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  • 51.
    Johansson, Anna
    et al.
    Division of Public Health Sciences, Department of Social Sciences and Environmental Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Denk, Thomas
    Department of Political Science, Åbo Akademi University, Åbo, Finland.
    Svedung, Inge
    Division of Public Health Sciences, Department of Social Sciences and Environmental Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    The typology for allocations of societal risk and safety management tasks at the local governmental level: Framing the current directions in Sweden2009In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 680-685Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The starting point for this article is the need to develop empirical insights about contemporary societal risk and safety management practice and executive structures. In order to facilitate insights about societal risk and safety management in a Scandinavian welfare context we use Sweden and its local governmental level (municipal) as an empirical frame in this paper. The aim for this article is to analyse how a variety of risk and safety management tasks are divided within the Swedish municipalities. The objectives are to frame the current directions for internal allocations of risk and safety issues by providing an empirically based executive typology and to contemplate the implications and future research needs that arise from that management pattern.The analysis is based on statistical analysis of information from a web-survey with chief officials (n = 1283) with responsibilities for different municipal functions and sectors. In this study the responses to one of the survey questions are used for statistical analysis. The analyzed question focused on the degree that the respondents estimated that their administrative sector or function handled a selection of risk and safety management assignments (n = 45). A factor analysis was applied to identify patterns in the dataset. The analysis resulted in an eight factor solution with a high degree of explained variance (74.3%). The results provide an elementary contribution to the understanding of the current societal risks and safety management directions.

  • 52.
    Karlsson, Martin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Denk, Thomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Department of Political Science.
    Åström, Joachim
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Perceptions of organizational culture and value conflicts in information security management2018In: Information and Computer Security, ISSN 2056-4961, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 213-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the occurrence of value conflicts between information security and other organizational values among white-collar workers. Further, analyzes are conducted of the relationship between white-collar workers' perceptions of the culture of their organizations and value conflicts involving information security.

    Design/methodology/approach: Descriptive analyses and regression analyses were conducted on survey data gathered among two samples of white-collar workers in Sweden.

    Findings: Value conflicts regarding information security occur regularly among white-collar workers in the private and public sectors and within different business sectors. Variations in their occurrence can be understood partly as a function of employees' work situations and the sensitivity of the information handled in the organization. Regarding how perceived organizational culture affects the occurrence of value conflicts, multivariate regression analysis reveals that employees who perceive their organizations as having externally oriented, flexible cultures experience value conflicts more often.

    Research limitations/implications: The relatively low share of explained variance in the explanatory models indicates the need to identify alternative explanations of the occurrence of value conflicts regarding information security.

    Practical implications: Information security managers need to recognize that value conflicts occur regularly among white-collar workers in different business sectors, more often among workers in organizations that handle sensitive information, and most often among white-collar workers who perceive the cultures of their organizations as being externally oriented and flexible.

    Originality/value: The study addresses a gap in the information security literature by contributing to the understanding of value conflicts between information security and other organizational values. This study has mapped the occurrence of value conflicts regarding information security among white-collar professionals and shows that the occurrence of value conflicts is associated with work situation, information sensitivity and perceived organizational culture.

  • 53.
    Karlsson, Martin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Department of Political Science.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Åström, Joachim
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Denk, Thomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    The effect of perceived organizational culture on employees’ information security compliance2022In: Information and Computer Security, E-ISSN 2056-4961, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 382-401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This paper aims to investigate the connection between different perceived organizational cultures and information security policy compliance among white-collar workers.

    Design/methodology/approach: The survey using the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument was sent to white-collar workers in Sweden (n = 674), asking about compliance with information security policies. The survey instrument is an operationalization of the Competing Values Framework that distinguishes between four different types of organizational culture: clan, adhocracy,market and bureaucracy.

    Findings: The results indicate that organizational cultures with an internal focus are positively related to employees’ information security policy compliance. Differences in organizational culture with regards to control and flexibility seem to have less effect. The analysis shows that a bureaucratic form of organizational culture is most fruitful for fostering employees’ information security policy compliance.

    Research limitations/implications: The results suggest that differences in organizational culture are important for employees’ information security policy compliance. This justifies further investigating the mechanisms linking organizational culture to information security compliance.

    Practical implications: Practitioners should be aware that the different organizational cultures do matter for employees’ information security compliance. In businesses and the public sector, the authors see a development toward customer orientation and marketization, i.e. the opposite an internal focus, that may have negative ramifications for the information security of organizations.

    Originality/value: Few information security policy compliance studies exist on the consequences of different organizational/information cultures.

  • 54.
    Niels, Nørgaard Kristensen
    et al.
    Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Denk, Thomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Maria, Olsson
    Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Trond, Solhaug
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
    Introduction2022In: Perspectives on Political Awareness: Conceptual, Theoretical and Methodological Issues / [ed] Niels Nørgaard Kristensen; Thomas Denk; Maria Olson; Trond Solhaug, Cham: Springer, 2022, p. 1-12Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, the authors argue for more developed conceptual, theoretical and measurement elaboration of political awareness. They claim that political awareness has relevance in more situations than previous studies have assumed. The chapter gives an overview of the conventional definition and model, which claims the relevance of political awareness for attitude formation. The seminal work of Zaller (The nature and origins of mass opinion, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1992) is in focus for the overview. The authors challenge his definition by introducing a new conceptual framework of political awareness that consists of three dimensions: (a) political attentiveness, (b) political knowledge and (c) political understanding. Furthermore, they present theoretical and methodological contributions from the chapter in the anthology. These contributions introduce new ideas about the significance of political awareness and new ways to explore political awareness with survey items and comparative design.

  • 55.
    Nørgaard Kristensen, Niels
    et al.
    Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Denk, ThomasÖrebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.Olsson, MariaStockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.Solhaug, TrondDepartment of Teacher Education, Faculty of Social and Educational Sciences, NTNU Trondheim, Norway.
    Perspectives on Political Awareness: Conceptual, Theoretical and Methodological Issues2022Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 56.
    Zorell, Carolin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Denk, Thomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Political Consumerism and Interpersonal Discussion Patterns2021In: Scandinavian Political Studies, ISSN 0080-6757, E-ISSN 1467-9477, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 392-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ecological impacts of consumption are well acknowledged, and most people worldwide are likely to have encountered proofs for or information about it. Likewise, online and offline media seem to be full of information on the issue. Even so, large numbers of people are ‘non-political’ consumers, inconsiderate of the ethical and ecological implications of what they buy and consume. Using representative survey data from Sweden collected in 2019, this paper shows that a major reason for non-political consumerism can be seen in the lack of interpersonal ‘recruitment’ efforts; that is, deliberate attempts by some to influence another’s consumption. Moreover, the analyses show that for a person having faced such attempts by others to influence their consumption is distinct from them discussing political consumption issues. With this, the paper also provides one of the first large-N studies confirming recent theoretical propositions of an extended definition of political consumerism: discussion, that is, discursive action, is a sub-form of political consumerism next to boycotting, buycotting, and lifestyle change. Interpersonal influence, in turn, is a key predictor of political consumerism. Altogether, the results suggest that spreading information may feed discursive actions. Yet, to get more people change their consumption choices and engage in political consumerism, what is needed is that people influence each other to do so.

  • 57.
    Åberg, Jenny
    et al.
    Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden .
    Denk, Thomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Diffusion and the choice of democratic government system at the time of democratisation2020In: Zeitschrift für Vergleichende Politikwissenschaft, ISSN 1865-2646, E-ISSN 1865-2654, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 75-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While significant research has been conducted on both the diffusion of democracy and the various democratic government systems (parliamentary, presidential and semi-presidential), the diffusion of individual democratic government systems has rarely been addressed. Therefore, this article examines whether diffusion explains why countries have established different types of government systems at the time of democratisation. Previous studies on democratic regime types have found that the establishment of democratic government systems is spatially and temporally clustered, which could indicate that democratic regime types are diffused. Inspired by diffusion studies, we test the hypothesis that the density of a particular democratic government system in a network positively affects the probability that a country in that network established the same form of democratic government system at the time of democratisation. We test this assumption through empirical analysis, using 121 cases of democratisation in which a democratic system of government was established at the time of independence or after a period of autocracy. Using logistic regression, this paper explores the connection between the choice of government system at the time of democratisation and the composition of democratic government systems in seven networks of countries: geographic neighbourhood, regional, continental, global, cultural, post-colonial and post-autocratic. The results indicate empirical support for our hypothesis; therefore, we conclude that the choice of government system at the time of democratisation is influenced by conditions in other countries.

  • 58.
    Åberg, Jenny
    et al.
    School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Denk, Thomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Semi-presidential Regimes and Subregimes: When, Where and Why?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 59.
    Åberg, Martin
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Denk, Thomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Comparative research designs: Interdependence as a challenge and opportunity in regional studies2019In: Regional economic development and history / [ed] Marijn Molema & Sara Svensson, Abingdon: Routledge, 2019, 1, p. 98-116Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How can social science and historical approaches combine in order to enrich the regional studies theme? This chapter focuses on designs for small-N comparative research, specifically the problem of how to apply systematically structured synchronic and diachronic comparisons as a means to analyze interdependence. We hold that comparative sequence design (CSD) poses an important methodological option in that perspective. In contrast to standard research designs, such as cross-sectional design and development design (“historical case studies”), CSD allows for both systematic (i) cross-unit and cross-case comparisons as well as (ii) within-unit analyses. It (iii) opens up for the use of process-oriented models with a focus on explaining developmental outcomes among sub-national level units, and thereby (iv) facilitates analysis of both spatial, temporal and temporal-spatial interdependence among sub-national level units (regions). CSD provides a tool for examining e.g. policy-making and policy diffusion as dynamic, historically contingent processes; and, from the perspective of the historical disciplines, allows analysts to move beyond the limits of traditional case studies of regions and localities.

  • 60.
    Åberg, Martin
    et al.
    Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Denk, Thomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Democratization and Secularization: Towards a Process-Oriented Model2017In: Politics, Religion & Ideology, ISSN 2156-7689, E-ISSN 2156-7697, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 175-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of secularization remains underdeveloped in theoretical studies of democratization. We hold that the relation between the two processes is difficult to analyse by help of standard, cross-sectional analysis. We therefore propose a process-oriented model of democratization in relation to secularization. We suggest that these processes do not unfold in random patterns. Theoretically they follow one of four distinct paths: democratization may precede secularization, secularization may precede democratization, democratization may occur without secularization, and democratization and secularization may occur as parallel processes. The contrasts between our model and cross-sectional analysis become particularly obvious when the first and the fourth paths are considered in historical perspective: secularism (as an independent variable) is in both cases positively correlated with democracy (the dependent variable), even though these processes are reversed temporally (path one), or even occur simultaneously (path four). The model therefore demonstrates the need for further research on the relation between democratization and secularization. This includes the problem of why certain states tend to follow certain paths; whether countries may shift between paths; the problem of democratic consolidation; the role of state-formation to secularization and democratization; and the contextual dependence of the model, including the relation between institutions and values/behaviour.

  • 61.
    Åström, Joachim
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Denk, Thomas
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Generationslarmet2017In: Larmar och gör sig till: SOM-undersökningen 2016 / [ed] Andersson, Ulrika; Ohlsson, Jonas; Oscarsson, Henrik; Oskarson, Maria, Göteborg: SOM-institutet , 2017, p. 155-168Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Finns det ökade motsättningar mellan äldre och yngre i Sverige? Andelen äldre i Sverige ökar med högre kostnader för vård, omsorg och pensioner som följd. Denna utveckling förutsätter att mer resurser omfördelas mellan generationer, vilket kan förväntas öka motsättningarna mellan äldre och yngre. Med detta som bakgrund undersöker kapitlet om människor upplever att motsättningar mellan äldre och yngre ökar i Sverige. Resultaten visar att 32 procent upplever ökade motsättningar mellan generationer, medan 24 procent inte anser att motsättningar ökar. Andelen som upp-lever ökade motsättningar är högre bland lågutbildade än högutbildade. Även personer som anser att allt mindre resurser går till att tillgodose äldres behov upplever i större utsträckning att motsättningarna ökar. Kapitlet visar också att upplevelsen av ökade motsättningar mellan äldre och yngre är oförändrad sedan 2001. Den sammantagna bilden är att Sverige inte präglas av intensiva motsättningar mellan generationer som formar grunden för politiska konfliktlinjer mellan äldre och yngre.

12 51 - 61 of 61
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