefoni-samtalet som ett gemensamt projekt: Tolkens positionering som samtalsbidragande2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 131.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Förmedlade samtal via bildtelefoni- en utmaning!2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 132.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Förmedlade samtal via bildtelefoni.net2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Uppbacknings- och återkopplingssignaler vid förmedlade samtal vid bildtelefoni.net

    Nutidens teknologiska utveckling har öppnat upp nya möjligheter att kommunicera på distans. Post och Telestyrelsen (PTS) tillhandahåller den reguljära samhällsservicen bildtelefoni.net, vilken ger personer som talar i ”vanlig” telefon möjlighet att kommunicera med personer som använder teckenspråk via bildtelefon. Samtalet förmedlas av en teckenspråkstolk. Samtliga samtalsdeltagare är fysiskt åtskilda och den enda som står i direkt kontakt med de båda primärparterna är teckenspråkstolken. Teckenspråkstolken måste därmed möjliggöra interaktion mellan en part som använder ett auditivt/verbalt språk och en part som använder ett visuellt/gestuellt språk.

    Teckenspråkstolken tolkar (primärt) simultant mellan de två språken, varvid viss fördröjning sker mellan det yttrande som görs av en av primärparterna och tolkningen av yttrandet (som görs av tolken). Tolken är även den enda part som kan ge uppbackningar direkt samt förmedla eller ge återkoppling till primärparterna. Hur dessa aktiviteter manifesteras i den aktuella kontexten är det som aktualiseras vid detta seminarium.

  • 133.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Interaction within the Video Relay Service in Sweden2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 134.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Interaktion vid förmedlade samtal via bildtelefoni.net2014Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 135.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Interpreter practices to strive for progressivity in the beginning of calls via the Swedish video relay service (VRS)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 136.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Teckenspråkstolkade samtal via bildtelefoni.net2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 137.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Teckenspråkstolkens positionering vid förmedlade samtal via bildtelefoni.net2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 138.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Textmeddelanden som en kommunikativ resurs vid förmedlade samtal via Bildtelefoni.net2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den statliga tjänsten Bildtelefoni.net ger teckenspråkiga personer som använder bildtelefon möjlighet att telefonera med personer som talar i telefon och vice versa. En tolk, som återfinns i en studio, förmedlar samtalet och tolkar mellan samtalsdeltagarna. Tolken är den enda i situationen som står i direktkontakt med de båda användarna av tjänsten. Tolken och användaren av bildtelefon delar den visuella arenan, medan tolken och den person som telefonerar delar den auditiva arenan. På den visuella arenan finns möjlighet att sända textmeddelanden.

    Studien baseras på 25 autentiska samtal från den reguljära tjänsten. Syftet med presentationen är att visa på användningen av textfunktionen mellan tolk och bildtelefonanvändare. Syftet är dessutom att initiera en diskussion om varför textmeddelanden används och vad som åstadkoms i interaktionen vid användning av textfunktionen vid förmedlade samtal via Bildtelefoni.net.

    Vid tjänsten Bildtelefoni.net används flera modaliteter: talad svenska, svenskt teckenspråk och skriven svenska. Utbyte av text som en kommunikativ resurs används i ungefär hälften av de samtal som inkluderas i studien. Preliminära resultat visar på att textfunktionen används vid: i. information av namn, nummer, eller adresser, ii. förtydligande av namn, nummer och adresser och iii. som stöd för minnet. Trots att möjligheten att sända text är exklusivt för den visuella arenan: mellan bildtelefonianvändaren och tolken, påverkar detta hela interaktionen, vilket även innefattar personen som använder telefon. Hur interaktionen påverkas och vad som åstadkoms genom användningen av text i denna situerade kontext, är fokus för diskussionerna vid denna datasession.

  • 139.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    The co-creation of communicative projects within the Swedish Video Relay Interpreting Service (VRI)2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Language of presentation: Spoken English

     

    The Swedish Video Relay Interpreting (VRI) Service is a facility that people who use a video phone can call in order to get in touch with people who use a telephone, or vice versa. The interlocutors have different access to the visual arena and the auditive space, and are physically separated from each other. The interpreters need to enable interaction across the different media, since the interpreter is the only one who has direct contact with both users of the service.

    The study is based on twenty-five authentic calls from the regular Swedish VRI Service, Bildtelefoni.net. The analysis of the recordings draws on Conversation Analytical (CA) methodology, in combination with dialogical theory (Linell 1998), and focuses on actions and activities within the calls on a moment-to-moment basis.  

    The presentation focuses on what techniques and strategies that the interpreters use in order to enable the establishment of communicative projects, and how these communicative projects are dialogically managed among all of the interlocutors. The interaction is systematically laminated by the interlocutors’ establishment of more global and local communicative projects that are dependent on the contingencies of the VRI service, e.g. who called the service and who is called, the different phases of the call, the different media used (videophone or telephone), the modalities of interaction (Swedish, and Swedish Sign Language), social and institutional conventions, and the characteristics of the interlocutors.

    Communication on a distance, utilizing services such as the VRI, is becoming more and more common. Since the communicative projects are highly dependent on the interpreter, it is important for interpreters to reflect upon, and get a deeper understanding of the intricate details of (inter)action.

  • 140.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    The co-creation of communicative projects within the Swedish Video Relay Service (VRS)2018In: Here or There: Research on Interpreting Via Video Link / [ed] Jemina Napier, Robert Skinner & Sabine Braun, Washington: Gallaudet University Press, 2018, p. 210-229Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 141.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    The headset as a communicative resource in a Video Relay Interpreting service setting2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 142.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    The use of the text-function in Video Relay Service callsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 143.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Turn-organisation in mediated phone interaction using Video Relay Service (VRS)2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 144.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Vems tur?: Ett perspektiv av interaktionen vid förmedlade samtal via Bildtelefoni.net2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 145.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Video Relay Service2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 146.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Languaging in the Swedish Video Relay Interpreting Service: Signed and Spoken Languages in Combination with Written Text Messages2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish Video Relay Interpreting Service (SVRS) is a facility that people who use Swedish Sign Language can call on a video phone, in order to get in touch with people who speak Swedish, on a telephone, or vice versa. The interlocutors are physically separated from each other and have different access to the visual arena and the auditive space of the setting. An interpreter, who works in a studio, enables the interaction across the different media and is the only person who has direct contact with both users of the service. Exclusive on the visual arena, between the interpreter and the user of the videophone, is also the possibility to send text messages.

    The present study is based on twenty-five authentic calls from the regular SVRS. The methodology used draws on Conversation Analysis (CA), and also departs from the notions languaging and communicative projects (Linell, 2009). The aim is to describe and discuss how communicative projects emerge, are established, dialogically managed, and co-created across time and space within the SVRS.

    This presentation will show how participants’ co-creation of meaning-making processes and communicative projects are contingent upon the specificities of the SVRS: the different media used (videophone or telephone), the modalities of the interaction (Swedish, Swedish Sign Language, and text), social and institutional conventions, the characteristics of the interlocutors, and other interactional resources (e.g. the text function on the visual arena).

    A limited amount of research in the area has been carried out so far (however, see Warnicke, 2017).

  • 147.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. University Health Care Research Center (UFC).
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    The headset as an interactional resource in a video relay interpreting (VRI) setting2018In: Interpreting, ISSN 1384-6647, E-ISSN 1569-982X, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 285-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Video relay interpreting (VRI) enables communication between a signed language user, remotely connected to an interpreter by videophone, and an interlocutor in spoken contact with the interpreter by telephone. Both users of the service are physically separated from each other and from the interpreter, who is in a studio. Essential technical components of the system include such items as videophones, telephones, computers, software, and a headset. This article explores how the interpreter orients towards the headset, turning it into an interactional resource. Examples of how this is done are identified in extracts from a corpus of VRI conversations between users of Swedish Sign Language (SSL) and spoken Swedish. Ethical approval and all participants' consent were obtained. Three practices were identified: pointing towards the headset, orienting towards it in other ways (positioning, gesturing, direction of gaze), and holding it. All these practices have concrete pragmatic implications for the various steps in communication, such as establishing reference, repairs, and turn allocation. Enhancing VRI interpreters' awareness of how equipment like a headset helps to organize the interaction is important, with a view to ensuring that the available technology is used to best effect for purposes of communication.

  • 148.
    Warnicke, Camilla
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Habiliteringens Forskningscentrum (HFC), School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Department of Culture and Communication, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Turn-organisation in mediated phone interaction using Video Relay Service (VRS)2012In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 44, no 10, p. 1313-1334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technical development has created new arenas of communication for people. One such arena is the Video Relay Service (VRS). The VRS facilitates interaction between people who use visual/gestual sign language on a video phone, and people who use verbal/auditive language on the telephone/mobile phone. The interaction is mediated by a sign language interpreter. The interpreter is the only person in the setting who is directly linked to the others, and all participants are physically separated fromeach other. The interpreter plays a key role in the interaction, administratingandco-ordinatingthe talk. In order to doso, the interpreter usesarange of different techniques andstrategies. It is the purpose of the current article to describe, analyse and discuss the turn-organisation of the VRS. The article demonstrates how the interpreter is a power figure, who may sanction or not sanction an utterance. The interpreter also manages the turn-taking machinery by means of visible and audible techniques, as well as rendition strategies. The interpreter is not only a mediator, but a co-creator of the interaction; a part that relates dynamically, and makes the participants relate dynamically, to the specific setting of the service.

  • 149.
    Westius, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    The significance of view of life in persons with Alzheimer's disease2010Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Making it possible for persons with Alzheimer‟s disease (AD) to retain a sense of identity and personal worth during the process of the disease poses a great challenge to caregivers. The objective of the study was to investigate if the view of life of persons with AD could be understood in the frame of their life story and to elucidate the role of view of life in connection to their sense of identity. The view of life of an individual is defined as a conception of reality, a central system of values and a basic emotional attitude.Twenty-one persons with mild to moderate stages of AD were interviewed about their life story and their view of life. The narratives were interpreted using a phenomenological hermeneutic method.Despite their cognitive deterioration it was possible to understand the view of life of the participants in the frame of their life story. Their view of life was not erased by the disease. No exceptional characteristics that could be traced to AD were found in the participants‟ view of life. Their view of life seemed to guide them towards selecting mainly emotionally powerful and value-oriented memories. The origins of their present central values and basic emotional attitude were interpreted to have been established already in early life. A sense of meaningfulness and continuity when looking back on life was also expressed. Despite progressive memory loss and cognitive deterioration, the participants‟ view of life was interpreted as a vital aspect of their sense of identity.The study implicates that knowledge of the view of life of persons with AD is valuable for confirming and supporting their sense of identity.

    List of papers
    1. View of life in persons with dementia
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>View of life in persons with dementia
    2009 (English)In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 481-499Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To study the view of life in dementia. The view of life of an individual is defined as a conception of reality, a central system of values and a basic emotional attitude.Method: Interviews with persons (N = 21) with mild to moderate dementia of the Alzheimer’s type. The interview data were interpreted with a phenomenological hermeneutical method.Results: Despite their cognitive deterioration it was possible to understand the view of life of the participants in the frame of their life story. Their view of life seemed to guide them towards selecting mainly emotionally powerful and value-oriented memories. No exceptional characteristics that could be traced to their dementia disease were found in the participants’ views of life. Conclusions: The view of life of the participants with mild to moderate dementia was vital for their life story and was not erased by dementia.Implications: In order to respect people with dementia as persons, caregivers should strive for gaining some knowledge of their view of life.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London: Sage, 2009
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Geriatrics Psychiatry Nursing Communication Studies
    Research subject
    Medicine; Nursing Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-11949 (URN)10.1177/1471301209350287 (DOI)
    Available from: 2010-09-30 Created: 2010-09-30 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    2. Views of life and sense of identity in people with Alzheimer's disease
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Views of life and sense of identity in people with Alzheimer's disease
    2010 (English)In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 1257-1278Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Making it possible for people with Alzheimer's disease to retain a sense of identity during the process of the disease poses a great challenge to care-givers, professionals and family carers. The aim of this study is to elucidate the role of the view of life of people with Alzheimer's in framing their sense of identity. Is their view of life a vital aspect of their sense of identity? ‘View of life’ was interpreted as a vital aspect of sense of identity, understood as the individual's beliefs about their life history and about the attributes that characterised them. Twenty-one people with mild to moderate stages of Alzheimer's disease were interviewed about their life story. The narratives were interpreted using a phenomenological hermeneutic method. By telling their life story, the participants also narrated their view of life, i.e. their conception of reality, their central system of values and their basic emotional attitudes. By their own accounts, the origins of the narrators' central values and basic emotional attitudes were established in early life. They also expressed a sense of meaningfulness and continuity when looking back on their lives. The findings suggest that for a care-giver or confidant, having knowledge of a person with dementia's view of life is valuable when seeking to confirm that person's sense of identity.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge university press, 2010
    Keywords
    Alzheimer's disease, identity, life story, view of life, interviews, phenomenological hermeneutics
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Geriatrics Psychiatry Nursing Communication Studies
    Research subject
    Medicine; Nursing Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-11950 (URN)10.1017/S0144686X10000309 (DOI)000283407000009 ()2-s2.0-77957257011 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2010-09-30 Created: 2010-09-30 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
  • 150.
    Westius, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Andersson, Lars
    Ersta Sköndal university college, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kallenberg, Kjell
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    View of life in persons with dementia2009In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 481-499Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To study the view of life in dementia. The view of life of an individual is defined as a conception of reality, a central system of values and a basic emotional attitude.Method: Interviews with persons (N = 21) with mild to moderate dementia of the Alzheimer’s type. The interview data were interpreted with a phenomenological hermeneutical method.Results: Despite their cognitive deterioration it was possible to understand the view of life of the participants in the frame of their life story. Their view of life seemed to guide them towards selecting mainly emotionally powerful and value-oriented memories. No exceptional characteristics that could be traced to their dementia disease were found in the participants’ views of life. Conclusions: The view of life of the participants with mild to moderate dementia was vital for their life story and was not erased by dementia.Implications: In order to respect people with dementia as persons, caregivers should strive for gaining some knowledge of their view of life.

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