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  • 51.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Johansson, A.
    Nyåker, S.
    Thurfors, J.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Uptake of arsenic in Pisum sativum grown on arsenic contaminated soil2013In: / [ed] E. Kothe and G. Büchel, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Determination of trace metal distribution in broad beans with ICP-ORS-QMS2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 53.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Impact of organic carbon on the leachability of vanadium, manganese, iron and molybdenum from shale residues2015In: Minerals Engineering, ISSN 0892-6875, E-ISSN 1872-9444, Vol. 75, p. 100-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From 1942 to the 1966, oil was produced by pyrolysis of shale, in Kvarntorp, Sweden. This generated some 40 million m3 of metal rich pyrolyzed shale and discarded fines that were piled on site with its original metal content almost intact. The present study focuses on the leaching of vanadium, manganese, iron and molybdenum from fines after addition of wood chips and steel slag, in outdoor 1 m3 reactor systems at low liquid to solid ratio, in order to evaluate the potential environmental impact and recovery of the elements from the leachates. Seasonal variations were observed, with increased leaching during peak summer. For vanadium and molybdenum, high addition of wood chips decreased the leaching, probably due to adsorption. Manganese showed the opposite behavior while leaching of iron was almost independent of the amount of wood chips. Depending on the systems, up to 2200 μg L-1 vanadium, 90 μg L-1 molybdenum, 25 mg L-1 manganese and 500 mg L-1 iron was found in the aqueous phase. Applied to the 40 million m3 pile, the annual leaching of those elements may reach 14 ton, 0.6 ton, 200 ton and 2400 ton, respectively.

  • 54.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    LC-MP AES as a screening tool for metal-DOC interactions in ARD2017In: Bio-geo interactions: basic knowledge to application: 16th Symposium on remediation in Jena “Jenaer Sanierungskolloquium”. Conference proceedings, 2017, p. 43-43Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) such as humic and fulvic acids have a high ability to form stable complexes with many metal ions. Also otherwise insoluble elements may be mobilized by complexolysis. Detection of the humic substances can be made with size exclusion chromatography (SEC) with UV/Vis and fluorescence detection. To detect the metals that different organic compounds carry the metal content in the eluent can be analyzed. However, the phosphate buffer that is used in the reference method is not well suited since phosphate and hydrogen phosphate ions are excellent complexing agents for many metals. In this work ammonium nitrate buffer was evaluated and used.

    To decrease the analytical cost and streamline the analytical procedure an LC-system (Agilent 1260) was connected to an MP AES (Agilent 4200). After separation and spectroscopic measurements the eluent was lead to the nebulizer and the metal content in the eluent was determined as a function of time.

    When acidic shale residues come in contact with wood chips, acidic hydrolysis and microbial degradation generate a complex mixture of hydrophilic organic compounds and acid rock drainage (ARD). If no subsequent condensation occurs the released organics would mainly contain low molecular weight carbon compounds (LMWOC). The fluorescence at 443 nm after exitation at 345 nm reveals that compounds of humic and fulvic character are present in the leachates. The content of manganese in the more complex forms of organic compounds is limited and it is mainly associated with LMWOC. Hence, humic compounds are not a good carrier of manganese in this type of system.

    By using ammonium nitrate as buffer solution the separation was almost identical to the phosphate buffer. The results show that LC and MP AES can be used for analysis of the metal content as a function of size of organic carriers, such as humic substances and LMWOC. By using MP AES for metal analysis, operating cost is significantly decreased compared to hitherto used methods based on ICP. The results also indicate that substances with humic character form during acidic and microbial degradation of wood. From an environmental perspective this is of importance since several organic compounds facilitate metal mobilization.

  • 55.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Mobilization of vanadium from alkaline LD-slag: first year of data2014In: / [ed] E. Kothe and G. Büchel, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 56.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Overgrowth of alkaline LD-slag with Agrostis capillaris: impact on solution chemistry2014In: / [ed] E. Kothe and G. Büchel, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 57.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Release of uranium from weathered black shale in meso-scale reactor systems: first year of data2014In: Uranium - Past and Future Challenges: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Uranium Mining and Hydrogeology / [ed] Merkel Broder J., Arab Alireza, Springer, 2014, p. 139-146Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 58.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Revegetation of acidic mine waste: impact of commercial bark compost2012In: / [ed] E. Kothe and G. Büchel, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 59.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Leaching of metals from incinerated black shales2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 60.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Removal of vanadium from neutralized acid mine drainage (AMD) by adsorption to saw dust2012In: International Mine Water Association Symposium: Bunbury, Australia 2012 / [ed] McCullough C.D., Lund M.A., Wyse L., International Mine Water Association ( IMWA ) , 2012, p. 727-734Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    reatment of AMD with alkaline waste materials such as LD-slag may cause increased mobilization of potentially toxic metals, particularly those that form oxyanions. Vanadium is one of them and it can reach up to 3 % (weight) in the LD-slag. In this report a multivariate approach was used to study the removal of primarily vanadium from AMD neutralized with LD-slag by adsorption to wood. Two of the most important factors for the adsorption were pH and contact time. Some 90 % removal of vanadium was obtained after a contact time of 7 days when 25 g L-1 saw dust was added to AMD neutralized with LD-slag.

  • 61.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Grandin, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Impact of an Organic Carbon Source on the Leaching of Vanadium from LD-Slag2012In: 9th International Conference on Acid Rock Drainage,ICARD 2012, Ottawa, Canada, 20-26 May 2012: Volume 1 of 2, 2012, p. -700Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Grandin, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Conditioning sulfidic mine waste for growth of Agrostis capillaris - impact on solution chemistry2014In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 21, no 11, p. 6888-6904Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contamination of the environment due to mining and mineral processing is an urgent problem worldwide. It is often desirable to establish a grass cover on old mine waste since it significantly decreases the production of leachates. To obtain sustainable growth, it is often necessary to improve several properties of the waste such as water-holding capacity, nutrient status, and toxicity. This can be done by addition of organic materials such as wood residues, e. g., compost. In this study, we focus on the solution chemistry of the leachates when a substrate containing historic sulfidic mine waste mixed with 30 % (volume) bark compost is overgrown by Agrostis capillaris. The pot experiments also included other growth-promoting additives (alkaline material, mycorrhiza, and metabolizable carbon) to examine whether a more sustainable growth could be obtained. Significant changes in the plant growth and in the leachates composition were observed during 8 weeks of growth. It was concluded that in this time span, the growth of A. capillaris did not affect the composition of the leachates from the pots. Instead, the composition of the leachates was determined by interactions between the bark compost and the mine waste. Best growth of A. capillaris was obtained when alkaline material and mycorrhiza or metabolizable carbon was added to the substrate.

  • 63.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Grandin, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Allard, Bert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Vegetation of historical mine waste from the Ljusnarsberg deposit with Agrostis capillaris: impact on leaching of copper2013In: Reliable mine water technology. Proceedings of the International Mine Water Association Annual Conference 2013, Golden, Colorado, USA, August 6-9, 2013, Golden Co. , 2013, p. 1119-1124Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden there are hundreds of sites that need to be remediated due to high release of metals such as Cu. In order to minimize costs the methods should involve cheap materials and technical solutions. This study focuses on the possibility to establish Agrostis capillaris on sulfidic mine waste, after mixing with 30 % bark compost, and the subsequent release of Cu. Ini- tially the substrate produced leachates with pH 3.5 containing approximately 1 mg/L Cu. After 4 months the pH had increased to 4.5 and up to 80 % of the Cu was retained     

  • 64.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sartz, Lotta
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Release of vanadium from LD-slag by exposure to ARD2010In: Mine water and innovative thinking: proceedings 2010 / [ed] Christian Wolkersdorfer, Antje Freund, Cape Breton University Press , 2010, p. 399-402Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In abatement of acid rock drainage (ARD) slag from the Linz-Donawitz steel making process (LD-slag) provides high neutralizing capacity at low cost. A serious drawback for the use of this by-product is its high content of vanadium, which makes it a potential source of toxic vanadium species. The aim of this work was to determine the most common vanadium species, V(IV) and V(V), leached from LD-slag by artificial ARD. Capillary electrophoresis was employed to quantify the species. From the results an initial dominance of V(V) and increasing abundance of V(IV) with increasing artificial ARD L/s ratio was observed.

  • 65.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Keiter, Steffen
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Metal toxicity: Are we measuring what we want?2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 66.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Tachauer, Heloise
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Grandin, Anna
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Leaching of low-grade black shale for recovery of vanadium, molybdenum and uranium2011In: 25th International Applied Geochemistry Symposium, 22-26 August, 2011, Rovaniemi, Finland / [ed] Pertti Sarala, V. Juhani Ojala, Marja-Leena Porsanger, Vuorimiesyhdistys , 2011, p. 132-133Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 67.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Todd, Kristen
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sartz, Lotta
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Impact of organic carbon in the release of vanadium from LD-slag2011In: Mine water: managing the challenges: proceedings of the International Mine Water Association Congress 2011 / [ed] Trude R.Rüde, Antje Freund, Christian Wolkersdorfer, Aachen: Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule Aachen (RWTH) , 2011, p. 481-484Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 68.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Todd, Kristen
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sartz, Lotta
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Release of vanadium from LD-slag: influence of organic carbon and water saturation2011In: 25th International Applied Geochemistry Symposium, 22-26 August, 2011, Rovaniemi, Finland / [ed] Pertti Sarala, V. Juhani Ojala, Marja-Leena Porsanger, Vuorimiesyhdistys , 2011, p. 132-132Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Zeiner, Michaela
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Mountain pine needles as a bio-monitor of potentially toxic elements in higher elevations2019In: Books of Abstracts, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pine needles are considered useful bio-monitors. Their waxy surface allows them to accumulate various air pollutants. Furthermore, long-term studies are possible, since the needles can reach an age of up to ten years. Mountain pines (Pinus mugo), locally called Latschen, grow amongst others in the Alps in a height of approx. 1000 m to 2200 m. Thus, they seem appropriate specimens to monitor air pollution by potentially toxic elements in higher elevations.

    Needle samples were collected on the northern slopes in the Lower Inn Valley (Tirol, Austria). Different sampling sites were selected between Münster and Innsbruck, the altitude ranging from 1200 m to 2000 m. From each sample tree fresh needles, one-year-old and two and more year old needles were taken. The elemental contents in all samples were determined using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after microwave assisted acid digestion.

    Compared to results for pines needles from lower altitudes, differences were mainly found in the contents of essential macro elements, but less regarding potentially toxic elements, such as Cd, Cu, Cr, Ni, Pb.

  • 70.
    Åhlgren, Kristina
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Leaching of U, V, Ni and Mo from Alum Shale Waste as a Function of Redox and pH - Suggestion for a Leaching method2018In: Mine Water: Risk to Opportunity / [ed] Wolkersdorfer, Ch., Sartz, L., Weber, A., Burgess, J. and Tremblay, G., Pretoria, South Africa: Tshwane University of Technology , 2018, Vol. II, p. 782-787Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alum shale residues in the form of nes and ash were leached at di erent pH and redox conditions. Total concentrations and mineral analysis indicate loss of some elements in burned shale, and redistribution of others. Uranium and nickel were shown to be more leachable from nes than from ashes. Decreased pH favoured leaching of Ni, U and V, whereas increased pH resulted in increased leaching of molybdenum. Redox conditions a ected leaching of Mo and V, but not U and Ni. us the method can be used as an estimate for leaching at di erent redox and pH conditions.

  • 71.
    Åhlgren, Kristina
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sartz, Lotta
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Bergskraft Bergslagen AB, Kumla, Sweden.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Understanding Groundwater composition at Kvarntorp, Sweden, from leaching tests and multivariate statistics2017In: 13th International Mine Water Association Congress – Mine Water & Circular Economy: Proceedings, Volume 2 / [ed] Wolkersdorfer, C.; Sartz, L.; Sillanpää, M.; Häkkinen, A., International Mine Water Association , 2017, p. 770-776Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to oil production from alum shale, the Kvarntorp area is heavily polluted. A waste deposit consisting mostly of shale ash and fines is of important concern. Groundwater shows that parameters such as pH, U, V, Ni and Mo are different at different localities around the deposit. Leaching tests indicate that burned and unburned shale residues leave different signatures on leachates. Principal component analysis of groundwater and leaching tests suggest that ground-water is affected by the waste deposit and that it is more influenced by shale ash than by fines.

  • 72.
    Åhlgren, Kristina
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sjöberg, Viktor
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Sartz, Lotta
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Bergskraft Bergslagen AB, Kumla, Sweden.
    Bäckström, Mattias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Understanding Groundwater Composition at Kvarntorp, Sweden, from Leaching Tests and Multivariate Statistics2017In: Mine Water & Circular Economy / [ed] Wolkersdorfer, C., Sartz, L., Sillanpää, M. and Häkkinen, A, Lappeenranta, Finland: Lappeenranta University of Technology , 2017, Vol. II, p. 770-776Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to oil production from alum shale, the Kvarntorp area is heavily polluted. A waste deposit consisting mostly of shale ash and fines is of important concern. Groundwater shows that parameters such as pH, U, V, Ni and Mo are different at different localities around the deposit. Leaching tests indicate that burned and unburned shale residues leave different signatures on leachates. Principal component analysis of groundwater and leaching tests suggest that ground-water is affected by the waste deposit and that it is more influenced by shale ash than by fines.

12 51 - 72 of 72
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