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  • 1.
    Avdic, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Eklund, Anders
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Searching reference databases: what students experience and what teachers believe that students experience2010In: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, ISSN 0961-0006, E-ISSN 1741-6477, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 224-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Internet has made it possible for students to access a vast amount of high quality references when writing papers. Yet research has shown that the use of reference databases is poor and the quality of student papers is consequently often below expectation. The objective of this paper is twofold. First, it aims to describe the problems students experience when they search information using a university reference database. Second it aims to compare the perspective of students on the problems with that of their teachers. As basis for the study we have used the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) model. A web-based survey was carried out. A total of 150 students at Örebro University in Sweden participated in the survey. The results have been analysed by comparison of median values. Results show that students experience problems mostly in the category of efforts expectancy. Differences between the two groups are most significant in the category of effort expectancy and students’ patience in searching. Teachers are more pessimistic about students’ capacity in information searching than the students themselves.

  • 2.
    Danielsen, Marie
    et al.
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Hansson, Birgitta
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Nya studerandegrupper - nya utmaningar2004In: Tidskrift för dokumentation, ISSN 0040-6872, no 3, p. 82-86Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Danielsen, Marie
    et al.
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Torhell, Catta
    Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö, Sweden.
    Från bokbärare till digitala tyngdlyftare2015In: Bokbärare: Biblioteket, bokhandeln och antikvariatet / [ed] Camilla Smedberg, Peter Ullgren, Bengt Erik Eriksson, Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag, 2015, p. 100-104Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Eriksson, Göran
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Why study media talk?2014In: SemiotiX, ISSN 1916-7296, Vol. 12, no 1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Eriksson, Göran
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Örebro University, University Library.
    Ekström, Mats
    Göteborgs universitet, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Press Conferences2018In: The Routledge handbook of language and politics / [ed] Ruth Wodak and Bernhard Forchtner, Abingdon: Routledge, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Hansson, Birgitta
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Handledning: ett biblioteksperspektiv2009In: Pedagogiskt arbete i teori och praktik: om bibliotekens roll för studenters och doktoranders lärande / [ed] Birgitta Hansson, Anna Lyngfelt, Lund: Btj , 2009, 1, p. 155-176Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Hansson, Birgitta
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Pedagogisk meritportfölj för bibliotekarier2009In: Pedagogisk arbete i teori och praktik: om bibliotekens roll för studenters och doktoranders lärande / [ed] Birgitta Hansson, Anna Lyngfelt, Lund: Btj , 2009, 1, p. 240-256Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Hansson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Lyngfelt, Anna
    Pedagogiskt arbete i teori och praktik: om bibliotekens roll för studenters och doktoranders lärande2009Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Hansson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Norr, Monica
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Riis, Peder
    Örebro University, School of Music, Theatre and Art.
    Multimedia: så här gjorde vi för att presentera Högskolans nya bibliotek i Örebro!1997In: Biblioteksbladet, ISSN 1651-5447, no 6, p. 29-31Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Norr, Monica
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Orebro university library: nova univerzitetna knjižnica na Švedskem2001In: Knjižničarske novice, ISSN 0353-9237, no 1/2, p. 23-26Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Tapper, Marie
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Addressing the affective domain in doctoral writing2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cognitive aspect of Bloom’s taxonomy is the aspect that primarily has been focused on in the few studies of the writing development of doctoral students that have been made to date (Burford, 2017; Lea & Street, 1998; Lillis & Curry, 2006). The process of becoming a full-fledged academic writer also includes Bloom’s two other domains, the affective and the psychomotor, but these have been less frequently addressed in the literature (Burford, 2017; Habibe, 2015; Hadjioaunnu, Shelton, Fu, & Dhanarattigannon, 2007). The importance of including the emotional aspects of writing in pedagogical practices that support the development of scholarly writing has, however, been noted (Cotterall, 2011; Wellington, 2010).

    Cotterall (2011) argues that both knowledge production and identity formation are features of doctoral education, and that doctoral writing is “the means by which doctoral students’ claims to scholarly identity are tested”. Thus, in order for doctoral students to become successful scholarly writers, they need not only to master their discipline’s genre specific writing style and rhetorical requirements, but also need to develop their own writing persona which functions to express a sense of personal identity in their writing.

    According to Wellington (2010), there are three main areas where doctoral writers may encounter emotional difficulties in their writing: getting started, handling their unfamiliarity with the “rules of the game”, and emotionally managing receiving feedback, all three of which are addressed in the doctoral writing course Academic Writing, step 1, offered by the Academic Writing Centre at Örebro University. The course has a genre-pedagogical foundation (Swales, 1990, 2004; Swales & Feak, 2012) and focuses on the identification of rhetorical patterns, but also includes peer response techniques, and writing strategies and processes, in order to address the three areas that Wellington (2010) mentions.

    The learning outcomes of the course are: 

    Knowledge and understanding

    • Identify rhetorical patterns for academic texts from participant’s field of research
    • Identify the characteristics of academic writing

    Proficiency and ability

    • Apply basic genre analysis for future academic writing projects
    • Use typical features of academic writing
    • Provide informed peer-response feedback
    • Reflect on writing as a process and self-assess areas of academic writing that require particular focus and improvement

    The affective domain of writing is addressed by assigning chapters from Becker (2007) which deal with writing strategies, persona and authority, and risk taking. In writing logs, the doctoral students then express their feelings after reading Becker, and also reflect on their own writing strategies, and experience of giving and receiving peer review during the course.

    The course has been held 6 times since its inception in the spring term of 2016 and 66 doctoral students from 22 disciplines have completed the course. The material used in this study is writing logs from 33 course participants, and the results are presented from the point of view of Wellington’s (2010) three main areas of emotional difficulties. The results indicate that the pedagogical considerations taken have indeed served to facilitate the overcoming of these three potential emotional obstacles. 

    References

    Becker, H. (2007). Writing for social scientists. How to start and finish your thesis, book, or article (2. ed.). Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

    Burford, J. (2017). Conceptualising doctoral writing as an affective-political practice. International Journal of Doctoral Studies, 12, 17-32. http://www.informingscience.org/Publications/3689

    Cotterall, S. (2011). Doctoral students writing: Where's the pedagogy? Teaching in Higher Education, 16(4), 413-425. doi:10.1080/13562517.2011.560381

    Habibe, P. (2015). An investigation into writing for scholarly publication by novice scholars: Practices of Canadian anglophone doctoral students. Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository. 3281. https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/3281

    Hadjioaunnu, X., Shelton, N., Fu, D., & Dhanarattigannon, J. (2007). The road to a doctoral degree: co-travelers through a perilous passage. College Student Journal, 41(1). 160-177. http://go.galegroup.com/ps/anonymous?id=GALE%7CA161282240&sid=googleScholar&v=2.1&it=r&linkaccess=fulltext&issn=01463934&p=AONE&sw=w&authCount=1&isAnonymousEntry=true

    Lea, M. & Street, B. (1998). Student writing in higher education: An academic literacies approach. Studies in Higher Education 23(2), 157-172.

    Lillis, T. & Curry, M. (2006) Reframing notions of competence in scholarly writing: From individual to networked activity. Revista Canaria de Estudios Ingleses 51, 63-78.

    Swales, J. (1990). Genre analysis: English in academic and research settings. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Swales, J. (2004). Research genres: Explorations and applications. New York: Cambridge University Press.

    Swales, J. & Feak, C. (2012). Academic writing for graduate students. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

    Wellington, J. (2010). More than a matter of cognition: An explorations of the affective writing problems of post-graduate students and their possible solutions. Teaching in Higher Education, 15(2), 135-15

     

  • 12.
    Tapper, Marie
    et al.
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Hadziefendic, Jasmina
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Nilsson, Dana
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Att sätta ord på lärares tysta språkkunskaper – ett sätt att både underlätta och höja kvaliteten på uppsatshandledning2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den senaste medarbetarundersökningen på Örebro universitet visade att lärare lägger alltmer tid på extra stöd till enskilda studenter som har svårt att skriva akademiskt, vilket speglar att studenters förkunskaper inte alltid motsvarar universitetets/ämnets krav på akademiskt skrivande (Dyste, Herzberg & Hoel, 2011; Lindgren, 2005; Ask, 2005, 2007; Bergström, 2007; Blűckert, 2010). Mötet med akademin innebär mötet med en helt ny diskurs och i litteraturen talar man ibland om en diskurschock när nya studenter möter skrivande inom akademin (Ask, 2007, 2013). En del studenter saknar kunskap om universitetets textgenrer, har en sämre skrivförmåga än tidigare studentgrupper och sämre uttrycksförmåga, ordförståelse och läsförmåga/läsförståelse (Pecorari, Shaw, Irvine, Malmström & Mežek, 2012). Också spridningen mellan studenter har ökat och de svagare skribenterna har blivit fler (Bergström, 2007). Dessutom har de inte alltid verktyg för att snabbt kunna ta igen de kunskaper om skrivande som de saknar (Ask, 2013; Pecorari et al., 2012).

    Utifrån ett lärarperspektiv framgår det att lärare inte alltid har ett tillräckligt medvetet förhållande till sitt skrivande och att många också känner att de saknar metaspråket för att kunna resonera kring språk och stil i studenttexter (Brorsson & Ekberg, 2012; Blűckert, 2010). Trots att de är erfarna skribenter av facktexter har de ofta endast en implicit kompetens i skrivande (Handal & Lauvås, 2008).

    Forskningen om akademiskt skrivande lyfter fram handledning som den kanske viktigaste framgångsfaktorn bakom uppsatser och handledning ses som avgörande också för studenters skrivutveckling (Blåsjö, 2010; Eriksson, 2014). Om lärare ska kunna utveckla sina studenters skrivkompetens behöver de kunna beskriva och förklara det de ser i texterna så att studenterna förstår och därför blir det problematiskt ur ett pedagogiskt perspektiv att inte kunna förmedla textnormerna i klartext (Handal, & Lauvås, 2008).

    För att hjälpa lärare att medvetandegöra sin kunskap om akademisk skrivande har Enheten för universitetspedagogik, IKT och lärande (PIL) tillsammans med Akademisk skrivcentrum (ASC) tagit fram en kurs för uppsatshandledare vars syfte är att ge kursdeltagarna en ökad medvetenhet om handledning av studentuppsatser och ett gemensamt underlag för studentuppsatsen som läraktivitet, samt för dess mål och examination, genom att gemensamt formulera en handledarguide eller handledningschecklista. Kursen behandlar även olika språkliga verktyg för att utveckla deltagarnas förmåga att ge respons på struktur, språk och stil i studentuppsatser.

    Resultatet efter två kursomgångar pekar på att lärare efter genomgången kurs har fått ett nytt perspektiv på sin handledarroll:

     ”Jag måste ha en egen tydlig struktur hur jag som handledare ser och granskar texten från studenten.”

     ”Språket behöver arbete.” 

    och fått syn på den kunskap de redan besitter:

     ”Fått förklaringar och ord på ’tyst kunskap’ kring skrivande och skrivregler.”

      ”Fått många begrepp som sätter ord på mina intuitiva språkkunskaper och kunskaper om skrivandet.”

    I denna presentation beskrivs kursupplägg och resultat från kursutvärderingar mer utförligt.  

    Referenser

    Ask, S. (2005). Akademisk skriftspråkskompetens i praktiken. I: Lindgren, M. (red.) Den skrivande studenten. Idéer, erfarenheter och forskning från Textverkstaden vid Växjö universitet. (Rapporter från Växjö universitet, Humaniora 15/2005.) Växjö: Växjö universitet, s. 93-105.

    Ask, S. (2007). Vägar till ett akademiskt skriftspråk. Diss. Acta Wexionensia, Humaniora 115/2007. Växjö: Växjö University Press.

    Ask, S. (2013). Skrivande studenter – problem och möjligheter. Föreläsning vid Studie- och språkverkstädernas nätverkskonferens, Stockholm, Stockholms universitet. 2013-11-14.

    Bergström, A. (2007).  Två olika ämnen? Svenska språket på gymnasiet och på högskolan. MISS 1102-4518; 59. Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet.

    Blűckert, A. (2010). Juridiska – ett nytt språk? En studie av juridikstudenternas språkliga inskolning. Diss. Skrifter utgivna av Institutionen för nordiska språk 79. Uppsala: Uppsala universitet.

    Blåsjö, M. (2010). Skrivteori och skrivforskning. En forskningsöversikt. 2 uppl. MINS 56. Stockholms universitet: Institutionen för nordiska språk.

    Brorsson, B. & Ekberg, K. (2012). Uppsatshandledning och skrivutveckling i högre utbildning – Om det självständiga arbetet och skrivande i alla ämnen. Stockholm: Liber.

    Dyste, O., Herzberg, F. & Hoel, T. L. (2011). Skriva för att lära. Skrivande i högre utbildning. 2 uppl. Lund: Studentlitteratur.

    Eriksson, A.-M. (2014). Formulating knowledge: engaging with issues of sustainable develop-ment through academic writing in engineering education. Diss. Gothenburg studies in educational sciences, 357. Göteborgs univ.: Institution för pedagogik, kommunikation och lärande.

    Handal, G. & Lauvås, P. (2008). Forskarhandledaren. Lund: Studentlitteratur.

    Lindgren, M. (red.) (2005). Den skrivande studenten. Idéer, erfarenheter och forskning från Textverkstaden vid Växjö universitet. (Rapporter från Växjö universitet, Humaniora 15/2005.) Växjö: Växjö universitet.

    Pecorari, D., Shaw, P., Irvine, A., Malmström, H. & Mežek, S. (2012). Reading in tertiary education: undergraduate student practices and attitudes, Quality in Higher Education, 18(2), 235-256, DOI: 10.1080/13538322.2012.706464

  • 13.
    Ternebrandt, Göran
    et al.
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Göran-Rodell, Annika
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Konst- och designbiblioteket i Grythyttan2013In: GUIDE till Årets Svenska Måltidslitteratur 2013 / [ed] Carl Jan Granqvist, Birgit Hemberg, Christina Möller, Dick Norberg, Barbro Stanley, Karsten Thurfjell, Ann Häppich, Grythyttan: Måltidsakademiens förlag i Grythyttan AB , 2013, p. 38-39Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Vimefall, Elin
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Hultkrantz, Lars
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Olofsson, Sara
    Swedish Institute for Health Economics, Lund, Sweden.
    Persson, Mattias
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Willingness to pay for suicidal prevention2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: In 1997 the Swedish Parliament decided on a “vision zero” long-term target for reduction of fatalities and severe injuries caused by traffic accidents. In 2008 a similar zero vision was adopted for suicides. While the former decision has been very successful, resulted in a slimming of the number of traffic fatalities by close to a half percentages, the number of suicides has been more or less constant since the latter decision was made. A possible explanation could be that the general public, and therefore also the many people that need to be involved to accomplish a broad and ambitious target of this kind, give less priority to the reduction of death that is in some sense caused by voluntary action than death brought about by an accident. The objective of this study is to compare the valuation of statistical life (VSL) of a representative sample of Swedish adult residents in traffic accident and suicide prevention contexts.

    Method: We make within-sample comparisons of responses to a pair of consecutive contingent-valuation WTP questions to a web panel of 800 individuals in the age of 18-80. The respondent are asked to state their WTP for interventions that are expected to save 100 (200) lives by prevention of traffic accidents or suicides, respectively. Respondents are also asked whether they think it is more important to reduce the number of deaths due to traffic accidents or due to suicides.

    Results: 68 percent state that they think it is equally important to save lives by prevention of suicides as by traffic accidents. For 18 percent suicide prevention is more important and for 13 percent reduction of traffic safety is more important. The same picture emerges from the WTP responses. 35 percent state equal WTP values and the differences between the average VSL are not statistically significant (preliminary results).

    Discussion: This finding indicates that the same VSL should be used in both areas, implying that funds for prevention of fatalities should be directed to the area with the lowest cost per saved life. To our knowledge the only previous studies on WTP for suicide prevention are Sueki (2015, 2016) that reported a lower average WTP to reduce mortality risk from suicide than from reducing mortality from other causes. However, these studies were framed within a private good context, which is problematic in the specific case of suicide since the respondent has to think of herself as a current “planner” restricting herself future “doer”. In our study, we therefore frame both kind of prevention measures as public goods, which avoids this cognitive task and also can be related to quite commonly made economic trade-offs in budget planning by state and local governments, traffic administrations, hospital boards, etc.

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