oru.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
234567 201 - 250 of 301
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 201.
    Pipping Ekström, Marianne
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Skrivregler och råd: för inlämningsuppgifter, PM, rapporter och uppsatser för studenter och lärare vid Restaurang- och hotellhögskolan Grythytte Akademi2010Other (Other academic)
  • 202.
    Pipping Ekström, Marianne
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Hjälmeskog, Karin
    150 år av "outsourcing" av hemarbete2006In: Lärarprofession i förändring: från "skolkök" till hem- och konsumentkunskap / [ed] Karin Hjälmeskog, Uppsala: Föreningen för svensk undervisningshistoria , 2006, p. 171-191Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 203.
    Pipping Ekström, Marianne
    et al.
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Family meals: competence, cooking and company2009In: Food in Contemporary Society / [ed] Hille Janhonen-Abruquah & Päivi Palojoki, Helsinki: University of Helsinki , 2009, p. 23-28Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to find out what is needed to produce a Family Meal. The article starts with an effort to summarise and discuss different descriptions of a meal. It then goes on to define what a meal is and discuss the concept cooking. The need of competence to produce a meal is also pointed out. With the aid of results from a Nordic study it is argued that family meals still exist, though not on an everyday basis. The importance of company is discussed, viewing the meal as a central family activity and also even now a context for cultural learning. Our conclusion, as far as the future is concerned, is that it is necessary to shift responsibility and enhance men's competence in everyday cooking, also a matter of importance at various educational levels as well as for adults.

  • 204.
    Pipping Ekström, Marianne
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Genus i rummet2007In: Den medvetna måltidskunskapen: en vänbok till Inga-Britt Gustafsson / [ed] Richard Tellström, Lena Mossberg, Inger M. Jonsson, Örebro: Örebro universitet , 2007, p. 163-169Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 205.
    Pipping Ekström, Marianne
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Tufft arbetsklimat på krogen granskas2012In: Nätverket för kulturvetenskaplig mat & måltidsforskning, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 206.
    Ranjbar, Parivash
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Akner-Koler, Cheryl
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Konstfack designar hjälpmedel2010In: Audio-nytt, ISSN 0347-6308, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 24-26Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 207.
    Rantajärvi, Pekka
    et al.
    Pfizer Oy Animal Health, Helsinki, Finland.
    Tham, Wilhelm
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Listeria monocytogenes – en 100-årig svensk upptäckt?2010In: Svensk veterinärtidning, ISSN 0346-2250, no 16, p. 21-25Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 208.
    Rantzén, Per
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Wall, Johan
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Kost och kosthållning: Medvetenhet och kunskap bland elitidrottare2010Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 209.
    Rapp, Erika
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Öström, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Food and context: the essence of a good meal and a potential model for promoting healthManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 210.
    Rapp, Erika
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Osika, Walter
    Öström, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Englund, Anders
    Annett, Judith
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Taste perception: an underlying risk factor for coronary heart disease?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 211.
    Rapp, Erika
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Öström, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Association of gender, body mass index (BMI), eating habits, and attitudes in a middle-aged Swedish populationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 212.
    Rapp [Nordin], Erika
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Anvisningar för inlämningsuppgifter, PM, rapporter och uppsatser2007Other (Other academic)
  • 213.
    Rapp [Nordin], Erika
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Att njuta sig sjuk, att äta sig frisk: smakens betydelse för hälsan2008In: Smaksinnet och den goda smaken: ett seminarium om människans smaksinne : [januari 2005] / [ed] Marieanne Alsne, Inga-Britt Gustafsson, Örebro: Örebro universitet , 2008, p. 65-73Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 214.
    Rapp [Nordin], Erika
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Den goda måltiden: en kategorisering med FAMM som analysverktyg2007In: Den medvetna måltidskunskapen: en vänbok till Inga-Britt Gustafsson / [ed] Richard Tellström, Lena Mossberg, Inger M. Jonsson, Örebro: Universitetsbiblioteket , 2007, p. 171-181Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 215.
    Rapp [Nordin], Erika
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Sensory, attitudinal, and contextual aspects of the meal: health implications and connections with risk factors for coronary heart disease and obesity2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim was to study risk factors for obesity and coronary heart disease (CHD), in relation to food and meals. A case-control study of people diagnosed with CHD was used to evaluate preferences for full-fat versus low-fat versions of a range of foods, along with basic taste sensitivity and sensitivity to the bitter substance PROP. No significant differences in taste perception were obtained between the groups. However, in the pooled sample, a heightened sensitivity to sour taste was correlated with low BMI, while a heightened sensitiv-ity to bitter taste was correlated with low HDL-cholesterol, and high BMI and abdominal fat. This indicates a relationship between risk profile, taste sensitivity and food intake. Heightened sensitivity to bitter taste might result in lower consumption of fruit and vegeta-bles including those with a bitter tone. Preference related to total fat content per se was not confirmed as a risk factor for CHD. However, a less favourable metabolic profile were seen in the CHD group, indicating a higher intake of fat-rich and energy-rich food. The sensory effects of fat content were also evaluated, using two sauces as the vehicle. Overall, increased butter content resulted in decreased perception of all flavours except butter flavour, which increased, as did viscosity. However, a high fat content could not always be justified in terms of taste; large increases in energy content produced only small sensory differences.

    Data were also collected through a survey on eating habits and attitudes to health and food consumption. A cluster analysis revealed the existence of a gender-mixed overweight group, with less healthy eating habits. This group seems to consist of women less interested in health and men more interested in getting pleasure from food than general, demonstrating different reasons for unhealthy eating between genders. The essence of a good meal was found to include a number of demands on both food (a restaurant-type meal, a proper meal, sensory experience, satisfying and nourishing, and primary product quality) and context (spirit of community, aesthetic experience, tranquillity, and frame of mind), which might be relevant to the goal of changing people’s eating habits. Additionally, a deeper understanding was gained about meal experiences, with a focus on acceptance and satisfaction in relation to health outcome. Overall, the present findings could be of interest in health promotion and intervention when identifying individuals’ opportunities for and requirements of good meals, starting with one’s own familiar taste and context.

    List of papers
    1. The sensory effect of butter in culinary sacues
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The sensory effect of butter in culinary sacues
    2007 (English)In: Journal of Foodservice, E-ISSN 1748-0159, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 31-42Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A common belief is that when butter is added to food, a more desired flavour develops and that other flavours are enhanced. The aim of this study was to investigate how different amounts of added butter affected the perceived sensory characteristics of tomato sauce and chicken velouté using sensory analysis. In addition, a preference test was performed for tomato sauce. As more butter was added, the intensity of butter flavour and the viscosity increased, and the other flavour, aroma and taste attributes tested were perceived as being less intense in varying magnitudes. No significant difference was obtained in the preference study, except liking of the appearance among the men who preferred the sauce containing less butter. The results show that a large amount of butter is not always essential, unless it is the flavour and aroma of butter itself that is sought, or if it is necessary to balance the flavour, taste and texture attributes. These results could have a positive health effect for consumers if the use of fat in restaurant kitchens is reduced.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Blackwell Publishing, 2007
    Keywords
    Butter, dietary fat, energy content, flavour, sauce, sensory evaluation
    National Category
    Nutrition and Dietetics
    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3002 (URN)10.1111/j.1745-4506.2007.00044.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-10-07 Created: 2008-10-07 Last updated: 2019-03-25Bibliographically approved
    2. Preference for full-fat over low-fat foods among individuals suffering from coronary heart disease and healthy controls
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preference for full-fat over low-fat foods among individuals suffering from coronary heart disease and healthy controls
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: Physiology and Behavior, ISSN 0031-9384, E-ISSN 1873-507X, Vol. 98, no 4, p. 489-497Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Dietary behaviour can modify the risks for coronary heart disease (CHD). Dietary fat contributes to the sensory characteristics of many foods, but there are individual differences in liking for regular and reduced fat products. Preference for dietary fat might differ between healthy individuals and those of diagnosed CHD status. Preference for full-fat versus low-fat foods was assessed in a group suffering from CHD (N = 24) and a healthy control group (N = 41). Preferences were evaluated using a series of paired preference tests including 34 food pairs. Further, patterns across fat preference and a range of known risk factors for CHD were examined. The study was conducted in Sweden; March 2004 until May 2006. Overall the full-fat food items were preferred to the low-fat alternatives by both patients and control participants. The pattern of preference responses diverged significantly between patients and controls on only four of the 34 food items, in both directions, why preference related to total fat content per se is not confirmed as differentiating significantly between a group diagnosed with CHD compared to a healthy control group.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2009
    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-9002 (URN)10.1016/j.physbeh.2009.08.001 (DOI)000271358600017 ()19682474 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-70149085385 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2008-10-07 Created: 2008-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    3. Taste perception: an underlying risk factor for coronary heart disease?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Taste perception: an underlying risk factor for coronary heart disease?
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-15592 (URN)
    Available from: 2011-05-17 Created: 2011-05-17 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
    4. Association of gender, body mass index (BMI), eating habits, and attitudes in a middle-aged Swedish population
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association of gender, body mass index (BMI), eating habits, and attitudes in a middle-aged Swedish population
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-15593 (URN)
    Available from: 2011-05-17 Created: 2011-05-17 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
    5. Food and context: the essence of a good meal and a potential model for promoting health
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Food and context: the essence of a good meal and a potential model for promoting health
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-15594 (URN)
    Available from: 2011-05-17 Created: 2011-05-17 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
    6. Application of the meal environment as a tool to improve health?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Application of the meal environment as a tool to improve health?
    2008 (English)In: Journal of Foodservice, E-ISSN 1748-0159, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 80-86Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper was to look into meal experiences with a focus on acceptance and satisfaction in institutional eating locations, primarily in the caring sector. The situation and the context have the ability to influence the acceptability of a meal, as well as the amount eaten. Context factors can be at least important in determining acceptance of food and beverage as sensory factors. Variables such as location, physical and social environment, expectations, description of foods and choice can have an impact on the acceptance of a meal. In addition, proper response to guests' needs and requests can lead to satisfaction. Improvement of the atmosphere in the eating location during the meal has been shown to be a meaningful way to stabilize health and nutritional status, as well as having an impact on the energy intake in patients. When the food and beverage meets certain expectations, the room and the meeting can enhance the atmosphere, and therefore the entire quality of the meal experience.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Malden, Mass.: Blackwell Publishing, 2008
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3007 (URN)10.1111/j.1745-4506.2007.00084.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2008-10-07 Created: 2008-10-07 Last updated: 2019-03-25Bibliographically approved
  • 216.
    Rapp [Nordin], Erika
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Smakupplevelse: en riskindikator för övervikt och hjärtkärlsjukdom2008In: Gastronomiska forskning / [ed] Christina Fjellström, Stockholm: Gastonomiska akademien , 2008, p. 181-190Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 217.
    Rapp [Nordin], Erika
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Öström, Åsa
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Bosander, Fredrik
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    The sensory effect of butter in culinary sacues2007In: Journal of Foodservice, E-ISSN 1748-0159, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 31-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common belief is that when butter is added to food, a more desired flavour develops and that other flavours are enhanced. The aim of this study was to investigate how different amounts of added butter affected the perceived sensory characteristics of tomato sauce and chicken velouté using sensory analysis. In addition, a preference test was performed for tomato sauce. As more butter was added, the intensity of butter flavour and the viscosity increased, and the other flavour, aroma and taste attributes tested were perceived as being less intense in varying magnitudes. No significant difference was obtained in the preference study, except liking of the appearance among the men who preferred the sauce containing less butter. The results show that a large amount of butter is not always essential, unless it is the flavour and aroma of butter itself that is sought, or if it is necessary to balance the flavour, taste and texture attributes. These results could have a positive health effect for consumers if the use of fat in restaurant kitchens is reduced.

  • 218.
    Rapp [Nordin], Erika
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Öström, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Osika, Walter
    Englund, Anders
    Annett, Judith
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Preference for full-fat over low-fat foods among individuals suffering from coronary heart disease and healthy controls2009In: Physiology and Behavior, ISSN 0031-9384, E-ISSN 1873-507X, Vol. 98, no 4, p. 489-497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dietary behaviour can modify the risks for coronary heart disease (CHD). Dietary fat contributes to the sensory characteristics of many foods, but there are individual differences in liking for regular and reduced fat products. Preference for dietary fat might differ between healthy individuals and those of diagnosed CHD status. Preference for full-fat versus low-fat foods was assessed in a group suffering from CHD (N = 24) and a healthy control group (N = 41). Preferences were evaluated using a series of paired preference tests including 34 food pairs. Further, patterns across fat preference and a range of known risk factors for CHD were examined. The study was conducted in Sweden; March 2004 until May 2006. Overall the full-fat food items were preferred to the low-fat alternatives by both patients and control participants. The pattern of preference responses diverged significantly between patients and controls on only four of the 34 food items, in both directions, why preference related to total fat content per se is not confirmed as differentiating significantly between a group diagnosed with CHD compared to a healthy control group.

  • 219.
    Sampels, S.
    et al.
    Dept Food Sci, Swedish Univ Agr Sci (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Turner, T.
    Dept Food Sci, Swedish Univ Agr Sci (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Öström, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Pickova, J.
    Dept Food Sci, Swedish Univ Agr Sci (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Effects of -linolenic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid from linseed and algae, respectively, on reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus L.) muscle fatty acid composition2010In: Acta agriculturae Scandinavica. Section A, Animal science, ISSN 0906-4702, E-ISSN 1651-1972, Vol. 60, no 3, p. 175-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an earlier study, we concluded that pellet-fed reindeer could not elongate 18:3n - 3 (-linolenic acid - ALA) sufficiently towards long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC PUFA) and need supplementation of LC PUFA. The present work investigated that the addition of n - 3 LC PUFA to feed in combination with ALA would increase the LC PUFA in the meat. Two groups of reindeer were fed pellets containing either linseed cake or linseed cake combined with algae (Nannochloropsis oculata) for 6 weeks before slaughter. Dietary n - 6/n - 3 ratio had a distinct influence on meat fatty acid (FA) composition when comparing linseed and linseed algae-fed animals with animals fed a conventional diet. Increased dietary proportions of ALA and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) increased these FA in muscle and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and docosahexaenoic acid in the polar lipid fraction compared to the conventional-fed animals. We concluded that an increased proportion of dietary EPA might lead to an increased elongation towards DPA in muscle. Algae and linseed are possible additives to reindeer feed in order to assure a similar valuable FA composition as in pasturing animals.

  • 220. Sarlöv-Herlin, Ingrid
    et al.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Storstadsbornas matval formar landsbygdens landskap2008In: Ska hela Sverige leva? / [ed] Birgitta Johansson, Stockholm: Formas , 2008, p. 299-310Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 221.
    Scander, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Ah...du underbara Bordeaux2010In: Vinkällaren Grappe: matrikel 2010 / [ed] Barbro Henning, Stockholm: Vinkällaren Grappe , 2010, p. 24-25Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 222.
    Scander, Henrik
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Hovmästaren, någon att lita på?2008In: Martins Magasin, no 11, p. 6-8Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 223.
    Schönbeck, Filip
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Victorin, Carin
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    En förbättring eller ett steg närmare avveckling?: Ett nytt gemensamt klassificeringssystem för hotell2010Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Inledning: Hotel Stars Union bildades i slutet av år 2009 och är ett unikt samarbete mellan sju europeiska länder som inrättat ett gemensamt hotellklassificeringssystem. Detta skapade en debatt i hotellbranschen där ena sidan ansåg att det nya klassificeringssystemet redan var inaktuellt. Andra sidan ansåg att det var ett bra komplement till alternativa bedömningar. Denna studie är intressant av många orsaker, en av dem är att författarna har utrett det nya klassificeringssystemet och dess kriterier på ett helt nytt sätt.Syfte: Författarna önskade att utvärdera vad ett urval av branschföreträdare ansåg om det nya klassificeringssystemet utifrån dess styrkor, svagheter, möjligheter och hot.

    Metod och material: För att kunna utreda syftet använde sig författarna utav en kvalitativ intervjustudie. Sex branschföreträdare intervjuades utifrån de fyra tidigare nämnda variablerna.

    Resultat: Majoriteten av intervjupersonerna ansåg, trots uppdateringen och ett internationellt samarbete, att klassificeringssystemet var förlegat. Denna uppfattning grundade de främst i att systemet saknade kriterier som var relevanta för gästen. Framförallt saknade klassificeringssystemet mjuka värden, till exempel bedömning av bemötande och renlighet.

    Slutsats: Den slutsats som författarna kom fram till var att klassificeringssystemet var förlegat även om det fanns målgrupper som kunde ha användning av det. Författarnas bedömning var att det fanns förutsättningar för klassificeringssystemet att lyckas om mjuka värden integrerades i kriterierna.

    Nyckelord: Branschföreträdare, Hotel Stars Union, Stjärnklassificering, SWOT.

  • 224.
    Sjögren, Per
    et al.
    Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Sect Clin Nutr & Metab, Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Becker, Wulf
    Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Sect Clin Nutr & Metab, Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Warensjö, Eva
    Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Sect Clin Nutr & Metab, Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Olsson, Erika
    Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Sect Clin Nutr & Metab, Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Byberg, Liisa
    Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Karlström, Brita
    Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Sect Clin Nutr & Metab, Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci, Sect Clin Nutr & Metab, Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Mediterranean and carbohydrate-restricted diets and mortality among elderly men: a cohort study in Sweden2010In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 92, no 4, p. 967-974Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Comparative studies on dietary patterns and long-term mortality are sparse.

    Objective: The objective was to examine the relations between 10-y mortality and adherence to the World Health Organization dietary guidelines [Healthy Diet Indicator (HDI)], a Mediterranean-like diet, and a carbohydrate-restricted (CR) diet in elderly Swedish men.

    Design: Dietary habits were determined by 7-d dietary records in a population-based longitudinal study of 924 Swedish men (age: 71 ± 1 y). The HDI score (–1 to 8 points), the Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS; 0–8 points), and the CR score (2–20 points) were calculated for each participant. Nonadequate reporters of energy intake were identified (n = 413). Mortality was registered during a median follow-up of 10.2 y. Cox proportional hazards regression, with multivariable adjustments, was used to determine the effects of adherence to each dietary pattern.

    Results: Two hundred fifteen and 88 subjects died of all-cause and cardiovascular disease, respectively. In all individuals, risk relations to mortality for each SD increment in the scores were observed for only MDS, with an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 0.83 (95% CI: 0.70, 0.99). Among adequate dietary reporters (n = 511), adjusted HRs for each SD increment in scores were enhanced for MDS (ie, 0.71; 95% CI: 0.55, 0.92) for all-cause mortality and 0.63 (95% CI: 0.42, 0.96) for cardiovascular mortality. Corresponding HRs for CR diet score were 1.19 (95% CI: 0.97, 1.45) for all-cause mortality and 1.44 (95% CI: 1.03, 2.02) for cardiovascular mortality.

    Conclusion: Adherence to a Mediterranean-like dietary pattern reduced mortality, whereas adherence to a CR dietary pattern appeared to increase mortality in elderly Swedish men, especially when only adequate dietary reporters were considered.

  • 225.
    Sjörling, Jenny
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Carlsson, Malin
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Marknadsföring i salladsdisken: Hur sensoriska beskrivningar påverkar konsumenters val av småbladssallat2010Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Inledning: I dagens matbutiker är utbudet av produkter stort, vilket kan göra det svårare för konsumenter att veta vad de skall köpa. Vid val av småbladssallat, kan det vara svårt att veta vad som skiljer de olika sorterna åt och vad de bäst kan användas till. Att beskriva sallaternas smaker och dofter med ord kan hjälpa konsumenterna att välja. Syftet med studien var att undersöka effekten av sensoriska beskrivningar i valet av småbladssallat hos konsumenter. Metod och material: Den metod som användes var observation och genomfördes på 59 respondenter. Observationen var uppdelad i tre sessioner och skedde under tre dagar, där de 59 respondenterna återkom varje dag. Alla tre sessionerna innehöll tre uppgifter, som förutom den första uppgiften såg likadana ut. Respondenterna skulle i Session 1 välja en sallatssort utefter sortnamnet, i Session 2 efter USP och i Session 3 efter sensorisk beskrivning. De resterande två uppgifterna i varje session bestod av provsmakning och ”ta med hem sallat”. De tre sallaterna som användes i observationen var Mache, Röd Mangold och Ruccola. Resultatet visade att respondenternas val av sallat påverkades av de sensoriska beskrivningarna. Framförallt var de utvalda orden, samt hur sallaterna smakade, betydelsefullt för deras val. Utifrån resultatet kunde också ett förändringsmönster uttydas, vilket visade att vissa respondenter ändrade sitt val av sallat när de fick se den sensoriska beskrivningen, jämfört med sortnamnet. Slutsatsen blev att sensoriska beskrivningar påverkade respondenternas val av småbladssallat, både synmässigt och smakmässigt. Beskrivningarnas utvalda ord och sallaternas smak var viktiga för det slutliga valet.

    Nyckelord: Beslutsfattande, neofobi, sinnenas påverkan, unique selling point.

  • 226.
    Skovbjerg, Susann
    et al.
    Inst Biomed, Dept Infect Med Clin Bacteriol,Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Martner, Anna
    Inst Biomed, Dept Infect Med Clin Bacteriol, Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hynsjö, Lars
    Inst Biomed, Dept Clin Chem & Transfus Med, Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hessle, Christina
    Inst Biomed, Dept Infect Med Clin Bacteriol, Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olsen, Ingar
    Inst Oral Biol, Fac Dent, Univ Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Dewhirst, Floyd E.
    Sch Dent Med, Harvard Univ, Boston MA, USA.
    Tham, Wilhelm
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Wold, Agnes E.
    Inst Biomed, Dept Infect Med Clin Bacteriol, Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria Induce Different Patterns of Cytokine Production in Human Mononuclear Cells Irrespective of Taxonomic Relatedness2010In: Journal of Interferon and Cytokine Research, ISSN 1079-9907, E-ISSN 1557-7465, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 23-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Upon bacterial stimulation, tissue macrophages produce a variety of cytokines that orchestrate the immune response that clears the infection. We have shown that Gram-positives induce higher levels of interleukin-12 (IL-12), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) than do Gram-negatives, which instead induce more of IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10. Here, we study whether these patterns follows or crosses taxonomic borders. PBMCs from blood donors were incubated with UV-inactivated bacteria representing 37 species from five phyla. IL-12, TNF, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 were measured in the supernatants after 24 h and IFN-γ after 5 days. Irrespective of phylogenetic position, Gram-positive bacteria induced much more IL-12 (nine times more on average) and IFN-γ (seven times), more TNF (three times), and slightly more IL-1β (1.5 times) than did Gram-negatives, which instead induced more IL-6 (1.5 times), IL-8 (1.9 times), and IL-10 (3.3 times) than did Gram-positives. A notable exception was the Gram-positive Listeria monocytogenes, which induced very little IL-12, IFN-γ, and TNF. The results confirm the fundamental difference in innate immune responses to Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, which crosses taxonomic borders and probably reflects differences in cell wall structure.

  • 227. Sundström, G.
    et al.
    Ungvari, P.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Strömberg, E.
    Skoglund, L.
    The pharmacy, the primary health care develop a forum together for self care, health counselling and drug dispensing2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 228.
    Swahn, Johan
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    If I can taste it, I want it...: sensory marketing in grocery retail stores2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Avhandlingen syftar till att undersöka hur man kan utveckla ett kognitivt baserat sensoriskt språk för olika produkter i detaljhandel och därefter använda det i marknadsföringen i butiksledet. Vidare undersökts om denna marknadsföring har någon effekt på konsumenternas val av produkt. Inom forskningsprocessen, tvärvetenskapligprocess, används metodik och teorier inom sensorik, lingvistik (semantik) och marknadsföring (konsumentbeteende).

    I en sensorisk studie jämfördes en tränad sensorisk panel och en grupp konsumenters förmåga att beskriva och analysera olika produkters sensoriska egenskaper. Resultatet visade på att de två gruppernas beskrivningar av de olika produkterna var relativt överensstämmande. Att beskriva smak verbalt anses som relativt svårt och komplext. Baserat på det sensoriska resultatet analyserades egenskapsorden ytterligare utifrån ett lingvistiskt perspektiv, semantik. Den semantiska analysen, empiriska resultat och teori, påvisade en möjlighet att utvinna värdefulla attribut från mer diffusa attribut, t.ex. ”nötig smak” – som kan härledas från sort, e.g. ”mandel” som i sin tur innefattar olika egenskaper i form a smak, doft, textur etc.

    För att ta reda på om de sensoriska beskrivningarna hade någon effekt på konsumenternas beteende och val i butik genomfördes två empiriska studier. Konsumenternas val av produkt i butik studerades utifrån olika variabler; sensoriska beskrivningar, sensoriska och semantiska beskrivningar, sortnamn, pris, och smak preferens. Resultatet visade att de sensoriska beskrivningarna påverkade konsumenternas val av produkt, t.ex. när bara sort namn kommunicerades var man benägen att välja en känd sort, men när man använde sig av sensoriska beskrivningar skiftade konsumenternas val och de var inte längre styrda av det mer välkända sortnamnet.

    Vidare visade det sig att konsumenterna vara mindre priskänslig när sensoriska beskrivningar visades. Konklusion: Användningen av ett sensoriskt språk i marknadsföringen av de undersökta livsmedlen påverkade konsumenternas val av produkt i butik samt att konsumenterna tenderade till att vara mindre priskänslig när sensoriska beskrivningar användes.

    List of papers
    1. Sensory and semantic language model for red apples
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sensory and semantic language model for red apples
    2010 (Swedish)In: Journal of sensory studies, ISSN 0887-8250, E-ISSN 1745-459X, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 591-615Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This study (1) examines the sensory attributes of a large group of red apples and compares consumer perceptions of them with those of a trained sensory panel; and (2) uses a sensory semantic frame classification to analyze the vocabulary used. Descriptive analysis was carried out with the trained panel, while a simplified version of the repertory grid method was used for one-to-one interviews with consumers. The perceptions expressed by the consumers correlated quite well with the terminology used by the trained panel, and the two groups used many identical words when describing the apples' texture, flavor and taste according to partial least squares regression. A sensory semantic frame was constructed based on the vocabulary used by the two groups. The combination of sensory and semantic analysis could be one way of extracting valuable words for use in contexts such as product description for marketing purposes in retail stores.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Malden, USA: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2010
    National Category
    Social Sciences Food Science
    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-12426 (URN)10.1111/j.1745-459X.2010.00296.x (DOI)000280646100008 ()2-s2.0-78149257632 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2010-11-09 Created: 2010-11-09 Last updated: 2019-03-26Bibliographically approved
    2. Green frames: a semantic study in the lexicon of babyleaf salad
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Green frames: a semantic study in the lexicon of babyleaf salad
    2011 (English)In: Studia Neophilologica, ISSN 0039-3274, E-ISSN 1651-2308, Vol. 83, no 2, p. 149-168Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    How do we communicate a sensory experience of food? For example, we most probably would describe the sensory experience of a food product as “It was good, I liked it”, but would probably not be able to describe the sensory characteristics of the various products with some precision. It seems that sensory aspects vary in how difficult they are to express verbally (Engen 1991); we do not use the same degree of precision of taste, smell and texture as we do to vision (Meilgaard et al. 2006). It has been argued that perceptual descriptions of colours and odours are based on different organizational principles (Richardson and Zucco 1989). Colours seem to involve a lexical system that is organized in memory, while odour perception is characterized by flexibility and adaptability but with a nonverbal coding system (Engen 1987). About 400,000 odorous substances exist, and it is not clear how many of these are similar or how many classes there might be (Engen 1982). Thus, to characterize the perceived odour and flavour (in which odour is involved) is a complex task (Amerine et al. 1965). The human being is equipped with mechanisms that could guarantee that we, to some extent, perceive the same thing with our “higher” senses, vision and audition. But the “lower” senses in the oro-nasal cavity do not function with the same accuracy when it comes to how we perceive things – they rely more on learning, memories and experiences (Köster 2003). Other circumstances such as gender and age could of course also affect the ability to detect and identify different sensory properties (Richardson and Zucco 1989). Without a description of the sensory qualities, the individual profiles of the item in question could not be captured.

    From a linguistic point of view, sensory studies seem to include many aspects highly relevant to different linguistic areas. Since sensory descriptions of food mainly operate with words, such as crisp, tender and nutty, including their conceptual content, lexical and cognitive semantics seem to be a fruitful approach to studying and developing sensory descriptions. But in spite of the central role of the lexicon in describing sensory qualities of food, surprisingly little attention has been paid to linguistic aspects of sensory language, which may be due to the fact that sensory studies and linguistics belong to different academic disciplines. Briefly, in sensory studies, some guidelines are usually used for words and definitions, e.g. the ISO standard and ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) Noble et al. (1987) created a system for aromatic flavour for wine arranged in a partly taxonomic and semantic domain-based wheel, i.e. rather general semantic domains such as “fruity” and “nutty”. The specific-general dimension in the wheel is obvious; the general “fruity” leads to the more specific “berry” and “strawberry” in the outer tier of the wheel. More recently Pickering and Demiglio (2008) used the same model for a white wine’s mouthfeel. There are a large number of studies where sensory vocabularies are discussed and developed; some recent examples are Duffrin and Pomper (2006), Carunchia Whetstine et al. (2007), Hongsoongnern and Chambers (2008) and Civille et al. (2010) regarding pawpaw fruit puree, Cheddar cheese, tomatoes and almonds respectively. However inspiring and important in sensory studies and marketing, these works are not always very systematic from a linguistic point of view. Several of the studies mentioned above use a wheel model to categorize the sensory descriptors, but as may be seen in for example Duffrin and Pomper (2006), the wheel form can make the semantic subcategorization tricky; in this “pawpaw fruit puree sensory wheel”, the words are not categorized at all except their grouping into different sensory dimensions such as texture, flavour etc. Besides, the wheel form seems to be best suited for one sensory dimension at a time, as may be seen in for example the wine aroma wheel of Noble et al. (1987). In this wheel, though, the word groups are sometimes a bit fuzzy semantically; for example, olives, asparagus and green beans are grouped together as a subcategory of “canned/cooked”, and the taxonomies are often asymmetrical in that the same word is sometimes used on several levels (for example “nutty” and “floral”, which both occupy two levels in the wheel), while the corresponding levels in other sectors show specification (“fruity” and on the next level “tropical fruit”). It may be assumed that a cross-disciplinary meeting between sensory studies and linguistics could provide interesting views leading to expanded awareness of the importance of semantics in the future development of different sensory vocabularies, as shown in a study by Swahn et al. (2010).

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London: Routledge, 2011
    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Food Science
    Research subject
    Household Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-16656 (URN)10.1080/00393274.2011.603905 (DOI)000297978500001 ()2-s2.0-84857525570 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2011-08-30 Created: 2011-08-30 Last updated: 2019-03-26Bibliographically approved
    3. Sensory description labels for food affect consumer product choice
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sensory description labels for food affect consumer product choice
    2012 (English)In: European Journal of Marketing, ISSN 0309-0566, E-ISSN 1758-7123, Vol. 46, no 11/12, p. 1628-1646Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - This observational study set out to investigate the effect of sensory description labels on consumer choice of apples in a grocery retail store.

    Design/methodology/approach - An independent observation study was conducted in a retail grocery store setting. A total of 1623 consumers were observed over a four day period in four different sessions, each using three apple varieties (JONAGOLD, INGRID MARIE, and ELISE). Marketing strategies differed between the sessions as follows: (1) sort name labelling only, (2) sort name and sensory description labelling, (3) sort name and sensory semantic description labelling, and (4) sort name labelling and allowing consumers to taste the apples before choosing.

    Findings - Consumer product choice was affected by the sensory description labels. When only the sort name was given on the label, the consumers tended to choose INGRID MARIE, which has a strong sort name. With the addition of sensory description labels, the consumer choice shifted to ELISE, which had been chosen with a low frequency when only sort name was given, but was chosen with a high frequency when sensory description labelling was used.

    Research limitations/implications - The study was limited to red apples and one national market.

    Practical implications - Practitioners, managers, and marketers may benefit from using proper sensory labelling as a marketing tool for various food products, such as a apples, in a grocery retail store.

    Originality/value - This study shows the importance and value of sensory description label marketing for food products in grocery retail stores. Little attention has previously been paid to the research area within sensory marketing communication concerning the interplay of sensory perception of food and the formulation of marketing labels, or taste marketing. This paper also addresses the possible interaction between the disciplines of sensory and marketing science

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Emerald, 2012
    Keywords
    Labelling, decision making, sensory description, food, grocery retail store, preference
    National Category
    Economics and Business
    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-16657 (URN)10.1108/03090561211260013 (DOI)000312765800009 ()2-s2.0-84869034586 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2011-08-30 Created: 2011-08-30 Last updated: 2019-03-26Bibliographically approved
    4. Different sensory marketing cues affect consumers’ food choice behaviour
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Different sensory marketing cues affect consumers’ food choice behaviour
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    By combining different methods and theories from sensory analysis and consumer behaviour, we investigated consumer choice of food products in a grocery retail store according to different sensory marketing cues across three observational experiments. Depending on the specific experiment in which they participated, consumers made their choice based on visual appearance, taste, and price; or descriptive labels, taste, and price. When presented with the opportunity to taste the products and examine their prices, the consumers were less likely to change their minds after making their initial choice if this choice was made on the basis of sensory description labels. Consumers were less price sensitive when sensory description labels were used. Our results reveal some practical implications for how to use a sensory language for food products as a marketing tool, and how to combine the research disciplines of sensory analysis and consumer behaviour.

    National Category
    Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Social Sciences
    Research subject
    Household Science; Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-16658 (URN)
    Available from: 2011-08-30 Created: 2011-08-30 Last updated: 2019-03-26Bibliographically approved
  • 229.
    Swahn, Johan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Mossberg, Lena
    University of Gothenburg, School of Business, Economics and Law, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Öström, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Different sensory marketing cues affect consumers’ food choice behaviourManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    By combining different methods and theories from sensory analysis and consumer behaviour, we investigated consumer choice of food products in a grocery retail store according to different sensory marketing cues across three observational experiments. Depending on the specific experiment in which they participated, consumers made their choice based on visual appearance, taste, and price; or descriptive labels, taste, and price. When presented with the opportunity to taste the products and examine their prices, the consumers were less likely to change their minds after making their initial choice if this choice was made on the basis of sensory description labels. Consumers were less price sensitive when sensory description labels were used. Our results reveal some practical implications for how to use a sensory language for food products as a marketing tool, and how to combine the research disciplines of sensory analysis and consumer behaviour.

  • 230.
    Swahn, Johan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Mossberg, Lena
    School of Business, Economics and Law, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Öström, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Sensory description labels for food affect consumer product choice2012In: European Journal of Marketing, ISSN 0309-0566, E-ISSN 1758-7123, Vol. 46, no 11/12, p. 1628-1646Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - This observational study set out to investigate the effect of sensory description labels on consumer choice of apples in a grocery retail store.

    Design/methodology/approach - An independent observation study was conducted in a retail grocery store setting. A total of 1623 consumers were observed over a four day period in four different sessions, each using three apple varieties (JONAGOLD, INGRID MARIE, and ELISE). Marketing strategies differed between the sessions as follows: (1) sort name labelling only, (2) sort name and sensory description labelling, (3) sort name and sensory semantic description labelling, and (4) sort name labelling and allowing consumers to taste the apples before choosing.

    Findings - Consumer product choice was affected by the sensory description labels. When only the sort name was given on the label, the consumers tended to choose INGRID MARIE, which has a strong sort name. With the addition of sensory description labels, the consumer choice shifted to ELISE, which had been chosen with a low frequency when only sort name was given, but was chosen with a high frequency when sensory description labelling was used.

    Research limitations/implications - The study was limited to red apples and one national market.

    Practical implications - Practitioners, managers, and marketers may benefit from using proper sensory labelling as a marketing tool for various food products, such as a apples, in a grocery retail store.

    Originality/value - This study shows the importance and value of sensory description label marketing for food products in grocery retail stores. Little attention has previously been paid to the research area within sensory marketing communication concerning the interplay of sensory perception of food and the formulation of marketing labels, or taste marketing. This paper also addresses the possible interaction between the disciplines of sensory and marketing science

  • 231.
    Swahn, Johan
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Öström, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Larsson, Ulf
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Sensory and semantic language model for red apples2010In: Journal of sensory studies, ISSN 0887-8250, E-ISSN 1745-459X, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 591-615Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study (1) examines the sensory attributes of a large group of red apples and compares consumer perceptions of them with those of a trained sensory panel; and (2) uses a sensory semantic frame classification to analyze the vocabulary used. Descriptive analysis was carried out with the trained panel, while a simplified version of the repertory grid method was used for one-to-one interviews with consumers. The perceptions expressed by the consumers correlated quite well with the terminology used by the trained panel, and the two groups used many identical words when describing the apples' texture, flavor and taste according to partial least squares regression. A sensory semantic frame was constructed based on the vocabulary used by the two groups. The combination of sensory and semantic analysis could be one way of extracting valuable words for use in contexts such as product description for marketing purposes in retail stores.

  • 232.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Bordsplacering2008In: Service på restaurang / [ed] Lena Mossberg, Inga-Britt Gustafsson, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2008, p. 25-35Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 233.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Brutna och levande smaklinjer: om den praktiska kunskapens betydelse för vetenskaplig forskning om äldre måltidskultur2004Other (Other academic)
  • 234.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Brännvinsbordet: smakintensitet från lagringens hyllor2006In: Årets svenska måltidslitteratur 2006 / [ed] Barbro Stanley, Ann Häppich, Grythyttan: Måltidens hus i Norden , 2006, p. 44-46Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 235.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Brödets geografi: 2008In: Forskning och framsteg, ISSN 0015-7937, no 1, p. 18-20Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 236.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    City branding through food culture: insights from the regional branding level2011In: City branding: theory and cases / [ed] Keith Dinnie, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011, p. 62-69Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 237.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Crispbread dәn tutmuş ciabatta ya qәdәr2006In: Kulina Elmi-Praktiki Jurnal, Vol. 18, p. 22-24Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 238.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Danish food culture: [Recension av Madkultur – opbrud og tradition]2004In: Ethnologia Scandinavica, ISSN 0348-9698, E-ISSN 0348-9698, p. 200-201Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 239.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Den politiska måltiden2004In: Tvärsnitt, ISSN 0348-7997, no 4, p. 57-60Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 240.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Den röda nationaldagens mat2005In: Årets svenska måltidslitteratur 2005, Grythyttan: Måltidens hus i Norden , 2005, p. 42-43Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 241.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Femaspektsmodellen: en metod att undersöka den lokala måltidskulturens revitalisering2006In: Festmåltid och vardagsmat: föredrag vid ett symposium till Anders Salomonssons minne 3–4 juni 2005 / [ed] Mats Hellspong, Uppsala: Kungl. Gustav Adolfs Akademien för svensk folkkultur , 2006, p. 103-112Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 242.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    From crispbread to ciabatta2005In: Culinary cultures of Europe: identity, diversity and dialogue / [ed] Darra Goldstein, Kathrin Merkle, Strasbourg: Council of Europe Publishing , 2005, p. 423-434Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 243.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    God smak, dålig smak och avsmak: om den kulturella och korrekta smaken2008In: Smaksinnet och den goda smaken: ett seminarium om människans smaksinne : [januari 2005] / [ed] Marieanne Alsne, Inga-Britt Gustafsson, Örebro: Örebro universitet , 2008, p. 51-58Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 244.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Knyt tallriken till marken: ursprungsgestaltning i den kommersiella restaurangen2006In: Mat: genealogi och gestaltning / [ed] Anna Burstedt, Cecilia Fredriksson, Håkan Jönsson, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2006, p. 55-70Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 245.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Känslan som restaurangupplevelse: symbolik och estetik i den kommersiella måltiden2005In: Kulturstudier i Sverige: nationell forskarkonferens, Norrköping 13-15 juni, 2005, Norrköping, Sweden / [ed] Bodil Axelsson, Johan Fornäs, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press , 2005, p. 1015-1026Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 246.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Liselotte Bergström: Gräddat – Brödkultur under järnåldern i östra Mälardalen. Avhandlingsanmälan2009In: RIG: Kulturhistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0035-5267, E-ISSN 2002-3863, no 1, p. 46-49Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 247.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Matkulturen i Tornedalen2008In: Kangos: framtidslandet / [ed] Rolf Berggård, Christer Frånlund, Uppsala: Uppsala Publishing House , 2008, p. 95-96Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 248.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Mediterranean food and its influences abroad2005In: Ethnologia Scandinavica, ISSN 0348-9698, E-ISSN 0348-9698, Vol. 35, p. 100-101Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 249.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Måltidskultur – värde och form för kulturell evolution?2007In: Den medvetna måltidskunskapen: en vänbok till Inga-Britt Gustafsson / [ed] Richard Tellström, Lena Mossberg, Inger M. Jonsson, Örebro: Örebro universitetsbibliotek , 2007, p. 189-198Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 250.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Norwegian Food Culture [av Virginie Amilien, Erling Krogh (red)]2008In: Ethnologia Scandinavica, ISSN 0348-9698, E-ISSN 0348-9698, Vol. 38, p. 195-196Article, book review (Other academic)
234567 201 - 250 of 301
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf