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  • 51.
    Nordin, Erika
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Maten är serverad: en syn- och smalupplevelse: en betraktelse ur kockens perspektiv2005In: Hörsel och lyssnande: ett seminarium om människans hörselsinne, dess funktion och betydelse, januari 2004 / [ed] Lisbeth Axelsson, Örebro: Örebro universitetsbibliotek , 2005, p. 71-87Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 52.
    Nordin, Erika
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Matlagning och kemi ur ett måltidskunskapsperspektiv2004In: Tid för måltidskunskap: En vänbok till Birgitta Ulmander, Örebro: Örebro universitet , 2004, p. 195-206Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 53.
    Nordin, Erika
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Måltidens betydelse för folkhälsan: påverkas våra smakpreferenser av klasstillhörighet?2002In: Vård, ISSN 0281-921X, no 4, p. 61-64Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 54.
    Nygren, Ingemar Tobias
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Sensory evaluation and consumer preference of wine and food combinations: influences of tasting techniques2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The entire project consists of five studies. Descriptive sensory analyses were performed on combinations of five dry white wines and either Hollandaise sauce with two levels of fat or two blue mould cheeses. Assessments were carried out by a student panel and by a selected and trained panel. The effect of tasting technique on defined attributes was investigated: firstly by switching the order of serving wine and sauce or wine and cheese within the sequential tasting technique and secondly by mixing wine and cheese in the mouth, mixed tasting technique. Finally, consumers in Norway and Sweden, accustomed to drinking wine and eating blue mould cheese, carried out a preference test on wine and cheese combinations.

    The perception of the white wine characteristics generally decreased in intensity after the tasting of Hollandaise sauce. The buttery flavour of wine, however, increased after the tasting of Hollandaise sauce.

    Generally, the perception of dry white wine flavours (blackcurrant leaf, oak, mineral, spice) decreased after the tasting of both cheeses, whether the tasting was sequential or mixed.

    Few changes in the perception of the sauce attributes were observed after the tasting of white wine. However, lemon flavour of Hollandaise sauce decreased after the tasting of oaked wine.

    The perception of pronounced cheese flavours (butter, wool, basement-like) and tastes (sour and salty) decreased after the tasting of dry white wine for both sequential and mixed tasting whereas the other attributes remained unchanged.

    The perception of the wine attributes decreased more in the case of mixed tasting technique than in the case of sequential, while few changes in the perception of the cheese attributes were observed. Sweetness, however, increased in the Roquefort cheese mixed with certain wines.

    The consumers in both Norway and Sweden usually (80%) drank dry red wine with blue mould cheese. The Norwegian consumers preferred dry red wines to sweet red wines in combination with blue mould cheese. The wines rather than the cheeses separated the preferences regarding the combinations.

    List of papers
    1. Flavor changes produced by wine and food interactions: Chardonnay wine and Hollandaise sauce
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Flavor changes produced by wine and food interactions: Chardonnay wine and Hollandaise sauce
    Show others...
    2001 (English)In: Journal of sensory studies, ISSN 0887-8250, E-ISSN 1745-459X, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 461-470Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The change in flavor produced by food and wine interactions was explored using descriptive analysis of Hollandaise sauce prepared with two levels of butter and three wines: a Chardonnay which was unoaked, acidified with 1.5 g/L citric acid or aged in oak for one year. To measure the effect of the sauce on wine flavor, the intensity of citrus, buttery, and toasted flavor by mouth and of sourness and bitterness was rated in each wine before and after each sauce was tasted. In a second testing series, lemon, brothy and creamy-butter flavor by mouth and creamy mouthfeel were rated for each sauce before and after tasting each wine. The effect of Hollandaise sauce on wine flavor was greater than the effect of wines on sauce flavor, with the higher fat sauce having a slightly larger effect overall. Sour and bitter flavors of the wines decreased in intensity after Hollandaise sauce was tasted, while the buttery flavor by mouth increased. The toasted flavor decreased significantly in the oaked wine after the sauce had been tasted, while citrus flavor was decreased only for the unoaked wine.

    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-8763 (URN)10.1111/j.1745-459X.2001.tb00313.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2009-12-13 Created: 2009-12-13 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    2. Perceived flavour changes in white wine after tasting blue mould cheese
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceived flavour changes in white wine after tasting blue mould cheese
    2002 (English)In: Food Service Technology, ISSN 1471-5732, E-ISSN 1471-5740, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 163-171Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The object of this study was to evaluate by descriptive sensory analysis how the sensory perception of dry white wines was affected by prior tasting of blue mould cheese. Trained assessors profiled five commercial white wines before and after tasting each of two blue mould cheeses. The study showed that descriptive sensory analysis could be used to quantify changes in the perception of white wines after the consumption of cheese. For all five wines the main findings were that most of the intensities of perceived flavours and acidity decreased after tasting blue mould cheese.

    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3095 (URN)10.1046/j.1471-5740.2002.00048.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2004-02-20 Created: 2004-02-20 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Perceived flavour changes in blue mould cheese after tasting white wine
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceived flavour changes in blue mould cheese after tasting white wine
    2003 (English)In: Food Service Technology, ISSN 1471-5732, E-ISSN 1471-5740, Vol. 3, no 3-4, p. 143-150Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The object of this study was to evaluate by descriptive sensory analysis how prior tasting of dry white wine affects the sensory perception of blue mould cheese. Two blue mould cheeses, a Swedish one, Bredsjö Blå (Bredsjö Mjölkfår AB, Sweden), and a French one, Roquefort (Roquefort Société, France), were tasted in combination with five commercial dry white wines. Nine trained assessors assessed the cheeses and the wines in sequential order, with the cheese being assessed before and after tasting the wines. The main findings were that the most pronounced characteristics of the Bredsjö Blå, such as buttery and woolly flavours, and the saltiness and sour taste of the Roquefort, decreased after tasting dry white wine.

    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3098 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-5740.2003.00070.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2004-02-20 Created: 2004-02-20 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    4. Effects of tasting technique: sequential tasting vs. mixed tasting – on perception of dry white wine and blue mould cheese
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of tasting technique: sequential tasting vs. mixed tasting – on perception of dry white wine and blue mould cheese
    2003 (English)In: Food Service Technology, ISSN 1471-5732, E-ISSN 1471-5740, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 61-69Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The object of this study was to evaluate by means of descriptive sensory analysis the effect of mixed tasting on the perception of dry white wine and blue mould cheese, and to establish whether the tasting technique (sequential vs. mixed tasting) significantly affects this perception. A Swedish blue mould cheese, Bredsjö Blå, and a French blue mould cheese, Roquefort Société, and five commercial types of dry white wine were used. The same panel, selected and trained according to ISO standards, as in Nygren et al. (2002, 2003) carried out the descriptive analyses by means of a mixed tasting technique. The panel scored the same attributes for both cheese and wine as in Nygren et al. (2002, 2003). In general, the original wine attribute scores decreased more by means of mixed tasting technique than by means of sequential, while few changes of the original cheese attribute scores were observed. Overall, mixed tasting gave greater decreasing changes than sequential tasting.

    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3096 (URN)10.1046/j.1471-5740.2003.00066.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2004-02-20 Created: 2004-02-20 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    5. Consumer preference for combinations of wine and blue mould cheese influenced by eating and drinking attitudes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consumer preference for combinations of wine and blue mould cheese influenced by eating and drinking attitudes
    2005 (English)In: Culinary Arts and Sciences: Global and National Perspectives / [ed] Edwards JSA, Kowrygo B, Rejman K, Bornemouth: The Worshipful Company of Cooks Research Centre at Bornemouth University , 2005Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Bornemouth: The Worshipful Company of Cooks Research Centre at Bornemouth University, 2005
    Series
    Culinary arts and sciences ; V
    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-9272 (URN)1-85899-179-X (ISBN)
    Conference
    The Fifth International Conference on Culinary Arts and Sciences , Global and National Perspectives (ICCAS 05), Warsaw Poland, 27 June - 1 July 2005
    Available from: 2010-01-25 Created: 2010-01-25 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
  • 55.
    Nygren, Ingemar Tobias
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Haglund, Å.
    Johansson, Lisbeth
    Noble, A. C.
    Flavor changes produced by wine and food interactions: Chardonnay wine and Hollandaise sauce2001In: Journal of sensory studies, ISSN 0887-8250, E-ISSN 1745-459X, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 461-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The change in flavor produced by food and wine interactions was explored using descriptive analysis of Hollandaise sauce prepared with two levels of butter and three wines: a Chardonnay which was unoaked, acidified with 1.5 g/L citric acid or aged in oak for one year. To measure the effect of the sauce on wine flavor, the intensity of citrus, buttery, and toasted flavor by mouth and of sourness and bitterness was rated in each wine before and after each sauce was tasted. In a second testing series, lemon, brothy and creamy-butter flavor by mouth and creamy mouthfeel were rated for each sauce before and after tasting each wine. The effect of Hollandaise sauce on wine flavor was greater than the effect of wines on sauce flavor, with the higher fat sauce having a slightly larger effect overall. Sour and bitter flavors of the wines decreased in intensity after Hollandaise sauce was tasted, while the buttery flavor by mouth increased. The toasted flavor decreased significantly in the oaked wine after the sauce had been tasted, while citrus flavor was decreased only for the unoaked wine.

  • 56.
    Nygren, Ingemar Tobias
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Johansson, L.
    Perceived flavour changes in white wine after tasting blue mould cheese2002In: Food Service Technology, ISSN 1471-5732, E-ISSN 1471-5740, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 163-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The object of this study was to evaluate by descriptive sensory analysis how the sensory perception of dry white wines was affected by prior tasting of blue mould cheese. Trained assessors profiled five commercial white wines before and after tasting each of two blue mould cheeses. The study showed that descriptive sensory analysis could be used to quantify changes in the perception of white wines after the consumption of cheese. For all five wines the main findings were that most of the intensities of perceived flavours and acidity decreased after tasting blue mould cheese.

  • 57.
    Nygren, Ingemar Tobias
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Johansson, Lisbeth
    Effects of tasting technique: sequential tasting vs. mixed tasting – on perception of dry white wine and blue mould cheese2003In: Food Service Technology, ISSN 1471-5732, E-ISSN 1471-5740, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 61-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The object of this study was to evaluate by means of descriptive sensory analysis the effect of mixed tasting on the perception of dry white wine and blue mould cheese, and to establish whether the tasting technique (sequential vs. mixed tasting) significantly affects this perception. A Swedish blue mould cheese, Bredsjö Blå, and a French blue mould cheese, Roquefort Société, and five commercial types of dry white wine were used. The same panel, selected and trained according to ISO standards, as in Nygren et al. (2002, 2003) carried out the descriptive analyses by means of a mixed tasting technique. The panel scored the same attributes for both cheese and wine as in Nygren et al. (2002, 2003). In general, the original wine attribute scores decreased more by means of mixed tasting technique than by means of sequential, while few changes of the original cheese attribute scores were observed. Overall, mixed tasting gave greater decreasing changes than sequential tasting.

  • 58.
    Nygren, Ingemar Tobias
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Johansson, Lisbeth
    Perceived flavour changes in blue mould cheese after tasting white wine2003In: Food Service Technology, ISSN 1471-5732, E-ISSN 1471-5740, Vol. 3, no 3-4, p. 143-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The object of this study was to evaluate by descriptive sensory analysis how prior tasting of dry white wine affects the sensory perception of blue mould cheese. Two blue mould cheeses, a Swedish one, Bredsjö Blå (Bredsjö Mjölkfår AB, Sweden), and a French one, Roquefort (Roquefort Société, France), were tasted in combination with five commercial dry white wines. Nine trained assessors assessed the cheeses and the wines in sequential order, with the cheese being assessed before and after tasting the wines. The main findings were that the most pronounced characteristics of the Bredsjö Blå, such as buttery and woolly flavours, and the saltiness and sour taste of the Roquefort, decreased after tasting dry white wine.

  • 59.
    Nygren, Tobias
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Grundsmakerna är sött, surt, salt och beskt — och umami?2004In: Tid för måltidskunskap: En vänbok till Birgitta Ulmander / [ed] Inga-Britt Gustafsson, Ulla-Britt Strömberg, Örebro: Örebro universitet , 2004, p. 215-220Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 60.
    Nygren, Tobias
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Johansson, Lisbeth
    Perceived flavour changes in blue mould cheese after tasting white wine2003In: Culinary arts and sciences IV: global and national perspectives / [ed] John S. A. Edwards, Inga-Britt Gustafsson, Bornemouth: Worshipful Company of Cooks Research Centre at Bournemouth University, UK , 2003, p. 440-448Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 61.
    Parihar, Vishal Singh
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Barbuddhe, Sukhadeo B.
    Chakurkar, E.B.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Tham, Wilhelm
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Isolation of Listeria species from farm bulk milk at the receiving dairy plant and cervico-vaginal swabs2007In: Indian Journal of Comparative Microbiology, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0974-0147, Vol. 28, no 1/2, p. 53-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Listeria species were isolated from farm bulk milk (n=123) at the receiving dairy plant and cervico-vaginal samples (n=20) collected from dairy cows with reproductive disorders. Following enrichment and plating on two selective agar media, confirmation of the isolates was based on standard tests. Isolates were subjected to a PCR assay for detection of the hlyA gene. Overall, Listeria spp. were isolated from 30(24.4%) bulk milk samples and four (20%) cervico-vaginal swabs. Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from 17.9%, L. innocua from 1.6%, L. seeligeri from 3.3% and L. welshimeri from 1.6% bulk milk samples. Only L. monocytogenes (10%) and L. innocua (10%) could be isolated from cervico-vaginal swabs. The hlyA gene was detected in all L. monocytogenes isolates. These findings represent a public health risk where homemade unpasteurised milk and milk products are largely consumed.

  • 62.
    Parihar, Vishal Singh
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts. Department of Clinical Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lopez-Valladares, Gloria
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Peiris, Inoka
    Helmersson, Seved
    Department of Environmental Assessment, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Unemo, Magnus
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences. Department of Clinical Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Andersson, Birgitta
    Department of Bacteriology, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Arneborn, Malin
    The Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control and MTC, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Bannerman, Elizabeth
    Centre National des Listeria, Institut de Microbiologie, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Barbuddhe, Sukhadeo
    ICAR Research Complex for Goa, Old Goa, India.
    Bille, Jacques
    Centre National des Listeria, Institut de Microbiologie, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Hajdu, Lajos
    AstraZeneca AB, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Jacquet, Christine
    Laboratoire des Listeria, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France.
    Johansson, Christina
    The Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control and MTC, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Löfdahl, Margareta
    The Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control and MTC, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Möllerberg, Gunnel
    The Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control and MTC, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Ringberg, Håkan
    Regional Centre for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Malmö, Sweden.
    Rocourt, Jocelyne
    Centre Pasteur du Cameroun, Yaounde, Cameroon.
    Tjernberg, Ingela
    Department of Bacteriology, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Ursing, Jan
    Department of Bacteriology, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Henriques-Normark, Birgitta
    The Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control and MTC, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Tham, Wilhelm
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science. Department of Restaurant and Culinary Arts, Örebro University, Grythyttan, Sweden.
    Characterization of human invasive isolates of Listeria monocytogenes in Sweden 1986-20072008In: Foodborne pathogens and disease, ISSN 1535-3141, E-ISSN 1556-7125, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 755-761Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since 1986, 68% of the Listeria monocytogenes isolates from human cases of invasive listeriosis in Sweden are available for retrospective studies. The aim of the present study was to characterize 601 human invasive isolates of L. monocytogenes in Sweden from 1986 to 2007 by using serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Since 1996, serovar 4b was permanently reduced to the second or third most common serovar in human cases in Sweden. During the latter period, 2000-2007, only 13% belonged to serovar 4b and 71% to 1/2a. The dendrogram, based on pulsovars, reveals two clusters with different serovars. Cluster 1 exhibits serovars 4b and 1/2b, whereas cluster 2 consists of serovar 1/2a. Serovar 1/2a seems to be more heterogeneous than serovar 4b.

  • 63.
    Pipping Ekström, Marianne
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Fyra varianter av matlagare: mamma, bambatanten, grillkungen och årets kock2004In: Kotitalous- kuluttaja- ja ravitsemisalan ammattilehti, Vol. 68, no 5, p. 26-27Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 64.
    Pipping Ekström, Marianne
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Genus på krogen2006Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 65.
    Pipping Ekström, Marianne
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Sisyfos och exhibitionisten2004In: Tid för måltidskunskap.: En vänbok till Birgitta Ulmander / [ed] Inga-Britt Gustafsson, Ulla-Britt Strömberg, Örebro: Örebro universitet , 2004, p. 129-137Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 66.
    Pipping Ekström, Marianne
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Vi ska äta, vem ska laga?2005In: Kulturstudier i Sverige: nationell forskarkonferens, Norrköping 13-15 juni, 2005, Norrköping, Sweden / [ed] Bodil Axelsson, Johan Fornäs, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, Linköpings universitet , 2005, p. 827-834Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 67.
    Pipping Ekström, Marianne
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Åberg, HelenaBergström, KerstinPrell, Hillevi
    Hushållsvetenskap & Co2007Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 68.
    Prim, Mia
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Ready meals from the consumers' perspective: attitudes, beliefs, contexts and appropriateness2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis was to gain a deeper understanding of ready meal consumers and their demands regarding ready meal products in different situations. Data were gathered with one extensive postal survey and five focus group discussions. The aim of the survey was to investigate the beliefs held about ready meal consumers, identify typical ready meal situations, assess the aims of eating ready meals in these meal situations and, finally, to identify demands regarding ready meals in the purchase situation. The results of the survey showed that the image of the frequent ready meal consumer was a person alone and stressed. The ready meal-consuming respondents confirmed this image when they were in actual situations eating ready meals but not in general. Four common ready meal-eating situations were identified. Ready meals were eaten most frequently as lunch at work and dinner at home. The social context in these situations was found to differ and to affect the activities performed. Ready meals for lunch at work were commonly eaten with colleagues and then discussing was a normal activity. For dinner at home ready meals were usually eaten alone watching TV. The reasons why ready meals were chosen as meal solutions differed. Ready meals suitable for lunch at work should be time-saving and for dinner at home the main demand was that the products should be convenient in order to avoid cooking. Purchaser demands regarding ready meals were found to be influenced by the gender of the purchaser and the intended end-consumer. Female ready meal purchasers were more demanding buyers than males, especially concerning health aspects. The aim of the focus groups was to explore consumers' reasons regarding the choice of ready meals for dinner and to find out how ready meals suit their needs. Ready meals were not regarded as being very appropriate for dinner at home. The social setting of the dinner was one of the most important aspects affecting the choice of what to eat. For ready meals to be suitable for dinner use they should be dishes out of the ordinary with more taste. This thesis has demonstrated that the context of meals affects the entire ready meal choice process and that there is a need to broaden the research perspective beyond the meal. The entire food provisioning process needs to be taken into account.

    List of papers
    1. Attitudes and beliefs directed towards ready-meal consumption
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attitudes and beliefs directed towards ready-meal consumption
    2004 (English)In: Food Service Technology, ISSN 1471-5732, E-ISSN 1471-5740, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 159-169Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Our food choice is dependent upon our beliefs about both the products and those who consume them. In this study beliefs about the prototypical attributes of ready meal consumers have been investigated to establish which beliefs exist and whether they have any actual basis when compared with self-reported behaviours of ready meal consumers. In a survey, respondents described what they considered to be common attributes of ready meal consumers. Some of these attributes were supported by the data provided by the ready meal consuming respondents, while many were not. Most interesting was the fact that two frequently mentioned attributes, being alone and no interest in cooking or food, were confirmed by the ready meal consuming respondents in the actual eating situation but not by their life-style and beliefs in general. The results support the call for more situation-oriented food research.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Oxford: Blackwell Science, 2004
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-2847 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-5740.2004.00102.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-11-02 Created: 2007-11-02 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    2. The impact of the meal situation on the consumption of ready meals
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of the meal situation on the consumption of ready meals
    2005 (English)In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 485-492Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The context in which a meal is eaten is known to affect intake and choice of food. The purpose of this study was to investigate in what typical situations ready meals are consumed and if consumer demands vary according to different situations. With a market survey four typical ready meal eating situations were identified, and the respondent's ready meal consumption was shown to be affected by situational factors. In the different eating situations there were dissimilar reasons for consumption. Two ready meal eating situations were investigated in greater detail in order to establish what triggered the ready meal consumption in these situations. One of these meal situations proved to be convenience driven and the other time driven. A situation-oriented approach is suggested for further ready meal product development.

    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-2848 (URN)10.1111/j.1470-6431.2005.00416.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-11-02 Created: 2007-11-02 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Buyers’ demands for ready meals: influenced by gender and who will eat them
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Buyers’ demands for ready meals: influenced by gender and who will eat them
    2006 (English)In: Journal of Foodservice, ISSN 1748-0140, Vol. 17, no 5-6, p. 205-211Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The ready-meal market in Sweden is increasing rapidly, and in the last 10 years has nearly doubled. The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of the demand buyers have for ready meals, both when buying for themselves and for others. A postal survey was completed by 249 residents of Gothenburg, Sweden. Results show that the demand when buying ready meals is dependent on both gender and whether or not the buyer is the end consumer. In general, the buyers' demands for sensory and convenience aspects were the most important. Female respondents were more demanding buyers than males, and their priorities were different. The implications of the findings are that foodservice operators and producers of ready meals must pay attention to the different demands of buyers, their gender and who will be the end consumer.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2006
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-2849 (URN)10.1111/j.1745-4506.2006.00038.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-11-02 Created: 2007-11-02 Last updated: 2018-02-12Bibliographically approved
    4. The appropriateness of ready meals for dinner
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The appropriateness of ready meals for dinner
    2007 (English)In: Journal of Foodservice, ISSN 1748-0140, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 238-250Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Different meal contexts call for different meal solutions. With the aim of understanding how people reason when choosing what to eat for dinner and how ready meal solutions fit their demands in this meal situation, a focus group study was conducted. Although there is an image of the ideal dinner as being cooked and eaten together with the family, this often conflicts with reality and scarcity of time. The social setting was shown to be of utmost importance in the choice of cooking, place to eat and actual meal. Suggestions were given on how to improve the appropriateness of ready meals for consumption at dinner

    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-2850 (URN)10.1111/j.1745-4506.2007.00070.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2007-11-02 Created: 2007-11-02 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
  • 69.
    Prim, Mia
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Hall, Gunnar
    The appropriateness of ready meals for dinner2007In: Journal of Foodservice, ISSN 1748-0140, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 238-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Different meal contexts call for different meal solutions. With the aim of understanding how people reason when choosing what to eat for dinner and how ready meal solutions fit their demands in this meal situation, a focus group study was conducted. Although there is an image of the ideal dinner as being cooked and eaten together with the family, this often conflicts with reality and scarcity of time. The social setting was shown to be of utmost importance in the choice of cooking, place to eat and actual meal. Suggestions were given on how to improve the appropriateness of ready meals for consumption at dinner

  • 70.
    Rapp [Nordin], Erika
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Application of the meal environment as a tool to improve health?2008In: Journal of Foodservice, E-ISSN 1748-0159, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 80-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper was to look into meal experiences with a focus on acceptance and satisfaction in institutional eating locations, primarily in the caring sector. The situation and the context have the ability to influence the acceptability of a meal, as well as the amount eaten. Context factors can be at least important in determining acceptance of food and beverage as sensory factors. Variables such as location, physical and social environment, expectations, description of foods and choice can have an impact on the acceptance of a meal. In addition, proper response to guests' needs and requests can lead to satisfaction. Improvement of the atmosphere in the eating location during the meal has been shown to be a meaningful way to stabilize health and nutritional status, as well as having an impact on the energy intake in patients. When the food and beverage meets certain expectations, the room and the meeting can enhance the atmosphere, and therefore the entire quality of the meal experience.

  • 71.
    Rapp [Nordin], Erika
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Öström, Åsa
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Bosander, Fredrik
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    The sensory effect of butter in culinary sacues2007In: Journal of Foodservice, E-ISSN 1748-0159, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 31-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common belief is that when butter is added to food, a more desired flavour develops and that other flavours are enhanced. The aim of this study was to investigate how different amounts of added butter affected the perceived sensory characteristics of tomato sauce and chicken velouté using sensory analysis. In addition, a preference test was performed for tomato sauce. As more butter was added, the intensity of butter flavour and the viscosity increased, and the other flavour, aroma and taste attributes tested were perceived as being less intense in varying magnitudes. No significant difference was obtained in the preference study, except liking of the appearance among the men who preferred the sauce containing less butter. The results show that a large amount of butter is not always essential, unless it is the flavour and aroma of butter itself that is sought, or if it is necessary to balance the flavour, taste and texture attributes. These results could have a positive health effect for consumers if the use of fat in restaurant kitchens is reduced.

  • 72. Rosell, Magdalena
    et al.
    Hellénius, Maj-Lis
    de Faire, Ulf
    Berglund, Lars
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Contribution of a manually coded part in an optically readable, precoded sevenday food record for the intake of energy, nutrients and foods2003In: Scandinavian Journal of Nutrition/Næringsforskning, ISSN 1102-6480, E-ISSN 1651-2359, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 123-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study investigated the contribution of a manually coded part (MP) in a precoded 7 day food record for the intake of energy, nutrients and foods. Design: The dietary intake was assessed in a cross-sectional study using an optically readable precoded 7 day food record. Biological markers for the intakes of protein, sodium and potassium were measured in 24 h urine samples. Underreporters were identified according to the Goldberg cut-off for energy intake:basal metabolic rate. The study setting was an outpatient clinic at Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. The subjects were 301 healthy men aged 63 years. Results: The MP represented 20% of the energy intake. Intakes recorded as free text were foods commonly eaten between meals, especially in the evening and were, with the exception of fruits, characterized as less healthy. The agreement between using the food record with and without the MP, respectively, was low for energy, carbohydrates, a-tocopherol and vitamin C, and high for retinol, vitamin D and vitamin B12. Underreporters recorded their food intake as free text to a lesser degree than did non-underreporters. When the MP was included in the food record, the percentage of energy from fat and carbohydrates increased and the percentage of energy from protein decreased. The biological markers for protein, sodium and potassium confirmed an improved validity of the dietary data when the MP was included. Conclusions: Inclusion of the food consumption recorded in free text influenced the dietary quality and indicated improved validity of the optically readable precoded food record. To increase the possibility of catching underreporting in dietary surveys, these findings emphasize the importance of the recording/ reporting of between-meal eating. Keywords: biological markers; dietary assessment; in-between meals; precoded food record; underreporting.

  • 73.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Den politiska måltiden: ärebetygelse och problemlösare2004In: Tid för måltidskunskap: En vänbok till Birgitta Ulmander / [ed] Gustafsson, Inga-Britt, Strömberg, Ulla-Britt, Örebro: Örebro universitet , 2004, p. 119-127Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 74.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    En smak av Sverige: recept för många gäster [av Inger Claesson Wästberg och Olle Wästberg]2005In: RIG: Kulturhistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0035-5267, E-ISSN 2002-3863, no 3, p. 179-180Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 75.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    En smakbit av landskapet: sinnesförnimmelser och platsegenskaper i den lokala och regionala måltidslitteraturen 20032005In: Hörsel och lyssnande: ett seminarium om människans hörselsinne, dess funktion och betydelse, januari 2004 / [ed] Lisbeth Axelsson, Örebro: Örebro universitetsbibliotek , 2005, p. 57-70Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 76.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Historiebok för kakälskare [av Dick Harrison och Eva Helen Ulvros]2003In: RIG: Kulturhistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0035-5267, E-ISSN 2002-3863, no 4, p. 255-256Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 77.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Kok-konsten som vetenskap och konst [av Charles Emil Hagdahl]2005In: RIG: Kulturhistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0035-5267, E-ISSN 2002-3863, no 1, p. 45-46Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 78.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Matrike Norrland: norrländska mattraditioner och måltidsseder med nya och gamla recept [av Kurt Genrup och Ulla Tham]2003In: RIG: Kulturhistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0035-5267, E-ISSN 2002-3863, no 3, p. 179-181Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 79.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Modern European political food culture: in search of the optimal balance of food and political factors2005In: Etnološka istraživanja : Ethnological Researches, ISSN 0351-4323, Vol. 1, no 10, p. 29-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Meetings with other politicians, business people and NGO representatives, and the discussion of ideas on how to formulate new policies constitute a major part of politicians’ work in Europe today. Many meetings take place during meals; which may be ceremonial, but are often informal. The food served during these meals is commonly carefully selected to support the political strategy of the meeting. The dayto-day political meal, with its strong functional element, has until now been of little interest to the ethnological research tradition. The aim of this study is to analyse how a group of politicians in contemporary Sweden use meals in their daily work, how they choose food in relation to the purpose of the meeting, and what role they give the meal in political discussions and negotiations. The method used is semi-structured interviews with ten Swedish politicians; ministers and permanent secretaries (both politically appointed in Sweden).The politicians explained how they select topics that should be discussed during the formal meeting, and which topics might better be discusse dduring the meal following the meeting. The analysis showedthat several ministers and permanent secretaries use the meal as a political tool, and that there is a perceived benefit for those who use the meal in a strategic way. The politicians’ interest in food can be seen as a reflection of post-modern society’s interest in food and meal culture.

  • 80.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Politisk gastronomi - om måltiden som politiskt medel2004In: Gastronomisk kalender, Stokholm: Prisma , 2004, Vol. 43, p. 77-86Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 81.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    The construction of food and meal culture for political and commercial ends: EU-summits, rural businesses and World Exhibitions2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examines how cultural values of food and meal culture were expressed and used by professional agents. The overall aim was to analyse and synthesise the interpretation and creation by professionals in commercial food and meal production of what they defined as a local, regional or national food and meal culture. Four groups of professional agents were interviewed on their use of food and meal culture as cultural value and form when: organising meals for ministerial meetings during Sweden’s first tenure of the rotating European Union presidency (chairmanship) in 2001 (political civil servants, meal editors, chefs and sponsors), producing and marketing food and meals in rural areas (restaurateurs, food producers and event organisers), branding food products with a place-related origin (marketing consultants), and when food products and meals were deployed in the international political arena of world exhibitions, 1851–2005 (political civil servants). Data was gathered using qualitative methods: semi-structured interviews, various observation techniques and analysis of contemporary and historical government and commercial documents. The analytical methods used were based on how agents in a field interact to negotiate the values significant in the field, and on how the use of cultural form as symbol affects the presentation. Culinary arts and meal science methodology as followed using ethnological research techniques. The results showed that food and meal culture for commercial and political use was carefully shaped to achieve specific professional goals: to be bought or accepted by the customer or citizen. Meals for EU ministers were designed to match those visitors’ apprehensions of high-status Swedish food and of local food and meal culture. In marketing situations, food product brands were created and shaped to match consumer ideas of place-related origin and ‘genuineness’. At world exhibitions, food and meals were presented as entertainment based on stereotypes of pre-existing food and meal culture. Concepts of the ‘commercial’ and ‘political’ dimensions became cultural values affecting the cultural form, demonstrating that in these cases culture was manufactured to be acceptable to its consumers.

    List of papers
    1. Food culture as a political tool: meal construction during the Swedish EU-chairmanship 2001
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Food culture as a political tool: meal construction during the Swedish EU-chairmanship 2001
    2003 (English)In: Food Service Technology, ISSN 1471-5732, E-ISSN 1471-5740, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 89-96Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to analyse how the European Union (EU) ministerial meals during Sweden's EU-chairmanship 2001 were devised, and how the official representatives of Sweden chose to interpret and present a national image based on local and regional food identities. The manufacture of the Swedish culinary profile was compared with the same process during Finland's EU-chairmanship 1999 and Denmark's EU-chairmanship 2002. Sixteen professionals involved in the decision-making process in the three countries were interviewed in 2001 and 2002. The regional food profile chosen in Sweden supported different political goals such as the idea of the production of local food and local economic development. Local and regional food culture had a broad and open definition, but the decisions as to what constituted local and regional food culture as served at the ministerial meals were made at the top political level. The central decision-making process transformed the concept of a typical local and regional food culture into a political tool serving political goals, with the end product presented at different EU-ministerial meals.

    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3107 (URN)10.1046/j.1471-5740.2003.00069.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2006-09-07 Created: 2006-09-07 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    2. Local food cultures in the Swedish rural economy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Local food cultures in the Swedish rural economy
    2005 (English)In: Sociologia Ruralis, ISSN 0038-0199, E-ISSN 1467-9523, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 346-359Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A rising interest in the commercial benefits of locally and regionally connoted food culture for rural development is notable in Sweden. Local and regional food culture is used as a tool both to encourage the rural economy, but also to fulfil urban residents' dreams of an authentic rural idyll. A qualitative study of a government project involving ten rural food businesses was performed to analyse how local food culture was used as a business advantage. The managers were interviewed and their conceptions analysed using company documents, observational notes and photographs. The results revealed that the managers do use food culture to gain a competitive advantage. They produce only those products that signal perceived 'good taste' and those that best reflect urban customers' ideas of rurality. It is also important to satisfy their kitchen staff's demands to work with developing urban food trends, otherwise the managers risk losing skilled staff. Rural customers are of minor day-to-day economic value, except when using the restaurant on festive occasions. But on those occasions, rural customers demand meals prepared in an urban classical style, not the local and regional food culture they eat at home. The most advantageous local and regional food culture for rural development is therefore that which best combines the urban ideal of the countryside, authentic rural products, and the rural ideal of urban classical cuisine.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Oxford: Blackwell, 2005
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3108 (URN)10.1111/j.1467-9523.2005.00309.x (DOI)
    Available from: 2006-09-07 Created: 2006-09-07 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Consuming heritage: the use of local food culture in branding
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consuming heritage: the use of local food culture in branding
    2006 (English)In: Place Branding, ISSN 1744-070X, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 130-143Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper was to examine how specialised food marketing consultants interpret local and regional food culture and locality in branding food products to match consumer ideals. Interview data were collected from eight food marketing consultants. The interviews were conducted in two parts: semi-structured interviews, followed by confrontation with actual 'stimulus products'. The data were analysed using current theories on country-of-origin. Results indicate that an association to an alleged origin in a local or regional food culture is seen as an attractive way to interest the urban consumer in new food product brands. The marketing consultants conceive of local and regional food culture as an invention to reflect urban consumers' ideas of the countryside.

    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3109 (URN)10.1057/palgrave.pb.5990051 (DOI)
    Available from: 2006-09-07 Created: 2006-09-07 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
    4. Constructed national food and meal archetypes at international exhibitions from Paris 1867 to Aichi 2005
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Constructed national food and meal archetypes at international exhibitions from Paris 1867 to Aichi 2005
    2008 (English)In: National Identities, ISSN 1460-8944, E-ISSN 1469-9907, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 313-327Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the selection of food culture objects by the Swedish state for presentation at the international exhibitions (world fairs) of 1851 to 2005, and in particular the methodologies used by Swedish National Exhibition Committees to select representative national food culture to be served in national exhibition arenas. The material used consists of government documents from 1846 to 2000, semi-structured interviews of six civil servants responsible for the joint Scandinavian pavilion at the Aichi International Exhibition in 2005 (Japan), field diary notes and photographs from observations, and exhibition brochures. The process of political selection in creating a representative national food cultural heritage, with the aim of promoting the sale of national produce and a positive reputation abroad, as well as of fostering national pride at home, is delineated. The importance of economic and marketing values in shaping a national cultural form designed as a symbol of the nation is examined, and the question of whose food cultures are selected for inclusion and whose are excluded are addressed.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London: Routledge, 2008
    Research subject
    Culinary Arts and Meal Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3110 (URN)10.1080/14608940802249957 (DOI)
    Available from: 2006-09-07 Created: 2006-09-07 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
  • 82.
    Tellström, Richard
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Ulrica Söderlind: Skrovmål - Kosthållning och matlagning i den svenska flottan från 1500-tal till 1700-tal2007In: RIG: Kulturhistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0035-5267, E-ISSN 2002-3863, no 4, p. 233-235Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 83.
    Tellström, Richard
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Food culture as a political tool: meal construction during the Swedish EU-chairmanship 20012003In: Food Service Technology, ISSN 1471-5732, E-ISSN 1471-5740, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 89-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to analyse how the European Union (EU) ministerial meals during Sweden's EU-chairmanship 2001 were devised, and how the official representatives of Sweden chose to interpret and present a national image based on local and regional food identities. The manufacture of the Swedish culinary profile was compared with the same process during Finland's EU-chairmanship 1999 and Denmark's EU-chairmanship 2002. Sixteen professionals involved in the decision-making process in the three countries were interviewed in 2001 and 2002. The regional food profile chosen in Sweden supported different political goals such as the idea of the production of local food and local economic development. Local and regional food culture had a broad and open definition, but the decisions as to what constituted local and regional food culture as served at the ministerial meals were made at the top political level. The central decision-making process transformed the concept of a typical local and regional food culture into a political tool serving political goals, with the end product presented at different EU-ministerial meals.

  • 84.
    Tellström, Richard
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Mossberg, Lena
    Consuming heritage: the use of local food culture in branding2006In: Place Branding, ISSN 1744-070X, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 130-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this paper was to examine how specialised food marketing consultants interpret local and regional food culture and locality in branding food products to match consumer ideals. Interview data were collected from eight food marketing consultants. The interviews were conducted in two parts: semi-structured interviews, followed by confrontation with actual 'stimulus products'. The data were analysed using current theories on country-of-origin. Results indicate that an association to an alleged origin in a local or regional food culture is seen as an attractive way to interest the urban consumer in new food product brands. The marketing consultants conceive of local and regional food culture as an invention to reflect urban consumers' ideas of the countryside.

  • 85.
    Tellström, Richard
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Mossberg, Lena
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Local food cultures in the Swedish rural economy2005In: Sociologia Ruralis, ISSN 0038-0199, E-ISSN 1467-9523, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 346-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A rising interest in the commercial benefits of locally and regionally connoted food culture for rural development is notable in Sweden. Local and regional food culture is used as a tool both to encourage the rural economy, but also to fulfil urban residents' dreams of an authentic rural idyll. A qualitative study of a government project involving ten rural food businesses was performed to analyse how local food culture was used as a business advantage. The managers were interviewed and their conceptions analysed using company documents, observational notes and photographs. The results revealed that the managers do use food culture to gain a competitive advantage. They produce only those products that signal perceived 'good taste' and those that best reflect urban customers' ideas of rurality. It is also important to satisfy their kitchen staff's demands to work with developing urban food trends, otherwise the managers risk losing skilled staff. Rural customers are of minor day-to-day economic value, except when using the restaurant on festive occasions. But on those occasions, rural customers demand meals prepared in an urban classical style, not the local and regional food culture they eat at home. The most advantageous local and regional food culture for rural development is therefore that which best combines the urban ideal of the countryside, authentic rural products, and the rural ideal of urban classical cuisine.

  • 86.
    Tellström, Richard
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Mossberg, Lena
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Jonsson, Inger M.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Förord2007In: Tid för måltidskunskap: en vänbok till Inga-Brittt Gustafsson / [ed] Richard Tellström, Lena Mossberg, Inger M. Jonsson, Örebro: Örebro universitet , 2007, p. 9-9Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 87.
    Tham, Wilhelm
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Lopez-Valladares, Gloria
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Helmersson, S.
    Österlund, A.
    Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    More than one variant of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from each of two human cases of invasive listeriosis2007In: Epidemiology and Infection, ISSN 0950-2688, E-ISSN 1469-4409, Vol. 135, no 5, p. 854-856Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two variants of Listeria monocytogenes were isolated from blood cultures from each of two patients with listeriosis. Each variant displayed a two-band difference in DNA profile from the other by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Although this difference in profile is insufficient to distinguish clearly between the variants, the possibility of co-infection with different strains of L. monocytogenes needs to be considered. We suggest that more than one colony should be selected for molecular typing to aid interpretation during investigation of the sources and routes of Listeria infection.

  • 88.
    Ulmander, Birgitta
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    FAMM i den sydkinesiska måltiden2007In: Den medvetna måltidskunskapen: en vänbok till Inga-Britt Gustafsson / [ed] Richard Tellström, Lena Mossberg, Inger M. Jonsson, Örebro: Örebro universitet , 2007, p. 201-205Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 89. Vessby, B.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Inga-Britt
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Tengblad, S.
    Boberg, M.
    Andersson, A.
    Desaturation and elongation of fatty acids and insulin action2002In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, E-ISSN 1749-6632, Vol. 967, p. 183-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Insulin resistance is characterized by specific changes of the composition of fatty acids in the serum lipids and in the skeletal muscle membranes. Impaired insulin sensitivity is associated with high proportions of palmitic (16:0) acid and low levels of linoleic (18:2 n-6) acid in serum. In addition, there are apparent changes of the fatty acid desaturase activities, suggesting an increased activity of the Delta9 and Delta6 desaturases and a decreased activity of the Delta5 desaturase. The activity of the fatty acid desaturases is regulated by long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and insulin and is probably also dependent on the degree of physical activity. A high ratio between arachidonic (20:4 n-6) and dihomo-gamma linolenic (20:3 n-6) acid, as a measure of Delta5 desaturase activity, in the skeletal muscle phospholipids has been related to good insulin sensitivity. Available knowledge seems to indicate that the degree of saturation of the body lipids, and especially the proportion of palmitic acid in the lipid membranes, may be critical for insulin sensitivity. The strong relationships between the Delta5 desaturase activity, a high content of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in the skeletal muscle, and insulin sensitivity may be due to parallel effects of diet and/or physical activity on the fatty acid composition and on insulin sensitivity.

  • 90.
    Walter, Ute
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Konstnärer och "kokkonstnärer" som företagare2007In: Den medvetna måltidskunskapen: en vänbok till Inga-Britt Gustafsson / [ed] Richard Tellström, Lena Mossberg, Inger M. Jonsson, Örebro: Örebro universitet , 2007, p. 217-223Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 91.
    Walter, Ute
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Öström, Åsa
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    The role of the physical and social environment in customers’ restaurant experiences2009In: Quis 11: Moving forward with service quality / [ed] Bernd Stauss, Stephen W. Brown, Bo Edvardsson, Robert Johnston, Wolfsburg: Ingolstadt School of Management , 2009, p. 710-712Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 92.
    Watz, Birgitta
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Måltidens rum2004In: Tid för måltidskunskap: En vänbok till Birgitta Ulmander / [ed] Gustafsson, Inga-Britt, Strömberg, Ulla-Britt, Örebro: Örebro universitet , 2004, p. 99-102Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 93.
    Watz, Birgitta
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Om absolut gehör i köket2005In: Hörsel och lyssnande: ett seminarium om människans hörselsinne, dess funktion och betydelse, januari 2004 / [ed] Lisbeth Axelsson, Örebro: Örebro universitetsbibliotek , 2005, p. 33-37Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 94.
    Öström, Åsa
    Örebro University, Department of Restaurant & Culinary Arts.
    Sensorik: ett verktyg för att mäta upplevd matkvalitet2004In: Tid för måltidskunskap: en vänbok till Birgitta Ulmander / [ed] Inga-Britt Gustafsson, Ulla-Britt Strömberg, Örebro: Örebro universitet , 2004, p. 207-214Chapter in book (Other academic)
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    Consumer preference for combinations of wine and blue mould cheese influenced by eating and drinking attitudes2005In: Culinary Arts and Sciences: Global and National Perspectives / [ed] Edwards JSA, Kowrygo B, Rejman K, Bornemouth: The Worshipful Company of Cooks Research Centre at Bornemouth University , 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
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