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  • 1.
    Brandt, Daniel
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Geografiska perspektiv på den moderna statens organisering2010Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    There and back again?: Dutch lifestyle migrants moving to rural Sweden in the early 21st century.2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis has a twofold aim. First, it studies motivations and decision processes of Dutch families moving to rural Sweden, with a focus on Hällefors municipality in the Bergslagen area. Second, it explores how this migration flow can be conceptualised within migration theory. The results of the study are presented in four papers.

    The migrants’ characteristics are explored using variables from the Bergslagen Database. This is complemented with data from interviews with municipality officials, project leaders and Dutch families in rural Sweden.The theoretical framework consists of literature on counterurbanisation, the creative class thesis and lifestyle migration. The creative class thesis has inspired many rural place marketing projects and efforts to attract the ‘right type’ of people to stimulate rural development. Based on the interview study, I argue that lifestyle migration research offers most apt insights into the act of migration within the wider life trajectories of these Dutch families.

    The thesis offers new empirical data that suggest amendments to be made to the academic definition of lifestyle migration. Additional contributions consider the novel geographic direction of the migration flow (northwards), the destination (a deprived area) and the structure framing the decision process; a local authority and its deliberate attempts to attract new residents from abroad. The findings suggest transcending four binaries. First, in the context of an integrating EU, the thesis adds international dimensions to the initial story of internal counterurbanisation. Second, these flexibly mobile families transcend and combine issues of urbanity and rurality through access- facilitating technology and cheap means of long distance transport. Third, this study reiterates the importance of production as a complement to consumption in lifestyle migration research. Finally, the thesis adds dynamic issues of transience to the static permanent-temporary binary of migration.

    List of papers
    1. Exploring Dutch migration to rural Sweden: international counterurbanisation in the EU
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring Dutch migration to rural Sweden: international counterurbanisation in the EU
    2012 (English)In: Tijdschrift voor economische en sociale geografie, ISSN 0040-747X, E-ISSN 1467-9663, Vol. 103, no 3, p. 330-346Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores whether the concept of counterurbanisation, expanded with an international dimension, offers a valuable framework for understanding recent migration flows from the Netherlands to Sweden. Using a geo-referenced database comprising demographic and socio-economic variables, the post-migration employment status, employment sector and settlement location of Dutch migrants in Central Sweden are analysed. In addition, results from observation, interviews and a survey during emigration fairs are employed to describe the motives for migration from the Netherlands to Central Sweden. We argue that counterurbanisation is not an exhausted research topic, when international political, economic and socio-cultural factors are added to the study.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2012
    Keywords
    international counterurbanisation, Central Sweden, database, interviews, Dutch migration
    National Category
    Human Geography
    Research subject
    Social and Economic Geography
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-24185 (URN)10.1111/j.1467-9663.2011.00696.x (DOI)000305124000005 ()
    Available from: 2012-08-01 Created: 2012-08-01 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
    2. Promoting Swedish countryside in the Netherlands: International rural place marketing to attract new residents
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Promoting Swedish countryside in the Netherlands: International rural place marketing to attract new residents
    2015 (English)In: European Urban and Regional Studies, ISSN 0969-7764, E-ISSN 1461-7145, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 398-415Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Urban-to-rural consumption-led mobility contributes to restructuring stagnating rural areas in Europe. Against this background, this article explores international rural place-marketing efforts by Swedish municipalities towards affluent western European migrants, exemplified by campaigns in the Netherlands. The analysis is based on the concepts of rural place marketing and lifestyle migration. Research methods employed in this article are observation and a survey during migration information meetings, followed by interviews with both stakeholders and migrants. The results suggest that rural municipalities with less favourable or unfavourable geographic conditions are the most actively engaged in international place-marketing efforts. Participation in migration information meetings and the Internet are the most commonly used communication strategies. The engaged municipalities are selective in their consideration of target groups. Attracting even a few of the ‘right type’ of migrants (i.e. families and entrepreneurs from affluent countries) over the course of some years contributes considerably to maintaining a small municipality’s population and economic viability. However, although stakeholders claim that the marketing efforts have been effective and statistics point out that the number of Dutch migrants has increased, it is hard to distinguish the effect of rural place-marketing campaigns from the myriad possibilities for migrants to gather information about potential destination areas. Therefore, regional policy makers may consider shifting their focus to actively receiving potential migrants who are in the final stage of their decision process.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Sage Publications, 2015
    Keywords
    Demographic shrinkage, interviews, rural idyll, rural place marketing, Sweden
    National Category
    Human Geography
    Research subject
    Social and Economic Geography
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-29074 (URN)10.1177/0969776413481370 (DOI)000362330300005 ()2-s2.0-84942795313 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agency:

    Swedish Society for Anthropology and Geography (SSAG)

    Available from: 2013-05-20 Created: 2013-05-20 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    3. Lifestyle migration to the North: Dutch families and the decision to move to rural Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lifestyle migration to the North: Dutch families and the decision to move to rural Sweden
    2015 (English)In: Population, Space and Place, ISSN 1544-8444, E-ISSN 1544-8452, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 68-85Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Lifestyle migration is part of an ongoing quest for a better way of life. More or less affluent migrants moving to a destination with a perceived better climate are studied in the context of social rather than economic motivations. This paper focuses on Dutch families and their decision to move to the rural municipality of Hällefors in the Bergslagen area, Sweden. Such a Nordic destination, actively attracting migrants, has not previously been investigated in the context of lifestyle migration. The purpose of the paper is to examine what factors contribute to the decision to move. The research questions are the following: what are the socio-demographic characteristics of the migrating families? What meanings do the migrants attach to their work environments and places of residence prior to moving? What motivations and expectations have shaped the decision to move? These questions are addressed through an interview study. Results show that the adult family members were mainly born in the late 1950s or in the 1960s. The children were born in the 1990s and early 21st century. According to most respondents, effects of overpopulation and rapid urbanisation, both felt on the work floor and in the living environment, became a serious trigger to leave the Netherlands. Differences between the families consider the character of occupations (within or outside the creative industries) and the length of the decision process. In contrast to some other lifestyle migrant populations, families in this study considered returning as part of their ongoing quest.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2015
    Keywords
    lifestyle migration; Dutch migration; rural Sweden; interview study; decision process
    National Category
    Human Geography
    Research subject
    Social and Economic Geography
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-30168 (URN)10.1002/psp.1807 (DOI)000347706100005 ()
    Available from: 2013-08-12 Created: 2013-08-12 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    4. “I Felt Confined”: narratives of ambivalence among Dutch lifestyle migrants in rural Sweden
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>“I Felt Confined”: narratives of ambivalence among Dutch lifestyle migrants in rural Sweden
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the context of lifestyle migration, this chapter describes and analyses the motives of a group of affluent Western migrants in the rural Swedish municipality of Hällefors...

    ...The Dutch seem to prefer rural and sparsely populated areas over urban areas (Eimermann et al. 2012).Against this background, the study at hand focuses in particular on one rural Swedish municipality: Hällefors. The aim of this chapter is to examine the migration process of Dutch lifestyle migrants in Hällefors and their ambivalent attitudes towards returning, and thereby to give voice to the hope, pain, nostalgia, and triumph of lives lived in other places (King et al.1995). Consequently, the empirical question is as follows: “After migrating to Hällefors, what influences the Dutch households’ attitude towards returning?” This question is addressed through narratives of Dutch migrant households, gathered during fieldwork in 2011.

    National Category
    Human Geography
    Research subject
    Social and Economic Geography
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-32231 (URN)
    Note

    This paper is published http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-100686

    The fieldwork for this study was funded by the Swedish Society forAnthropology and Geography (SSAG; Svenska Sällskapet för Antropologi och Geografi). Iam grateful for the hospitality and enthusiasm of the migrants who participated in this study.Many thanks go to commentators on previous drafts, especially to Associate Professor IreneMolina (Uppsala University).

    Available from: 2013-11-04 Created: 2013-11-04 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
  • 3.
    Ghotbi, Ramis
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Stadsplanering i vems tjänst?: En studie om maktfördelningen mellan politiker-stadsplanerare och byggaktörer i bostadsbebyggelse2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 4.
    Gustavsson, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Mellan det lokala och det globala: klimat, kommuner, nätverk2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Between the local and the global: climate, local governments, networks

    The notion of an ongoing global warming is shared by a large number of researchers and decision-makers around the world. Through the act of signing the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change a majority of the world's naitons have accepted the idea of human induced climate change, and to develop national climate change mitigation programmes. The Kyoto protocol later quantified the commitments made by the nations.

    The issue of climate change has become a political issue of its own. In the European Union as well as in Sweden and other nations, climate mitigation goals, programmes and strategies are developed. This is also the situation on the local level, for example in Swedish municipalities, which is the context of this study. Local goverment is an important actor in climate mitigation, both as a political organization in its own right and as an arena involving actors from different sectors in society. Climate change mitigation measures conducted by local governments re partly shaped by national grant programmes. The study shows, however, that the local context - the palce - with its natural prerequisites, economic structures and composition of actors, is just as decisive for how the local climate policies are developed and implemented. It also shows that although responsibility for the environment is an important driving force in local climate mitigation there are at least two other dirving forces; local and regional development and the symbolic valute of being in the forefront of climate change mitigation.

    Another arena where actors in climate change mitigation meet is the network. Together wiht actors from different sectors and levels many municipalities participate in various networks, with local to global extension. The fact that the netsorks like climate change in inself transcends political and administrative borders, is alsö addressed theoretically in the study, focusing upon the concepts of re-scaling, multilevel governance and network governance, which constitute the theoretichal fram of the thesis.

  • 5.
    Hedfeldt, Mona
    Örebro University, Department of Social and Political Sciences.
    Företagande kvinnor i bruksort: arbetsliv och vardagsliv i samspel2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Bergslagen region in Sweden has a history of iron and steel production, and in the small industrial towns in the region, one large employer has often held a strong position. Although the region has gone through structural change since the 1970’s, in previous research, becoming self-employed is perceived of as difficult, since it implies going against a strong working culture. The image of Bergslagen is that of a non-entrepreneurial region. Furthermore, in previous research, the gender contract in the region is characterized as traditional.

    In this thesis light is shed on women in the region who are self-employed. Topics that are focused on are work experience, role models, family situation and networks. The study builds on qualitative interviews and longitudinal registry based statistics (1993-2003). The interviews were carried out in the municipalities of Norberg and Fagersta with self-employed women in the fields of health and business services.

    Conclusions drawn concern both the region Bergslagen as an entrepreneurial region and the lives of self-employed women. The situations and conditions under which women become and remain self-employed displays a complex interaction between different areas of life, both in relation to the start-up phase and the subsequent running of their businesses.

    The idea of the region as non-entrepreneurial is scrutinized. For one, the share of self-employed in the Bergslagen municipalities only differs among men, compared to the national average. The share of self-employed women in the region, however, is similar to the national average. Furthermore, the share of self-employed men and women varies among the municipalities within the region. Thus, it is problematic to speak of the region as non-entrepreneurial and as homogenous when it comes to self-employment and entrepreneurship. These findings indicate that the idea of the region as non-entrepreneurial is an expression of both the region being male coded and women entrepreneurs being subordinated.

  • 6.
    Jakobsson, Max
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Från industrier till upplevelser: en studie av symbolisk och materiell omvandling i Bergslagen2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In old industrial regions traces from historical mining and production of iron and steel have become a valuable resource in developing a tourism industry and other experience-oriented industries in the post-industrial society. The so called Experience Industry became a buzz-word in regional development programs during the 2000´s.

    The region of Bergslagen in the middle of Sweden is a good example of this structural change in economy which has been going on since the crisis of the steel industry in the middle of the 1970´s. In the 1980’s, the region was seen as one of the most depressed areas in Sweden, together with the sparsely populated north. Because of that, cultural heritage has been promoted to strengthen regional identity in Bergslagen.

    Strengthening regional identity is still a matter in regional development in the region, but today efforts are more concentrated on commercial use and packaging of heritage as experience in order to create an attractive image of Bergslagen. Statistical data shows that the regional labour market is changing. During the 1990s and early 2000s employment in the Experience Economy in Bergslagen has increased by almost 30 percent. The emerging labour force is in many ways different from the traditional patterns on the regional labour market. Traditionally marginalized group, such as women, young people and immigrants are well represented. But they are often low educated, low paid and part-time employed. On the other hand we also find a growing well educated and well paid group of employees. They are often in-migrants or commuters from places outside the region.

    Campaigns to promote Experience Industries on the local level are common in many places in the region. Local campaigns tend to focus on tourism and the commercial use of the typical industrial heritage associated with Bergslagen. However, the regional identity is often considered a problem due to the negative image of Bergslagen which where formed after the crisis for the steel industry. Although there is a tendency towards a more positive approach to Bergslagen, developers and politicians often still claim that they rather use other local and regional identities in place marketing than being a place in Bergslagen.

  • 7.
    Möller, Peter
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Young adults in rural tourism areas2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examines how tourism affects conditions for young adults in rural areas. Such a study lies at the intersection of research about tourism impacts, adult transition, and rural areas. The aim is to examine how largescale tourism affects the opportunities for young adults living in rural areas; their perception of place and the perceived opportunities and obstacles that tourism provides.

    The thesis utilizes a mixed method approach. A quantitative study based on micro-data on individuals identifies the patterns and magnitudes of the mechanisms by which tourism affects population change among young adults. Interview methods are used in the case study area, Sälen, to investigate these mechanisms in depth. Finally, the rural–urban dichotomy is explored in a conceptual study that asks how tourism affects the perception of a local village as either rural or urban. Young inhabitants in rural areas are rarely considered in tourism research; therefore, the main contribution of this thesis is that it illuminates how tourism affects conditions for young adults in rural areas.

    The thesis reveals a substantial impact on the adult transition, mainly due to easier access to the labor market and a good supply of jobs during the high season. Further, the large number of people passing through creates flows of opportunities to make friends, get a job, or just meet people. All of these factors contribute to high mobility in these places, and to the perception of them as places where things happen. The high mobility in Sälen implies that fixed migrant categories (such as stayers and leavers) are largely insufficient. The tourism environment creates a space that is always under construction and continually producing new social relations mainly perceived as opportunities. Conceptualizing this as a modern rurality is a way to move beyond the often implicit notions of urban as modern and rural as traditional.

    List of papers
    1. Young Adult Transition in a Tourism Dominated Rural Area
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Young Adult Transition in a Tourism Dominated Rural Area
    2012 (English)In: Tourism Planning & Development, ISSN 2156-8316, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 429-440Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Rural peripheral areas generally have an ageing and declining population, few possibilities for education, limited labour market opportunities, and a net loss of young adults. However, some peripheral rural areas hosting large-scale tourism industry has faced a different development. But despite the fact that the loss of young adults is important for the development of these areas, the adult transition in a tourism context has not been so well addressed. In this paper the adult transition in Sälen, a large-scale winter tourism destination, is explored. The analysis is based on life history interviews with focus on how young adults experience the ability to make a living (year-round) in the tourism-dominated area. The way in which they perceive their current and possible future life in Sälen is important when they make decisions about how and where to shape their futures. The findings imply that the flows of people passing through Sälen, as tourists and young seasonal workers, are important both socially and economically for the young adult inhabitants, which in turn contributes to a more secure adult transition and to Sälen's attractiveness among young adults.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Routledge, 2012
    Keywords
    young adults, adult transition, rural, tourism, life history interviews
    National Category
    Human Geography
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-50106 (URN)10.1080/21568316.2012.726260 (DOI)2-s2.0-84867554932 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2012-11-08 Created: 2016-05-03 Last updated: 2018-05-14Bibliographically approved
    2. Young adults’ perceptions of and affective bonds to a rural tourism community
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Young adults’ perceptions of and affective bonds to a rural tourism community
    2016 (English)In: Fennia, ISSN 0015-0010, Vol. 194, no 1, p. 32-45Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Many rural areas, in Sweden and worldwide, experience population decline where the young leave for education and work in urban areas. Employment has declined in several rural industries, such as agriculture, forestry, and fishing, while growing in other industries are often located in urban areas. Politicians and organizations have put much hope in tourism as a tool of rural development, but can tourism help reverse the rural out-migration trend among young adults? This paper explores how tourism affects young inhabitants’ perceptions of and affective bonds to a rural area in Sweden, the ski resort of Sälen. Students from the 1993–1995 elementary school graduating classes were interviewed about their migration history, childhood, and view of and ties to Sälen. The respondents experience that tourism contributes to a more vital community incorporating influences from elsewhere, but without eliminating the positive aspects of rural life. The regular flow of people – tourists, seasonal workers, and entrepreneurs – passing through Sälen presents opportunities to extend one’s social network that are widely appreciated by respondents. The high in and out mobility constitutes a key part of Sälen’s character. Contributions from tourism – such as employment, entertainment, leisure, and opportunities to forge new social relationships – are available during the adult transition, the life phase when rural areas are often perceived as least attractive. Even though out-migration occurs in Sälen, and some respondents still find Sälen too small, tourism has clearly increased the available opportunities and contributed significantly to making Sälen more attractive to young adults.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Suomen Maantieteellinen Seura, 2016
    Keywords
    young adults, tourism, rural development, out-migration
    National Category
    Human Geography
    Research subject
    Social and Economic Geography
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-50107 (URN)10.11143/46308 (DOI)000372741400004 ()
    Available from: 2016-05-03 Created: 2016-05-03 Last updated: 2018-07-10Bibliographically approved
    3. Can Tourism Reduce the Negative Out-Migration Trend of Rural Young Adults?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can Tourism Reduce the Negative Out-Migration Trend of Rural Young Adults?
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Human Geography
    Research subject
    Social and Economic Geography
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-50108 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-05-04 Created: 2016-05-03 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
    4. Urbanity and Rurality in a Tourism Context: Exploring the Myth of Vivid Cities and Sleepy Villages
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Urbanity and Rurality in a Tourism Context: Exploring the Myth of Vivid Cities and Sleepy Villages
    2014 (English)In: Rural Tourism: An International Perspective / [ed] Katherine Dashper, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2014, p. 22-40Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2014
    National Category
    Human Geography
    Research subject
    Social and Economic Geography
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-50109 (URN)978-1-4438-6677-4 (ISBN)
    Available from: 2016-05-03 Created: 2016-05-03 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
  • 8.
    Thulemark, Maria
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Moved by the mountains: migration into tourism dominated rural areas2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    List of papers
    1. A new life in the mountains: changing lifestyles among in-migrants to Wanaka, New Zealand
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A new life in the mountains: changing lifestyles among in-migrants to Wanaka, New Zealand
    2011 (English)In: Recreation and Society in Africa, Asia and Latin America, ISSN 1916-7873, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 35-50Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Mountainous areas with a high dependency on its tourism industry are often relatively small and remote. But some of these areas have faced a population increase due to large in-migration;Wanaka in New Zealand’s Southern Alps is one example. This paper is studying the migration motivations of a few individuals that have moved to Wanaka and how they started to feel like part of their new community. The meaning of the place is important for these newcomers. The results of the study indicate that there is a strong link between the community and the lifestyle that in-migrants are seeking. It also highlights the importance for in-migrants to be a part of the social community. Social Clubs, sport clubs and voluntary work are ways of becoming a part of a social network.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    SPREAD Corporation, 2011
    Keywords
    Mountainous areas, lifestyle migration, amenity migration, New Zealand
    National Category
    Human Geography
    Research subject
    Complex Systems – Microdata Analysis, General Microdata Analysis - tourism
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-44651 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-05-18 Created: 2015-05-18 Last updated: 2018-09-05Bibliographically approved
    2. Community formation and sense of place among seasonal tourism workers
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Community formation and sense of place among seasonal tourism workers
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Human Geography
    Research subject
    Social and Economic Geography
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-44654 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-05-18 Created: 2015-05-18 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
    3. Creativity in the recreational industry: Re-conceptualization of the Creative Class theory in a tourism-dominated rural area
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Creativity in the recreational industry: Re-conceptualization of the Creative Class theory in a tourism-dominated rural area
    2014 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Administration, ISSN 2000-8058, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 87-105Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to analyse the dynamics of development in a small rural region. Sälen in Sweden is a typical ski resort, with vast seasonal fluctuation of people and amenities. Our main analytical tool is Richard Florida’s theory on the Creative Class. This is a somewhat original approach for this type of context. Despite the great impact and controversy the theory of the Creative Class has had in both academia and among policy makers, it has primarily been applied on larger urban areas. The last few decades have seen a clear tendency towards urbanisation; cities and larger urban regions have undergone the most positive development, both in terms of job creation and the number of inhabitants. However, some rural areas have experienced positive development not normally seen in this type of vicinities. A dominating tourism industry is often seen as serving as an engine for overall development. This paper attempts to re-conceptualise the theory of the Creative Class to determine how it can be used to understand development in rural tourism-dominated areas.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, 2014
    Keywords
    Creative Class, rural development, tourism, policy implication, mountain tourism
    National Category
    Human Geography
    Research subject
    Complex Systems – Microdata Analysis, General Microdata Analysis - tourism
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-44652 (URN)
    Note

    det finns en konflikt mellan norska listan (NDS) och Scandinavian Journal of  Public Administration (SJPA).SJPA anger ISSN på sin HTTP://sajt sjpa.gu.se/ medan NDS påstår att tidskriften heter

    Available from: 2015-05-18 Created: 2015-05-18 Last updated: 2018-06-18Bibliographically approved
    4. Tourism Employment and Creative In-migrants
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tourism Employment and Creative In-migrants
    2014 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 403-421Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses the importance of tourism employment for in-migration to Malung/Sälen and Älvdalen, two rural municipalities hosting two major tourist destinations in the southern Swedish mountains. It uses micro-data from a database that includes, among many other variables, residence and employment information. This work is explorative and uses longitudinal data that permit examining individuals and go beyond simple net employment figures to show that many in-migrants to these municipalities are employed in tourism and constitute part of what is defined as the “creative workforce” in the local labour market. In this sense, tourism employment is found to be a pull factor for in-migration of highly skilled and well-paid people.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Routledge, 2014
    Keywords
    in-migration, tourism employment, labour market, creative class, creative workforce, regional development, rural Sweden
    National Category
    Social Sciences Human Geography
    Research subject
    Social and Economic Geography
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-38508 (URN)10.1080/15022250.2014.968000 (DOI)000343824300004 ()
    Available from: 2014-11-10 Created: 2014-11-10 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
  • 9.
    Trumberg, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Den delade skolan: segregationsprocesser i det svenska skolsystemet2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the beginning of the 1990s the responsibility for the compulsory schools shifted from the government to the local authorities, a freedom of choice was introduced, and several municipalities brought in a school voucher system. With these changes, the educational system in Sweden went from being one of the world’s most government dominated and unified, to one with a high level of freedom of choice. The overall aim for this study is to explore the interplay between the school choice policy in the compulsory school and the process of integration and segregation on a school level. The aim is also specifically to study to what degree the pupils’ choice of school reflect the schools’ composition, with regards to ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds between 1992 and 2004.The thesis is based on three different kinds of materials; registry data from SCB (Statistics Sweden), the municipality’s data surrounding the school applications, and interviews with civil servants, politicians, and head teachers. In conclusion, the study shows that a divide has emerged between different schools, the make-up of pupils is becoming more homogenous, and the school as a meeting place between different ethnic groups is affected in a negative way. The study also shows that the school choices have an influence on this segregation between the schools. However, there are a small number of exceptions. In certain schools, the ethnic mix of pupils is relatively fair.

  • 10.
    Trumberg (Eklundh), Anders
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Det fria skolvalet2004Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Hur påverkas den etniska och socioekonomiska segregationen i och mellan Örebros skolor av elevers frihet att välja skola?

  • 11.
    Tunström, Moa
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    På spaning efter den goda staden: om konstruktioner av ideal och problem i svensk stadsbyggnadsdiskussion2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this dissertation constructions of contemporary urban ideals are in focus, starting from the understanding that they are constructed in relation to both an idea of an urban renaissance and one ofa dissolving, or sprawling, city. The aim of the dissertation is to investigate and analyse how the city and the urban are discursively constructed in contemporary Swedish urban planning discussion. This is done by analysing articles from the Swedish Journal of Planning (Plan) and publications from the National Board of Housing, Building and Planning (Boverket) and the Urban Environment Council (Stadsmiljörådet). The main research topics are: How is the city and its history constructed? What norms are constructed about the city and the urban? How is planning and the role of the planner constructed, and what kind of knowledge and practices are emphasised? Methodologically, the dissertation is inspired by social constructivist methods, and mainly discourse theory. Applying this to the urban context means understanding urbanity and cities as constantly constructed and reconstructed discursively, even if both appear to be defined, absolute and recognisable. The analysis investigates these appearances and the meanings they are given – in this case in an urban planning context.  The analysis shows that history plays an important part in both the construction of ideals and problems. Both contemporary planning and the urban ideals are conceptualised in the light of a modernist planning era, which is emphasised as the period when the “real” city was dissolved or even destroyed. An “original”, pre-modern city is constructed and guarded as the norm, and the categorisation of places appear as important. Concepts both open and defined appear as central, such as diversity, variation, identity and urbanity. The planning practice that supposedly creates the good city is ideally a sensitive and emotional practice and practitioner, in line with communicative planning theory. Binary conceptual couples structure the discourse to a high degree, resulting in polarisations such as compact/sparse, city/countryside or inner city/suburb. The problematic or contradictory, such as the suburb, is marked off from the “real” city, and an inside and outside of the good city is created. The importance of a holistic and comprehensive planning perspective is emphasized, but at the same time the urban ideal that comes out appear as a strongly normative outlook from the traditional inner city. An inner city “we” is constructed, and the suburb, the suburban and its inhabitants are seen as an Other.  The dissertation also discusses some openings and contrary voices in the discourse and in other urban research indicative of an attempt to move beyond the polarisations. By questioning hierarchies and polarisations, and opening up for influence from outside of the discourse, concepts such as diversity and urbanity could be given alternative meanings instead of being used to mourn the loss of a “real”, original city or urban public space.

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