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  • 51.
    Faag, Carina
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    A comprehensive nurse-led intervention for patients with peripheral vestibular disorders: the feasibility and benefits2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Dizziness and balance problems are common symptoms at all ages, the symptoms are more common in women than in men and increases with age. Several studies clearly demonstrate that peripheral vestibular disorders symptoms may lead to the patients reporting functional consequences of a physical, mental and social character. The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate the efficacy and feasibility of an intervention for patients with peripheral vestibular disorders that contains patient education in groups in combination with individual support. The study is a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Thirty-six patients participated in the study: the intervention group (n = 18), who received the intervention and standard care, and patients in a control group (n = 18), who received standard care. The intervention includes a patient education program and individualized nursing support during a six-month period. Outcomes were collected by self-assessment questionnaires about dizziness-related symptoms, well-being, sense of coherence, and self-care measured at baseline before randomization and at six and nine months later. All patients were also instructed to complete a diary where they recorded symptoms that arose during an episode of dizziness. The main results show that the patients who received the intervention rated statistically significant fewer vertigo-related symptoms and a higher sense of coherence than the control group at the ninemonth follow-up. The intervention was feasible and seems to support the patients to manage symptoms. The effects were small and must be considered in relation to the efforts of the intervention. Confirmative studies are warranted.

    List of papers
    1. Feasibility and effects of a nursing intervention for patients with peripheral vestibular disorders
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Feasibility and effects of a nursing intervention for patients with peripheral vestibular disorders
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Nursing
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-51599 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-08-08 Created: 2016-08-08 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
    2. Symptoms experienced by patients with peripheral vestibular disorders: evaluation of the Vertigo Symptom Scale for clinical application
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Symptoms experienced by patients with peripheral vestibular disorders: evaluation of the Vertigo Symptom Scale for clinical application
    2007 (English)In: Clinical Otolaryngology, ISSN 1749-4478, E-ISSN 1365-2273, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 440-446Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To describe symptoms during an episode of dizziness in a sample of patients suffering from peripheral vestibular disorders and to compare them with the items in the Vertigo Symptom Scale.

    Design: A descriptive study from a sample of patients with peripheral vestibular disorders.

    Setting: Patients visiting a department of audiology at a university hospital.

    Participants: Twenty patients with peripheral vestibular disorders. The inclusion criteria were that the patient had had at least three spontaneous attacks of vertigo and/or was constantly unsteady during the last 3 months for at least 75% of the time when awake.

    Main outcome measure: Patients were instructed to complete a diary where they recorded symptoms that arose during an episode of dizziness. These symptoms were compared with the content of the Vertigo Symptom Scale.

    Results: The most frequent symptoms as mentioned by the patients in their diaries were a feeling that things are spinning or moving around, nausea, feeling unsteady/about to lose one's balance, fatigue, headache, a feeling as if the ground you walk on is distant and ear-related such as tinnitus and a feeling of pressure in the ear. Pain in the heart or chest region, a heavy feeling in the arms or legs, pain in the lower part of the back and excessive sweating were not mentioned at all or by very few patients. Analysis showed that some of the symptoms included in the Vertigo Symptom Scale occurred less during an episode of dizziness than others in this sample of patients with peripheral vestibular disorders.

    Conclusion: It was found that the Vertigo Symptom Scale is an adequate base but may need to be developed for use in patients diagnosed with peripheral vestibular symptoms to be able to evaluate care and treatment.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2007
    National Category
    Otorhinolaryngology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-51596 (URN)000251414800004 ()18076429 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-36849088281 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2016-08-08 Created: 2016-08-08 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
  • 52.
    Forsberg, Anette
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital. Division of Neurology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Family Medicine Research Centre, Örebro County Council, Örebro, Sweden.
    Widén-Holmqvist, Lotta
    Division of Neurology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Physiotherapy, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Balancing everyday life two years after falling ill with Guillain-Barre syndrome: a qualitative study2015In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 601-610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim was to describe experiences of disability in everyday life and managing the recovery process two years after falling ill with Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    Design: Qualitative interview study.

    Methods: Interviews were conducted with 35 persons (22 male, mean age 50 years) two years after the onset of Guillain-Barré syndrome. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using content analysis.

    Results: The analysis revealed four categories and an overall theme: ‘Striving for balance in everyday life’. The participants described persistent lived body restrictions that affected their arms, legs, and face. Bodily symptoms and loss of energy limited or restricted many everyday activities. In connection with healthcare, both satisfaction and feeling vulnerable in a critical situation were described. Experiences of the recovery process varied. The participants described acceptance and reappraisal of a new life situation despite their limitations, and having gained the knowledge that life can change suddenly. However, they also expressed disappointment following an overly positive prognosis in the early stages, and over a continuous wait for recovery. For some participants life had returned to as before.

    Conclusion: The participants experienced limitations in everyday life and decreased functioning in several parts of the body. The recovery process may still be ongoing two years after onset. Rehabilitation intervention with an extended focus on supporting individualized coping processes could facilitate ways to live with persistent disability.

  • 53.
    Fransson, Elin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Liman, Linnea
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    CI och identitet: Samhörighet i vardagen hos unga vuxna kvinnor med CI- en intervjustudie2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 54.
    Fransson, Linda
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Wrang, Amanda
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    En undersköterskas upplevelser: Vårdsituationen med hörapparatbärande brukare på äldreboende: en intervjustudie2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 55.
    Fredriksson, Ingela
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Leisure-time youth-center as health-promotion settings2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Leisure time is an important part of young people’s lives. Despite this, leisure-time settings have hitherto had only a minor role in setting-based health-promotion initiatives. Improving adolescents’ quality of leisuretime activities can reduce social differences in health, thus youth-centers can be appropriate settings for promoting health. However, young people with immigrant backgrounds participate less in organized leisure-time activities.

    The overall aim of this study is to explore young people’s leisure time as their health-promotion setting in two NGO-run youth-centers in multicultural, socially deprived suburbs in Sweden.

    This study took a practice-based approach using a mixture of methods in close collaboration with the youth-centers. Data collection was done through surveys with young people (n = 207) and interviews with young people and leaders (n = 16). Study I, about who participates in youthcenter activities, used an explanatory mixed method. Study II, about the youth-centers’ strategies, used an explorative qualitative method with an inductive content analysis.

    This study shows that youth-centers have great potential to be a healthpromotion setting if their strategies include some important factors, both in theory and in daily practice. To be a health-promotion setting, a youthcenter needs to be open and inclusive for its target group, foster supportive relationships, emphasize youth empowerment, and integrate family, school, and community in its strategies.

    Local knowledge about young people's backgrounds, needs, interests, and motivations to attend youth-center activities – as well as good contact with young people's families – is important because it can increase participation in leisure-time activities for young people in multicultural and socio- economically disadvantaged neighborhoods and can thus help to reduce social inequalities in health.

    List of papers
    1. Two NGO-run youth-centers in multicultural, socially deprived suburbs in Sweden: Who are the participants?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Two NGO-run youth-centers in multicultural, socially deprived suburbs in Sweden: Who are the participants?
    2015 (English)In: Health, ISSN 1949-4998, Vol. 7, no 9, p. 1158-1174Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Leisure-time is an important part of young people’s lives. One way to reduce social differences in health is to improve adolescents’ living conditions, for example by enhancing the quality of after-school activities. Multicultural, socially deprived suburbs have less youth participation in organized leisure-time activities. This study explores who the participants are at two NGO-run youth-centers in multicultural, socially deprived suburbs in Sweden and whether socio-demographic, health-related, and leisure-time factors affect the targeted participation. Methods: The study can be seen as an explanatory mixed-methods study where qualitative data help explain initial quantitative results. The included data are a survey with youth (n = 207), seven individual interviews with staff, and six focus-groups interviews with young people at two youth-centers in two different cities. Results and Conclusions: The participants in the youth-centers are Swedish born youths having foreign-born parents who live with both parents, often in crowded apartments with many siblings. Moreover they feel healthy, enjoy school and have good contact with their parents. It seems that strategies for recruiting youths to youth-centers have a large impact on who participates. One way to succeed in having a more equal gender and ethnicity distribution is to offer youth activities that are a natural step forward from children’s activities. The youth-centers’ proximity is also of importance for participation, in these types of neighborhoods.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Scientific Research Publishing, 2015
    Keywords
    Youth-Center, Leisure-Time, Participation, Suburbs, NGO
    National Category
    Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
    Research subject
    Public health
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-45914 (URN)10.4236/health.2015.79131 (DOI)
    Funder
    Swedish National Institute of Public Health
    Available from: 2015-09-24 Created: 2015-09-24 Last updated: 2018-04-04Bibliographically approved
    2. Important Strategies for Youth Centers to be Health-Promoting Settings
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Important Strategies for Youth Centers to be Health-Promoting Settings
    2015 (English)In: Health Science Journal, ISSN 1791-809X, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Adolescence is a time that offers many opportunities for good health. It is also when the foundations for future patterns of adult health are established. Leisure time is a significant part of young people’s lives, and is often spent together with peers, it could therefore be a crucial arena for helping adolescents develop their full potential and attain the best possible health in the transition to adulthood. Since many young people spend their leisure time at youth centers they can play an active role in health promotion and be a health-promoting setting.

    This study aims to explore different strategies at two NGO-driven youth centers in multicultural, socially deprived suburbs in Sweden, and to determine what factors are important for making the youth centers health-promoting settings.

    Method and findings: The study includes data from seven individual interviews with staff and six group interviews with youth at two youth centers. The groups consisted of three to five members with different ages (13–17 years), ethnicities, experiences and number of years at the center, totally 26 young people. An inductive qualitative content analysis was performed to analyze the interviews. The two youth centers studied are located in suburbs of two top-ten (by population) cities in Sweden. Both suburbs are characterized by apartment blocks and a high proportion of people with immigrant backgrounds and lower socio- economic status. The results show that youth centers can be health-promoting settings when their strategies include some important factors, both in theory and in daily practice.

    Conclusion: To be a health-promoting setting a youth center needs to be open and inclusive towards its target groups, foster supportive relationships, emphasize youth empowerment, and integrate family, school and community into its strategies.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Athens, Greece: Technological Educational Institute of Athens, 2015
    Keywords
    Youth center, leisure time, health promotion, settings, NGO, strategies
    National Category
    Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
    Research subject
    Public health
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-48465 (URN)
    Funder
    Public Health Agency of Sweden
    Available from: 2016-02-22 Created: 2016-02-22 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
  • 56.
    Friman, Anne
    et al.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Wiegleb Edström, Desiree
    Dermatology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Department of Dermatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Edelbring, Samuel
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    General practitioners’ perceptions of their role and their collaboration with district nurses in wound care2018In: Primary Health Care Research and Development, ISSN 1463-4236, E-ISSN 1477-1128, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To explore the perceptions of general practitioners (GPs) regarding their role and their collaboration with district nurses (DNs) in the management of leg ulcers in primary healthcare.

    Background

    Earlier research regarding the treatment of leg ulcers in a primary care context has focussed primarily on wound healing. Less is known about GPs’ understandings of their role and their collaboration with DNs in the management of leg ulcers. Since the structured care of patients with leg ulcers involving both GP and DN is currently rather uncommon in Swedish primary care, this study sets out to highlight these aspects from the GP’s perspective.

    Methods

    Semi-structured individual interviews with 16 GPs including both private and county council run healthcare centres. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data.

    Results

    Four themes were identified. The first theme: ‘role as consultant and coordinator’ shows how the GPs perceived their role in wound care. In the second theme: ‘responsibility for diagnosis’ the GPs’ views on responsibility for wound diagnosis is presented. The third theme: ‘desire for continuity’ is based on the GPs’ desire for continuity concerning various aspects. In the fourth theme: ‘collaboration within the organisation’ the importance of the organisation for collaboration between GPs and DNs is presented.

    Conclusions

    The GP’s often work on a consultation-like basis and feel that they become involved late in the patients’ wound treatment. This can have negative consequences for the medical diagnosis and, thereby, lead to a prolonged healing time for the patient. Shortcomings regarding collaboration are mainly attributed to organisational factors.

  • 57.
    Frölander, Hans Erik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro Audiological Research Centre, Örebro, Sweden; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; The Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Linköping, Sweden; Research on Hearing and Deafness (HEAD) Graduate School, Linköping, Sweden .
    Lyxell, Björn
    Department of Behavioral Science and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; The Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Linköping, Sweden.
    Marshall, Jan D
    Jackson laboratory, Bar Harbor, Maine, ME, USA; Alstrom Syndrome international, Mt. Desert, Maine, ME, USA.
    Piacentini, Heather
    Alstrom Syndrome international, Mt. Desert, Maine, ME, USA.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro Audiological Research Centre, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Audiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Sweden; The Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Linköping, Sweden.
    Theory-of-mind in young adults with Alström syndrome is affected by social relationshipsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Frölander, Hans-Erik
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Deafblindness: Theory-of-mind, cognitive functioning and social network in Alström syndrome2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis addresses young adults with Alström syndrome (AS). AS causes acquired deafblindness, a severe, progressive, combined auditory and visual impairment affecting daily life and self-reliance to a degree that full participation depends on help from others and society. AS is an autosomal, recessively inherited single-gene disorder that affects the ALMS1 gene. AS has a multi-systemic pathology including a high incidence of additional multiple endocrine abnormalities, cardiomyopathy, pulmonary fibrosis, restrictive lung disease and progressive hepatic and renal failure leading to reduced life expectancy. The focus in the present thesis is on the development of Theory-of-mind (ToM) and on how ToM relates to the development of certain cognitive skills and the characteristics of the individual social network. ToM refers to the ability to understand the thoughts and feelings of others.

    The results reveal that individuals with AS displayed a significantly higher degree of heterogeneity in the performance of ToM tasks, and some individuals with AS performed on an equal level with nondisabled individuals. ToM performance was predicted by verbal ability and executive functioning (EF), whereas working memory capacity (WM) proved to be an indirect predictor. Later onset of visual loss further characterized AS individuals with better ToM. The sizes of the social networks of individuals with AS were smaller relative to those of nondisabled individuals, and many of the acquaintances were professionals working with individuals with AS. The number of friends correlated with ToM performance.

    Methods to improve verbal ability and EF, and interventions to enhance social participation in childhood of individuals with AS might prove to be fruitful. In addition assistive technology to establish and maintain friendships in adulthood is required.

    List of papers
    1. Theory-of-mind in adolescents and young adults with Alström Syndrome
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Theory-of-mind in adolescents and young adults with Alström Syndrome
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 78, no 3, p. 530-537Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The study focuses on theory-of-mind in adolescents and young adults with Alström syndrome (ALMS). ALMS, an autosomal recessive syndrome causes juvenile blindness, sensorineural hearing loss, cardiomyopathy, endocrinological disorders and metabolic dysfunction. Theory-of-mind (ToM) refers to the ability to impute mental states to one self and to others. Clinical observations have revealed an increased occurence of deviances in mental state understanding in ALMS. In the present study ToM will be examined and related to working memory (WM), verbal ability and sensory loss.

    Methods: Twelve young individuals (16-37 years) with ALMS and 24 nondisabled individuals matched on age, gender and educational level participated. ToM was assessed by means of a multiple task that taxes the ability to understand thoughts and feelings of story chraracters´. WM was examined by means of a reading span task and verbal ability by means of a vocabulary test.

    Results: The ALMS group performed at significantly lower levels in ToM tasks and displayed a higher variability in performance than the control group. Individuals with ALMS and a relatively poor level performance provided fewer correct mental state inferences in ToM tasks than ALMS individuals with relatively higher performance levels. ALMS individuals with relatively high performance levels made as many correct inferences in ToM tasks as the control group, but their inferences were more often incomplete. Vocabulary skills and educational level, but not WM-capacity predicted ToM performance. Degree of deafblindness did not have an impact on ToM. Age of onset of visual loss but not hearing loss related to ToM.

    Conclusions: The individuals with ALMS display a high degree of heterogeneity in terms of ToM, where some individuals reached performance levels comparable to nondisabled individuals. The results are discussed with respect to how cognitive and verbal abilities and factors related to the disability affect ToM.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2014
    Keywords
    Alström syndrome (ALMS), Deafblindness, Theory-of-mind, Working memory, Verbal ability, Dual sensory loss
    National Category
    Otorhinolaryngology Pediatrics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-33957 (URN)10.1016/j.ijporl.2013.12.038 (DOI)000334394400026 ()24485176 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84893729756 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies:

    Linnaeus Centre HEAD

    JDM

    NIH

    Available from: 2014-02-27 Created: 2014-02-27 Last updated: 2018-06-05Bibliographically approved
    2. Theory of mind and cognitive function in adults with Usher or Alström syndrome
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Theory of mind and cognitive function in adults with Usher or Alström syndrome
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Other Health Sciences
    Research subject
    Disability Research
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-49433 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-03-18 Created: 2016-03-18 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
    3. Theory-of-mind in individuals with Alström syndrome is related to executive functions, and verbal ability
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Theory-of-mind in individuals with Alström syndrome is related to executive functions, and verbal ability
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 6, article id 1426Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study focuses on cognitive prerequisites for the development of theory-of-mind (ToM), the ability to impute mental states to self and others in young adults with Alström syndrome (AS). AS is a rare and quite recently described recessively inherited ciliopathic disorder which causes progressive sensorineural hearing loss and juvenile blindness, as well as many other organ dysfunctions. Two cognitive abilities were considered; Phonological working memory (WM) and executive functions (EF), both of importance in speech development.                                                                                              

    Methods: Ten individuals (18–37 years) diagnosed with AS, and 20 individuals with no known impairment matched for age, gender, and educational level participated. Sensory functions were measured. Information about motor functions and communicative skills was obtained from responses to a questionnaire. ToM was assessed using Happés strange stories, verbal ability by a vocabulary test, phonological WM by means of an auditory presented non-word serial recall task and EF by tests of updating and inhibition.                                           

    Results: The AS group performed at a significantly lower level than the control group in both the ToM task and the EF tasks. A significant correlation was observed between recall of non-words and EF in the AS group. Updating, but not inhibition, correlated significantly with verbal ability, whereas both updating and inhibition were significantly related to the ability to initiate and sustain communication. Poorer performance in the ToM and EF tasks were related to language perseverance and motor mannerisms.                                                     

    Conclusion: The AS group displayed a delayed ToM as well as reduced phonological WM, EF, and verbal ability. A significant association between ToM and EF, suggests a compensatory role of EF. This association may reflect the importance of EF to perceive and process input from the social environment when the social interaction is challenged by dual sensory loss. We argue that limitations in EF capacity in individuals with AS, to some extent, may be related to early blindness and progressive hearing loss, but maybe also to gene specific abnormalities.

    Keywords
    Alström syndrome (AS), ciliopathy, deafblindness, theory-of-mind, verbal ability, executive functions
    National Category
    Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
    Research subject
    Psychology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-46002 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01426 (DOI)000361813000001 ()26441796 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    NIH (National Institute of Health), HDO36878
    Note

    Funding Agency:

    Linnaeus Centre HEAD

    Available from: 2015-10-02 Created: 2015-10-02 Last updated: 2018-07-02Bibliographically approved
    4. Theory-of-mind in young adults with Alström syndrome is affected by social relationships
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Theory-of-mind in young adults with Alström syndrome is affected by social relationships
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Other Health Sciences
    Research subject
    Disability Research
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-49434 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-03-18 Created: 2016-03-18 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
  • 59. Fu, Qiang
    et al.
    Xue, Zhanggang
    Klein, Gunnar
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Using mobile information technology to build a database for anesthesia quality control and to provide clinical guidelines.2003In: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, ISSN 0926-9630, E-ISSN 1879-8365, Vol. 95, p. 629-634Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper describes a mobile information system to collect patient information for anaesthesia quality control. In this system we use handheld computers, to collect patient data at the bedside with a daily synchronization of the data of the anaesthesiologist's handheld with the anaesthesia database center, later used for quality control analysis. Further, we design mobile clinical guidelines to be used on the same handhelds.

  • 60.
    Fu, Qiang
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Xue, Zhanggang
    Zhongshan Hospital affiliated to Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
    Zhu, Jie
    Computer Informatics College of Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
    Fors, Uno
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Klein, Gunnar
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Anaesthesia record system on handheld computers: pilot experience and uses for quality control and clinical guidelines2005In: Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine, ISSN 0169-2607, E-ISSN 1872-7565, Vol. 77, no 2, p. 155-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a mobile information system to collect patient information for anesthesia quality control. In this system, a mobile database program was designed for use on handheld computers (Pocket PC). This program is used to collect patient data at the bedside on the handhelds, with a daily synchronization of the data between the anaesthesiologists' handhelds with the anaesthesia database. All collected data are later used for quality control analysis. Furthermore, clinical guidelines will be included on these same handhelds. During the pilot phase, data from a sample set of about 300 patients were incorporated. The processes and interfaces of the system are presented in the paper. The current mobile database system has been designed to replace the original paper-based data collection system. The individual anaesthesiologist's handheld synchronizes patient data daily with anaesthesia database center. This information database is analyzed and used not only to give feedback to the individual doctor or center, but also to review the use of the guidelines provided and the results of their utilization.

  • 61.
    Fägerstad, Anida
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    No-shows in dental care: perspectives on adolescents' attendance pattern2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 62.
    Germundsson, Per
    et al.
    The Department of Social Work, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX, USA; Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning , Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; Audiology India, Mysore, India; Department of Speech and Hearing, School of Allied Health Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal, India.
    Ratinaud, Pierre
    LERASS Laboratory, University of Toulouse, Toulouse, France.
    Tympas, Aristotle
    Department of History and Philosophy of Science, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Patterns in the social representation of "hearing loss" across countries: how do demographic factors influence this representation?2018In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 57, no 12, p. 925-932Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to understand patterns in the social representation of hearing loss reported by adults across different countries and explore the impact of different demographic factors on response patterns. The study used a cross-sectional survey design. Data were collected using a free association task and analysed using qualitative content analysis, cluster analysis and chi-square analysis. The study sample included 404 adults (18 years and over) in the general population from four countries (India, Iran, Portugal and UK). The cluster analysis included 380 responses out of 404 (94.06%) and resulted in five clusters. The clusters were named: (1) individual aspects; (2) aetiology; (3) the surrounding society; (4) limitations and (5) exposed. Various demographic factors (age, occupation type, education and country) showed an association with different clusters, although country of origin seemed to be associated with most clusters. The study results suggest that how hearing loss is represented in adults in general population varies and is mainly related to country of origin. These findings strengthen the argument about cross-cultural differences in perception of hearing loss, which calls for a need to make necessary accommodations while developing public health strategies about hearing loss.

  • 63.
    Granberg, Sarah
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Functioning and disability in adults with hearing loss: the preparatory studies in the ICF Core sets for hearing loss project2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Hearing loss (HL) is a health condition that affects more than 360 million people worldwide. The findings from previous research point at the adverse relationship between adults with hearing loss and important aspects of everyday life such as social relations, communication and work-related tasks. However, the overall picture concerning the functional and disabling aspects of adults with HL re- mains incomplete. To identify the functional and disabling aspects, a conceptual and/or theoretical framework is required. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) offer a multidimensional framework based on bio-psycho-social assumptions about health. In previous research inves- tigations in which the ICF has been used, some utility problems in the linking (relating) of data to the classification have been highlighted.

    The aims of the present thesis were to explore the areas of functioning and disability of relevance for adults with HL and to explore how audiological data can be linked to ICF. The aims were explored by applying the methodology of the ‘interdisciplinary evidence-based approach to functioning and disability in adults with HL’, acknowledging the merging of three perspectives designated the Researcher, the Patient and the Professional perspective. Four studies that focus on the three perspectives were conducted. All results were linked to the ICF classification. The results were merged into a model designated ‘the integrative model of functioning and disability in adults with HL’.

    When the three perspectives were linked, the results revealed several aspects of relevance for the target group. Bodily (individual) dimensions, such as hear- ing, auditory perception, memory, attention, energy, and emotions, were acknowledged. Aspects of everyday life such as conversations, the usage of communication strategies, family relationships and work, were highlighted. Influential environmental factors, such as noise, assistive technical devices, the design of public buildings, social support and the attitudes of people in the envi- ronment, were also identified. In conclusion, interactions seemed to be vital as almost all identified aspects highlighted or were tied to this dimension of human functioning. Further, concerning the linking of the data it was acknowledged that the ICF and the research area of adult HL do not fully comply. Suggestions for improvements in future revisions of the ICF were highlighted and discussed.

    List of papers
    1. The ICF Core Sets for hearing loss - researcher perspective. Part I: Systematic review of outcome measures identified in audiological research
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The ICF Core Sets for hearing loss - researcher perspective. Part I: Systematic review of outcome measures identified in audiological research
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 65-76Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To review the literature in order to identify outcome measures used in research on adults with hearing loss (HL) as part of the ICF Core Sets development project, and to describe study and population characteristics of the reviewed studies.

    Design: A systematic review methodology was applied using multiple databases. A comprehensive search was conducted and two search pools were created, pool I and pool II.

    Study sample: The study population included adults (>= 18 years of age) with HL and oral language as the primary mode of communication.

    Results: 122 studies were included. Outcome measures were distinguished by 'instrument type', and 10 types were identified. In total, 246 (pool I) and 122 (pool II) different measures were identified, and only approximately 20% were extracted twice or more. Most measures were related to speech recognition. Fifty-one different questionnaires were identified. Many studies used small sample sizes, and the sex of participants was not revealed in several studies.

    Conclusion: The low prevalence of identified measures reflects a lack of consensus regarding the optimal outcome measures to use in audiology. Reflections and discussions are made in relation to small sample sizes and the lack of sex differentiation/descriptions within the included articles.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London, UK: Informa Healthcare, 2014
    Keywords
    Hearing loss, audiology, ICF, ICF core sets, outcome assessment, systematic literature review
    National Category
    Other Health Sciences Otorhinolaryngology
    Research subject
    Disability Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-33754 (URN)10.3109/14992027.2013.851799 (DOI)000329834600001 ()24313738 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84892578224 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies:

    Oticon Foundation  

    Stinger Foundation

    Available from: 2014-02-14 Created: 2014-02-14 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
    2. The ICF Core Sets for hearing loss: researcher perspective, Part II: Linking outcome measures to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF)
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The ICF Core Sets for hearing loss: researcher perspective, Part II: Linking outcome measures to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF)
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 77-87Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To link outcome measures used in audiological research to the ICF classification and thereby describe audiological research from the ICF perspective.

    Design: Through a peer-reviewed or a joint linking procedure, link outcome measures to the ICF classification system using standardized ICF linking rules. Additional linking rules were developed in combination with the established rules to overcome difficulties when connecting audiological data to ICF. Absolute and relative frequencies of ICF categories were reported.

    Study sample: The identified outcome measures from the previous study (Part I) constituted the empirical material. Results: In total, 285 ICF categories were identified. The most prevalent categories were related to listening, hearing functions, auditory perceptions, emotions and the physical environment, such as noise and hearing aids. Categories related to communication showed lower relative frequencies, as did categories related to the social and attitudinal environment.

    Conclusions: Based on the linked outcome measures, communication as a research topic is subordinated to other research topics. The same conclusion can be drawn for research targeting the social and attitudinal environment of adults with HL. Difficulties in the linking procedure were highlighted and discussed, and suggestions for future revisions of the ICF from the audiological perspective were described.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Informa Healthcare, 2014
    Keywords
    Hearing loss, audiology, ICF, linking, ICF core sets
    National Category
    Other Health Sciences Otorhinolaryngology
    Research subject
    Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-33755 (URN)10.3109/14992027.2013.858279 (DOI)000329834600002 ()24329490 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84892619855 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies:

    Oticon Foundation  

    Stinger Foundation

    Available from: 2014-02-14 Created: 2014-02-14 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
    3. The ICF core sets for hearing loss project: International expert survey on functioning and disability of adults with hearing loss using the International classification of functioning, disability, and health (ICF)
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The ICF core sets for hearing loss project: International expert survey on functioning and disability of adults with hearing loss using the International classification of functioning, disability, and health (ICF)
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 497-506Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To identify relevant aspects of functioning, disability, and contextual factors for adults with hearing loss (HL) from hearing health professional perspective summarized using the ICF classification as reference tool.

    Design: Internet-based cross-sectional survey using open-ended questions. Responses were analysed using a simplified content analysis approach to link concept to ICF categories according to linking rules.

    Study sample: Hearing health professionals (experts) recruited through e-mail distribution lists of professional organizations and personal networks of ICF core set for hearing loss steering committee members. Stratified sampling according to profession and world region enhanced the international and professional representation.

    Results: Sixty-three experts constituted the stratified sample used in the analysis. A total of 1726 meaningful concepts were identified in this study, resulting in 209 distinctive ICF categories, with 106 mentioned by 5% or more of respondents. Most categories in the activities & participation component related to communication, while the most frequent environmental factors related to the physical environment such as hearing aids or noise. Mental functions, such as confidence or emotional functions were also frequently highlighted.

    Conclusions: More than half (53.3%) of the entire ICF classification categories were included in the expert survey results. This emphasizes the importance of a multidimensional tool, such as the ICF, for assessing persons with hearing loss.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Informa Healthcare, 2014
    Keywords
    Hearing loss; audiology; ICF; ICF core sets; hearing health professionals; expert survey
    National Category
    Other Health Sciences Otorhinolaryngology
    Research subject
    Disability Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-34834 (URN)10.3109/14992027.2014.900196 (DOI)000339630500001 ()24754459 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84904126425 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies:

    Oticon Foundation

    Hörselforskningsfonden (Swedish hearing research foundation)

    Available from: 2014-04-24 Created: 2014-04-24 Last updated: 2018-06-05Bibliographically approved
    4. The ICF core sets for hearing loss project: Functioning and disability from the patient perspective
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The ICF core sets for hearing loss project: Functioning and disability from the patient perspective
    Show others...
    2014 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 11, p. 777-786Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore areas of functioning, disability, and environmental factors of adults with hearing loss (HL) by using the ICF classification as a tool to determine and document each element. Design: A qualitative study applying mainly focus-group methodology was applied.

    Study sample: Thirty-six Dutch and South African adults (18 years of age) with HL (20–95 dB HL) who used oral communication as first communication. Summative content analysis was performed on the transcripts by linkage to appropriate ICF categories.

    Results: 143 ICF categories were identified, most of which belonged to the Activities & Participation (d) component, closely followed by the Environmental factors component. Participants specifically mentioned categories related to oral communication and interaction. Assistive technology (such as hearing aids), noise, and support by and attitudes of others in the environment of the participants were considered highly influential for functioning and disability.

    Conclusions: The present study illustrates the complex and encompassing nature of aspects involved in functioning and disability of adults with HL. Findings highlight the necessity of using a multidimensional tool, such as the ICF, to map functioning and disability with hearing loss, allowing consideration and evaluation of aspects that are both internal and external.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London, UK: Informa Healthcare, 2014
    Keywords
    ICF, ICF core sets, focus groups, qualitative study, patient perspective
    National Category
    Other Health Sciences Otorhinolaryngology
    Research subject
    Disability Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-39251 (URN)10.3109/14992027.2014.938370 (DOI)000343928200001 ()25311099 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84911460995 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agency:

    Oticon Foundation  

    Available from: 2014-12-02 Created: 2014-12-02 Last updated: 2019-03-01Bibliographically approved
  • 64.
    Granberg, Sarah
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Functioning in adults with hearing loss2017In: The experience of hearing loss: Journey through aural rehabilitation / [ed] Vinaya Manchaiah, Berth Danermark, New York, USA: Routledge, 2017, p. 17-28Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 65.
    Granberg, Sarah
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Centre, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; HEAD Graduate School, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Jennie
    Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Kähäri, Kim
    Division of Audiology, Institution for Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    The ICF Core Sets for hearing loss - researcher perspective. Part I: Systematic review of outcome measures identified in audiological research2014In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 65-76Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To review the literature in order to identify outcome measures used in research on adults with hearing loss (HL) as part of the ICF Core Sets development project, and to describe study and population characteristics of the reviewed studies.

    Design: A systematic review methodology was applied using multiple databases. A comprehensive search was conducted and two search pools were created, pool I and pool II.

    Study sample: The study population included adults (>= 18 years of age) with HL and oral language as the primary mode of communication.

    Results: 122 studies were included. Outcome measures were distinguished by 'instrument type', and 10 types were identified. In total, 246 (pool I) and 122 (pool II) different measures were identified, and only approximately 20% were extracted twice or more. Most measures were related to speech recognition. Fifty-one different questionnaires were identified. Many studies used small sample sizes, and the sex of participants was not revealed in several studies.

    Conclusion: The low prevalence of identified measures reflects a lack of consensus regarding the optimal outcome measures to use in audiology. Reflections and discussions are made in relation to small sample sizes and the lack of sex differentiation/descriptions within the included articles.

  • 66.
    Granberg, Sarah
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Gagné, Jean-Pierre
    The Development of ICF Core Sets for Hearing Loss2010In: PERSPECTIVES ON AUDIOLOGY, ISSN 1940-8587, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 20-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disabilityand Health (ICF), adopted by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2001, offers a framework for a comprehensive understandingof health. One of the main goals of the ICF is to provide aconceptual framework of health that can be applied both forresearch purposes and in clinical settings. In order to promotethe use of the ICF in clinical settings, the WHO initiated theCore Sets project. Core Sets, targeting a specific health condition,consist of a set of ICF categories that can serve as minimalstandards (Brief ICF Core Set) or as standards for comprehensiveassessment (Comprehensive ICF Core Set). In 2009, a processof developing ICF Core Sets for Hearing Loss was initiated.This process involves three phases of development. In the firstphase, four scientific studies are conducted to collect evidencefor relevant ICF categories to be used in the Core Sets. Inphase two, a consensus conference is held to establish relevantICF categories, and in the third phase, the Core Sets that areretained are tested and validated. This paper describes theprocess of developing ICF Core Sets for Hearing Loss as wellas an invitation to participate in the project

  • 67.
    Granberg, Sarah
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Centre, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; HEAD Graduate School, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Möller, Kerstin
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Skagerstrand, Åsa
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; HEAD Graduate School, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Centre, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    The ICF Core Sets for hearing loss: researcher perspective, Part II: Linking outcome measures to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF)2014In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 77-87Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To link outcome measures used in audiological research to the ICF classification and thereby describe audiological research from the ICF perspective.

    Design: Through a peer-reviewed or a joint linking procedure, link outcome measures to the ICF classification system using standardized ICF linking rules. Additional linking rules were developed in combination with the established rules to overcome difficulties when connecting audiological data to ICF. Absolute and relative frequencies of ICF categories were reported.

    Study sample: The identified outcome measures from the previous study (Part I) constituted the empirical material. Results: In total, 285 ICF categories were identified. The most prevalent categories were related to listening, hearing functions, auditory perceptions, emotions and the physical environment, such as noise and hearing aids. Categories related to communication showed lower relative frequencies, as did categories related to the social and attitudinal environment.

    Conclusions: Based on the linked outcome measures, communication as a research topic is subordinated to other research topics. The same conclusion can be drawn for research targeting the social and attitudinal environment of adults with HL. Difficulties in the linking procedure were highlighted and discussed, and suggestions for future revisions of the ICF from the audiological perspective were described.

  • 68.
    Granberg, Sarah
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; HEAD Graduate School, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Pronk, Marieke
    Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Audiology Section, Vrije University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Swanepoel, De Wet
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa; Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia; Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, Australia.
    Kramer, Sophia E.
    Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Audiology Section, Vrije University Medical Center, EMGO, Institute for Health and Care Research, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Hagsten, Hanna
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hjaldahl, Jennie
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    The ICF core sets for hearing loss project: Functioning and disability from the patient perspective2014In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 11, p. 777-786Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore areas of functioning, disability, and environmental factors of adults with hearing loss (HL) by using the ICF classification as a tool to determine and document each element. Design: A qualitative study applying mainly focus-group methodology was applied.

    Study sample: Thirty-six Dutch and South African adults (18 years of age) with HL (20–95 dB HL) who used oral communication as first communication. Summative content analysis was performed on the transcripts by linkage to appropriate ICF categories.

    Results: 143 ICF categories were identified, most of which belonged to the Activities & Participation (d) component, closely followed by the Environmental factors component. Participants specifically mentioned categories related to oral communication and interaction. Assistive technology (such as hearing aids), noise, and support by and attitudes of others in the environment of the participants were considered highly influential for functioning and disability.

    Conclusions: The present study illustrates the complex and encompassing nature of aspects involved in functioning and disability of adults with HL. Findings highlight the necessity of using a multidimensional tool, such as the ICF, to map functioning and disability with hearing loss, allowing consideration and evaluation of aspects that are both internal and external.

  • 69.
    Granberg, Sarah
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; HEAD Grad Sch, Linköping Univ, Linköping, Sweden.
    Swanepoel, De Wet
    University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa; University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Australia; Ear Sci Inst Australia, Subiaco WA, Australia.
    Englund, Ulrika
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    The ICF core sets for hearing loss project: International expert survey on functioning and disability of adults with hearing loss using the International classification of functioning, disability, and health (ICF)2014In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 497-506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To identify relevant aspects of functioning, disability, and contextual factors for adults with hearing loss (HL) from hearing health professional perspective summarized using the ICF classification as reference tool.

    Design: Internet-based cross-sectional survey using open-ended questions. Responses were analysed using a simplified content analysis approach to link concept to ICF categories according to linking rules.

    Study sample: Hearing health professionals (experts) recruited through e-mail distribution lists of professional organizations and personal networks of ICF core set for hearing loss steering committee members. Stratified sampling according to profession and world region enhanced the international and professional representation.

    Results: Sixty-three experts constituted the stratified sample used in the analysis. A total of 1726 meaningful concepts were identified in this study, resulting in 209 distinctive ICF categories, with 106 mentioned by 5% or more of respondents. Most categories in the activities & participation component related to communication, while the most frequent environmental factors related to the physical environment such as hearing aids or noise. Mental functions, such as confidence or emotional functions were also frequently highlighted.

    Conclusions: More than half (53.3%) of the entire ICF classification categories were included in the expert survey results. This emphasizes the importance of a multidimensional tool, such as the ICF, for assessing persons with hearing loss.

  • 70.
    Gustafsson, Johanna
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Peralta, Julia
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Danermark, Berth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Supported Employment and Social Inclusion: Experiences of Workers with Disabilities in Wage Subsidized Employment in Sweden2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 26-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Labour market policies targeting people with disabilities primarily focus on establishing a working life based on reaching and procuring employment. Less attention is directed towards the qualitative aspects of working conditions or opportunities to retain employment. This study seeks to examine how people with disabilities who, with the help of Supported Employment (SE) methods, are establishing themselves in the labour market, experience social inclusion at their workplaces and how their working conditions influence their experiences with social inclusion. Data were collected in semi-structured interviews. Two themes were prominent in the interviewees’ experiences with social inclusion: the importance of being a valued worker and the sense of social belonging. Competence is important to feeling valued, as is working in fair working conditions. Disclosure of disability often helps to create fairness. The sense of social belonging arises from natural support and mattering to others. Important conditions that increase social inclusion are job-matching and natural support. The SE method can therefore contribute to the creation of social inclusion by ensuring that the matching process is well thought out and by utilizing strategies for inclusion, such as encouragement of natural support.

  • 71.
    Göransson, Carina
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Developing and evaluating an interactive app to support self-care among older persons receiving home care2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The proportion of older persons worldwide is growing. With older age, complex health problems may occur and the need for home care increases. To support older persons to maintain health and self-care, innovative ways need to be developed. The aim of the project was to develop and evaluate an interactive app among older persons receiving home care. The project had several phases: i) to define and understand the problem ii) develop the intervention iii) develop and optimise evaluation. Qualitative and quantitative methods were employed. Data were collected through a scoping review, interviews with healthcare experts, older persons and nursing assistants (study I); interviews with older persons (studies II, III); focus groups with homecare nurses (study II). Questionnaires at baseline, end of intervention and 6-month follow-up; with instruments to assess aspects of health, health literacy, self-care, and a study specific question regarding sense of security were used (studies III-IV). Logged data from reported health concerns, alerts, and notes were collected (study IV). Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis (study I), thematic analysis (study II), qualitative content analysis with directed approach (study III) and descriptive and inferential statistics (studies III, IV). Results: Important aspects for health and self-care from the older persons’ perspectives were described as: frame of mind, having relationships and social activities, physical ability and concerns, and maintaining self-care (I). These results were included in the app as questions with self-care advice, graphs and alerts to homecare nurses. The app use was described as an enabler for learning (II). The older persons showed improved communicative and critical health literacy at the 6- month follow-up (IV). They described an increased sense of security (II and III), which decreased at the 6-month follow-up (III). They expressed increased self-confidence (II) and support in self-care, but reported a decrease in self-care ability at the 6-month follow-up (III). App usage was high, with the health concern pain triggering the most alerts (IV). Their aspects of health were unchanged at the three assessments points (IV). In this context using an app may increase older persons’ participation in their care. The results show that for some older persons, an app can be implemented as a tool for support in conventional home care.

    List of papers
    1. Perspectives of health and self-care among older persons: to be implemented in an interactive interactive information and communication technology-platform
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perspectives of health and self-care among older persons: to be implemented in an interactive interactive information and communication technology-platform
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 23-24, p. 4745-4755Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    AIM AND OBJECTIVES: To acquire knowledge regarding the contents to be implemented in an interactive ICT-platform perceived to be relevant to health and self-care among older persons based on the literature, healthcare professionals and the older persons themselves.

    BACKGROUND: The growing ageing population places demands on the healthcare system to promote healthy ageing and to strengthen the older person's self-care ability. This requires innovative approaches to facilitate communication between the older person and healthcare professionals, and to increase the older person's participation in their care. An information and communication technology-platform (ICT-platform) could be used for this purpose, but the content needs to be relevant to both the older persons and the healthcare professionals.

    DESIGN: Descriptive qualitative design.

    METHODS: This study was based on three samplings: a scoping review of the literature (n=20 articles), interviews with healthcare professionals (n=5), and a secondary analysis of interviews with older persons (n=8) and nursing assistants (n=7). The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: Four areas were identified to be of relevance to older persons' perceived health: frame of mind, having relationships and social activities, physical ability and concerns, and maintaining self-care. Self-care was described in the literature and by the healthcare professionals more than by the older persons.

    CONCLUSIONS: The results show a concordance in the data samplings that give a clear indication of the areas relevant to older persons' health and self-care that can be integrated in an interactive ICT-platform for use in regular daily care assessments. Descriptions of self-care was limited indicating a possible gap in knowledge that requires further research.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Areas relevant to older persons' health and self-care could be used for regular assessment to support and promote healthy ageing.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2017
    Keywords
    Health status, information-communication technology, nursing care, older persons, qualitative content analysis, self-care
    National Category
    Nursing
    Research subject
    Nursing Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-56862 (URN)10.1111/jocn.13827 (DOI)000416319600087 ()28334519 (PubMedID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies:

    Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health Sciences, Örebro University  

    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University 

    Available from: 2017-03-28 Created: 2017-03-28 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved
    2. Testing an app for reporting health concerns: Experiences from older people and home care nurses
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Testing an app for reporting health concerns: Experiences from older people and home care nurses
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    2018 (English)In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 13, no 2, article id e12181Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore the experiences of using an app among older people with home-based health care and their nurses.

    BACKGROUND: Few information and communication technology innovations have been developed and tested for older people with chronic conditions living at home with home-based health care support. Innovative ways to support older people's health and self-care are needed.

    DESIGN: Explorative qualitative design.

    METHODS: For 3 months to report health concerns, older people receiving home-based health care used an interactive app, which included direct access to self-care advice, graphs and a risk assessment model that sends alerts to nurses for rapid management. Interviews with older people (n = 17) and focus group discussions with home care nurses (n = 12) were conducted and analysed using thematic analysis.

    RESULTS: The findings reveal that a process occurs. Using the app, the older people participated in their care, and the app enabled learning and a new way of communication. The interaction gave a sense of security and increased self-confidence among older people. The home care nurses viewed the alerts as appropriate for the management of health concerns. However, all participants experienced challenges in using new technology and had suggestions for improvement.

    CONCLUSIONS: The use of an app appears to increase the older people's participation in their health care and offers them an opportunity to be an active partner in their care. The app as a new way to interact with home care nurses increased the feeling of security. The older people were motivated to learn to use the app and described potential use for it in the future.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: The use of an app should be considered as a useful information and communication technology innovation that can improve communication and accessibility for older people with home-based health care.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2018
    Keywords
    App, health concerns, older people, security, self-confidence, thematic analysis
    National Category
    Nursing Geriatrics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-63300 (URN)10.1111/opn.12181 (DOI)000434118100005 ()29210218 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85037995107 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies:

    Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health Sciences, Örebro University  

    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University  

    Karolinska Institutet 

    Available from: 2017-12-11 Created: 2017-12-11 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved
    3. Self-care ability and sense of security among older persons when using an app as a tool for support
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-care ability and sense of security among older persons when using an app as a tool for support
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    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Other Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72808 (URN)
    Available from: 2019-02-26 Created: 2019-02-26 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved
    4. Evaluating an app for older people: interaction, health and health literacy, a quasi-experimental study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluating an app for older people: interaction, health and health literacy, a quasi-experimental study
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    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Other Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-72809 (URN)
    Available from: 2019-02-26 Created: 2019-02-26 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved
  • 72.
    Göransson, Carina
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Wengström, Yvonne
    Cancer Theme, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Hälleberg Nyman, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Langius-Eklöf, Ann
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Evaluating an app for older people: interaction, health and health literacy, a quasi-experimental studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 73.
    Göransson, Carina
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Wengström, Yvonne
    Cancer Theme, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ziegert, Kristina
    School of Health and Welfare, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Langius-Eklöf, Ann
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Self-care ability and sense of security among older persons when using an app as a tool for supportManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 74.
    Göras, Camilla
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Open the door to complexity: Safety climate and work processes in the operating room2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A complex adaptive system such as the operating room (OR), consists of different safety cultures, sub-cultures and ways of working. When measuring, a strong safety climate has been associated with lower rates of surgical complications. Teamwork is an important factor of safety climate. Discrepancies among professionals’ perceptions of teamwork climate exists. Hence it seems crucial to explore if diversity exists in the perception of factors related to safety climate and between managers and front-line staff in the OR. Complex work processes including multitasking and interruptions are other challenges with potential effect on patient safety. However, multitasking and interruptions may have positive impact on patient safety, but are not well understood in clinical work. Despite challenges a lot of things go well in the OR. Thus, the overall aim of this thesis was to evaluate an instrument for assessing safety climate, to describe and compare perceptions of safety climate, and to explore the complexity of work processes in the OR.

    To evaluate the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire-operating room (SAQ-OR) version and elicit estimations of the surgical team a cross-sectional study design was used. How work was done was studied by observations using the Work Observation Method by Activity Timing and by group interviews with OR professionals.

    The results show that the SAQ-OR is a relatively acceptable instrument to assess perceptions of safety climate within Swedish ORs. OR professionals´ perceptions of safety climate showed variations and some weak areas which cohered fairly well with managers' estimations. Work in the OR was found to be complex and consisting of multiple tasks where communication was most frequent. Multitasking and interruptions, mostly followed by communication, were common. This reflects interactions and adaptations common for a complex adaptive system. Managing complexity and creating safe care in the OR was described as a process of planning and preparing for the expected and preparedness to be able to adapt to the unexpected.

    List of papers
    1. Swedish translation and psychometric testing of the safety attitudes questionnaire (operating room version)
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish translation and psychometric testing of the safety attitudes questionnaire (operating room version)
    2013 (English)In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 13, article id 104Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Tens of millions of patients worldwide suffer from avoidable disabling injuries and death every year. Measuring the safety climate in health care is an important step in improving patient safety. The most commonly used instrument to measure safety climate is the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). The aim of the present study was to establish the validity and reliability of the translated version of the SAQ.

    Methods: The SAQ was translated and adapted to the Swedish context. The survey was then carried out with 374 respondents in the operating room (OR) setting. Data was received from three hospitals, a total of 237 responses. Cronbach's alpha and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to evaluate the reliability and validity of the instrument.

    Results: The Cronbach's alpha values for each of the factors of the SAQ ranged between 0.59 and 0.83. The CFA and its goodness-of-fit indices (SRMR 0.055, RMSEA 0.043, CFI 0.98) showed good model fit. Intercorrelations between the factors safety climate, teamwork climate, job satisfaction, perceptions of management, and working conditions showed moderate to high correlation with each other. The factor stress recognition had no significant correlation with teamwork climate, perception of management, or job satisfaction.

    Conclusions: Therefore, the Swedish translation and psychometric testing of the SAQ (OR version) has good construct validity. However, the reliability analysis suggested that some of the items need further refinement to establish sound internal consistency. As suggested by previous research, the SAQ is potentially a useful tool for evaluating safety climate. However, further psychometric testing is required with larger samples to establish the psychometric properties of the instrument for use in Sweden.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    BioMed Central, 2013
    Keywords
    Patient safety, Operating room, Safety climate, Psychometrics, Translation, Safety attitudes questionnaire
    National Category
    Nursing
    Research subject
    Caring sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-28904 (URN)10.1186/1472-6963-13-104 (DOI)000317113300001 ()23506044 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84875072612 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2013-05-06 Created: 2013-05-03 Last updated: 2019-05-15Bibliographically approved
    2. The Swedish Safety Attitudes Questionnaire - Operating Room Version: Psychometric Properties in the Surgical Team
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Swedish Safety Attitudes Questionnaire - Operating Room Version: Psychometric Properties in the Surgical Team
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    2018 (English)In: Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, ISSN 1089-9472, E-ISSN 1532-8473, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 935-945Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To validate the Swedish Safety Attitudes Questionnaire–operating room (SAQ-OR) version by re-evaluating its psychometric properties for the surgical team.

    Design: Cross-sectional questionnaire study.

    Methods: 541 surgical team members including perioperative nurses, physicians, and licensed practical nurses at three Swedish hospitals were included.

    Findings: For the total sample, the Cronbach’s a for the six factors ranged from 0.51 to 0.76. Goodness-of-fit analyses indicated that the six-factor model was acceptable and the factor loadings were statistically significant. The test of the hypothesized relationships among the factors showed a correlation from 0.936 to 0.042.

    Conclusions: The refined Swedish version of the SAQ-OR is a reasonably reliable and acceptably valid instrument for the measurement of patient safety climate in the surgical team. However, the results related to the different analyses varied among the different professionals and further research, using larger samples, is needed to explore these differences, especially among the physicians.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Maryland Heights, MO, United States: Elsevier, 2018
    Keywords
    Safety Attitudes Questionnaire, safety climate, operating room, patient safety, psychometrics, surgical team
    National Category
    Nursing
    Research subject
    Caring Sciences w. Medical Focus
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-64024 (URN)10.1016/j.jopan.2017.09.009 (DOI)000450368000017 ()30449442 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85040001880 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2018-01-10 Created: 2018-01-10 Last updated: 2019-04-30Bibliographically approved
    3. Interprofessional team assessments of the patient safety climate in Swedish operating rooms: a cross-sectional survey
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interprofessional team assessments of the patient safety climate in Swedish operating rooms: a cross-sectional survey
    2017 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, no 9, article id e015607Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A positive patient safety climate within teams has been associated with higher safety performance. The aim of this study was to describe and compare attitudes to patient safety among the various professionals in surgical teams in Swedish operating room (OR) departments. A further aim was to study nurse managers in the OR and medical directors’ estimations of their staffs’ attitudes to patient safety.

    Methods: A cross-sectional survey with the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) was used to elicit estimations from surgical teams. To evoke estimations from nurse managers and medical directors about staff attitudes to patient safety, a short questionnaire, based on SAQ, was used. Three OR departments at three different hospitals in Sweden participated. All licensed practical nurses (n=124), perioperative nurses (n=233), physicians (n=184) and their respective manager (n=22) were invited to participate.

    Results: Mean percentage positive scores for the six SAQ factors and the three professional groups varied, and most factors (safety climate, teamwork climate, stress recognition, working conditions and perceptions of management), except job satisfaction, were below 60%. Significantly lower mean values were found for perioperative nurses compared with physicians for perceptions of management (56.4 vs 61.4, p=0.013) and working conditions (63.7 vs 69.8, p=0.007). Nurse managers and medical directors’ estimations of their staffs’ ratings of the safety climate cohered fairly well.

    Conclusions: This study shows variations and some weak areas for patient safety climate in the studied ORs as reported by front-line staff and acknowledged by nurse managers and medical directors. This finding is a concern because a weak patient safety climate has been associated with poor patient outcomes. To raise awareness, managers need to support patient safety work in the OR.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2017
    National Category
    Nursing
    Research subject
    Caring sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-59446 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2016-015607 (DOI)000412650700060 ()28864690 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85029118920 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agency:

    Centre for Clinical Research Dalarna

    Available from: 2017-09-03 Created: 2017-09-03 Last updated: 2019-04-30Bibliographically approved
    4. Tasks, multitasking and interruptions among the surgical team in an operating room: a prospective observational study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tasks, multitasking and interruptions among the surgical team in an operating room: a prospective observational study
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    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Other Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73974 (URN)
    Available from: 2019-04-30 Created: 2019-04-30 Last updated: 2019-04-30Bibliographically approved
    5. Managing complexity in the operating room: a group interview study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managing complexity in the operating room: a group interview study
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Other Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-73975 (URN)
    Available from: 2019-04-30 Created: 2019-04-30 Last updated: 2019-04-30Bibliographically approved
  • 75.
    Göras, Camilla
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, Falu Hospital, Falun, Sweden; Centre for Clinical Research, Falun, Dalarna, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Perioperative Medicine and Intensive Care, Karolinska University Hospital, stockholm, Sweden.
    Ekstedt, Mirjam
    Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar/Växjö, Sweden; Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Unbeck, Maria
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Trauma and Reparative Medicine Theme, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ehrenberg, Anna
    School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Managing complexity in the operating room: a group interview studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 76.
    Göras, Camilla
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, Falu Hospital, Falun, Sweden; Centre for Clinical Research, Falun, Dalarna, Sweden.
    Olin, Karolina
    Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Unbeck, Maria
    Trauma and Reparative Medicine Theme, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pukk-Härenstam, Karin
    Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Paediatric Emergency Department, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ehrenberg, Anna
    School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Kassaye Tessma, Mesfin
    Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet Perioperative Medicine and Intensive Care, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ekstedt, Mirjam
    Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar/Växjö, Sweden.
    Tasks, multitasking and interruptions among the surgical team in an operating room: a prospective observational studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 77.
    Hansson, Anders
    et al.
    Primärvårdens FoUU-enhet i Fyrbodal, Vänersborg, Sverige.
    Marklund, Bertil
    Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sverige.
    ST-läkare vill se praktisk nytta av FoU-kurser [ST-doctors believe scientific courses should relate more to everyday practice]2013In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 110, no 22, p. 1098-1098Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Enligt Socialstyrelsens målbeskrivning för läkarnas specialistutbildning ska ST-läkaren tillägna sig ett vetenskapligt förhållningssätt.

    Det är oklart vad målet innebär och hur det ska tolkas, vilket speglas i de olika specialistföreningarnas olika anvisningar och kursernas olika utformning.

    De traditionella FoU-kurser som erbjuds har inte alltid motsvarat ST-läkarnas förväntningar.

    Två fokusgruppsintervjuer med ST-läkare från olika specialiteter visar att ST-läkare anser att det är viktigt att tillägna sig ett vetenskapligt kritiskt tänkande för att kunna granska sina egna behandlingsmetoder och be­möta patienternas frågor.

  • 78.
    Hartman, Eva-Lena
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Kareliussén, Malin
    Förskolepersonalens hörsel och upplevda hörselbesvär2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 79. Hasman, A
    et al.
    Andersen, S K
    Klein, Gunnar O
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Schulz, S
    Aarts, J
    Mazzoleni, M C
    MIE 2008: eHealth beyond the horizon-get IT there.2009In: Methods of Information in Medicine, ISSN 0026-1270, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 135-136Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 80.
    Henricson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping university.
    Frölander, Hans Erik
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro Audiological Research Centre, Örebro SE 701 85, Sweden; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden; The Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Linköping, Sweden; Research on Hearing and Deafness (HEAD) Graduate School, Linköping, Sweden .
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro Audiological Research Centre, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Audiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping university.
    Theory of mind and cognitive function in adults with Usher or Alström syndromeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 81.
    Henricson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Department of Behavioral Science and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; The Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Research on Hearing and Deafness (HEAD) Graduate School, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Frölander, Hans-Erik
    School of Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Department of Behavioral Science and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; The Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Theory of Mind and Cognitive Function in Adults with Alstrom or Usher Syndrome2016In: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, ISSN 0145-482X, E-ISSN 1559-1476, Vol. 110, no 5, p. 349-366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Theory of mind (ToM) refers to the ability to impute mental states to one's self and others. ToM was investigated in adults with Usher syndrome type 2 (USH2) or Alstrom syndrome (AS). Both syndromes cause deafblindness, but differ with regard to onset and degree of sensory loss. Individuals with AS, furthermore, display additional physical diseases. Comparisons were made with individuals with typical hearing and vision.

    Methods: Thirteen people with USH2, 12 people with AS, and 33 people with typical hearing and vision performed tests of working memory capacity and verbal ability. ToM was tested via Happe's Strange Stories, assessing ability to understand the emotions and actions of story characters. The test also included matched physical stories to evaluate understanding of the logical outcomes associated with everyday situations.

    Results: Significant differences were identified in problem solving regarding physical conditions, with higher scores for the typical hearing and vision group, H(2) = 22.91, p < 0.01. The two groups with deafblindness also demonstrated poorer ToM than the typical hearing and vision group, H(2) = 21.61, p < 0.01, and the USH2 group outperformed the AS group, U(34), z = 2.42, p = 0.016. Intra-group variability was related to working memory capacity, verbal ability, visual status, and to a minor extent auditory capacity. The prevalence of the additional physical diseases was not related to ToM performance.

    Conclusions: Limited access to information due to visual loss may have reduced the degree of social experience, thereby negatively affecting the development of ToM. That working memory capacity and verbal ability displayed an impact implies that hearing also contributes to ToM development. Differences between the two groups might be a function of genetic conditions, in which the gene causing USH2 only affects the ears and the eyes, whereas AS has a multisystemic pathology.

    Implications for practitioners: Advice and support technology should emphasize ease of communication and boost the development of the communication required to develop ToM.

  • 82.
    Henriksson, Monica
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Jenny
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Attityder gentemot yrkesverksamma med hörselnedsättning2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Attityder gentemot funktionsnedsättning grundar sig historiskt sett i samhällets förändring och kunskap. Attitydbegreppet utgår i examensarbetet från Theory of planned behavior, där bakomliggande faktorer leder handling. En hörselnedsättning är en dold oftast kronisk funktionsnedsättning. Svensk lagstiftning reglerar rättigheter och skyldigheter i arbetslivet för inblandade aktörer. Personen med hörselnedsättning bearbetar sin situation i tre skeenden i en livsomställningsprocess.

    Syfte: Genom integrativ litteraturstudie kartlägga attityder personer med hörselnedsättning möter i arbetslivet och personens eget förhållande till sin hörselnedsättning.

    Metod: Innehållsanalys av 13 skandinaviska undersökningar, där hörselnedsättning ingår. Attityderna delas upp i 12 kategorier utifrån område. Vilka aktörer (Arbetsgivare, kollegor och personen med hörselnedsättning) attityden framkommer vid redovisas.

    Resultat: Attityder framkommer jämt fördelat mellan positivt och negativt i kategorierna. Vid Hänsyn vid kommunikation och Användande av tekniska hörhjälpmedel framkommer attityder mest frekvent. I fyra kategorier, Frånvaro vid raster på arbetet, Synlig hörhjälpmedel, Öppenhet om hörselnedsättning och Mötesdisciplin, är det framförallt personen med hörselnedsättning som är den som har attityder gentemot sin hörselnedsättning och dess konsekvenser.

    Slutsatser: När attityderna i kategorierna sammanbinds med Theory of planned behavior framkommer att kunskap och information påverkar den slutliga handlingen. Livsomställningsprocessen påverkar hur personen med hörselnedsättning förhåller sig till hörselnedsättningen och dess konsekvenser.

  • 83.
    Hermansson, Liselotte
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; University Health Care Research Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden.
    Turner, Kristi
    Center for Bionic Medicine, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, USA.
    Occupational Therapy for prosthetic rehabilitation in adults with acquired upper limb loss: body-powered and myoelectric control systems2017In: Journal of prosthetics and orthotics, ISSN 1040-8800, E-ISSN 1534-6331, Vol. 29, no 4S, p. P45-P50Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is uncertainty as to whether occupational therapy differs between patients fitted with upper-limb prostheses using different control systems. The aim was to describe occupational therapy in upper-limb prosthetic rehabilitation and discuss potential differences in therapy between patients fitted with body-powered or myoelectric control systems. An overview and description of occupational therapy methods for upper-limb prosthetic rehabilitation is provided based on literature and clinical experience from two independent occupational therapists. Ultimately, the same phased approach to occupational therapy is used for both control systems for upper-limb rehabilitation, inclusive of the evaluation, the pre- and postsurgery phase; preprosthetic therapy; prosthetic training including both controls and functional use training; and discharge planning. The one thing that differed between control systems was the methods for evaluation and training of controls, based on the underlying nature of the systems. The time required to acquire functional use skills differed between control systems—users of myoelectric devices, especially at transhumeral level or higher, and patients with bilateral limb loss often need more time in therapy in order to learn to operate the terminal device and perform bilateral activities. Occupational therapy for prosthetic rehabilitation in adults with acquired upper-limb loss follows a basic structure that is common to several types of prosthetic control systems. Increased time is required for functional use training with myoelectric systems. The shortage of validated outcome measures restricts the ability to cover all aspects of upper-limb prosthesis use. Further studies to provide evidence in support of different training methods for upper-limb prosthesis users are warranted.

  • 84.
    Hjaldahl, Jennie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. University Health Care Research Center, Region Örebro County, Örebro, Sweden; Audiological Research Center, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Widén, Stephen
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Per-Inge
    Audiological Research Center, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Central Hospital, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Severe to profound hearing impairment: Factors associated with the use of hearing aids and cochlear implants and participation in extended audiological rehabilitation2017In: Hearing, Balance and Communication, ISSN 2169-5717, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 6-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To determine whether various demographic variables are associated with hearing aid (HA) and cochlear implant (CI) use and participation in extended audiological rehabilitation among patients with severe to profound hearing loss (HL) and to compare the use of unilateral and bilateral HAs.

    Materials and Methods: Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to analyze general HA use, binaural HA use, CI use and participation in extended audiological rehabilitation. A total of 2297 adult patients from The Swedish Quality Register of Otorhinolaryngology with a PTA4 (0.5, 1, 2, 4 kHz) ≥70 dB HL in the better ear were included.

    Results: The degree of HL was associated with HA and CI use and participation in extended audiological rehabilitation. The patients with at least a college degree were more likely to use bilateral HAs, have a CI and participate in audiological rehabilitation compared to those with elementary school education. The sex distribution was evenly divided, but the men indicated a lower level of participation in extended audiological rehabilitation. No significant associations where found for sex and HA or CI use.

    Conclusions: The degree of HL was the strongest factor associated with the use of HAs, CI and extended audiological rehabilitation among the patients.

  • 85.
    Holmefur, Marie
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Institutionen för Kvinnors och Barns Hälsa, Astrid Lindgrens Barnsjukhus, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Aarts, Pauline
    Brian, Hoare
    Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena
    Test-retest och alternate forms reliabilitet hos Assisting Hand Assessment2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 86.
    Holmefur, Marie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Eliasson, Ann-Christin
    Institutionen för kvinnors och barns hälsa, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Kan baby CIMT-träning vid 2-3 års ålder ge en bättre framtida utveckling av handfunktion hos barn med unilateral CP?2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 87.
    Holmefur, Marie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Krumlinde Sundholm, Lena
    Bergström, Jakob
    Hanna, Steven
    Kits, Annika
    Eliasson, Ann-Christin
    Assisting Hand Assessment: continued development, psychometrics and longitudinal use2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 88.
    Holmefur, Marie
    et al.
    Örebro Läns Landsting, Örebro, Sweden.
    Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena
    Psykometriska egenskaper hos den reviderade versionen av Assisting Hand Assessment (AHA)2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 89.
    Holmefur, Marie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena
    Bergström, Jakob
    Flodmark, Olof
    Kits, Annika
    Eliasson, Ann-Christin
    Factors associated with development of hand function in children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 90.
    Holmefur, Marie
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Astrid Lindgrens Barnsjukhus, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena
    Neuropediatriska Forskningsenheten, Karolinska Institutet, Astrid Lindgrens Barnsjukhus, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Eliasson, Ann-Christin
    Neuropediatriska Forskningsenheten, Karolinska Institutet, Astrid Lindgrens Barnsjukhus, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Assisting Hand Assessment: Validity and Reliability for the age range 18 months to 12 years2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 91.
    Holmefur, Marie
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Institutionen för Kvinnors och Barns Hälsa, Astrid Lindgrens Barnsjukhus, Stockholm, Sverige.
    Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena
    Eliasson, Ann-Christin
    Hur utvecklas bimanuell förmåga hos barn (18 mån – 8 år) med unilateral CP? En longitudinell studie2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 92.
    Holmefur, Marie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Lidström-Holmqvist, Kajsa
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Roshanai, Afsaneh
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    White, Suzanne
    SUNY Downstate University, New York, NY, USA.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Let’s Get Organized: pilot study of an occupational therapy group intervention aimed to improve time management skills2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Managing daily life activities requires time management and organizing skills. Individuals with cognitive disabilities commonly have poor ability to manage time, which often results in decreased ability to properly manage daily life activities. An intervention aimed to increase time management skills is "Let’s get organized" (LGO).

    Objective: The current pilot study was designed to explore the outcome of the LGO with regards to time management skills, executive functions and satisfaction with daily occupations among individuals with cognitive disabilities.

    Method: Persons with mental and neurodevelopmental disorder with decreased ability to manage time in daily life according to self-rated measures, were recruited by their local Occupational Therapist. All participants took part in LGO, which is a 10-week manual based group intervention with weekly meetings. Each session has a separate theme, with a common structure and goal to improve time management skills and to implement the use of a calendar in daily life. Measured outcomes were time management skills (Assessment of Time Management Skills), executive functioning (Weekly Calendar Planning Activity) and overall satisfaction with daily activities (Satisfaction with Daily Occupations).

    Results: In all 55 persons participated in the study. Preliminary results from a subgroup indicate significant improvements in time management skills, in aspects of executive functioning and in overall satisfaction with daily occupations.

    Conclusion: The LGO seems to be a promising intervention to improve time management skills and satisfaction with daily occupations in the short term. The used instruments appear to be sensitive to capture change from LGO.

  • 93.
    Holmefur, Marie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Lidström-Holmqvist, Kajsa
    Region Örebro Län, Örebro, Sweden.
    Roshanay, Afsaneh
    Arbetsförmedlingen, Kista, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    Vuxenhabiliteringen, Region Gävleborg, Sweden.
    White, Suzanne
    SUNY Downstate University, Brooklyn, NY, USA.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Centrum för klinisk forskning, Landstinget Dalarna, Sweden.
    Ha koll!: pilotstudie av en arbetsterapeutisk gruppintervention som syftar till förbättrad tidshantering2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 94.
    Holmefur, Marie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Lidström-Holmqvist, Kajsa
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    White, Suzanne
    College Of Health Related Professions, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, New York, USA.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Centre For Clinical Research, Dalarna County Council, Falun, Sweden.
    Assessment of Time Management Skills: psychometric properties of the Swedish version (ATMS-S)2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 95.
    Holmefur, Marie
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Lidström-Holmqvist, Kajsa
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    White, Suzanne
    Occupational Therapy Program, Downstate University, New York, USA.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Centrum för klinisk forskning, Landstinget i Dalarna, Falun, Sverige.
    Prövning av validitet hos den svenska versionen av Assessment of Time Management Skills (ATMS-S)2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 96.
    Holmqvist, Kajsa
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Kamwendo, Kitty
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Ivarsson, Ann-Britt
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Occupational therapists' practice patterns for clients with cognitive impairment following acquired brain injury: development of a questionnaire2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 150-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clients with cognitive impairment following acquired brain injury (CIABI) are a common group to receive occupational therapy services. Research has shown that occupational therapy has a positive effect on occupational performance for these clients, but the exact nature of the interventions is not clearly described and needs to be better understood and defined. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate an empirically derived questionnaire for the purpose of surveying occupational therapists' (OTs') practice patterns in relation to CIABI. The questionnaire was developed from the results of a former qualitative study. It was evaluated for content validity by a group of six OT researchers with experience in CIABI, using the content validity index (CVI). Reliability was evaluated by a test-retest design with a group of 51 OTs. Data were analysed by non-parametric statistical methods. Initially the questionnaire consisted of 90 items dealing with OT practice and nine demographic questions. After the reliability and content validity process the OT practice items were reduced to 44. The revised questionnaire will be used to survey and explicitly describe occupational therapy practice for clients with CIABI.

  • 97.
    Hua, Håkan
    et al.
    Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Anderzén-Carlsson, Agneta
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Widén, Stephen
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Möller, Claes
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Audiological Research Centre, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Conceptions of working life among employees with mild-moderate aided hearing impairment: A phenomenographic study2015In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, no 11, p. 874-880Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim was to explore the conceptions of working life among employees with mild-moderate aided hearing impairment (HI).

    Design: This study has a descriptive design, in which data was collected by means of semi-structured interviews. All interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The text was analysed in accordance with the phenomenographic approach.

    Study sample: Fifteen participants with mild-moderate aided HI were recruited to the current study.

    Results: The analysis of the interviews resulted in four main categories describing the participants’ conceptions of working life: (1) diffiiculties in daily work, (2) communication strategies, (3) facilitating factors in work environment, and (4) impact on daily life. The four identified descriptive categories show that the effects of HI on the lives of working adults generate far-reaching psychosocial consequences for the individual.

    Conclusions: This study demonstrates that difficulties and impact of having a HI interact with strategies used by the individual and contextual facilitators made in the work environment. We argue that there is a need for extensive services in aural rehabilitation for this population. This includes identifying the need of assistive listening devices, teaching the individual with HI about communication strategies and informing stakeholders about the consequence of having a HI.

  • 98.
    Hugelius, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Disaster response for recovery: survivors experiences, and the use of disaster radio to promote health after natural disasters2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Disasters occur all over the world, and affect a rising number of people. The health effects of natural disasters depend on several factors present before, during, and after a disaster event. However, there is only limited knowledge of survivors experiences, needs, and health after natural disasters. Disaster radio means a temporary radio station that broadcasts information, music, and support to the affected population. Disaster radio has the potential to function even in a severely affected area, but its effects need to be further evaluated from a health perspective. The context of this thesis was the Haiyan supertyphoon that hit parts of the Philippines in November 2013.

    The overall aim was to describe survivors’ and health professionals’ experiences during and in the immediate aftermath of a natural disaster, the health effects from such a disaster, and how disaster radio as a disaster response intervention can be used and evaluated from a health perspective. The thesis includes four studies using qualitative research methods, including content analysis and a phenomenological hermeneutic method, and quantitative methods with statistical analysis.

    The results show that the Haiyan typhoon affected physical, psychological, and social dimensions of health. Disaster radio was used to broadcast health-related information and psychosocial support, and made a positive contribution to recovery from the perspective of the survivors. Being a health professional deployed during the disaster was an experience of being both a helper and a victim. The use of a self-selected internetbased sample recruited via Facebook for a web-based survey mitigated several practical challenges related to disaster research, but also raised questions about the generalizability of the results.

    Based on the findings, the importance of an integrated physical, psychological, and social health response to natural disasters is emphazized. Also, the health care system should prepare to use disaster radio as disaster response. In addition, the results suggest that disaster training for health professionals should include personal preparation and coping strategies. Internet-based methods in disaster research need to be further evaluated.

    List of papers
    1. Disaster Radio for Communication of Vital messages and Health-related Information: Experiences from the Haiyan typhoon, The Philippines
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disaster Radio for Communication of Vital messages and Health-related Information: Experiences from the Haiyan typhoon, The Philippines
    2016 (English)In: Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness, ISSN 1935-7893, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 591-597Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Crisis communication is seen as an integrated and essential part of disaster management measures. After Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda) in the Philippines 2013, radio was used to broadcast information to the affected community. The aim of this study was to describe how disaster radio was used to communicate vital messages and health-related information to the public in one affected region after Typhoon Haiyan.

    Methods: Mixed-methods analysis using qualitative content analysis and descriptive statistics was used to analyze 2587 logged radio log files.

    Results: Radio was used to give general information and to demonstrate the capability of officials to manage the situation, to encourage, to promote recovery and foster a sense of hope, and to give practical advice and encourage self-activity. The content and focus of the messages changed over time. Encouraging messages were the most frequently broadcast messages. Health-related messages were a minor part of all information broadcast and gaps in the broadcast over time were found.

    Conclusion: Disaster radio can serve as a transmitter of vital messages including health-related information and psychological support in disaster areas. The present study indicated the potential for increased use. The perception, impact, and use of disaster radio need to be further evaluated.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    New York, USA: Cambridge University Press, 2016
    Keywords
    Communication, disaster, natural disasters, health communication, psychosocial support
    National Category
    Nursing
    Research subject
    Caring Sciences w. Medical Focus
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47270 (URN)10.1017/dmp.2015.188 (DOI)000381283000015 ()26940871 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84960112370 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2016-01-01 Created: 2016-01-01 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
    2. "To silence the deafening silence": Survivor's needs and experiences of the impact of disaster radio for their recovery after a natural disaste
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>"To silence the deafening silence": Survivor's needs and experiences of the impact of disaster radio for their recovery after a natural disaste
    2016 (English)In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 28, p. 8-13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In the aftermath of the Haiyan typhoon, disaster radio was used to spread information and music to the affected population. The study described survivors' experiences of being in the immediate aftermath of a natural disaster and the impact disaster radio made on recovery from the perspective of the individuals affected. Twenty eight survivors were interviewed in focus groups and individual interviews analyzed with phenomenological-hermeneutic method. Being in disaster mode included physical and psychosocial dimensions of being in the immediate aftermath of the disaster. Several needs among the survivors were expressed. Disaster radio contributed to recovery by providing facts and information that helped the survivor to understand and adapt. The music played contributed to emotional endurance and reduced feelings of loneliness. To re-establish social contacts, other interventions are needed. Disaster radio is a positive contribution to the promotion of survivors' recovery after disasters involving a large number of affected people and severely damaged infrastructure. Further studies on the use and impact of disaster radio are needed.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2016
    Keywords
    Disaster, needs, psychosocial support, radio, recovery, biopsychosocial model
    National Category
    Nursing
    Research subject
    Caring sciences; Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47268 (URN)10.1016/j.ienj.2015.11.009 (DOI)000383526700002 ()26724170 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2016-01-01 Created: 2016-01-01 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
    3. Being Both Helpers and Victims: Health Professionals' Experiences of Working During a Natural Disaster
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Being Both Helpers and Victims: Health Professionals' Experiences of Working During a Natural Disaster
    2017 (English)In: Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, ISSN 1049-023X, E-ISSN 1945-1938, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 117-123Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In November 2013, the Haiyan typhoon hit parts of the Philippines. The typhoon caused severe damage to the medical facilities and many injuries and deaths. Health professionals have a crucial role in the immediate disaster response system, but knowledge of their experiences of working during and in the immediate aftermath of a natural disaster is limited. Aim The aim of this study was to explore health professionals' experiences of working during and in the immediate aftermath of a natural disaster.

    Method: Eight health professionals were interviewed five months after the disaster. The interviews were analyzed using phenomenological hermeneutic methods.

    Results: The main theme, being professional and survivor, described both positive and negative emotions and experiences from being both a helper, as part of the responding organization, and a victim, as part of the surviving but severely affected community. Sub-themes described feelings of strength and confidence, feelings of adjustment and acceptance, feelings of satisfaction, feelings of powerless and fear, feelings of guilt and shame, and feelings of loneliness.

    Conclusion: Being a health professional during a natural disaster was a multi-faceted, powerful, and ambiguous experience of being part of the response system at the same time as being a survivor of the disaster. Personal values and altruistic motives as well as social aspects and stress-coping strategies to reach a balance between acceptance and control were important elements of the experience. Based on these findings, implications for disaster training and response strategies are suggested. Hugelius K , Adolfsson A , Örtenwall P , Gifford M . Being both helpers and victims: health professionals' experiences of working during a natural disaster.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    New York, USA: Cambridge University Press, 2017
    Keywords
    disaster medicine; disasters; health professionals; phenomenological hermeneutic method; relief work
    National Category
    Nursing
    Research subject
    Nursing Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54391 (URN)10.1017/S1049023X16001412 (DOI)000398228600002 ()28043240 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85007572037 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agencies:

    Fortifikationsföreningens Forskningsfond (Foundation of Fortification-Related Research)

    Örebro County Council Research Committee (Örebro, Sweden)

    Available from: 2017-02-07 Created: 2017-01-10 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
    4. Health among disaster survivors 30 months after Typhoon Haiyan, using a selfselected Internet sample in a web-based survey
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health among disaster survivors 30 months after Typhoon Haiyan, using a selfselected Internet sample in a web-based survey
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Other Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-56205 (URN)
    Available from: 2017-03-10 Created: 2017-03-08 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
  • 99.
    Hugelius, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    HESPER Web; A web based survey to assess experienced needs in disasters and humanitarian emergencies2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 100.
    Hugelius, Karin
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    The link between disaster radio and health in disaster affected commmunities2018In: World Radio Day, UN Geneva, 2018Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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