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  • 51.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Education as a citizenship right2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the recently started project, presented here, the aim is to analyse consequences of the growing importance of viewing education through a perspective of rights more generally. The international conventions like the United Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the European Convention on Human Rights and The United Nations’ Convention on the Rights of the Child are our main documents for study and we are also interested in  their transformation primarily to the national context of Sweden. The main aim of the project is to focus the implications of the parental rights in different respects and to analyse potential contradictions between parents’ and childrens’ rights.

     

    By studying and analysing parents’ and childrens’ rights concerning education we want to contribute to a discussion of how the educational sphere in the future can be understood as situated in a field of force between being a public space and an encounter between different cultures or as a more or less private space directly related to the values of families choosing a specific school.

     

  • 52.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Education as a potential for creating mutual trust: schools as sites for deliberation2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    In recent decades, the concept of social capital as basic for the sustainability of democracy and economic growth has had an enormous impact on the social scientific debate, primarily through the works of Robert Putnam (1993, 2000). Despite its vagueness and the difficulties involved in operationalizing it, the concept expresses a distinction that is of significance for the maintenance and depth of democracy in different societies. At the same time, I am not (as many others) convinced by the overarching thesis which Putnam puts forward concerning the fundamental role of associations and social networks in the creation of social capital.

    In my article I will apply and develop further the views and the critique of Putnam put forward by Bo Rothstein (2005), relating to the role of what are termed universal institutions, and primarily of one such institution, the general school system, in creating social capital. In an analysis of under what conditions mutual trust is created, Rothstein (2005) argues that it develops through extensive interaction with others, and mainly with others who are not of the same category as oneself. Multicultural societies have to create arenas for social encounters where this interaction can come about. A general, non-segregated educational system, from pre-school to university level, offers such an arena when not segregating on the basis of ethnicity and social class (cf. Yamagishi 2001). An educational system of that kind can, referring to Hardin (2002), be seen as an example of an (at least) thin universal institution. However, universal institutions are not just difficult to establish, they also tend to be weak and are thus, as we all know, often at risk of being dissolved. There are always different particular interests that tend to challenge universal institutions on the ground that their own group or category is being singled out for special treatment or put at a disadvantage by existing institutions of this kind. Schools within an educational system based on particularism – like the one that has developed in Sweden during the last twenty years as a challenge to a more universal system one, a particularly based school system which is established in many countries since a long time ago – tends to reify given group or cultural identities and implies a failure to interrogate the meaning of cultural identity. At the same time I see this potential of interrogation as central for the sustainability and development of democracy and crossing borders in multicultural societies of today.

    With Seyla Benhabib (2002) I will distinguish between democratic and multicultural theorizing “without disputing that most multiculturalists fully support democratic practices and institutions. The emphasis as well as the ordering of our principles are different. Most democratic theorists welcome and support struggles for recognition and identity/difference movements to the degree to which they are movements for democratic inclusion, greater social and political justice, and cultural fluidity. But movements for maintaining the purity or distinctiveness of cultures seem to me irreconciliable with both democratic and more basic epistemological considerations” (Benhabib 2002 p. ix).

    In my contribution I will take a closer look on both the potential and the vulnerability of universal institutions and more specifically of the general education system as a universal institution when it comes to an interplay with the multicultural situation. Questions needed to be asked are if and in what way the educational system can be compared with other societal institutions important for the sustainability of democracy. Can the educational system by being an arena for social and cultural encounters contribute to create trust, and in the long run social capital, among the members of society?

    The second area I will try to analyse and comment is the current state of the political philosophical and / or educational debate about how the general education system (as a universal institution or otherwise) could operate today and in the future within multiculturalist societies, and what preconditions the different views on this subject imply in terms of creating social trust, social intelligence and social capital.

    References:

    Benhabib, Seyla (2002): The Claims of Culture. Equality and Diversity in The Global Era. Princeton: Princeton University press.

    Hardin, Russell (2002): Trust and Trustworthiness. New York: Russel Sage Foundation.

    Putnam, R. (1993). Making Democracy Work: Civic Traditions in Modern Italy. Princeton:

    Princeton University Press.

    Putnam, R. (2000). Bowling Alone. The Collapse and Revival of American Community. New York: Simon & Schuster.

    Rothstein, Bo (2005): Social Traps and the Problem of Trust. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Yamagishi, Toshio (2001): Trust as a form of social intelligence. In Karen Cook (ed.): Trust in Society, pp. 121–147. New York: Russel Sage Foundation.

  • 53.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Education as communication as deliberation2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Is it possible to trace, within the philosophy of education, a historical line or tradition in which education has been understood in terms of communication – or at least to discern specific attempts, not necessarily related to one another, to understand it in such terms? Could such a tradition, if one exists, also be viewed as a way of developing education understood as deliberation (where deliberation is seen as a specific qualifier of communication)? My main underlying endeavour is to try to develop an understanding of education and an educational rationale that are in line with democratic ideals, supporting a democratic way of life. Such an understanding can of course be developed along many different lines, but here I propose a communicative and deliberative approach.

    My paper comprises three sections. In the first, I will try to show how Dewey, in the first three chapters of his Democracy and Education (1916), creates a specific starting point for my deliberative approach. In the second section, I will show how certain writings of Jürgen Habermas are central to the construction of my model of deliberative communication and to its potential to change the rationale of education. Lastly, I will address certain criticisms of the concept of deliberation, while still maintaining the proposed model as a normative ideal. In this last section I will also refer to some of the contributions in a recently written anthology on ‘education as communication’ edited by me (Englund ed. 2007: Utbildning som kommunikation [Education as communication]).

  • 54.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Education as deliberative communication – preconditions,possibilities and consequences (project report to the Committee for Educational Research,  Swedish Research Council)2006Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    (a) To develop and refine the basic ideas of the theory of deliberative democracy in relation to education as a public sphere, (b) to analyse the preconditions within educational policy for schools and other educational institutions to constitute deliberative democratic environments, (c) to analyse the possibilities and limits as regards changing schools and the internal work of educational institutions in the direction of deliberative democracy, (d) to analyse the relationship between learning and deliberative communication within different school subjects and to test deliberative communication as a didactic idea.

     

    It is difficult and perhaps also inappropriate to (try to) distinguish between the scientific and the practice field with regard to the problem that is the focus of this project, education as (deliberative) communication, with an analysis of the classroom as a potential weak public sphere. However, starting from the question whether the classroom can serve as a potential weak public (cf. Fraser 1992/2003), the project has learnt that the classroom seems to be underutilized in this respect, while at the same time there is an obvious boom in educational research (of which this project forms a part) advocating education and learning as communication. The project’s interest in deliberative communication can be seen as one branch of the communication tree that has been developed in close relation to the question of the constitution of democratic values in Swedish schools. The concept of deliberation also has a specific relationship to a certain view of democracy, namely deliberative democracy. In the context of the project, deliberative communication is understood as and has its starting point in a view of communication in which different opinions and values can be brought face to face, with “an endeavour to ensure that each individual takes a stand by listening, deliberating, seeking arguments and evaluating, while at the same time there is a collective effort to find values and norms that everyone can agree upon” (National Agency for Education, Dnr 2000:1613, p. 6, my tr.).

     

  • 55.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Education, the curriculum, society and citizenship: starting points for a historical-sociological comparative approach2007In: Democracy and human rights in education and society: explorations from South Africa and Sweden / [ed] Chaterine Odora Hoppers, Bernt Gustavsson, Enver Motala, John Pampallis, Örebro: Örebro universitet , 2007, p. 135-180Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 56.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Educational implications of the idea of deliberative democracy2010In: Habermas, critical theory and education / [ed] Mark Murphy, Ted Fleming, New York: Routledge , 2010, p. 19-32Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The movement towards deliberative democracy has many proponents among American political scientists but one outstanding spokesman in Europe, the German social philosopher Jürgen Habermas, who also has located the idea of deliberative democracy in a broad analytical frame of reference of societal development not just related to democratic theory. He contends that the project of modernity can be seen as unfinished, and that, through communicative action, an on-going normative rationalization is possible. The theory of communicative action that he develops is, thus, a theory of social integration, and further developed into a model for deliberative democracy and a discourse theory of law and democracy.

    The implications of the model of deliberative democracy for education are not explicit and Habermas can be interpreted in different ways. What can be said is that he places the realization of deliberative policy in the institutionalization of procedures, where an intersubjectivity on a higher level is expected to emerge; public discourses find a good response only under circumstances of broad participation. This in turn requires a background political culture that is egalitarian, divested of all educational privileges, and thoroughly intellectual, according to Habermas. Political autonomy, he says, cannot be realized by a person who fulfils his or her own private interests, but only as a joint enterprise in an intersubjective, shared practice. On this account, the deliberative project could be regarded as the continuation of the project of modernity.

    While an ongoing deliberative democracy requires citizens with well-established deliberative attitudes and a society that rests on the idea of deliberative democracy is a long-term project, it implies that some institutions are given a central role. A possible way of strengthening deliberative democracy might be to use the educational system for deliberative communication, which is understood as communication in which different opinions and values can be brought face to face with an endeavour to ensure that each individual takes a stand by listening, deliberating, seeking arguments and evaluating, while at the same time there is a collective effort to find values and norms that everyone can agree upon. Five characteristics of deliberative communication are presented and discussed.

  • 57.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Ett ifrågasättande av föräldrars rätt till auktoritet i utbildningsfrågor: argument för en allmän pluralistisk utbildning2011In: Utbildning som medborgerlig rättighet: föräldrarätt eller barns rätt eller... ? / [ed] Tomas Englund, Göteborg: Daidalos , 2011, p. 247-287Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Formation of school subjects as curriculum content: patterns and structures2010In: NERA congress Malmö March 2010, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To show that curriculum content is always socially constructed and might be a result of struggling social forces giving way for different interpretations, interpretations that lean on different political and ideological visions, but also that curriculum and school subjects in practice are interpreted, designed and performed by unique teachers in ways that we might try to characterize for further comparisons anmd evaluations.

     

  • 59.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Forskning om medborgar- och demokratifostran - en forskningsöversikt beställd av Utbildningsvetenskapliga kommittén vid Vetenskapsrådet2014Other (Other academic)
  • 60.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Föreställningar om den goda läraren2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Föreställningar om den goda läraren [prolog]2012In: Föreställningar om den goda läraren / [ed] Tomas Englund, Göteborg: Daidalos, 2012, p. 7-8Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Föräldrarätten och barns rätt till en pluralistisk utbildning2018In: Barn og deres voksne / [ed] Tone Kvernbekk och Moira von Wright, Oslo: Cappelen Damm AS, 2018, p. 236-256Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 63.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Hur heligt är skolvalet?2011In: Skola & samhälle, E-ISSN 2001-6727Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 64.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Inledning [till avd I, Kommunikationsfilosofiska utgångspunkter]2007In: Utbildning som kommunikation: deliberativa samtal som möjlighet / [ed] Tomas Englund, Göteborg: Daidalos , 2007, p. 23-31Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 65.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Inledning [till avd II, Deliberationens institutionella villkor]2007In: Utbildning som kommunikation: deliberativa samtal som möjlighet / [ed] Tomas Englund, Göteborg: Daidalos , 2007, p. 147-151Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 66.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Inledning [till avd III, Didaktiska implikationer och reflektioner]2007In: Utbildning som kommunikation: deliberativa samtal som möjlighet / [ed] Tomas Englund, Göteborg: Daidalos , 2007, p. 311-316Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 67.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Inledning [till avdelning I: Tre konventioner om rätt och auktoritet att formera utbildning]2011In: Utbildning som medborgerlig rättighet: föräldrarätt eller barns rätt eller … ? / [ed] Tomas Englund, Göteborg: Daidalos , 2011, p. 13-16Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 68.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Inledning [till avdelning II: Konventionernas uttolkning och användning i Sverige]2011In: Utbildning som medborgerlig rättighet: föräldrarätt eller barns rätt eller … ? / [ed] Tomas Englund, Göteborg: Daidalos , 2011, p. 81-85Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Inledning [till avdelning III: Politisk-filosofiska betraktelser av spänningen mellan föräldrarätt och barns rätt till utbildning]2011In: Utbildning som medborgerlig rättighet: föräldrarätt eller barns rätt eller … ? / [ed] Tomas Englund, Göteborg: Daidalos , 2011, p. 243-245Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Is the concept of didactics relevant to use in an age of the communicative turn?: Towards a new didactic conceptualism when didactics meets classroom research2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the middle of the 1990s Swedish educational research and especially the two traditions related to the didactic movement, phenomenographic didactics and didactics based on curriculum theory, was praised and looked upon as very successful in an international perspective. During the last 10-15 years these didactic traditions have developed further into a sociocultural perspective on learning and the idea of dialogic classrooms (Säljö 1995, 2000, 2005, Dysthe ed. 2003) inspired by Vygotsky and Bakhtin and a socio-political perspective on teaching and the idea of deliberative communication (Englund 1996, 2000, ed. 2007) inspired by Dewey, Mead and Habermas.

    Implied in this later development is the proliferated use of the linguistic and communicative turns meaning that teaching and learning are looked upon as processes of mutual communication and meaning creating. A question than can be put is if the problematization of the selective tradition of each school subject and the displacement to a view of education as communication that this implies, also means that we have to exceed our traditional language of teaching and learning, i.e. that our didactic language has constituted a selective tradition and a limited and recitative relationship between teachers and learners for what we see as possible activities of the classroom. In sum, do we (researchers and teachers) need a language of communication and meaning-creating, instead of, or at least supplementing the languages of different subject didactics, to analyse the desirable activities of the classroom?

  • 71.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Is there a future for (Swedish) curriculum theory?2007In: Curriculum theory revisited / [ed] Eva Forsberg, Uppsala: Uppsala university , 2007, p. 31-41Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 72.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Jürgen Habermas and education2006In: Journal of Curriculum Studies, ISSN 0022-0272, E-ISSN 1366-5839, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 499-501Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 73.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Kommentar till Anders Fredriksson recension av boken Utbildning som kommunikation. Deliberativa samtal som möjlighet2008In: Pedagogisk forskning i Sverige, ISSN 1401-6788, E-ISSN 2001-3345, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 233-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Det är, i den överlag mycket positiva recensionen, ett alltför enkelt och näst intill skamligt grepp som tas av recensenten Anders Fredriksson då han ger så mycket plats åt att antologin Utbildning som kommunikation. Deliberativa samtal som möjlighet inte innehåller empiriska analyser av deliberativa samtal i skolan. Eftersom sådana empiriska studier inte är något som utlovas av antologin så kan den inte heller knappast kritiseras därför. Däremot kan jag gärna hålla med recensenten om det potentiella värdet därav, men jag vill samtidigt understryka dess problematiska karaktär och svårigheten att ”genom experiment empiriskt testa…..potentialen i deliberativa samtal i skolan”

  • 74.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Lärande genom deliberativ kommunikation2011In: Lärandets grunder: teorier och perspektiv / [ed] Mikael Jensen, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2011, p. 203-222Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 75.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Läraren i samhällsomvandlingen: den goda läraren som diskursiv konstruktion på olika samhälleliga arenor2012In: Föreställningar om den goda läraren / [ed] Tomas Englund, Göteborg: Daidalos, 2012, p. 9-60Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 76.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Mellan utbildningsvetenskap och utbildningspolitik2011In: Utbildningsvetenskapens kärna / [ed] Bo Jansson, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2011, p. 65-88Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Har svensk utbildningspolitik tagit intryck av och lutat sig mot svensk pedagogik och pedagogisk filosofi och har denna vetenskap i någon mån legitimerat svensk utbildningspolitik eller har det snarare utvecklats en motsättning mellan dessa bägge och när och varför inträdde i så fall denna motsättning?

  • 77.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Moralisk omdömesbildning genom deliberativ kommunikation: en ansats inspirerad av Dewey2016In: Utbildning och Demokrati, ISSN 1102-6472, E-ISSN 2001-7316, Vol. 25, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 78.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    New trends in Swedish educational research 2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 383-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     

    What new tendencies can be made out in Swedish educational research in the last three decades? Briefly, the following developments are described: In the 1970s, a long-prevailing emphasis on quantitative research was challenged by a number of different qualitative methods. Traditional sociology of education, meanwhile, was challenged by the new sociology of education. During the1980s, the dominant trend was a ‘‘didacticisation’’ of educational research, and here two main strands can be discerned, based in phenomenography and curriculum theory. Didactics very soon made its presence felt in educational policy, and in a major evaluation of Swedish educational research the two largely didactics-based traditions of ‘‘teaching and learning’’ and ‘‘curriculum theory’’ were identified as internationally the most significant. In the 1990s, educational research took a ‘‘linguistic turn’’—involving a wide-ranging shift in emphasis towards language and communication—with the result that new perspectives emerged. In addition, the philosophy of education experienced a powerful renaissance, partly as a reflection of the new focus on language and communication, but also in other respects, leading to a reawakening of interest in both classical and modern philosophy (of education).

     

  • 79.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Nya utmaningar för läroplansteorin2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 80.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Om evidensanspråk och universitetspolitik: Underlag för en diskussion2013Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I föreliggande paper vill jag för det första ifrågasätta en alltmer utbredd och okritisk användning av evidensbegreppet som legitimitetssignal för god forskning. Jag kommer därför att först ta upp frågan om användning av evidensbegreppet i ett mer generellt perspektiv och sedan ge några konkreta exempel på hur det används. Därvid vill jag ställa den universitetspolitiska frågan om lämpligheten att använda metoder som påstås ha evidens, trots förekomst av utvärderingar som ifrågasatt densamma, för att kapitalisera universitetet, eller som det låter: ”Vi ska nu satsa på att verifiera den här metoden och varumärkesskydda den och utveckla den som en kommersiell produkt” (Örebro universitet Forskningsnyheter 2013-02-04). I förlängningen av denna fråga skall slutligen kort också en fråga diskuteras, nämligen om lämpligheten över huvud taget att (Örebro) universitet har ett holdingbolag.

  • 81.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Om nödvändigheten av kontrovershantering i skolans samhällsundervisning2015In: Kontroversiella frågor: om kunskap och politik i samhällsundervisningen / [ed] Carsten Ljunggren, Ingrid Unemar-Öst, Tomas Englund, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2015, p. 187-204Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 82.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Om nödvändigheten av lärares kommunikativa kompetens2006In: Lärares arbete: pedagogikforskare reflekterar utifrån olika perspektiv : en antologi från en konferens anordnad av Myndigheten för skolutveckling, Stockholm: Myndigheten för skolutveckling , 2006, p. 41-56Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 83.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Om relevansen av begreppet didaktik.2007In: Acta Didactica Norge, ISSN 1504-9922, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    I artikeln ställs den kritiska frågan om bruket av didaktikbegreppet förhindrar en fortsatt utveckling och fördjupning av den kommunikativa vändningen, dvs. ett vetenskapligt stöd till den ömsesidiga kommunikationen mellan lärare och elever och mellan elever i olika former som det nödvändiga och framgångsrika förhållningssättet för att skapa mening i klassrummet. Behovet att analysera olika skolämnens selektiva traditioner understryks och exempel ges på studier som gjort detta och utvecklat den kommunikativa ansatsen.En fråga som också ställs, är om problematiseringen av den selektiva traditionen och förskjutningen till en ömsesidigt kommunikativ ansats kräver ett språkligt överskridande av det traditionella språket för undervisning och lärande, dvs. att vårt pedagogiska och didaktiska språk länge konstituerat en selektiv tradition för vad vi uppfattar som klassrummets möjliga aktiviteter.

     

  • 84.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Om relevansen av (begreppet) didaktik.2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 85.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Om skolplikt, föräldrars rätt och segregation2007In: Utbildning och Demokrati, ISSN 1102-6472, E-ISSN 2001-7316, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 5-8Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 86.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Om villkor för pedagogisk kommunikation och kommunikativt handlande i skolan2007In: Utbildning och Demokrati, ISSN 1102-6472, E-ISSN 2001-7316, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 123-126Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 87.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    On children's right to pluralism in education2011In: NERA (Nordic Educational Research Association) 2011 congress in Jyväskylä, Finland March, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The starting points of this paper imply a use from one article (Englund 2010) published within the project (Education as a citizenship right – parents’ rights, children’s rights or …..) in which the parental right to educational authority is questioned. Using deliberative democracy as an ideal I am putting the question if it is possible to create a deliberative democracy without future citizens growing into a pluralist, deliberative culture developing deliberative capabilities, with schools serving as crucial intermediate institutions. It is within common schools that encounters between different cultures, different value orientations etc. can take place and classrooms as weak publics can be created. However, this kind of development seems less plausible with the renaissance of what can be called liberal patriarchalism now legitimizing the growing use of parental right to educational authority[1], at the same time neglecting children’s right to a pluralist education. In my paper I will try to analyze the components of this dilemma by relating it to an ongoing discussion on citizenship education questioning in what perspective this citizenship education shall be seen, in a perspective of societal reproduction of from a perspective of each child’s rights to a pluralist education.[2]Depending on in what perspective this question is seen we find different outcomes. [1]The liberal, private-law paradigm privileges individual freedom, e.g. parental right to educational authority and civil rights at the same time subordinating political and social citizenship rights (Marshall 1949/1964, Habermas 1996). Among philosophers of education, William Galston (1991, 2002, 2005) is an outspoken proponent to parental right to educational authority. [2]William Galston (1991) poses two dilemmas about parental rights and education. The first of these arises from conflict between the proper ends of civic education in a liberal society and the values that some parents will want to honor in the way they rear their children; the second arises from conflict between how basic interests of the child are understood by the wider society and the dissident views of some parents (cf. Callan 2006) 

  • 88.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    On deliberation as education2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this contribution I intend, as a kind of introduction, (1) to show how the concept of deliberation and arguments in favour of a conversational and deliberative view of education were used within the classical analytical philosophy of education to understand the moral dimension of education. Secondly (2) I will try to put the case for deliberation as education by discussing the question of the rationality of education, drawing attention to communicative rationality as one starting point for understanding moral education in terms of deliberation, and comparing this approach with current discussions of moral education as conversation. My preliminary conclusion is that a strengthening of the deliberative character of education is desirable and in the final (3) part of my paper I will try to critically deliberate upon this goal in relation to the commonest critiques of deliberation as education.

     

     

  • 89.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    On moral education through deliberative communication2016In: Journal of Curriculum Studies, ISSN 0022-0272, E-ISSN 1366-5839, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 58-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    John Dewey’s masterpiece Democracy and Education, from 1916, is clearly far removed from the dominant tendencies of current education policy in the western world, with theiremphasis on the narrow accountability of the New Public Management. Nevertheless, his book still challenges those tendencies and sets forth criteria for citizenship and moral education for democracy as ‘a mode of associated living, of conjoint communicated experience’. According to Dewey, the measure of the worth of activities in schools is the extent to which they are animated by a social spirit, a spirit that can be actively present only when certain conditions are met. How can we understand and characterize these conditions in today’s schools, and to what extent are they desirable by different forces? I will move between these two questions using texts by Dewey and others on moral education, exploring communicative strategies that have inspired my own writing. In particular, I will present and discuss my own proposal of deliberative communication, and briefly relate it to the challenge from agonism, the ‘realities’ of educational policies and the status of moral and citizenship education in Sweden and the US today.

  • 90.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    On the need of citizenship literacy: a normative view2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 91.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Pedagogikämnets potential inom ramen för utbildningsvetenskap2009In: Pedagogik som examensämne 100 år / [ed] Lennart Wikander, Christina Gustafsson, Ulla Riis, Lena Larson, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet , 2009, p. 193-199Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 92.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Pedagogisk filosofi, etik och politik2006In: Utbildning och Demokrati, ISSN 1102-6472, E-ISSN 2001-7316, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 5-11Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 93.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Professional responsibility under pressure2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Professional work is characterized by what might be called discretionary specialization. This kind of professional performance is situated in a field of force between the judgments made by professionals and public instances controlling and evaluating this performance and is also established in different professional formation processes. Thus, it is not only a matter of how professional responsibility is practiced, but also one of what is given priority in the rhetoric of professionalism and within education of professionals. By bringing to the fore the concepts of professional ‘responsibility’ and ‘accountability’, a tension between the two concepts is gained into the different logics and implications of ‘responsibility’ and ‘accountability’ regimes.

  • 94.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Questioning the parental right to educational authority2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What might schooling mean for democracy and more precise: What are the implications for democracy in relation to different models of educational authority? What does especially the, by many attractive, principle of parental right to educational authority mean for democracy in the long run?

    I will in the following take my starting point in three models of educational authority and especially question the permissive attitude among prominent philosophers of education and political philosophers towards the parental right to educational authority in light of its shortcomings in relation to a development towards a democracy with deliberative qualities, which I use as a normative reference point.

  • 95.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Questioning the parental right to educational authority - arguments for a pluralist public education system2010In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 235-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What could the principle of a parental right to educational authority mean for democracy in the long run? Taking its starting point in three models of educational authority, this article questions the current permissive attitude to a parental right in this area. It does so in the light of the shortcomings of such a right with regard to pluralism in education for each child and a development towards a democracy with deliberative qualities, which is used here as a normative point of reference. The article develops three arguments for a common pluralist public education system for the public good and analyses different ways in which the parental right to educational authority has been legitimised as a basis for creating independent schools. It also highlights the neglect of the role of political socialisation in political philosophy, while raising the question of whether it is possible to create a deliberative democracy without future citizens growing into a deliberative culture, with schools serving as the crucial intermediate institution.

  • 96.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Recension, Gert J J Biesta & Nicholas Burbules: Pragmatism and educational research2006In: Utbildning och Demokrati, ISSN 1102-6472, E-ISSN 2001-7316, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 127-130Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 97.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Risk för religiös indoktrinering i friskolor?: Replik DN-debatt 2010-03-192010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 98.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, Department of Education.
    Skola för deliberativ kommunikation2007In: Utbildning som kommunikation: deliberativa samtal som möjlighet / [ed] Tomas Englund, Göteborg: Daidalos , 2007, p. 153-168Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 99.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Slaget om lärarutbildningen2012In: Föreställningar om den goda läraren / [ed] Tomas Englund, Göteborg: Daidalos, 2012, p. 199-213Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 100.
    Englund, Tomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Swedish educational policy monopoly: A challenge for curriculum theory2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a short history of Swedish educational policy during the last decades I will first differentiate three phases characterized by 1) an equality-oriented centralism, 2) decentralism based on free choice and 3) a result-steered recentralism combined with standardization and stress on restricted learning outcomes     

    Secondly, I will elaborate the current ‘recentralised’ monopoly phase of educational policy in a number of  characteristics and show how this phase has been established, influenced by two main forces: On the one hand a constellation of conservative and neoliberal social and political forces (criticizing earlier social democratic education policy of phase one) and on the other hand an international influence that can be characterized by the New Public Management and moulded in two ways, international comparisons like TIMMS, PISA and PIRLS and the stabilization of the longreaching restructuration movement aiming at education for private good and the creating of a segregated school system.

    Thirdly, I will, in spite of the seemingly hopeless (from a perspective of education for the public good) picture outlined, point out some possible ways to a ‘positive’ development, implying a ‘better’ education for everyone.

     

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