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Cao, Yang, Associate ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3552-9153
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Publications (10 of 272) Show all publications
Rauma, J., Jansson, S. P. O., Cao, Y. & van Nieuwenhoven, M. A. (2024). A comparison of Swedish IBS patients and general practitioners regarding viewpoints on IBS: a Q-methodology study. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, 59(6), 632-638
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A comparison of Swedish IBS patients and general practitioners regarding viewpoints on IBS: a Q-methodology study
2024 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 59, no 6, p. 632-638Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional gastrointestinal condition. A respectful patient-doctor relationship with good communication is crucial for optimal treatment. Q-methodology is a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods used to study subjectivity. The aim of this study was to compare viewpoints on IBS between patients with IBS and general practitioners (GPs).

Methods: We conducted a Q-methodology study by including 30 patients and 30 GPs. All participants were asked to complete Q- sorting of 66 statements on IBS using an online software program. Data were processed using factor analysis. In addition, 3 patients and 3 GPs were interviewed.

Results: Three factors were extracted from both groups: Patient Factor 1 'Question the diagnosis of IBS', Patient Factor 2 'Lifestyle changes for a physical disorder', Patient Factor 3 'Importance of a diagnosis', GP Factor 1 'Unknown causes of great suffering', GP Factor 2 'Lifestyle changes are important, stress makes IBS worse', GP Factor 3 'Recognized the way IBS affects patients'. There was a strong and statistically significant correlation between patient Factor 1 and GP Factor 1, with a Pearson's r of 0.81 (p < 0.001). Correlations between other factors varied.

Conclusions: There was consensus between patients and GPs that IBS is a physical and not a psychiatric disorder of unknown etiology. They also seemed to agree that IBS has a great negative impact on patients' lives and that lifestyle changes are beneficial. There were conflicting opinions regarding gender, cultural factors and the use of antidepressants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2024
Keywords
Factor analysis, general practitioner, irritable bowel syndrome, primary care, q-methodology, qualitative research
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-112761 (URN)10.1080/00365521.2024.2328590 (DOI)001195123600001 ()38557218 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85189612187 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Region Örebro County
Note

Funding: The study was financed by grants from the Swedish state under the agreement between the Swedish government and the county councils, the ALF-agreement (OLL-980043). Funding was also granted by Forskningskommittén, Region Örebro County.

Available from: 2024-04-02 Created: 2024-04-02 Last updated: 2024-06-05Bibliographically approved
Lind, A., Cao, Y., Hesser, H., Hårdstedt, M., Jansson, S. P. O., Lernmark, Å., . . . Jendle, J. (2024). Anxiety, depression and quality of life in relation to SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in individuals living with diabetes during the second wave of COVID-19. Diabetes epidemiology and management, 13, Article ID 100194.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anxiety, depression and quality of life in relation to SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in individuals living with diabetes during the second wave of COVID-19
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2024 (English)In: Diabetes epidemiology and management, ISSN 2666-9706, Vol. 13, article id 100194Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: The objective was to compare anxiety, depression, and quality of life (QoL) in individuals living with type 1 (T1D) and type 2 (T2D) diabetes with matched controls during the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Methods: Via randomization, individuals living with diabetes T1D (n = 203) and T2D (n = 413), were identified during February-July 2021 through health-care registers. Population controls (n = 282) were matched for age, gender, and residential area. Questionnaires included self-assessment of anxiety, depression, QoL, and demographics in relation to SARS-CoV-2 exposure. Blood was collected through home-capillary sampling, and SARS-CoV-2 Nucleocapsid (NCP) and Spike antibodies (SC2_S1) were determined by multiplex Antibody Detection by Agglutination-PCR (ADAP) assays.

Results: Younger age and health issues were related to anxiety, depression, and QoL, with no differences between the study groups. Female gender was associated with anxiety, while obesity was associated with lower QoL. The SARS-CoV-2 NCP seroprevalence was higher in T1D (8.9 %) compared to T2D (3.9 %) and controls (4.0 %), while the SARS-CoV-2 SC2_S1 seroprevalence was higher for controls (25.5 %) compared to T1D (16.8 %) and T2D (14.0 %).

Conclusions: A higher SARS-CoV-2 infection rate in T1D may be explained by younger age and higher employment rate, and the associated increased risk for viral exposure.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
Diabetes, SARS-CoV-2, COVID-19, Anxiety, Depression, Quality of life, Virus antibodies
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-111559 (URN)10.1016/j.deman.2023.100194 (DOI)001154927400001 ()38463606 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85182889973 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research, IRC15-0067
Note

This work was supported by NIH SBIR 2R44DK110005-02, Strategic Research Area Exodiab Dnr 2009-1039, and the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research Dnr IRC15-0067.

Available from: 2024-02-14 Created: 2024-02-14 Last updated: 2024-03-19Bibliographically approved
Zhai, Y., Hu, F., Yuan, L., Ye, X., Shi, W., Yang, R., . . . Xu, F. (2024). Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of all-cause dementia, Alzheimer's disease, and vascular dementia: A cohort study of 373, 415 participants in the UK Biobank. Journal of Affective Disorders, 351, 323-330
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of all-cause dementia, Alzheimer's disease, and vascular dementia: A cohort study of 373, 415 participants in the UK Biobank
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 351, p. 323-330Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Accumulated evidence has highlighted the association between atrial fibrillation and the risk of developing dementia.

METHODS: This current cohort study utilized data from the UK Biobank to explore the association between atrial fibrillation (AF) and all-cause dementia (ACD), encompassing its main subtypes (Alzheimer's disease (AD), and vascular dementia (VD)). Cox proportional hazards models were applied to examine the association of AF and dementia with its primary subtypes after adjusting for different sets of covariates. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95 % confidential intervals (CIs) were estimated to quantify the associated risks. Competing risk model was applied in sensitivity analysis.

RESULTS: After exclusion, 373, 415 participants entered the primary analysis. Among these, 27, 934 (7.48 %) were with a history AF at baseline, while 345, 481 (92.52 %) were without. During a mean follow-up of 13.45 years, ACD was diagnosed in 1215 individuals with AF and 3988 individuals without AF. Participants with AF had higher risks of ACD (1.79 [1.67-1.91]), AD (1.48 [1.32-1.65]), and VD (2.46 [2.17-2.80]) in the fully adjusted Cox regression models. Results of subgroup and sensitivity analyses predominantly aligned with the positive associations in primary analysis.

LIMITATIONS: The applicability of our findings to diverse ethnicities might require careful consideration and the behind biological mechanisms need to be further revealed.

CONCLUSIONS: It indicated that people with atrial fibrillation had an increased future risk of all-cause dementia, Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia. Atrial fibrillation screening and prevention strategies should take into account to prevent and delay the onset of dementia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
All-cause dementia, Alzheimer's disease, Atrial fibrillation, Cohort study, UK Biobank, Vascular dementia
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-111232 (URN)10.1016/j.jad.2024.01.224 (DOI)001177216300001 ()38286227 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85184052899 (Scopus ID)
Note

This study was supported by the following funding: The 2021 Shanghai “Science and Technology Innovation Action Plan” (Project Number: 21XD1432900), the Research Project Plan of the Shanghai Municipal Health Commission (Project Number: 202150019), the Project of Hospital Management from Shanghai Ninth People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (Project Number: YGA202308), and the 2022 Medical and Health Science and Technology Plan of Zhoushan City, China (Project Number: 2022JYB05).

Available from: 2024-02-01 Created: 2024-02-01 Last updated: 2024-03-20Bibliographically approved
Mohammad Ismail, A., Forssten, M. P., Hildebrand, F., Sarani, B., Ioannidis, I., Cao, Y., . . . Mohseni, S. (2024). Cardiac risk stratification and adverse outcomes in surgically managed patients with isolated traumatic spine injuries. European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, 50(2), 523-530
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cardiac risk stratification and adverse outcomes in surgically managed patients with isolated traumatic spine injuries
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2024 (English)In: European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, ISSN 1863-9933, E-ISSN 1863-9941, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 523-530Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: As the incidence of traumatic spine injuries has been steadily increasing, especially in the elderly, the ability to categorize patients based on their underlying risk for the adverse outcomes could be of great value in clinical decision making. This study aimed to investigate the association between the Revised Cardiac Risk Index (RCRI) and adverse outcomes in patients who have undergone surgery for traumatic spine injuries.

METHODS: All adult patients (18 years or older) in the 2013-2019 TQIP database with isolated spine injuries resulting from blunt force trauma, who underwent spinal surgery, were eligible for inclusion in the study. The association between the RCRI and in-hospital mortality, cardiopulmonary complications, and failure-to-rescue (FTR) was determined using Poisson regression models with robust standard errors to adjust for potential confounding.

RESULTS: A total of 39,391 patients were included for further analysis. In the regression model, an RCRI ≥ 3 was associated with a threefold risk of in-hospital mortality [adjusted IRR (95% CI): 3.19 (2.30-4.43), p < 0.001] and cardiopulmonary complications [adjusted IRR (95% CI): 3.27 (2.46-4.34), p < 0.001], as well as a fourfold risk of FTR [adjusted IRR (95% CI): 4.27 (2.59-7.02), p < 0.001], compared to RCRI 0. The risk of all adverse outcomes increased stepwise along with each RCRI score.

CONCLUSION: The RCRI may be a useful tool for identifying patients with traumatic spine injuries who are at an increased risk of in-hospital mortality, cardiopulmonary complications, and failure-to-rescue after surgery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Urban und Vogel Medien und Medizin Verlagsgesellsc, 2024
Keywords
Cardiopulmonary complications, Mortality, Revised Cardiac Risk Index, Risk stratification, Traumatic spine injury
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-110622 (URN)10.1007/s00068-023-02413-7 (DOI)001135545400001 ()38170276 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85181522328 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Örebro University
Available from: 2024-01-09 Created: 2024-01-09 Last updated: 2024-05-02Bibliographically approved
Gunnarsson, K., Tofiq, a., Mathew, A., Cao, Y., von Euler, M. & Ström, J. O. (2024). Changes in stroke and TIA admissions during the COVID-19 pandemic: A meta-analysis. European Stroke Journal, 9(1), 78-87
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in stroke and TIA admissions during the COVID-19 pandemic: A meta-analysis
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2024 (English)In: European Stroke Journal, ISSN 2396-9873, E-ISSN 2396-9881, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 78-87Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: To perform a meta-analysis on how the admissions of stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) changed during the Corona Virus infection-19 (COVID-19) pandemic and evaluate if the effect was depending on stroke severity.

METHODS: Observational cohort studies comparing the number of stroke and/or TIA admissions during a period of the pandemic compared to a period before the pandemic were identified in PubMed and Embase. After excluding studies with overlapping populations and studies without satisfactory case ascertainment, data was extracted and meta-analyzed.

FINDINGS: A total of 59 studies were included. During the pandemic, there was a decrease in admissions of ischemic stroke (admission rate ratio (ARR) = 0.77, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.72, 0.82), intracerebral hemorrhage (ARR = 0.79, 95% CI: 0.70, 0.90) and TIA (ARR = 0.66, 95% CI: 0.58, 0.75). Albeit admission rates of both mild (ARR = 0.61, 95% CI: 0.49, 0.77) and severe (ARR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.71, 0.95) strokes decreased, milder strokes decreased more (proportion ratio (PR) = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.65, 0.89).

DISCUSSION: Potential causes for the admission reduction could be strict prioritizations within the health care, patients' fear of acquiring COVID-19, or decreased access to health care due to lockdowns.

CONCLUSION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, there was a reduction in admissions of stroke and TIA, possibly caused by reluctance to seek medical care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2024
Keywords
Acute ischemic stroke, Corona virus, NIHSS, SARS-CoV-2, TIA, cerebral infarction, intracerebral hemorrhage
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-108656 (URN)10.1177/23969873231204127 (DOI)001073208700001 ()37776062 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85173493290 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-10-02 Created: 2023-10-02 Last updated: 2024-03-22Bibliographically approved
Bakoyan, Z., Cao, Y., Hansson, S. R., Karlsson, J. P. & Lodefalk, M. (2024). Childhood atopic disorders in relation to placental changes: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, 35(5), Article ID e14141.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Childhood atopic disorders in relation to placental changes: A systematic review and meta-analysis
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2024 (English)In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 35, no 5, article id e14141Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fetal programming may arise from prenatal exposure and increase the risk of diseases later in life, potentially mediated by the placenta. The objective of this systematic review was to summarize and critically evaluate publications describing associations between human placental changes and risk of atopic disorders during childhood. The review adhered to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis guidelines. The inclusion criteria were original research articles or case reports written in English describing a human placental change in relation to disease occurring in offspring during childhood. The MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched for eligible studies. Risk of bias (RoB) was assessed using the ROBINS-I tool. The results were pooled both in a narrative way and by a meta-analysis. Nineteen studies were included (n = 12,997 participants). All studies had an overall serious RoB, and publication bias could not be completely ruled out. However, five studies showed that histological chorioamnionitis in preterm-born children was associated with asthma-related problems (pooled odds ratio = 3.25 (95% confidence interval = 2.22-4.75)). In term-born children, a large placenta (≥750 g) increased the risk of being prescribed anti-asthma medications during the first year of life. Placental histone acetylation, DNA methylation, and gene expression differences were found to be associated with different atopic disorders in term-born children. There is some evidence supporting the idea that the placenta can mediate an increased risk of atopic disorders in children. However, further studies are needed to validate the findings, properly control for confounders, and examine potential mechanisms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Munksgaard Forlag, 2024
Keywords
Allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis, chorioamnionitis, fetal development, gene expression, placenta
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-113810 (URN)10.1111/pai.14141 (DOI)001228297300001 ()38773752 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85193731687 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Region Örebro County
Available from: 2024-05-23 Created: 2024-05-23 Last updated: 2024-06-04Bibliographically approved
Forssten, M. P., Cao, Y., Mohammad Ismail, A., Tennakoon, L., Spain, D. A. & Mohseni, S. (2024). Comparative Analysis of Frailty Scores for Predicting Adverse Outcomes in Hip Fracture Patients: Insights from the United States National Inpatient Sample. Journal of Personalized Medicine, 14(6), Article ID 621.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparative Analysis of Frailty Scores for Predicting Adverse Outcomes in Hip Fracture Patients: Insights from the United States National Inpatient Sample
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Personalized Medicine, E-ISSN 2075-4426, Vol. 14, no 6, article id 621Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the current investigation was to compare the ability of several frailty scores to predict adverse outcomes in hip fracture patients. All adult patients (18 years or older) who suffered a hip fracture due to a fall and underwent surgical fixation were extracted from the 2019 National Inpatient Sample (NIS) Database. A combination of logistic regression and bootstrapping was used to compare the predictive ability of the Orthopedic Frailty Score (OFS), the Nottingham Hip Fracture Score (NHFS), the 11-factor modified Frailty Index (11-mFI) and 5-factor (5-mFI) modified Frailty Index, as well as the Johns Hopkins Frailty Indicator. A total of 227,850 patients were extracted from the NIS. In the prediction of in-hospital mortality and failure-to-rescue (FTR), the OFS surpassed all other frailty measures, approaching an acceptable predictive ability for mortality [AUC (95% CI): 0.69 (0.67-0.72)] and achieving an acceptable predictive ability for FTR [AUC (95% CI): 0.70 (0.67-0.72)]. The NHFS demonstrated the highest predictive ability for predicting any complication [AUC (95% CI): 0.62 (0.62-0.63)]. The 11-mFI exhibited the highest predictive ability for cardiovascular complications [AUC (95% CI): 0.66 (0.64-0.67)] and the NHFS achieved the highest predictive ability for delirium [AUC (95% CI): 0.69 (0.68-0.70)]. No score succeeded in effectively predicting venous thromboembolism or infections. In summary, the investigated frailty scores were most effective in predicting in-hospital mortality and failure-to-rescue; however, they struggled to predict complications.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2024
Keywords
Johns Hopkins Frailty Indicator, Modified Frailty Index, Nottingham Hip Fracture Score, Orthopedic Frailty Score, frailty, hip fracture, logistic regression, morbidity, mortality, prediction
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-114472 (URN)10.3390/jpm14060621 (DOI)38929842 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2024-06-28 Created: 2024-06-28 Last updated: 2024-06-28Bibliographically approved
Karlqvist, S., Sachs, M., Eriksson, C., Cao, Y., Montgomery, S., Ludvigsson, J. F., . . . Halfvarson, J. (2024). Comparative risk of serious infection with vedolizumab vs anti-TNF in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Results from nationwide Swedish registers. Paper presented at 19th Congress of ECCO, Stockholm, Sweden, February 21-24, 2024. Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, 18(Suppl. 1), I1291-I1293, Article ID P680.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparative risk of serious infection with vedolizumab vs anti-TNF in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Results from nationwide Swedish registers
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 18, no Suppl. 1, p. I1291-I1293, article id P680Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The real-world comparative safety of vedolizumab in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remains uncertain. We aimed to assess the risk of serious infection in IBD patients treated with vedolizumab, compared to (i) those treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) treatment and (ii) the general population.

Methods: In this nationwide cohort study, treatment episodes were identified from Swedish health registers (from 1 May 2014 – 31 December 2020). Patients were considered exposed from initiation of treatment until 90 days after discontinuation of treatment. We used Cox regression with propensity score-matched cohorts to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for incident serious infection, defined as infection requiring hospital admission.

Results: After propensity score matching, the cohorts were not materially different at baseline with regard to demographic, disease and treatment characteristics (Table 1). During 1376 treatment-episodes in patients with Crohn’s disease, there were 5.18 (95%CI: 3.98-6.63) serious infections per 100 person-years (PY) with vedolizumab vs 3.54 (95%CI: 2.50-4.85) per 100 PY with anti-TNF; HR 1.72 (95%CI: 1.12-2.65; Figure 1A). When examining site-specific infections in Crohn’s disease, vedolizumab was associated with an HR of 2.47 (95% CI: 0.96-6.39) for serious gastrointestinal infections. Compared to the rate of 0.75 (95%CI: 0.59-0.92) serious infections per 100 PY in the general population, vedolizumab demonstrated an increased HR of 7.00 (95%CI: 5.04-9.72).

Across 1294 episodes among patients with ulcerative colitis there were 3.74 (95%CI: 2.66-5.11) serious infections per 100 PY with vedolizumab vs 3.42 (95%CI: 2.31-4.89) per 100 PY with anti-TNF, corresponding to HRs of 0.80 (95%CI: 0.47-1.36, Figure 1B) within the initial 1.1 years of treatment and 2.03 (95%CI: 0.65-6.32) after 1.1 years (follow-up truncated due to non-proportional hazards). In ulcerative colitis, there was no statistically significant association between vedolizumab treatment and any of the site-specific serious infections. Compared to the rate of 0.69 (95%CI: 0.53-0.87) serious infections per 100 PY in the general population, vedolizumab showed an increased HR of 5.45 (95%CI: 3.67-8.11).

Conclusion: Vedolizumab was associated with higher hazard ratios of serious infections compared to anti-TNF in Crohn’s disease, but not in ulcerative colitis. Nonetheless, in both IBD subtypes vedolizumab exhibited increased hazard ratios compared to the general population. These results underscore the importance of heightened clinical awareness of infections in vedolizumab-treated patients and may help clinicians understanding the optimal positioning of vedolizumab.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2024
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-113289 (URN)10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjad212.0810 (DOI)001189928901172 ()
Conference
19th Congress of ECCO, Stockholm, Sweden, February 21-24, 2024
Available from: 2024-04-19 Created: 2024-04-19 Last updated: 2024-04-19Bibliographically approved
Li, H., Zhang, X., Cao, Y. & Zhang, G. (2024). Effects of Participating in Religious Groups on Mental Health Issues: A Two-Sample Mendelian Randomization Study. The international journal for the psychology of religion, 34(1), 24-36
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Participating in Religious Groups on Mental Health Issues: A Two-Sample Mendelian Randomization Study
2024 (English)In: The international journal for the psychology of religion, ISSN 1050-8619, E-ISSN 1532-7582, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 24-36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We conducted a Mendelian randomization study to evaluate the potential causal effects of attending religious groups on the prevalence of depression, generalized anxiety disorders, anxiety disorders, and suicide and self-harm. Data from the UK Biobank and the FinnGen project were processed by inverse variance weighting (IVW), weighted median, and MR-Egger regression methods. Despite certain pleiotropic risks, we found that attending religious groups was potentially associated with a reduced risk of anxiety disorders (OR = 0.213, p = .028). The pleiotropies were largely controlled and the effect on anxiety disorders became more significant in our sensitivity analysis (OR = 0.162; p = .006). Additionally, attending religious groups was associated with a reduced risk of suicide and self-harm (OR = 0.231, p = .0006). However, we did not observe any substantial protection against depression. In conclusion, our study adds to the existing literature and sheds light on the potential health benefits of religious activities from a novel perspective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2024
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-109404 (URN)10.1080/10508619.2023.2267956 (DOI)001080739000001 ()2-s2.0-85173728230 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-10-25 Created: 2023-10-25 Last updated: 2024-01-29Bibliographically approved
Wang, J., Cao, Y., Wei, X., Winkley, K. & Chang, Y.-S. (2024). Empowering parents to optimize feeding practices with preschool children (EPO-Feeding): A study protocol for a feasibility randomized controlled trial. PLOS ONE, 19(6), Article ID e0304707.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Empowering parents to optimize feeding practices with preschool children (EPO-Feeding): A study protocol for a feasibility randomized controlled trial
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2024 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 19, no 6, article id e0304707Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Parental feeding practices (PFPs) play a key role in fostering preschoolers' dietary habits and in mitigating the risk of childhood obesity. Nevertheless, parents often employ inappropriate feeding practices, leading to children's potential nutrition-related issues. Thus, research is needed to inform interventions that focus on optimizing feeding practices.

METHODS: This protocol describes the evaluation of a novel intervention-Empowering Parents to Optimize Feeding Practices (EPO-Feeding Program). The program will be evaluated with a two-arm feasibility randomized controlled trial (RCT) in Yangzhou, China. The program includes four weekly group-based training sessions led by healthcare professionals for parents of preschool children. The intervention incorporates sessions, group discussions, motivational interviewing, and supplementary materials (e.g., key messages and educational videos) aimed at enhancing parents' knowledge, skills, and behaviours related to feeding practices. The primary outcomes include i) implementation feasibility, primarily assessed through retention rates; and ii) program acceptability through a survey and qualitative process evaluation. Secondary outcomes encompass the potential impacts on i) PFPs, ii) parental perception of child weight (PPCW), iii) parenting sense of competence, iv) children's eating behaviours, and v) child weight status. Quantitative analyses include descriptive estimates for evaluating the feasibility and linear mixed regression analysis for testing the potential effects. Qualitative valuation will use thematic framework analysis.

DISCUSSION: If this study shows this program to be feasible to implement and acceptable to parents, it will be used to inform a fully powered trial to determine its effectiveness. The research will also help inform policy and practices in the context of child nutrition promotion, particularly regarding implementing group-based training sessions by healthcare providers in similar settings.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov, Protocol #NCT06181773, 20/11/2023.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2024
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-114073 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0304707 (DOI)38829882 (PubMedID)
Note

Study Protocol.

Available from: 2024-06-05 Created: 2024-06-05 Last updated: 2024-06-05Bibliographically approved
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