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  • 42401.
    van de Veen, Roelf
    et al.
    Center of Expertise for Long Term Care, Vilans, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Versteeg, Marleen
    Center of Expertise for Long Term Care, Vilans, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Mak, Sabina
    Center of Expertise for Long Term Care, Vilans, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Bodnarova, Bernadina
    Institute for Labour and Family Research, Staré Mesto, Slovakia.
    Selestiakova, Katarina
    Institute for Labour and Family Research, Staré Mesto, Slovakia.
    Hanson, Elizabeth
    The Swedish National Family Care Competence Centre, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gunnel
    Department of Urology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Santini, Sara
    INRCA, Italian National Research Centre on Aging, MOPACT EU FP7, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.
    Quattrini, Sabrina
    INRCA, Italian National Research Centre on Aging, MOPACT EU FP7, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    INRCA, Italian National Research Centre on Aging, MOPACT EU FP7, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.
    Quality of life of carers managing incontinence in Europe: SURVEY REPORT May 20112011Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 42402. Van de Velde, Tommie
    et al.
    Thevissen, Eric
    Persson, Rutger G.
    Johansson, Carina B.
    Örebro universitet, Hälsoakademin.
    De Bruyn, Hugo
    Two-Year Outcome with Nobel Direct® Implants: A Retrospective Radiographic and Microbiologic Study in 10 Patients2009Inngår i: Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, ISSN 1523-0899, E-ISSN 1708-8208, Vol. 11, nr 3, s. 183-193Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The Nobel Direct® implant (Nobel Biocare AB, Göteborg, Sweden) was developed to minimize marginal bone resorption and to result in "soft tissue integration" for an optimized aesthetic outcome. However, conflicting results have been presented in the literature. The aim of this present study was to evaluate the clinical and microbiologic outcomes of Nobel Direct implants.

    Materials and Methods: Ten partially edentulous subjects without evidence of active periodontitis (mean age 55 years) received 12 Nobel Direct implants. Implants were loaded with single crowns after a healing period of 3 to 6 months. Treatment outcomes were assessed at month 24. Routine clinical assessments, intraoral radiographs, and microbiologic samplings were made. Histologic analysis of one failing implant and chemical spectroscopy around three unused implants was performed. Paired Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for the evaluation of bone loss; otherwise, descriptive analysis was performed.

    Results: Implants were functionally loaded after 3 to 6 months. At 2 years, the mean bone loss of remaining implants was 2.0 mm (SD ± 1.1 mm; range: 0.0–3.4 mm). Three out of 12 implants with an early mean bone loss >3 mm were lost. The surviving implants showed increasing bone loss between 6 and 24 months (p = .028). Only 3 out of the 12 implants were considered successful and showed bone loss of <1.7 mm after 2 years. High rates of pathogens, including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium spp., Porphyromonas gingivalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Tanerella forsythia, were found. Chemical spectroscopy revealed, despite the normal signals from Ti, O, and C, also peaks of P, F, S, N, and Ca. A normal histologic image of osseointegration was observed in the apical part of the retrieved implant.

    Conclusion: Radiographic evidence and 25% implant failures are indications of a low success rate. High counts and prevalence of significant pathogens were found at surviving implants. Although extensive bone loss had occurred in the coronal part, the apical portion of the implant showed some bone to implant integration.

  • 42403.
    van den Berg, Lisa
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete.
    Postkontraktuella förpliktelser i samverkansavtal2018Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
  • 42404.
    Van den Berg, Martin
    et al.
    World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Research on Environmental Health Risk Assessment and Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Faculties of Veterinary Medicine, Science and University Medical Center, Universiteit Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Birnbaum, Linda S.
    National Health & Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, United States Environmental Protection Agency Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA.
    Denison, Michael
    Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California at Davis, Davis, California, USA.
    De Vito, Mike
    National Health & Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, United States Environmental Protection Agency Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA.
    Farland, William
    Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), NW, Washington, District of Columbia, USA.
    Feeley, Mark
    Chemical Health Hazard Assessment Division, Bureau of Chemical Safety, Health Canada, Tunney’s Pasture, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
    Fiedler, Heidelore
    United Nations Environment Program Chemicals, International Environment House, Châtelaine (GE), Switzerland.
    Håkansson, Helen
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Unit of Environmental Health Risk Assessment, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hanberg, Annika
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Unit of Environmental Health Risk Assessment, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Haws, Laurie
    ChemRisk, Austin, Texas, USA.
    Rose, Martin
    Central Science Laboratory, Sand Hutton, York, United Kingdom.
    Safe, Stephen
    Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology, Texas A&M University, Texas, USA.
    Schrenk, Dieter
    Department of Food Chemistry and Environmental Toxicology, University of Kaiserslautern, Kaiserslautern, Germany.
    Tohyama, Chiharu
    Division of Environmental Health Sciences, Center for Disease Biology and Integrative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo Japan.
    Tritscher, Angelika
    nternational Programme on Chemical Safety, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Tuomisto, Jouko
    National Public Health Institute, Department of Environmental Health, Kuopio, Finland.
    Tysklind, Mats
    Environmental Chemistry, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Walker, Nigel
    National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA.
    Peterson, Richard E.
    School of Pharmacy and Molecular and Environmental Toxicology Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, USA.
    The 2005 World Health Organization reevaluation of human and mammalian toxic equivalency factors for dioxins and dioxin-like compounds2006Inngår i: Toxicological Sciences, ISSN 1096-6080, E-ISSN 1096-0929, Vol. 93, nr 2, s. 223-241Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In June 2005, a World Health Organization (WHO)-International Programme on Chemical Safety expert meeting was held in Geneva during which the toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) for dioxin-like compounds, including some polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), were reevaluated. For this reevaluation process, the refined TEF database recently published by Haws et al. (2006, Toxicol. Sci. 89, 4-30) was used as a starting point. Decisions about a TEF value were made based on a combination of unweighted relative effect potency (REP) distributions from this database, expert judgment, and point estimates. Previous TEFs were assigned in increments of 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, etc., but for this reevaluation, it was decided to use half order of magnitude increments on a logarithmic scale of 0.03, 0.1, 0.3, etc. Changes were decided by the expert panel for 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (PeCDF) (TEF = 0.3), 1,2,3,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (PeCDF) (TEF = 0.03), octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and octachlorodibenzofuran (TEFs = 0.0003), 3,4,4',5-tetrachlorbiphenyl (PCB 81) (TEF = 0.0003), 3,3',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 169) (TEF = 0.03), and a single TEF value (0.00003) for all relevant mono-ortho-substituted PCBs. Additivity, an important prerequisite of the TEF concept was again confirmed by results from recent in vivo mixture studies. Some experimental evidence shows that non-dioxin-like aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists/antagonists are able to impact the overall toxic potency of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and related compounds, and this needs to be investigated further. Certain individual and groups of compounds were identified for possible future inclusion in the TEF concept, including 3,4,4'-TCB (PCB 37), polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans, mixed polyhalogenated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans, polyhalogenated naphthalenes, and polybrominated biphenyls. Concern was expressed about direct application of the TEF/total toxic equivalency (TEQ) approach to abiotic matrices, such as soil, sediment, etc., for direct application in human risk assessment. This is problematic as the present TEF scheme and TEQ methodology are primarily intended for estimating exposure and risks via oral ingestion (e.g., by dietary intake). A number of future approaches to determine alternative or additional TEFs were also identified. These included the use of a probabilistic methodology to determine TEFs that better describe the associated levels of uncertainty and "systemic" TEFs for blood and adipose tissue and TEQ for body burden.

  • 42405.
    van den Berg, Martin
    et al.
    Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS) and WHO Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health Risk Assessment, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Denison, Michael S.
    Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis CA, USA.
    Birnbaum, Linda S.
    National Cancer Institute and National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park NC, USA.
    DeVito, Michael J.
    Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park NC, USA.
    Fiedler, Heidelore
    United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), Geneva, Switzerland.
    Falandysz, Jerzy
    University of Gdańsk, Gdańsk, Poland.
    Rose, Martin
    Food and Environment Research Agency, York, United Kingdom.
    Schrenk, Dieter
    Department of Food Chemistry & Environmental Toxicology, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Kaiserslautern, Germany.
    Safe, Stephen
    Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology, Texas A&M University, College Station TX, USA.
    Tohyama, Chiharu
    Laboratory of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
    Tritscher, Angelika
    Department of Food Safety and Zoonoses, World Health Organization (WHO), Geneva, Switzerland.
    Tysklind, Mats
    Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Peterson, Richard E.
    Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison WI, USA.
    Polybrominated Dibenzo-p-Dioxins, Dibenzofurans, and Biphenyls: Inclusion in the Toxicity Equivalency Factor Concept for Dioxin-Like Compounds2013Inngår i: Toxicological Sciences, ISSN 1096-6080, E-ISSN 1096-0929, Vol. 133, nr 2, s. 197-208Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2011, a joint World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) expert consultation took place, during which the possible inclusion of brominated analogues of the dioxin-like compounds in the WHO Toxicity Equivalency Factor (TEF) scheme was evaluated. The expert panel concluded that polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PBDDs), dibenzofurans (PBDFs), and some dioxin-like biphenyls (dl-PBBs) may contribute significantly in daily human background exposure to the total dioxin toxic equivalencies (TEQs). These compounds are also commonly found in the aquatic environment. Available data for fish toxicity were evaluated for possible inclusion in the WHO-UNEP TEF scheme (van den Berg et al., 1998). Because of the limited database, it was decided not to derive specific WHO-UNEP TEFs for fish, but for ecotoxicological risk assessment, the use of specific relative effect potencies (REPs) from fish embryo assays is recommended. Based on the limited mammalian REP database for these brominated compounds, it was concluded that sufficient differentiation from the present TEF values of the chlorinated analogues (van den Berg et al., 2006) was not possible. However, the REPs for PBDDs, PBDFs, and non-ortho dl-PBBs in mammals closely follow those of the chlorinated analogues, at least within one order of magnitude. Therefore, the use of similar interim TEF values for brominated and chlorinated congeners for human risk assessment is recommended, pending more detailed information in the future.

  • 42406.
    van den Berg, Martin
    et al.
    Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Kypke, Karin
    WHO/UNEP Reference Laboratory, State Institute for Chemical and Veterinary Analysis of Food (CVUA), Freiburg, Germany.
    Kotz, Alexander
    WHO/UNEP Reference Laboratory, State Institute for Chemical and Veterinary Analysis of Food (CVUA), Freiburg, Germany.
    Tritscher, Angelika
    Department of Food Safety and Zoonoses, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Lee, Seoung Yong
    Department of Food Safety and Zoonoses, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Magulova, Katarina
    Stockholm Convention Secretariat, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), International Environment House, Châtelaine, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Fiedler, Heidelore
    Division of Technology, Industry and Economics/Chemical Branch, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), Chemin des Anémones, Châtelaine, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Malisch, Rainer
    WHO/UNEP Reference Laboratory, State Institute for Chemical and Veterinary Analysis of Food (CVUA), Freiburg, Germany.
    WHO/UNEP global surveys of PCDDs, PCDFs, PCBs and DDTs in human milk and benefit – risk evaluation of breastfeeding2017Inngår i: Archives of Toxicology, ISSN 0340-5761, E-ISSN 1432-0738, Vol. 91, nr 1, s. 83-96Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Since 1987, the World Health Organization (WHO) carried out global surveys on polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in human milk. This study presents a review of the three most recent surveys from 2000 to 2010, including DDT. The objective was to identify global quantitative differences and provide baseline information for 52 countries or provide time-trends for countries with previous data. Individual human milk samples were collected following a WHO-designed procedure and combined to form a national pooled sample. Here, we report global levels for PCDDs, PCDFs, PCBs and the sum of o,p′-DDT, p,p′-DDT, o,p′-DDE, p,p′-DDE, o,p′-DDD and p,p′-DDD (ΣDDTs). A concise risk–benefit evaluation related to human milk contamination with these persistent organic pollutants (POPs) was also done. Large global and regional differences were observed. Levels of PCDDs and PCDFs were highest in India and some European and African countries. PCB levels were highest in East and West Europe. The highest levels of ΣDDTs were found in less industrialized countries. A temporal downward trend for PCDDs, PCDFs and PCBs is indicated. A risk–benefit assessment indicates that human milk levels of PCDDs, PCDFs and PCBs are still significantly above those considered toxicologically safe, while ΣDDTs are below or around those considered safe. With respect to potential adverse health effects, a more dominant role of in utero exposure versus lactational exposure is indicated. If potential adverse effects are balanced against positive health aspects for (breastfed) infants, the advantages of breastfeeding far outweigh the possible disadvantages. Our observations provide a strong argument to plea for further global source-directed measures to reduce human exposure further to dioxin-like compounds.

  • 42407.
    van den Besselaar, Peter
    et al.
    Department of Social Informatics, Vrije University, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Network Institution, Vrije University, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Sandström, Ulf
    Örebro universitet. INDEK, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Does Quantity Make a Difference?2015Inngår i: Proceedings of ISSI 2015 Istanbul: 15th International Society of Scientometrics and Informetrics Conference, International Society of Scientometrics and Informetrics , 2015, s. 577-583Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Do highly productive researchers have significantly higher probability to produce top cited papers? Or does the increased productivity in science only result in a sea of irrelevant papers as a perverse effect of competition and the increased use of indicators for research evaluation and accountability focus? We use a Swedish author disambiguated dataset consisting of 48,000 researchers and their WoS-listed publications during the period of 2008-2011 with citations until 2014 to investigate the relation between productivity and production of highly cited papers. As the analysis shows, quantity does make a difference.

  • 42408.
    van den Besselaar, Peter
    et al.
    Department of Organization Science & Network Institute, Vrije University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Sandström, Ulf
    Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro Universitet. INDEK, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden; Business School, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Early career grants, performance, and careers: A study on predictive validity of grant decisions2015Inngår i: Journal of Informetrics, ISSN 1751-1577, E-ISSN 1875-5879, Vol. 9, nr 4, s. 826-838Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The main rationale behind career grants is helping top talent to develop into the next generation leading scientists. Does career grant competition result in the selection of the best young talents? In this paper we investigate whether the selected applicants are indeed performing at the expected excellent level something that is hardly investigated in the research literature.

    We investigate the predictive validity of grant decision-making, using a sample of 260 early career grant applications in three social science fields. We measure output and impact of the applicants about ten years after the application to find out whether the selected researchers perform ex post better than the non-successful ones. Overall, we find that predictive validity is low to moderate when comparing grantees with all non-successful applicants. Comparing grantees with the best performing non-successful applicants, predictive validity is absent. This implies that the common belief that peers in selection panels are good in recognizing outstanding talents is incorrect. We also investigate the effects of the grants on careers and show that recipients of the grants do have a better career than the non-granted applicants. This makes the observed lack of predictive validity even more problematic.

  • 42409.
    van den Besselaar, Peter
    et al.
    Department of Organization Sciences & Network Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Sandström, Ulf
    Örebro universitet. INDEK, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gender differences in research performance and its impact on careers: a longitudinal case study2016Inngår i: Scientometrics, ISSN 0138-9130, E-ISSN 1588-2861, Vol. 106, nr 1, s. 143-162Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We take up the issue of performance differences between male and female researchers, and investigate the change of performance differences during the early career. In a previous paper it was shown that among starting researchers gendered performance differences seem small to non-existent (Van Arensbergen et al. 2012). If the differences do not occur in the early career anymore, they may emerge in a later period, or may remain absent. In this paper we use the same sample of male and female researchers, but now compare performance levels about 10 years later. We use various performance indicators: full/fractional counted productivity, citation impact, and relative citation impact in terms of the share of papers in the top 10 % highly cited papers. After the 10 years period, productivity of male researchers has grown faster than of female researcher, but the field normalized (relative) citation impact indicators of male and female researchers remain about equal. Furthermore, performance data do explain to a certain extent why male careers in our sample develop much faster than female researchers' careers; but controlling for performance differences, we find that gender is an important determinant too. Consequently, the process of hiring academic staff still remains biased.

  • 42410.
    van den Bos, Wouter
    et al.
    Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden, the Netherlands; Center for Adaptive Rationality (ARC), Max-Planck-Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Germany; Department of Psychology, Leiden University, Leiden, the Netherlands.
    Vahl, Pauline
    Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden, the Netherlands; Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, the Netherlands .
    Güroğlu, Berna
    Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden, the Netherlands; Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, the Netherlands .
    van Nunspeet, Félice
    Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden, the Netherlands; Department of Psychology, Leiden University, Leiden, the Netherlands.
    Colins, Olivier F.
    Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, the Netherlands .
    Markus, Monica
    Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, the Netherlands .
    Rombouts, Serge A R B
    Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden, the Netherlands; Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, the Netherlands; Department of Psychiatry, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, the Netherlands.
    van der Wee, Nic
    Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden, the Netherlands; Department of Psychiatry, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, the Netherlands.
    Vermeiren, Robert
    Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden, the Netherlands; Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, the Netherlands .
    Crone, Eveline A
    Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden, the Netherlands; Department of Psychology, Leiden University, Leiden, the Netherlands; Department of Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Neural correlates of social decision-making in severely antisocial adolescents2014Inngår i: Social Cognitive & Affective Neuroscience, ISSN 1749-5016, E-ISSN 1749-5024, Vol. 9, nr 12, s. 2059-2066Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Neurobiological and behavioral findings suggest that the development of delinquent behavior is associated with atypical social-affective processing. However, to date, no study has examined neural processes associated with social interactions in severely antisocial adolescents. In this study we investigated the behavioral and neural processes underlying social interactions of juvenile delinquents and a matched control group. Participants played the mini-Ultimatum Game as a responder while in the MRI scanner. Participants rejected unfair offers significantly less when the other player had 'no alternative' compared with a 'fair' alternative, suggesting that they took the intentions of the other player into account. However, this effect was reduced in the juvenile delinquents. The neuroimaging results revealed that juvenile delinquents showed less activation in the temporal parietal junction (TPJ) and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). However, the groups showed similar activation levels in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the right anterior insula (AI) when norms were violated. These results indicate that juvenile delinquents with severe antisocial behavior process norm violations adequately, but may have difficulties with attending spontaneously to relevant features of the social context during interactions.

  • 42411.
    van den Brink, Brian
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, statistik och informatik.
    Olsson, Lina
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, statistik och informatik.
    Reinhold, Thomas
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för ekonomi, statistik och informatik.
    Nautilus: Värdeskapande och kvalitet2007Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
    Abstract [sv]

    Under gymbranschens tidiga år var det nästan uteslutande manliga kroppsbyggare som använde sig av gymträningen. I dag ser situationen helt annorlunda ut, gymträningen är en träningsform som utövas av män och kvinnor i alla åldrar och med helt olika bakgrund.

    Fler och olika typer av människor innebär även fler och olika uppfattningar om vad ett bra gym är. Större krav började ställas på gymmen att identifiera vilka tränande de hade och vad dessa önskade av sitt gym och därmed blev det viktigare än någonsin för ledningen till gymmen att förstå och tolka begrepp som tjänstekvalitet och värdeskapande. Vidare är det av central betydelse för ledningen att veta vad de tränande på gymmen håller som värdeskapande och samtidigt kunna använda denna vetskap i den värdeskapande processen, allt för att skillnaden i värdeuppfattningar mellan företaget och dess kunder ska vara så liten som möjligt. Som fallföretag för denna undersökning står Nautilus gym och dess tränande i Örebro.

    Tjänster skiljer sig i vissa avseenden ifrån produkter, en viktig aspekt är kundens deltagande i produktionsprocessen. Att producera eller utföra en tjänst innebär att sätta ihop och leverera resultatet av en blandning mellan fysiska faciliteter och mentalt/fysiskt arbete.

    Värdeskapande är en grundläggande beståndsdel för företagens överlevnad idag. För att kunna tillhandahålla överlägset kundvärde blir det allt viktigare att skapa och behålla långsiktiga kundrelationer. Företagsledningens uppfattning om kundernas förväntningar styr beslut om vilken specificerad tjänstekvalitet företaget ska följa när genomförandet av tjänsteprocessen sker.

    Syftet med denna studie är att jämföra vad Nautilus gym uppfattar som centralt värdeskapande ur konsumentens synvinkel och vad konsumenterna i själva verket upplever som viktigast. Vidare syftar studien till att utröna vad konsumenter värdesätter högst i upplevelsen kring sin träning, ett minskat upplevt uppoffrande eller ett ökat antal förmåner.

    Undersökningen baseras huvudsakligen på ett hermeneutiskt synsätt med inslag av positivism. Syftet med undersökningen var att utifrån befintlig teori samt egna erfarenheter och värderingar tolka den information som framkom i studien.

    Teoriavsnittet behandlar ämnesområdena tjänster, tjänstekvalitet, värde samt hur tjänster kan skapa värde.

    I empirin ges en kort historiebeskrivning av Nautilus gym och även viss information om Nautiluskonceptet. Kvalitativ data har samlats in ifrån intervjuer med fyra personer ur Nautilus management samt åtta medlemmar ur gymanläggningarna i Örebro.

    I analysdelen sammanställs den insamlade empirin och analyseras mot bakgrund av befintlig teori med hjälp av en framtagen analysmodell. Nautilusledningens uppfattning om värdeskapande ur dess tränandes synvinkel ställs mot de tränandes egna svar.

    I slutsatsen/diskussionen presenteras och utvecklas svaren från analysdelen och diskussion förs kring olika aspekter av tjänster, tjänstekvalitet och värdeskapande.

  • 42412.
    Van den Bussche, Karen
    et al.
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Kottner, Jan
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; Clinical Research Center for Hair and Skin Science, Department of Dermatology, Charité-Universtitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany.
    Beele, Hilde
    Department of Dermatology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium.
    De Meyer, Dorien
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Dunk, Ann Marie
    Tissue Viability Unit, Canberra Hospital, ACT Health, Canberra, ACT, Australia.
    Ersser, Steven
    Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, UK.
    Lange, Toni
    Center for Evidence-Based Healthcare, Medizinsche Fakultät Carl Gustav Carus TU Dresden, Dresden, Germany.
    Petrovic, Mirko
    Department of Geriatrics, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium.
    Schoonhoven, Lisette
    Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK; Radboud University Medical Center, Scientific Institute for Quality of Healthcare, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Smet, Steven
    Wound Care Center, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium.
    Van Damme, Nele
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Verhaeghe, Sofie
    Department of Public Health, University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Van Hecke, Ann
    Department of Public Health, University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; Nursing Department, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium.
    Beeckman, Dimitri
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; School of Nursing & Midwifery, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland.
    Core outcome domains in incontinence-associated dermatitis research2018Inngår i: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 74, nr 7, s. 1605-1617Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To report the development of a core set of outcome domains for clinical research involving adults with incontinence-associated dermatitis or at risk, independently from any geographical location or skin colour.

    BACKGROUND: The management of incontinence-associated dermatitis is important in caring for incontinent patients. The lack of comparability of clinical trial outcomes is a major challenge in the field of evidence-based incontinence-associated dermatitis prevention and treatment. Core outcome sets may therefore be helpful to improve the value of clinical incontinence-associated dermatitis research.

    DESIGN: Systematic literature review, patient interviews and consensus study using Delphi procedure.

    METHODS: A list of outcome domains was generated through a systematic literature review (no date restrictions-April 2016), consultation of an international steering committee and three patient interviews. The project team reviewed and refined the outcome domains prior to starting a three-round Delphi procedure conducted between April-September 2017. The panellists, including healthcare providers, researchers and industry were invited to rate the importance of the outcome domains.

    RESULTS: We extracted 1,852 outcomes from 244 articles. Experts proposed 56 and patients 32 outcome domains. After refinement, 57 panellists from 17 countries rated a list of 58 outcome domains. The final list of outcome domains includes erythema, erosion, maceration, IAD-related pain and patient satisfaction.

    CONCLUSION: Erythema, erosion, maceration, incontinence-associated dermatitis -related pain and patient satisfaction are the most important outcome domains to be measured in incontinence-associated dermatitis trials. Based on this international consensus on what to measure, the question of how to measure these domains now requires consideration. Registration: This project has been registered in the Core Outcome Measures in Effectiveness Trials (COMET Initiative) database and is part of the Cochrane Skin Group-Core Outcomes Set Initiative (CSG-COUSIN).

  • 42413.
    Van den Bussche, Karen
    et al.
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Belgium.
    Verhaeghe, Sofie
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Belgium; Department Health Care, VIVES University College, Roeselare, Belgium.
    Van Hecke, Ann
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Belgium; Nursing Department, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium.
    Beeckman, Dimitri
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Belgium; School of Nursing and Midwifery, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Ireland.
    Minimum Data Set for Incontinence-Associated Dermatitis (MDS-IAD) in adults: Design and pilot study in nursing home residents2018Inngår i: Journal of Tissue Viability, ISSN 0965-206X, Vol. 27, nr 4, s. 191-198Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Study aim: The aim of this study was to develop a Minimum Data Set for Incontinence-Associated Dermatitis (MDS-IAD), to psychometrically evaluate and pilot test the instrument in nursing homes. Comparable to the MDS for pressure ulcers, the MDS-IAD aims to collect epidemiological data and evaluate the quality of care.

    Materials and methods: After designing and content/face validation by experts and clinicians, staff nurses assessed 108 residents (75.9% female, 77.8% double incontinent) in a convenience sample of five wards. A second nurse independently assessed fifteen residents to calculate inter-rater agreement (p0) and reliability [Cohen's Kappa (ĸ)].

    Results: The ĸ-value for ‘urinary incontinence’ was 0.68 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.37–0.99] and 0.55 (95% CI 0.27–0.82) for ‘faecal incontinence’. The p0 for severity categorisation according to the Ghent Global IAD Categorisation Tool (GLOBIAD) was 0.60. IAD was diagnosed in 21.3% of the residents. IAD management mainly involved the application of a leave-on product (66.7%), no-rinse foams (49.1%), toilet paper (47.9%), and water and soap (38.8%). Fully adequate prevention or treatment was provided to respectively 3.6% and 8.7% of the residents.

    Conclusion: This instrument provides valuable insights in IAD prevalence at organisational level, will allow benchmarking between organisations, and will support policy makers. Future testing in other healthcare settings is recommended.

  • 42414.
    Van den Bussche, Karen
    et al.
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Verhaeghe, Sofie
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; Department Health Care, VIVES University College, Roeselare, Belgium.
    Van Hecke, Ann
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; Nursing Department, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium.
    Beeckman, Dimitri
    Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; School of Nursing & Midwifery, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI), Dublin, Ireland.
    The Ghent Global IAD Monitoring Tool (GLOBIAD-M) to monitor the healing of incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD): Design and reliability study2018Inngår i: International Wound Journal, ISSN 1742-4801, E-ISSN 1742-481X, Vol. 15, nr 4, s. 555-564Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to design and evaluate the reliability of the Ghent Global incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) Monitoring Tool (GLOBIAD-M). The tool was designed based on the internationally validated Ghent Global IAD Categorisation Tool (GLOBIAD). After designing and validation by experts, one trained researcher carried out 36 observations of 9 patients affected with IAD. Photographs of the IAD lesions were independently assessed by a second trained researcher. Measures for inter-rater agreement (po ) and reliability [Cohen's Kappa (ĸ) and intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC)] were analysed. The po ranged between 0.86 for the item 'maceration' and 0.97 for the item 'clinical signs of infection'. The ĸ for the item 'GLOBIAD classification' was 0.61 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.28-0.95] and 0.72 (95% CI 0.50-0.95) for 'maceration'. The lowest ĸ was found for the item 'oedema' (0.27; 95% CI -0.24-0.79). The ICC of the item 'redness' was 0.83 (95% CI 0.69-0.91) and 0.87 (95% CI 0.76-0.93) for 'skin loss'. The inter-rater agreement and reliability of the GLOBIAD-M appears to be good for the assessment of photographs by experts. This tool could support clinical decision-making for IAD treatment. Further validation with clinicians is, however, needed.

  • 42415.
    van den Homberg, Marc
    et al.
    510 An Initiative of The Netherlands Red Cross, The Hague, The Netherlands.
    Susha, Iryna
    Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro Universitet. Section Information and Communication Technology, Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Characterizing Data Ecosystems to Support Official Statistics with Open Mapping Data for Reporting on Sustainable Development Goals2018Inngår i: ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information, ISSN 2220-9964, Vol. 7, nr 12, artikkel-id 456Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Reporting on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is complex given the wide variety of governmental and NGO actors involved in development projects as well as the increased number of targets and indicators. However, data on the wide variety of indicators must be collected regularly, in a robust manner, comparable across but also within countries and at different administrative and disaggregated levels for adequate decision making to take place. Traditional census and household survey data is not enough. The increase in Small and Big Data streams have the potential to complement official statistics. The purpose of this research is to develop and evaluate a framework to characterize a data ecosystem in a developing country in its totality and to show how this can be used to identify data, outside the official statistics realm, that enriches the reporting on SDG indicators. Our method consisted of a literature study and an interpretative case study (two workshops with 60 and 35 participants and including two questionnaires, over 20 consultations and desk research). We focused on SDG 6.1.1. (Proportion of population using safely managed drinking water services) in rural Malawi. We propose a framework with five dimensions (actors, data supply, data infrastructure, data demand and data ecosystem governance). Results showed that many governmental and NGO actors are involved in water supply projects with different funding sources and little overall governance. There is a large variety of geospatial data sharing platforms and online accessible information management systems with however a low adoption due to limited internet connectivity and low data literacy. Lots of data is still not open. All this results in an immature data ecosystem. The characterization of the data ecosystem using the framework proves useful as it unveils gaps in data at geographical level and in terms of dimensionality (attributes per water point) as well as collaboration gaps. The data supply dimension of the framework allows identification of those datasets that have the right quality and lowest cost of data extraction to enrich official statistics. Overall, our analysis of the Malawian case study illustrated the complexities involved in achieving self-regulation through interaction, feedback and networked relationships. Additional complexities, typical for developing countries, include fragmentation, divide between governmental and non-governmental data activities, complex funding relationships and a data poor context.

  • 42416.
    Van den Nieuwboer, M.
    et al.
    Athena Institute, Vrije University, Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Brummer, Robert J.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för läkarutbildning.
    Guarner, F.
    Food Microbiology and Biotechnology Digestive System Research Unit, CIBERehd, University Hospital Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain.
    Morelli, L.
    Istituto di Microbiologia Università Cattolica S.C., Piacenza, Italy .
    Cabana, M.
    Departments of Pediatrics, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco (UCSF), San Francisco CA, United States .
    Claassen, E.
    Athena Institute, Vrije University, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Viroscience, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    The administration of probiotics and synbiotics in immune compromised adults: is it safe?2015Inngår i: Beneficial Microbes, ISSN 1876-2883, E-ISSN 1876-2891, Vol. 6, nr 1, s. 3-17Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to systematically evaluate safety of probiotics and synbiotics in immune compromised adults (>= 18 years). Safety was analysed using the Common Terminology Clinical Adverse Events (CTCAE version 4.0) classification, thereby providing an update on previous reports using the most recent available clinical data (2008-2013). Safety aspects are represented and related to number of participants per probiotic strain/culture, study duration, dosage, clinical condition and selected afflictions. Analysis of 57 clinical studies indicates that probiotic and/or synbiotic administration in immune compromised adults is safe with regard to the current evaluated probiotic strains, dosages and duration. Individuals were considered immune compromised if HIV-infected, critically ill, underwent surgery or had an organ- or an autoimmune disease. There were no major safety concerns in the study, as none of the serious adverse events (AE)s were related, or suspected to be related, to the probiotic or synbiotic product and the study products were well tolerated. Overall, AEs occurred less frequent in immune compromised subjects receiving probiotics and/or synbiotics compared to the control group. In addition, the results demonstrated a flaw in precise reporting and classification of AE in most studies. Furthermore, generalisability of conclusions are greatly limited by the inconsistent, imprecise and potentially incomplete reporting as well as the variation in probiotic strains, dosages, administration regimes, study populations and reported outcomes. We argue that standardised reporting on adverse events (CTCAE) in 'food' studies should be obligatory, thereby improving reliability of data and re-enforcing the safety profile of probiotics.

  • 42417.
    van den Nieuwboer, M.
    et al.
    Athena Institute, Vrije University, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
    Brummer, Robert Jan
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för läkarutbildning.
    Guarner, F.
    Digestive System Research Unit, CIBERehd, University Hospital Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona, Spain.
    Morelli, L.
    Istituto di Microbiologia, Università Cattolica S.C., Piacenza, Italy.
    Cabana, M.
    Departments of Pediatrics, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California (UCSF), San Francisco, USA.
    Claassen, E.
    Athena Institute, Vrije University, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; Department of Viroscience, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
    Safety of probiotics and synbiotics in children under 18 years of age2015Inngår i: Beneficial Microbes, ISSN 1876-2883, E-ISSN 1876-2891, Vol. 6, nr 5, s. 615-630Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to systematically evaluate safety of probiotics and synbiotics in children ageing 0-18 years. This study is the third and final part in a safety trilogy and an update is provided using the most recent available clinical data (2008-2013) by means of the Common Terminology Clinical Adverse Events (CTCAE version 4.0) classification. Safety aspects are represented and related to number of participants per probiotic strain/culture, study duration, dosage, clinical condition and selected afflictions. Analysis of 74 clinical studies indicated that probiotic and/or synbiotic administration in children is safe with regard to the specific evaluated strains, dosages and duration. The population of children include healthy, immune compromised and obese subjects, as well as subjects with intestinal disorders, infections and inflammatory disorders. This study revealed no major safety concerns, as the adverse events (AEs) were unrelated, or not suspected to be related, to the probiotic or synbiotic product. In general the study products were well tolerated. Overall, AEs occurred more frequent in the control arm compared to children receiving probiotics and/or synbiotics. Furthermore, the results indicate inadequate reporting and classification of AEs in the majority of the studies. In addition, generalizability of conclusions are greatly limited by the inconsistent, imprecise and potentially incomplete reporting as well as the variation in probiotic strains, dosages, administration regimes, study populations and reported outcomes.

  • 42418.
    van den Nieuwboer, M
    et al.
    Athena Inst, Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Swammerdam Inst Life Sci, Univ Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Claassen, E
    Athena Inst, Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Dept Virosci, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands .
    Morelli, L
    Ist Microbiol, Univ Cattolica SC, Piacenza, Italy.
    Guarner, F
    CIBERehd, Digest Syst Res Unit, Univ Hosp Vall dHebron, Barcelona, Spain.
    Brummer, Robert J
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för läkarutbildning. Region Örebro län.
    Probiotic and synbiotic safety in infants under two years of age2014Inngår i: Beneficial Microbes, ISSN 1876-2883, E-ISSN 1876-2891, Vol. 5, nr 1, s. 45-60Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we systematically evaluated safety aspects in clinical trials with probiotics and synbiotics in young infants (0-2 years of age). This study is an update of earlier reports and covers the recent literature from 2008-2013. The safety evaluation is performed along the Common Terminology Clinical Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4.0 scale, hereby also providing guidance for future studies. Safety aspects are represented and related to number of participants per probiotic strain/culture, study duration, dosage, clinical condition and selected afflictions. The results show a deficiency in the precise reporting and classification of adverse events in most studies. Analysis of 57 clinical trials with probiotics and synbiotics in combination with eight follow-up studies indicate that probiotic administration to infants between 0 and 24 months is safe with regard to the evaluated strains in infants with a particular health status or susceptibility. Most adverse events and serious adverse events were considered unrelated to the study product, and there were no major safety concerns. Almost all studies concluded that none of the adverse effects were related to the study product; the study products are generally well tolerated. Finally, inconsistent, imprecise and potentially incomplete reporting as well as the variation in probiotic strains, dosages, administration regimes, study populations and reported outcomes, greatly limit the generalizability of conclusions and argue convincingly for obligatory and standardised behaviour on adverse events (CTCAE) reporting in 'food' studies.

  • 42419.
    van der Burg, B. L. S. Borger
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Alrijne Hospital, Leiderdorp, the Netherlands.
    Kessel, B.
    Department of Trauma, Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, Hadera, Israel.
    DuBose, J. J.
    R Adam Cowley Shock Trauma Center, University of Maryland Medical System, Baltimore, USA.
    Hörer, Tal M.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Hoencamp, R.
    Department of Surgery, Alrijne Hospital, Leiderdorp, the Netherlands; Defense Healthcare Organization, Ministry of Defense, Utrecht, the Netherlands; Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, the Netherlands.
    Consensus on resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the Aorta: A first consensus paper using a Delphi method2019Inngår i: Injury, ISSN 0020-1383, E-ISSN 1879-0267, Vol. 50, nr 6, s. 1186-1191Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To further strengthen the evidence base on the use of Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon occlusion of the Aorta (REBOA) we performed a Delphi consensus. The aim of this paper is to establish consensus on the indications and contraindications for the use of REBOA in trauma and non-trauma patients based on the existing evidence and expertise.

    Study Design: A literature review facilitated the design of a three-round Delphi questionnaire. Delphi panelists were identified by the investigators. Consensus was reached when at least 70% of the panelists responded to the survey and more than 70% of respondents reached agreement or disagreement.

    Results: Panel members reached consensus on potential indications, contra-indications and settings for use of REBOA (excluding the pre hospital environment), physiological parameters for patient selection and indications for early femoral access. Panel members failed to reach consensus on the use of REBOA in patients in extremis (no pulse, no blood pressure) and the use of REBOA in patients with two major bleeding sites.

    Conclusions: Consensus was reached on indications, contra indications, physiological parameters for patient selection for REBOA and early femoral access. The panel did not reach consensus on the use of REBOA in patients in pre-hospital settings, patients in extremis (no pulse, no blood pressure) and in patients with 2 or more major bleeding sites. Further research should focus on the indications of REBOA in pre hospital settings, patients in near cardiac arrest and REBOA inflation times.

  • 42420.
    van der Burg, Boudewijn L. S. Borger
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Alrijne Hospital, Leiderdorp, The Netherlands.
    Hörer, Tal M.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Region Örebro län. Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Eefting, D.
    Department of Surgery, Haaglanden Medical Centre, The Hague, The Netherlands; Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    van Dongen, T. T. C. F.
    Department of Surgery, Alrijne Hospital, Leiderdorp, The Netherlands; Defense Healthcare Organization, Ministry of Defense, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Hamming, J. F.
    Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    DuBose, J. J.
    R Adam Cowley Shock Trauma Center, University of Maryland Medical System, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
    Bowyer, M.
    Department of Surgery, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences and the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, USA.
    Hoencamp, R.
    Department of Surgery, Alrijne Hospital, Leiderdorp, The Netherlands; Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands; Defense Healthcare Organization, Ministry of Defense, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Vascular access training for REBOA placement: a feasibility study in a live tissue-simulator hybrid porcine model2019Inngår i: Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps, ISSN 0035-8665, E-ISSN 2052-0468, Vol. 165, nr 3, s. 147-151Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The use of resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) in patients with severe haemorrhagic shock is increasing. Obtaining vascular access is a necessary prerequisite for REBOA placement in these situations.

    Methods: During the EVTM workshop (September 2017, Orebro, Sweden), 21 individuals participated in this study, 16 participants and five instructors. A formalised curriculum was constructed including basic anatomy of the femoral region and basic training in access materials for REBOA placement in zone 1. Key skills: (1) preparation of endovascular toolkit, (2) achieving vascular access in the model and (3) bleeding control with REBOA. Scoring ranged from 0 to 5 for non-anatomical skills. Identification of anatomical structures was either sufficient (score=1) or insufficient (score=0). Five consultants performed a second identical procedure as a post test.

    Results: Consultants had significantly better overall technical skills in comparison with residents (p=0.005), while understanding of surgical anatomy showed no difference. Procedure times differed significantly (p<0.01), with residents having a median procedure time of 3 min and 24 s, consultants 2:33 and instructors 1:09.

    Conclusion: This comprehensive training model using a live tissue-simulator hybrid porcine model can be used for femoral access and REBOA placement training in medical personnel with different prior training levels. Higher levels of training are associated with faster procedure times. Further research in open and percutaneous access training is necessary to simulate real-life situations. This training method can be used in a multistep training programme, in combination with realistic moulage and perfused cadaver models.

  • 42421.
    van der Schaaf, Migdalia Molina
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Norberg, Marita
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper.
    Reell och subjektiv upplevelse av arbetsrelaterat buller och dess eventuella konsekvenser för restaurangpersonal: en fallstudie2016Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
  • 42422. van der Veen, I.
    et al.
    Nilsson, H.
    van Bavel, Bert
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    de Boer, J.
    Fiedler, Heidelore
    United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Chemicals, Châtelaine GE, Switzerland.
    Results of UNEP’s 2nd Global Interlaboratory Assessment of the Persistent Organic Pollutants under the Stockholm Convention in Various Matrices2013Inngår i: Organohalogen Compounds, ISSN 1026-4892, Vol. 75, s. 387-390Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 42423.
    van der Veen, Ike
    et al.
    Vrije Universiteit, Dept. Environment & Health, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Fiedler, Heidelore
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    de Boer, Jacob
    Vrije Universiteit, Dept. Environment & Health, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Bi-ennial Global Interlaboratory Assessment on Persistent Organic Pollutants: Third Round 2016/2017, Organochlorine Pesticides, PCBs and Brominated Flame Retardants2017Inngår i: Organohalogen Compounds, Vol. 79, s. 575-578Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 42424.
    van der Wie, Lilly
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Vismutskydd vid datortomografiundersökningar: dosreducering och påverkan på bildkvalité2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
  • 42425.
    van Deth, Jan W.
    et al.
    Mannheim Centre for European Social Research, Mannheim, Germany.
    Zorell, Carolin
    University of Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany.
    Politischer Protest und Konsum2019Inngår i: Handbuch der politikwissenschaftlichen Einstellungs- und Verhaltensforschung / [ed] Thorsten Faas, Oscar W. Gabriel, and Jürgen Maier, Baden-Baden: Nomos Verlagsgesellschaft , 2019Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This handbook provides a comprehensive overview of the theories and findings of international empirical research in the areas of ‘processing political information and political communication’, ‘political attitudes and value orientations’, ‘political participation’ and ‘voter behaviour’. It also presents ‘new methods used in attitude and behaviour research’.

  • 42426.
    Van Du, Sanh
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Lärares syn på införandet av nationella provet i årskurs tre2010Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
    Abstract [sv]

    Sammanfattning

    Syftet med mitt examensarbete är att beskriva hur lärarna i årskurs två och tre uppfattar nationella provet i årskurs tre.

    En kvalitativ intervju som metod har använts. Intervjufrågorna är halvstrukturerade. Totalt åtta kvinnliga lärare intervjuades parvis. Samtliga lärare jobbar inom samma kommun, men i tre olika grundskolor för tidigare år.

    Studien visar att lärarnas uppfattningar av nationella provet i årskurs tre inte kan beskrivas/delas i diktomi, eftersom spänningen mellan för- och nackdelar av provet är ständigt närvarande. Lärarna anser att nationella provet i årskurs tre kan fungera som ett stöd för den formativa bedömningen, som konkret underlag för att ansöka om extra resurser och som underlag för en dialog mellan skola och hem. Studiens lärare beskriver också att provet som resurs- och tidskrävande. Det betyder att dennes handlingsutrymme påverkas, arbetsvillkor förändras och professionalitet diskuteras.

  • 42427.
    van Eijk, Sandra
    Örebro universitet, Humanistiska institutionen.
    Magi: Föreställningar om magiska väsen i Örebrotrakten på 1800-talet2008Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
  • 42428.
    van Eijk, Sandra
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Stengarn, Madelene
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    "Vi gör som vi alltid har gjort": Fördelningen av arbetsuppgifter bland gymnasielärare utifrån ett genusperspektiv2009Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med vår uppsats är att se hur lärare uppfattar sin arbetssituation, ur ett genusperspektiv, och då med fokus på fördelningen av arbetsuppgifter utanför undervisningen. Vi valde att utföra vår empiriska studie på en gymnasieskola i en liten kommun i Mellansverige. För att kunna undersöka vårt syfte valde vi att ställa följande frågor:

     Vilka tendenser går det att urskönja i utförd enkätundersökning som tyder på att vissa arbetsuppgifter tilldelas alternativt axlas självmant av män och/eller kvinnor?

     Uppfattar lärarna att en eventuell uppdelning är medveten eller omedveten?

    Vårt val att undersöka lärares uppfattningar kom i stor utsträckning från Göran Brantes (2008) syn på vad som är relevant att undersöka. Avstamp inför vår undersökning har vi även tagit i bland annat Eva Ganneruds (1999;2001;2006) studier kring lärare och genus.

    För att söka svar på våra frågeställningar samt vårt syfte valde vi att använda oss utav en enkätundersökning med såväl kryssfrågor som mer öppna frågor. Vi fick ett högt bortfall i vår studie. Ungefär 50 % av de önskade respondenterna valde att delta. Trots detta har vi sett tendenser i vår undersökning som vi finner intressanta och gör det möjligt för att besvara såväl vårt syfte som våra frågeställningar.

    I vår undersökning fann vi tendenser till att det finns en skillnad mellan de arbetsuppgifter som män och kvinnor axlar eller blir tilldelade. De kvinnliga respondenterna ansåg sig oftast axla omsorgsuppgifter. Denna uppdelning förefaller till stor del vara omedveten och utan reflektion. Föreställningar om manligt och kvinnligt synes vara djupt rotade och så pass naturligt att detta påverkar lärares arbete utan att de är medvetna om detta. Vid de tillfällen där genus diskuterades och reflekterades kring så rörde det allt som oftast i relation till eleverna eller mellan elever. Att tänka genusmedvetet mellan lärare ansågs inte relevant då kön inte tillskrevs någon betydelse av en stor del av våra respondenter.

  • 42429.
    van Essen, Thomas A.
    et al.
    Department of Neurosurgery, Leiden University Medical Center, University Neurosurgical Center Holland (UNCH), Leiden, The Netherlands; Department of Neurosurgery, Haaglanden Medical Center, University Neurosurgical Center Holland (UNCH), The Hague, The Netherlands.
    den Boogert, Hugo F.
    Department of Neurosurgery, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Cnossen, Maryse C.
    Center for Medical Decision Sciences, Department of Public Health, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    de Ruiter, Godard C. W.
    Department of Neurosurgery, Haaglanden Medical Center, University Neurosurgical Center Holland (UNCH), The Hague, The Netherlands.
    Haitsma, Iain
    Department of Neurosurgery, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Polinder, Suzanne
    Center for Medical Decision Sciences, Department of Public Health, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Steyerberg, Ewout W.
    Center for Medical Decision Sciences, Department of Public Health, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Biomedical Data Sciences, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.
    Menon, David
    Division of Anaesthesia, Addenbrooke's Hospital, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
    Maas, Andrew I. R.
    Department of Neurosurgery, Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Edegem, Belgium.
    Lingsma, Hester F.
    Center for Medical Decision Sciences, Department of Public Health, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Peul, Wilco. C.
    Department of Neurosurgery, Leiden University Medical Center, University Neurosurgical Center Holland (UNCH), Leiden, The Netherlands; Department of Neurosurgery, Haaglanden Medical Center, University Neurosurgical Center Holland (UNCH), The Hague, The Netherlands.
    CENTER-TBI, Investigators and Participants
    Correction to: Variation in neurosurgical management of traumatic brain injury2019Inngår i: Acta Neurochirurgica, ISSN 0001-6268, E-ISSN 0942-0940, Vol. 161, nr 3, s. 451-455Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 42430.
    Van Eyken, Els
    et al.
    Department of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp (UA), Antwerp, Belgium.
    Van Camp, Guy V.
    Department of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp (UA), Antwerp, Belgium.
    Fransen, Erik
    Department of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp (UA), Antwerp, Belgium.
    Topsakal, Vedat V.
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital of Antwerp (UZA), Antwerp, Belgium.
    Hendrickx, Jan Jaap
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital of Antwerp (UZA), Antwerp, Belgium.
    Demeester, Kelly
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital of Antwerp (UZA), Antwerp, Belgium.
    Van de Heyning, Paul
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital of Antwerp (UZA), Antwerp, Belgium.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Hannula, Samuli
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Sorri, Martti J.
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Jensen, Mona
    Department of Audiology, Bispebjerg Hospital (BBH), Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Parving, Agnete
    Department of Audiology, Bispebjerg Hospital (BBH), Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Bille, Michael
    Department of Audiology, Bispebjerg Hospital (BBH), Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Baur, Manuela
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany.
    Pfister, Markus H.F.
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany.
    Bonaconsa, Amanda
    Department of Oto-surgery, University Hospital Padova, Padova, Italy.
    Mazzoli, Manuela
    Department of Oto-surgery, University Hospital Padova, Padova, Italy.
    Orzan, Eva
    Department of Oto-surgery, University Hospital Padova, Padova, Italy.
    Espeso, Angeles
    Welsh hearing Institute, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, UK.
    Stephens, Dafydd
    Welsh hearing Institute, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, UK.
    Verbruggen, Katia
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital of Gent (UZ), Gent, Belgium.
    Huyghe, Joke
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital of Gent (UZ), Gent, Belgium.
    Dhooge, Ingeborg
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital of Gent (UZ), Gent, Belgium.
    Huygen, Patrick L.M.
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
    Kremer, Hannie Ph .
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
    Cremers, Cor Wrj R.J.
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
    Kunst, Sylvia J.W.
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
    Manninen, Minna
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Pyykkö, Ilmari V.
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Lacava, Amalia Diaz
    Institute of Medical Biometry, Informatics and Epidemiology, University of Bonn, Germany.
    Steffens, Michael
    Institute of Medical Biometry, Informatics and Epidemiology, University of Bonn, Germany.
    Wienker, Thomas F.
    Institute of Medical Biometry, Informatics and Epidemiology, University of Bonn, Germany.
    Van Laer, Lut
    Department of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp (UA), Antwerp, Belgium.
    Contribution of the N-acetyltransferase 2 polymorphism NAT2*6A to age-related hearing impairment2007Inngår i: Journal of Medical Genetics, ISSN 0022-2593, E-ISSN 1468-6244, Vol. 44, nr 9, s. 570-578Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) is the most common sensory impairment in older people, affecting 50% of those aged 80 years. The proportion of older people is increasing in the general population, and as a consequence, the number of people affected with ARHI is growing. ARHI is a complex disorder, with both environmental and genetic factors contributing to the disease. The first studies to elucidate these genetic factors were recently performed, resulting in the identification of the first two susceptibility genes for ARHI, NAT2 and KCNQ4.

    METHODS: In the present study, the association between ARHI and polymorphisms in genes that contribute to the defence against reactive oxygen species, including GSTT1, GSTM1 and NAT2, was tested. Samples originated from seven different countries and were combined into two test population samples, the general European population and the Finnish population. Two distinct phenotypes for ARHI were studied, Z(low) and Z(high), representing hearing in the low and high frequencies, respectively. Statistical analysis was performed for single polymorphisms (GSTM1, GSTT1, NAT2*5A, NAT2*6A, and NAT2*7A), haplotypes, and gene-environment and gene-gene interactions.

    RESULTS: We found an association between ARHI and GSTT1 and GSTM1 in the Finnish population sample, and with NAT2*6A in the general European population sample. The latter finding replicates previously published data.

    CONCLUSION: As replication is considered the ultimate proof of true associations in the study of complex disorders, this study provides further support for the involvement of NAT2*6A in ARHI.

  • 42431.
    Van Eyken, Els
    et al.
    Department of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
    Van Laer, Lut
    Department of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
    Fransen, Erik
    Department of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
    Topsakal, Vedat
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
    Hendrickx, Jan-Jaap
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
    Demeester, Kelly
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
    Van de Heyning, Paul
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Hannula, Samuli
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Sorri, Martti
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Jensen, Mona
    Department of Audiology, Bispebjerg Hospital (BBH) H:S, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Parving, Agnete
    Department of Audiology, Bispebjerg Hospital (BBH) H:S, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Bille, Michael
    Department of Audiology, Bispebjerg Hospital (BBH) H:S, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Baur, Manuela
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Tüebingen, Tüebingen, Germany;.
    Pfister, Markus
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Tüebingen, Tüebingen, Germany.
    Bonaconsa, Amanda
    Department of Oto-surgery, University Hospital Padova, Padova, Italy.
    Mazzoli, Manuela
    Department of Oto-surgery, University Hospital Padova, Padova, Italy.
    Orzan, Eva
    Department of Oto-surgery, University Hospital Padova, Padova, Italy.
    Espeso, Angeles
    Welsh hearing Institute, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, U.K..
    Stephens, Dafydd
    Welsh hearing Institute, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, U.K..
    Verbruggen, Katia
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital of Gent, Gent, Belgium.
    Huyghe, Joke
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital of Gent, Gent, Belgium.
    Dhooge, Ingeborg
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital of Gent, Gent, Belgium.
    Huygen, Patrick
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Kremer, Hannie
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Cremers, Cor
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Kunst, Sylvia
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Manninen, Mina
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Pyykkö, Ilmari
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Rajkowska, Elzbieta
    Department of Audiology and Phoniatrics, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz, Poland.
    Pawelczyk, Malgorzata
    Department of Audiology and Phoniatrics, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz, Poland.
    Sliwinska-Kowalska, Mariola
    Department of Audiology and Phoniatrics, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz, Poland.
    Steffens, Michael
    Institute of Medical Biometry, Informatics and Epidemiology, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
    Wienker, Thomas
    Institute of Medical Biometry, Informatics and Epidemiology, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
    Van Camp, Guy
    Department of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, the Netherlands.
    The contribution of GJB2 (Connexin 26) 35delG to age-related hearing impairment and noise-induced hearing loss2007Inngår i: Otology and Neurotology, ISSN 1531-7129, E-ISSN 1537-4505, Vol. 28, nr 7, s. 970-975Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    HYPOTHESIS: The common GJB2 (Connexin 26) 35delG mutation might contribute to the development of age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL).

    BACKGROUND: GJB2, a gene encoding a gap junction protein expressed in the inner ear, has been suggested to be involved in the potassium recycling pathway in the cochlea. GJB2 mutations account for a large number of individuals with nonsyndromic recessive hearing loss, with 35delG being the most frequent mutation in populations of European origin. Other genes involved in potassium homeostasis have been suggested to be associated with ARHI and NIHL, and distortion product otoacoustic emission distortions indicative of hearing loss alterations have been found in 35delG carriers.

    METHOD: We genotyped 35delG in two distinct sample sets: an ARHI sample set, composed of 2,311 Caucasian samples from nine different centers originating from seven different countries with an age range between 53 and 67 years, and an NIHL sample set consisting of 702 samples from the two extremes of a noise-exposed Polish sample.

    RESULTS: After statistical analysis, we were unable to detect an association between 35delG and ARHI, nor between 35delG and NIHL.

    CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that there is no increased susceptibility in 35delG carriers for the development of ARHI or NIHL.

  • 42432.
    Van Hecke, Ann
    et al.
    University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; Nursing Department, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium.
    Duprez, Veerle
    University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Pype, Peter
    General Practice Medicine, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; End-of-Life Care Research Group, Ghent University & Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Ghent, Belgium.
    Beeckman, Dimitri
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; School of Nursing & Midwifery, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI), Dublin, Ireland.
    Verhaeghe, Sofie
    University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; Department of Nursing, VIVES University College, Roeselare, Belgium.
    Criteria for describing and evaluating training interventions in healthcare professions - CRe-DEPTH2020Inngår i: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 84, artikkel-id 104254Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Descriptions of training intervention in healthcare include a lot of vagueness, leaving the reader in doubt about the intervention and the true value of the reported effects. A set of reporting criteria to improve the transparency and comprehensiveness in reporting training interventions in healthcare is recommended.

    Objective: This study aimed to develop and content validate a set of reporting criteria for the development and evaluation of training interventions for healthcare professionals.

    Method: The set of criteria was developed along three stages: (1) a literature review, (2) the design of the criteria, and (3) a Delphi and consensus meeting process with ten experts from different professional disciplines.

    Results: The Criteria for Reporting on Development and Evaluation of Professional Training interventions in Healthcare (CRe-DEPTH) set was systematically developed and consisted of 12 items representing four categories: (1) development of the training, (2) characteristics of the training, (3) characteristics of the providers, and (4) assessment of the training outcomes. Each item has a detailed description to support its unambiguous interpretation.

    Conclusions: The developed CRe-DEPTH reporting criteria guide high quality development, evaluation and reporting for complex training interventions, while preserving the flexibility to incorporate various teaching content or teaching methods. The Cre-DEPTH criteria will allow for detailed reporting on the training, its developmental process, as well as on the rationale for underlying choices, and will avoid non-reporting of training details.

  • 42433.
    Van Hecke, Ann
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; Nursing Department, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium.
    Goemaes, Regine
    Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Verhaeghe, Sofie
    Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; Department Health Care, VIVES University College, Roeselare, Belgium.
    Beyers, Wim
    Department of Developmental, Personality and Social Psychology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Decoene, Elsie
    Cancer Centre, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium.
    Beeckman, Dimitri
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskaper. Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Skin Integrity Research Group (SKINT), University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; School of Nursing and Midwifery, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Ireland.
    Leadership in nursing and midwifery: Activities and associated competencies of advanced practice nurses and midwives2019Inngår i: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 27, nr 6, s. 1261-1274Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore the practice profile and competencies of advanced practice nurses (APNs) and midwives (AMPs), and factors associated with task non-execution.

    Background: Advanced practitioner roles are increasingly implemented internationally. Unofficial role introduction led to confusion regarding task performance. Studies examining associations between APNs'/AMPs' task performance and competency levels, and factors associated with task non-execution are lacking.

    Method: A cross-sectional study among APNs/AMPs in Flanders (Belgium) explored tasks and competencies in seven domains: clinical/professional leadership, change management/innovation, research, clinical expertise/guidance/coaching, consultation/consultancy, multidisciplinary cooperation/care coordination and ethical decision-making. Task performance and competency level frequencies were calculated. Regression analysis identified factors associated with task non-execution on domain/item level.

    Results: Participants (n = 63) executed tasks in all domains. Task non-execution related to research and clinical expertise was associated with work setting; task non-execution regarding care coordination and ethical decision-making was associated with competency perception. Several tasks were performed by few APNs/AMPs despite many feeling competent. Five of ten tasks performed by fewest participants belonged to the leadership domain.

    Conclusion and implications for nursing and midwifery management: Supervisors could play an important part in APNs'/AMPs' role development, especially regarding leadership and tasks executed by few participants. Future studies should provide in-depth knowledge on task non-execution.

  • 42434.
    van Hees, Patrick A. W.
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Elgh-Dalgren, Kristin
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Engwall, Magnus
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    von Kronhelm, Thomas
    Sakab AB.
    Re-cycling of Remediated Soil in Sweden: An Environmental Advantage?2008Inngår i: Resources, Conservation and Recycling, ISSN 0921-3449, E-ISSN 1879-0658, Vol. 52, nr 12, s. 1349-1361Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The disposal of soil material after ex-situ treatment of contaminated soil is an issue of growing concern. The handling and use of this material are surrounded by numerous regulatory, economic, technical and societal aspects that complicate or hinder recycling. As a consequence, the lack of means of recovery can in the long term bias the whole remedial process. In addition, it can affect the competition between various treatment options such as ex-situ, and in-situ techniques and landfilling. At the same time the materials must not have any negative environmental impacts, and their usage must be compatible with existing risk assessment and management frameworks regarding contaminated land. Other concerns such as a possible distinction against “lightly” contaminated materials, waste status and public acceptance add to the complexity. This paper focuses on Swedish conditions, but does also provide an outlook concerning EU regulation. A summary of leaching and batch tests employed for re-use of soil and waste is presented as well as an overview of the eco-toxicological aspects of treated materials. The main conclusion is that re-cycling of treated soil is desirable from numerous aspects, but has to go along an adequate risk assessment.

  • 42435.
    van Hees, Patrick A. W.
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap.
    Johansson, Emma M.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap.
    Jones, D. L.
    Dynamics of simple carbon compounds in two forest soils as revealed by soil solution concentrations and biodegradation kinetics2008Inngår i: Plant and Soil, ISSN 0032-079X, E-ISSN 1573-5036, Vol. 310, nr 1-2, s. 11-23Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Simple compounds in soil such as organic acids, amino acids and monosaccharides are believed to be important in regulating many aspects of terrestrial ecosystem functioning (e.g. C cycling, nutrient acquisition). Understanding the fate and dynamics of these low molecular weight (MW) compounds is therefore essential for predicting ecosystem responses to disturbance. Our aim was to quantify the amounts of these compounds in two podzolic forest soil profiles (O, E, Bs and C horizons) and to quantify their contribution to total soil respiration. The total concentration of organic acids, amino acids and monosaccharides in soil solution comprised on average 15 +/- 10% of the total dissolved organic C (DOC), with declining concentrations in the deeper soil layers. Dissolved organic N (DON) was the dominant form of N in soil solution and free amino acids contributed to 34% of this pool. The mineralization behaviour of glucose and galactose was described by parabolic (Michaelis-Menten) type kinetics with V-max and K (M) values in the range of < 1-250 mu mol kg(-1) h(-1) and 15-1,100 mu M, respectively. Assuming that (1) microbially mediated substrate turnover follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and (2) steady state soil solution concentrations, we calculated the rate of CO2 efflux attributable to the mineralisation of the three classes of low MW compounds. Our results indicated that in the O horizon, the turnover of these substrates could comprise similar to 100% of the basal, heterotrophic, soil respiration. In contrast, in the deeper mineral soil < 20% of total soil respiration could be attributable to the mineralization of these compounds. Our compound-specific approach has identified the main substrates contributing to soil respiration in forest topsoils. However, our results also suggest that soil respiration in subsoils may be attributable to compounds other than organic acids, amino acids and monosaccharides.

  • 42436.
    van Hees, Patrick A. W.
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap.
    Rosling, A.
    Lundstrom, U. S.
    Finlay, R. D.
    The biogeochemical impact of ectomycorrhizal conifers on major soil elements (Al, Fe, K and Si)2006Inngår i: Geoderma, ISSN 0016-7061, E-ISSN 1872-6259, Vol. 136, nr 1-2, s. 364-377Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobilisation of nutrients and dissolution of minerals are of key importance for plant growth and soil formation, as well as long term ecosystem sustainability. The effects of Pinus sylvestris seedlings, ectomycorrhizal colonisation and potassium supply on the mobilisation of Al, Fe, K and Si were studied in a soil column experiment. Budgets were constructed considering amounts in drainage water, accumulation in plants and changes in the pools of exchangeable ions (BaCl2 extractions). Drainage was the most important sink under the experimental conditions imposed, but the other two pools were also of quantitative significance. Plants had a significant positive effect on the total quantities of all elements mobilized. Mycorrhizal colonisation had limited quantitative impact on the mobilization, probably because the chosen mycorrhizal fungi did not cause any growth promotion in this experiment. Despite this, a multivariate analysis (PCA) showed a clear separate grouping of mycorrhizal, non-mycorrhizal and no-plant treatments, and in particular Si and K mobilization was related to soil biological variables which in turn were affected by the presence of mycorrhiza. When K was omitted from the watering solution, plants were able to mobilise significantly more K, which was reflected in plant uptake and a potential replenishment of the exchangeable pool. Up-scaling of total Al, K and Si mobilization to field conditions resulted in rates between equal to and up to 10 times higher than the average historical weathering rate. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 42437.
    Van Hemelrijck, Mieke
    et al.
    King’s College London, London, UK.
    Wigertz, Annette
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sandin, Fredrik
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Garmo, Hans
    King’s College London, London, UK; Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hellstrom, Karin
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fransson, Per
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lambe, Mats
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Adolfsson, Jan
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Varenhorst, Eberhard
    Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Johansson, Jan-Erik
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin. Region Örebro län.
    Stattin, Pär
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, USA.
    Cohort Profile: The National Prostate Cancer Register of Sweden and Prostate Cancer data Base Sweden 2.02013Inngår i: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 42, nr 4, s. 956-967Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1987, the first Regional Prostate Cancer Register was set up in the South-East health-care region of Sweden. Other health-care regions joined and since 1998 virtually all prostate cancer (PCa) cases are registered in the National Prostate Cancer Register (NPCR) of Sweden to provide data for quality assurance, bench marking and clinical research. NPCR includes data on tumour stage, Gleason score, serum level of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and primary treatment. In 2008, the NPCR was linked to a number of other population-based registers by use of the personal identity number. This database named Prostate Cancer data Base Sweden (PCBaSe) has now been extended with more cases, longer follow-up and a selection of two control series of men free of PCa at the time of sampling, as well as information on brothers of men diagnosed with PCa, resulting in PCBaSe 2.0. This extension allows for studies with case-control, cohort or longitudinal case-only design on aetiological factors, pharmaceutical prescriptions and assessment of long-term outcomes. The NPCR covers > 96% of all incident PCa cases registered by the Swedish Cancer Register, which has an underreporting of < 3.7%. The NPCR is used to assess trends in incidence, treatment and outcome of men with PCa. Since the national registers linked to PCBaSe are complete, studies from PCBaSe 2.0 are truly population based.

  • 42438.
    van Hoewijk, Emilie
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro Universitet.
    Lööw, Lovisa
    Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro Universitet.
    Definitionen av Trust: En litteraturstudie av användningen av begreppet trust inom managementlitteratur2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
  • 42439.
    Van Hove, Ravi
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Effect of pro-inflammatory cytokines and nitrosative stress on tyrosine uptake in human fibroblasts2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 poäng / 45 hpOppgave
  • 42440.
    Van Laer, Lut
    et al.
    Department of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
    Huyghe, Jeroen R.
    Department of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
    Hannula, Samuli
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Van Eyken, Els
    Department of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
    Stephan, Dietrich A.
    Neurogenomics Division, Translational Genomics Research Institute, Phoenix AZ, United States.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Aikio, Pekka
    Thule Institute, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Fransen, Erik
    Department of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
    Lysholm-Bernacchi, Alana
    Neurogenomics Division, Translational Genomics Research Institute, Phoenix AZ, United States.
    Sorri, Martti
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Huentelman, Matthew J.
    Neurogenomics Division, Translational Genomics Research Institute, Phoenix AZ, United States.
    Van Camp, Guy
    Department of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
    A genome-wide association study for age-related hearing impairment in the Saami2010Inngår i: European Journal of Human Genetics, ISSN 1018-4813, E-ISSN 1476-5438, Vol. 18, nr 6, s. 685-693Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed at contributing to the elucidation of the genetic basis of age-related hearing impairment (ARHI), a common multifactorial disease with an important genetic contribution as demonstrated by heritability studies. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in the Finnish Saami, a small, ancient, genetically isolated population without evidence of demographic expansion. The choice of this study population was motivated by its anticipated higher extent of LD, potentially offering a substantial power advantage for association mapping. DNA samples and audiometric measurements were collected from 352 Finnish Saami individuals, aged between 50 and 75 years. To reduce the burden of multiple testing, we applied principal component (PC) analysis to the multivariate audiometric phenotype. The first three PCs captured 80% of the variation in hearing thresholds, while maintaining biologically important audiometric features. All subjects were genotyped with the Affymetrix 100 K chip. To account for multiple levels of relatedness among subjects, as well as for population stratification, association testing was performed using a mixed model. We summarised the top-ranking association signals for the three traits under study. The top-ranked SNP, rs457717 (P-value 3.55 x 10(-7)), was associated with PC3 and was localised in an intron of the IQ motif-containing GTPase-activating-like protein (IQGAP2). Intriguingly, the SNP rs161927 (P-value 0.000149), seventh-ranked for PC1, was positioned immediately downstream from the metabotropic glutamate receptor-7 gene (GRM7). As a previous GWAS of a European and Finnish sample set already suggested a role for GRM7 in ARHI, this study provides further evidence for the involvement of this gene.

  • 42441.
    Van Laer, Lut
    et al.
    Department of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
    Van Eyken, Els
    Department of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
    Fransen, Erik
    Department of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
    Huyghe, Jeroen R.
    Department of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
    Topsakal, Vedat
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
    Hendrickx, Jan-Jaap
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium; Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Hannula, Samuli
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Mäki-Torkko, Elina
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Jensen, Mona
    Department of Audiology, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Demeester, Kelly
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
    Baur, Manuela
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.
    Bonaconsa, Amanda
    Department of Oto-Surgery, University Hospital Padova, Padova, Italy.
    Mazzoli, Manuela
    Department of Oto-Surgery, University Hospital Padova, Padova, Italy.
    Espeso, Angeles
    Welsh Hearing Institute, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
    Verbruggen, Katia
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital of Ghent, Ghent, Belgium.
    Huyghe, Joke
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital of Ghent, Ghent, Belgium.
    Huygen, Patrick
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Kunst, Sylvia
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Manninen, Minna
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Konings, Annelies
    Department of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
    Diaz-Lacava, Amalia N.
    Institute of Medical Biometry, Informatics and Epidemiology, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
    Steffens, Michael
    Institute of Medical Biometry, Informatics and Epidemiology, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
    Wienker, Thomas F.
    Institute of Medical Biometry, Informatics and Epidemiology, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.
    Pyykkö, Ilmari
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Cremers, Cor W. R. J.
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Kremer, Hannie
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Dhooge, Ingeborg
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital of Ghent, Ghent, Belgium.
    Stephens, Dafydd
    Welsh Hearing Institute, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.
    Orzan, Eva
    Department of Oto-Surgery, University Hospital Padova, Padova, Italy.
    Pfister, Markus
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.
    Bille, Michael
    Department of Audiology, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Parving, Agnete
    Department of Audiology, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Sorri, Martti
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
    Van de Heyning, Paul H.
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
    Van Camp, Guy
    Department of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
    The grainyhead like 2 gene (GRHL2), alias TFCP2L3, is associated with age-related hearing impairment2008Inngår i: Human Molecular Genetics, ISSN 0964-6906, E-ISSN 1460-2083, Vol. 17, nr 2, s. 159-169Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) is the most prevalent sensory impairment in the elderly. ARHI is a complex disease caused by an interaction between environmental and genetic factors. The contribution of various environmental factors has been relatively extensively studied. In contrast, investigations to identify the genetic risk factors have only recently been initiated. In this paper we describe the results of an association study performed on 2418 ARHI samples derived from nine centers from seven European countries. In 70 candidate genes, a total of 768 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected based on HAPMAP data. These genes were chosen among the monogenic hearing loss genes identified in mice and men in addition to several strong functional candidates. After genotyping and data polishing, statistical analysis of all samples combined resulted in a P-value that survived correction for multiple testing for one SNP in the GRHL2 gene. Other SNPs in this gene were also associated, albeit to a lesser degree. Subsequently, an analysis of the most significant GRHL2 SNP was performed separately for each center. The direction of the association was identical in all nine centers. Two centers showed significant associations and a third center showed a trend towards significance. Subsequent fine mapping of this locus demonstrated that the majority of the associated SNPs reside in intron 1. We hypothesize that the causative variant may change the expression levels of a GRHL2 isoform.

  • 42442.
    Van Lancker, Aurélie
    et al.
    University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Van Hecke, Ann
    University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Verhaeghe, Sofie
    University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Mattheeuws, Matthias
    University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Beeckman, Dimitri
    University Centre for Nursing and Midwifery, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    A comparison of symptoms in older hospitalised cancer and non-cancer patients in need of palliative care: a secondary analysis of two cross-sectional studies2018Inngår i: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 18, nr 1, artikkel-id 40Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Evidence on the differences in symptom patterns between older palliative cancer and non-cancer patients is lacking. The purpose of the study was to determine the differences in symptoms between older hospitalised palliative cancer and non-cancer patients.

    METHODS: A secondary analysis of two multi-centre cross-sectional studies was performed. A validated instrument was used to assess the frequency and intensity of 40 symptoms in older hospitalised palliative cancer patients (n = 100) and older palliative non-cancer patients (n = 100). The data were collected between March 2013 and June 2015. Differences between groups were measured statistically.

    RESULTS: Overall, similarities in symptom patterns were observed between cancer and non-cancer patients. Some minor differences were detected between the groups. Non-cancer patients experienced significantly more physical symptoms and functional dependence than cancer patients. Patients with cancer experienced higher levels of frequency and intensity of psychological symptoms compared to non-cancer patients.

    CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare professionals should be aware of the high occurrence of symptoms in both cancer and non-cancer patients, and they should be educated about the systematic assessment of symptoms in multiple domains by accounting for the occurrence of generic symptoms and disease-specific symptoms.

  • 42443.
    Van Leeuwen, S. P. J.
    et al.
    RIKILT-Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen, Netherlands; Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM), Vrije University, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Van Bavel, Bert
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    Abad, E.
    Laboratory of Dioxins, Environmental Chemistry Department, IDÆA-CSIC, Barcelona, Spain.
    Leslie, H. A.
    Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM), Vrije University, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Fiedler, Heidelore
    Chemicals Branch, United Nations Environment Program, Châtelaine GE, Geneva, Switzerland.
    De Boer, J.
    Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM), Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    POPs analysis reveals issues in bringing laboratories in developing countries to a higher quality level2013Inngår i: TrAC. Trends in analytical chemistry, ISSN 0165-9936, E-ISSN 1879-3142, Vol. 46, s. 198-206Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We assessed the performance of laboratories in 18 developing countries in analyzing persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in environmental and human samples, as part of a capacity-building program with the goal of helping laboratories increase proficiency in the types of analyses required for the POPs Global Monitoring Program (GMP) under the Stockholm Convention. We identified several issues that need improvement before the laboratories can contribute to the GMP, including technical aspects of POPs analysis, QA/QC issues and laboratory-management problems.

  • 42444. Van Leeuwen, S. P. J.
    et al.
    Van Bavel, Bert
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik.
    De Boer, J.
    First worldwide UNEP interlaboratory study on persistent organic pollutants (POPs), with data on polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides2013Inngår i: TrAC. Trends in analytical chemistry, ISSN 0165-9936, E-ISSN 1879-3142, Vol. 46, s. 110-117Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The first worldwide interlaboratory study on persistent organic pollutants (POPs) under the Stockholm Convention was organized, with a participation of 103 laboratories from Asia, Europe, the Americas, Africa and Australia, of which the majority submitted data on polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). The participating laboratories were requested to analyze different matrices (i.e. two test solutions, and test materials for fish, sediment, fly ash and human milk). All results were statistically evaluated according to the procedures used in the European Union-based QUASIMEME proficiency-testing scheme.

  • 42445. van Leeuwen, Stefan P. J.
    et al.
    Kärrman, Anna
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap.
    van Bavel, Bert
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap.
    de Boer, Jacob
    Lindström, Gunilla
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för naturvetenskap.
    Struggle for quality in determination of perfluorinated contaminants in environmental and human samples2006Inngår i: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 40, nr 24, s. 7854-7860Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The first worldwide interlaboratory study on the analyses of 13 perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) in three environmental and two human samples indicates a varying degree of accuracy in relation to the matrix or analyte determined. The ability of 38 participating laboratories from 13 countries to determine the analytes in the various matrices was evaluated by calculation of z-scores according to the Cofino model. The PFCs which were reported most frequently by the laboratories, and assessed with the most satisfactory agreement, were perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). In general, the level of agreement between the participating laboratories decreased in the following order: PFC standard solution (76% satisfactory z-scores of <[2]1 for PFOS) < human blood (67%) < human plasma (63%) < fish liver extract (55%) < water (31%) < fish tissue (17%). This shows that relative good agreement between laboratories was obtained for the study of standard and human matrices. For the fish extract, most laboratories underestimated the actual PFOS concentration due to matrix effects. The results for the fish tissue and water are also poor, indicating that the extraction and cleanup steps require further improvement. It was concluded that the PFC determinations in various matrices are not yet fully mastered.

  • 42446.
    van Leuven, Sarah
    et al.
    Department of Family Medicine and Primary Health Care, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Berglez, Peter
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Global Journalism between Dream and Reality: A Comparative Study of The Times, Le Monde and De Standaard2016Inngår i: Journalism Studies, ISSN 1461-670X, E-ISSN 1469-9699, Vol. 17, nr 6, s. 667-683Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Global journalism is a practice that differs from traditional foreign correspondence. Instead of only covering distant events, it actively interconnects the local with the global. However, while some researchers claim that its practice has been incorporated into everyday news production as a natural response to the increasing interconnectedness of our globalized society, others see few empirical signs of its presence, and instead consider it to be a utopian vision for less “national provincialism” among the world's media. These contrasting views on the evidence for global journalism in the news call for more empirical research. The purpose of this study is thus to examine the prevalence of global journalism in mainstream news media. The article provides, first, an operationalization of global journalism and, second, a quantification of its presence or absence in the news output of three national newspapers, The Times, Le Monde and De Standaard, by means of a quantitative content analysis covering the period January to June 2013 (N = 850). According to our main results, a quarter of all articles include at least one building block of global journalism, and a fifth of all articles are centered on a global event and/or present a global outlook on the reported matter. Le Monde is the most “global” newspaper, as it exhibits the most examples of global journalism. However, the other two newspapers to a greater extent embed global outlooks in their domestic news sections, which might be viewed as an emerging way of producing globalized news discourse in a social reality with ever-more blurred distinctions between domestic and global reality.

  • 42447.
    van Maurik, Ingrid S.
    et al.
    Alzheimer Center Amsterdam, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Vos, Stephanie J.
    Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, Maastricht University, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Alzheimer Centre Limburg, Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Bos, Isabelle
    Alzheimer Center Amsterdam, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, Maastricht University, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Alzheimer Centre Limburg, Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Bouwman, Femke H.
    Alzheimer Center Amsterdam, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Teunissen, Charlotte E.
    Neurochemistry Laboratory, Department of Clinical Chemistry, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Scheltens, Philip
    Alzheimer Center Amsterdam, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Barkhof, Frederik
    Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam.
    Frolich, Lutz
    Department of Geriatric Psychiatry, Zentralinstitut für Seelische Gesundheit, Medical Faculty Mannheim University of Heidelberg, Germany.
    Kornhuber, Johannes
    Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany.
    Wiltfang, Jens
    Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center, Georg-August-University, Göttingen, Germany; German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Göttingen, Germany; iBiMED, Medical Sciences Department, University of Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal.
    Maier, Wolfgang
    Department of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Gerotopsychiatry, University of Bonn, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Bonn, Germany.
    Peters, Oliver
    Department of Psychiatry, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health, Berlin, Germany; German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Berlin, Germany.
    Rüther, Eckart
    Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany.
    Nobili, Flavio
    Clinical Neurology, Department of Neurosciences, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy; Neurology Department, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa, Italy.
    Frisoni, Giovanni B.
    Memory Clinic, University Hospital and University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Spiru, Luiza
    Geriatrics, Gerontology and Old Age Psychiatry Clinical Department, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy-"Elias" Emergency Clinical Hospital, Bucharest, Romania; Memory Clinic and Longevity Medicine, Ana Aslan International Foundation, Romania.
    Freund-Levi, Yvonne
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för medicinska vetenskaper. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Karolinska Institutet Center for Alzheimer Research, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Old Age Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK.
    Wallin, Åsa K.
    Clinical Memory Research Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hampel, Harald
    Alzheimer Precision Medicine, GRC 21, Sorbonne University, AP-HP, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France; Eisai, Neurology Business Group, Woodcliff Lake, NJ, USA.
    Soininen, Hilkka
    Institute of Clinical Medicine, Neurology, University of Eastern Finland and Neurocenter, Neurology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland.
    Tsolaki, Magda
    1st Department of Neurology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Memory and Dementia Center, "AHEPA" General Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Verhey, Frans
    Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, Maastricht University, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Alzheimer Centre Limburg, Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Kłoszewska, Iwona
    Department of Geriatric Psychiatry and Psychotic Disorders, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland.
    Mecocci, Patrizia
    Institute of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
    Vellas, Bruno
    UMR INSERM 1027, CHU Toulouse, Toulouse, France.
    Lovestone, Simon
    Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
    Galluzzi, Samantha
    Lab Alzheimer's Neuroimaging and Epidemiology, IRCCS San Giovanni di Dio Fatebenefratelli, Brescia, Italy.
    Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa
    Institute of Clinical Medicine, Neurology, University of Eastern Finland and Neurocenter, Neurology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland.
    Santana, Isabel
    Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal; Department of Neurology, Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.
    Baldeiras, Ines
    Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal; Department of Neurology, Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.
    de Mendonça, Alexandre
    Faculty of Medicine, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal.
    Silva, Dina
    Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal; Faculty of Medicine, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal; Centre for Biomedical Research, Universidade do Algarve, Faro, Portugal.
    Chetelat, Gael
    Université Normandie, Inserm, Université de Caen-Normandie, Inserm UMR-S U1237, GIP Cyceron, Caen, France.
    Egret, Stephanie
    Université Normandie, Inserm, Université de Caen-Normandie, Inserm UMR-S U1237, GIP Cyceron, Caen, France.
    Palmqvist, Sebastian
    Clinical Memory Research Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Department of Neurology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Hansson, Oskar
    Clinical Memory Research Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Memory Clinic, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Visser, Pieter Jelle
    Alzheimer Center Amsterdam, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, Maastricht University, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Alzheimer Centre Limburg, Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Berkhof, Johannes
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    van der Flier, Wiesje M.
    Alzheimer Center Amsterdam, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Biomarker-based prognosis for people with mild cognitive impairment (ABIDE): a modelling study2019Inngår i: Lancet Neurology, ISSN 1474-4422, E-ISSN 1474-4465, Vol. 18, nr 11, s. 1034-1044Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Biomarker-based risk predictions of dementia in people with mild cognitive impairment are highly relevant for care planning and to select patients for treatment when disease-modifying drugs become available. We aimed to establish robust prediction models of disease progression in people at risk of dementia.

    METHODS: In this modelling study, we included people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) from single-centre and multicentre cohorts in Europe and North America: the European Medical Information Framework for Alzheimer's Disease (EMIF-AD; n=883), Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI; n=829), Amsterdam Dementia Cohort (ADC; n=666), and the Swedish BioFINDER study (n=233). Inclusion criteria were a baseline diagnosis of MCI, at least 6 months of follow-up, and availability of a baseline Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and MRI or CSF biomarker assessment. The primary endpoint was clinical progression to any type of dementia. We evaluated performance of previously developed risk prediction models-a demographics model, a hippocampal volume model, and a CSF biomarkers model-by evaluating them across cohorts, incorporating different biomarker measurement methods, and determining prognostic performance with Harrell's C statistic. We then updated the models by re-estimating parameters with and without centre-specific effects and evaluated model calibration by comparing observed and expected survival. Finally, we constructed a model combining markers for amyloid deposition, tauopathy, and neurodegeneration (ATN), in accordance with the National Institute on Aging and Alzheimer's Association research framework.

    FINDINGS: We included all 2611 individuals with MCI in the four cohorts, 1007 (39%) of whom progressed to dementia. The validated demographics model (Harrell's C 0·62, 95% CI 0·59-0·65), validated hippocampal volume model (0·67, 0·62-0·72), and updated CSF biomarkers model (0·72, 0·68-0·74) had adequate prognostic performance across cohorts and were well calibrated. The newly constructed ATN model had the highest performance (0·74, 0·71-0·76).

    INTERPRETATION: We generated risk models that are robust across cohorts, which adds to their potential clinical applicability. The models could aid clinicians in the interpretation of CSF biomarker and hippocampal volume results in individuals with MCI, and help research and clinical settings to prepare for a future of precision medicine in Alzheimer's disease. Future research should focus on the clinical utility of the models, particularly if their use affects participants' understanding, emotional wellbeing, and behaviour.

  • 42448.
    van Ooijen, Erik
    Örebro universitet, Humanistiska institutionen.
    Att anlägga perspektiv [red. Staffan Hellberg & Göran Rossholm] och Essays on fiction and perspective [red. Göran Rossholm]2004Inngår i: Samlaren: tidskrift för svensk litteraturvetenskaplig forskning, ISSN 0348-6133, E-ISSN 2002-3871, Vol. 125, s. 442-447Artikkel, omtale (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 42449.
    van Ooijen, Erik
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Bose och crescografen2018Inngår i: Aiolos, ISSN 1400-7770, Vol. 62, s. 85-87Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 42450.
    van Ooijen, Erik
    Örebro universitet, Humanistiska institutionen.
    "bunden af en takskyld uden lige”. Om svenskspråklig Ibsen-formidling 1857–1906 (Red. Vigdis Ystad, Knut Brynhildsvoll och Roland Lysell)2007Inngår i: Samlaren: tidskrift för svensk litteraturvetenskaplig forskning, ISSN 0348-6133, E-ISSN 2002-3871, Vol. 128, s. 389-393Artikkel, omtale (Annet vitenskapelig)
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