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  • 1.
    Aahlin, Eirik K
    et al.
    Department of GI and HPB Surgery, University Hospital Northern Norway, Breivika, Tromsø, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway .
    von Meyenfeldt, Maarten
    Department of Surgery, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands; NUTRIM School for Nutrition, Toxicology and Metabolism, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Dejong, Cornelius Hc
    Department of Surgery, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands; NUTRIM School for Nutrition, Toxicology and Metabolism, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Örebro University, School of Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden. Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro; Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fearon, Kenneth C
    Clinical Surgery, University of Edinburgh, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK .
    Lobo, Dileep N
    Division of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Nottingham Digestive Diseases Centre, National Institute for Health Research, Biomedical Research Unit, Nottingham University Hospitals, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham, UK .
    Demartines, Nicolas
    Hospital of Lausanne (CHUV), Lausanne, Switzerland .
    Revhaug, Arthur
    Department of GI and HPB Surgery, University Hospital Northern Norway, Breivika, Tromsø, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway .
    Wigmore, Stephen J
    Clinical Surgery, University of Edinburgh, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK .
    Lassen, Kristoffer
    Department of GI and HPB Surgery, University Hospital Northern Norway, Breivika, Tromsø, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway .
    Functional recovery is considered the most important target: a survey of dedicated professionals2014In: Perioperative medicine, ISSN 2047-0525, Vol. 3, article id 3:5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was to survey the relative importance of postoperative recovery targets and perioperative care items, as perceived by a large group of international dedicated professionals.

    Methods: A questionnaire with eight postoperative recovery targets and 13 perioperative care items was mailed to participants of the first international Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) congress and to authors of papers with a clear relevance to ERAS in abdominal surgery. The responders were divided into categories according to profession and region.

    Results: The recovery targets 'To be completely free of nausea', 'To be independently mobile' and 'To be able to eat and drink as soon as possible' received the highest score irrespective of the responder's profession or region of origin. Equally, the care items 'Optimizing fluid balance', 'Preoperative counselling' and 'Promoting early and scheduled mobilisation' received the highest score across all groups.

    Conclusions: Functional recovery, as in tolerance of food without nausea and regained mobility, was considered the most important target of recovery. There was a consistent uniformity in the way international dedicated professionals scored the relative importance of recovery targets and care items. The relative rating of the perioperative care items was not dependent on the strength of evidence supporting the items.

  • 2.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ellabban, Mohamed A.
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Zdolsek, Johann
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Pros and Cons of Early and Late Skin Grafting in Children with Burns: Evaluation of Common Concepts2022In: European Burn Journal, E-ISSN 2673-1991, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 180-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Background: There is no consensus regarding the timing of surgery in children with smaller burn size, specifically in deep dermal burns. Delayed surgery has risks in terms of infection and delayed wound healing. Early surgery also risks the removal of potentially viable tissue. Our aim was to investigate the effect of the timing of surgical intervention on the size of the area operated on and the time to wound healing. Methods: A retrospective analysis for all children (<18 years) with burn size <20% body surface area (BSA%) during 2009–2020 who were operated on with a split-thickness skin graft. The patients were grouped by the timing of the first skin graft operation: early = operated on within 14 days of injury; delayed = operated on more than two weeks after injury. Results: A total of 84 patients were included in the study, 43 who had an early operation and 41 who had a delayed operation. There were no differences between the groups regarding burn size, or whether the burns were superficial or deep. The mean duration of healing time was seven days longer in the group with delayed operation (p = 0.001). The area operated on was somewhat larger (not significantly so) in the group who had early operation. Nine children had two skin graft operations, eight in the early group and one in the delayed group (p = 0.03). Conclusion: The patients who were operated on early had the advantage of a shorter healing time, but there was a higher rate of complementary operations and a tendency towards a larger burn excision.

  • 3. Adolfsson, Jan
    et al.
    Garmo, Hans
    Varenhorst, Eberhard
    Ahlgren, Göran
    Ahlstrand, Christer
    Andren, Ove
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    Bratt, Ola
    Damber, Jan-Erik
    Hellström, Karin
    Hellström, Magnus
    Holmberg, Erik
    Holmberg, Lars
    Hugosson, Jonas
    Johansson, Jan-Erik
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Petterson, Bill
    Törnblom, Magnus
    Widmark, Anders
    Stattin, Pär
    Clinical characteristics and primary treatment of prostate cancer in Sweden between 1996 and 2005: Data from the national prostate cancer register in Sweden2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 456-477Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The incidence of prostate cancer is rising rapidly in Sweden and there is a need to better understand the pattern of diagnosis, tumor characteristics and treatment. Material and methods. Between 1996 and 2005, all new cases of adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland were intended to be registered in the National Prostate Cancer Register (NPCR). This register contains information on diagnosing unit, date of diagnosis, cause of diagnosis, tumor grade, tumor stage according to the TNM classification in force, serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels at diagnosis and primary treatment given within the first 6 months after diagnosis. Results. In total, 72 028 patients were registered, comprising >97% of all pertinent incident cases of prostate cancer in the Swedish Cancer Register (SCR). During the study period there was a considerable decrease in median age at the time of diagnosis, a stage migration towards smaller tumors, a decrease in median serum PSA values at diagnosis, a decrease in the age-standardized incidence rate of men diagnosed with distant metastases or with a PSA level of >100 ng/ml at diagnosis and an increase in the proportion of tumors with Gleason score ≤6. Relatively large geographical differences in the median age at diagnosis and the age-standardized incidence of cases with category T1c tumors were observed. Treatment with curative intent increased dramatically and treatment patterns varied according to geographical region. In men with localized tumors and a PSA level of <20 ng/ml at diagnosis, expectant treatment was more commonly used in those aged ≥75 years than in those aged <75 years. Also, the pattern of endocrine treatment varied in different parts of Sweden. Conclusions. All changes in the register seen over time are consistent with increased diagnostic activity, especially PSA testing, resulting in an increased number of cases with early disease, predominantly tumors in category T1c. The patterns of diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer vary considerably in different parts of Sweden. The NPCR continues to be an important source for research, epidemiological surveillance of the incidence, diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer

  • 4.
    Agardh, Carl-David
    et al.
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Ahrén, Bo
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Hanås, Ragnar
    Jansson, Stefan
    Örebro University Hospital. Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Smith, Ulf
    Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Toft, Eva
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Östenson, Claes-Göran
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Varning för okritisk användning av överviktskirurgi vid typ 2-diabetes2012In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 109, no 25, p. 1208-1209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Överviktskirurgi diskuteras nu som ett behandlingsalternativ även för patienter med typ 2-diabetes där BMI inte överstiger nuvarande indikationsgräns 35 kg/m2. Artikelförfattarna vill varna för en sådan utveckling i avvaktan på kritisk värdering av denna typ av kirurgi.

  • 5.
    Ah, Rebecka
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    BChir, M. B.
    Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Department of Surgery, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Geijer, Håkan
    Department of Radiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Taha, Kardo
    Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Pourhossein-Sarmeh, Sahar
    Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Talving, Peep
    Division of Acute Care Surgery, Department of Surgery, North Estonia Medical Center, Tallinn, Estonia; Department of Surgery, University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery.
    Prognostic Value of P-POSSUM and Osteopenia for Predicting Mortality After Emergency Laparotomy in Geriatric Patients2019In: Bulletin of emergency and trauma, ISSN 2322-2522, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 223-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate the Portsmouth-Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the enUmeration of Mortality and morbidity (P-POSSUM) in comparison with other risk factors for mortality including osteopenia as an indicator for frailty in geriatric patients subjected to emergency laparotomy.

    Methods: All geriatric patients (≥65 years) undergoing emergency laparotomy at a single university hospital between 1/2015 and 12/2016 were included in this cohort study. Demographics and outcomes were retrospectively collected from medical records. Association between prognostic markers and 30-day mortality was assessed using Poisson and backward stepwise regression models. Prognostic value was assessed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves.

    Results: =0.004) while osteopenia was not. P-POSSUM had poor prognostic value for 30-day mortality with an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.59. The prognostic value of P-POSSUM improved significantly when adjusting for patient covariates (AUC=0.83).

    Conclusion: P-POSSUM and osteopenia alone hardly predict 30-day mortality in geriatric patients following emergency laparotomy. P-POSSUM adjusted for other patient covariates improves the prediction.

  • 6.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    The Association Between Beta-Blockade and Clinical Outcomes in the Context of Surgical and Traumatic Stress2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Traumatic injury and major abdominal surgery are areas in general surgery associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. The overall colorectal cancer surgery mortality rate is around 4%, with that for emergency surgery more than twice as high as for planned. Surgical morbidity varies between 25% and 45%. Around half of trauma patients develop low mood. In one quarter of patients this becomes permanent. Depression is known to impede physical rehabilitation and recovery. The onset of physiological stress, driven by adrenergic hyperactivity following traumatic and surgical injury is hypothesized to contribute to these adverse outcomes. Interest has therefore been sparked into blocking adrenergic receptor activation.

    Papers I and II investigated the role of beta-blocker therapy in preventing post-traumatic depression following severe traumatic brain injury (Paper I) and severe extracranial injury (Paper II). The Karolinska University Hospital Trauma Registry was used to identify patients admitted between 2007 and 2011. In Paper I (n = 545), patients on pre-injury beta-blocker therapy were matched to beta-blocker naïve patients with equivalent injury burden. Results revealed that beta-blocked patients exhibited a 60% reduced risk of needing antidepressant therapy within one year of trauma. In Paper II (n = 596), the lack of beta-blocker use before extracranial trauma was linked to a three-fold increase in the risk of antidepressant initiation.

    Papers III-V explored the role of pre-operative beta-blocker therapy in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer between 2007 and 2016, identified using the nationwide Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry. Paper III (n = 3,187) identified a 69% reduction in the risk of 30-day mortality in beta-blocked patients. Paper IV (n = 22,337) outlined long-term survival benefits for patients on beta-blocker therapy prior to undergoing elective surgery for colon cancer. Beta-blocked patients showed a risk reduction of 42% for 1-year all-cause mortality and 18% for 5-year cancerspecific mortality. Similarly, patients on beta-blocker therapy who underwent surgery for rectal cancer demonstrated improved survival up to one year after surgery with a risk reduction of 57% and a reduction in anastomotic failure and infectious complications in Paper V (n = 11,966).

    List of papers
    1. Does early beta-blockade in isolated severe traumatic brain injury reduce the risk of post traumatic depression?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does early beta-blockade in isolated severe traumatic brain injury reduce the risk of post traumatic depression?
    2017 (English)In: Injury, ISSN 0020-1383, E-ISSN 1879-0267, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 101-105Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Depressive symptoms occur in approximately half of trauma patients, negatively impacting on functional outcome and quality of life following severe head injury. Pontine noradrenaline has been shown to increase upon trauma and associated beta-adrenergic receptor activation appears to consolidate memory formation of traumatic events. Blocking adrenergic activity reduces physiological stress responses during recall of traumatic memories and impairs memory, implying a potential therapeutic role of beta-blockers. This study examines the effect of pre-admission beta-blockade on post-traumatic depression.

    Methods: All adult trauma patients (>= 18 years) with severe, isolated traumatic brain injury (intracranial Abbreviated Injury Scale score (AIS) >= 3 and extracranial AIS <3) were recruited from the trauma registry of an urban university hospital between 2007 and 2011. Exclusion criteria were in-hospital deaths and prescription of antidepressants up to one year prior to admission. Pre- and post-admission beta-blocker and antidepressant therapy data was requested from the national drugs registry. Post-traumatic depression was defined as the prescription of antidepressants within one year of trauma. Patients with and without pre-admission beta-blockers were matched 1: 1 by age, gender, Glasgow Coma Scale, Injury Severity Score and head AIS. Analysis was carried out using McNemar's and Student's t-test for categorical and continuous data, respectively.

    Results: A total of 545 patients met the study criteria. Of these, 15% (n = 80) were prescribed beta-blockers. After propensity matching, 80 matched pairs were analyzed. 33% (n = 26) of non beta-blocked patients developed post-traumatic depression, compared to only 18% (n = 14) in the beta-blocked group (p = 0.04). There were no significant differences in ICU (mean days: 5.8 (SD 10.5) vs. 5.6 (SD 7.2), p = 0.85) or hospital length of stay (mean days: 21 (SD 21) vs. 21 (SD 20), p = 0.94) between cohorts.

    Conclusion: beta-blockade appears to act prophylactically and significantly reduces the risk of posttraumatic depression in patients suffering from isolated severe traumatic brain injuries. Further prospective randomized studies are warranted to validate this finding.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2017
    Keywords
    Traumatic brain injury, Beta-blockade, Depression
    National Category
    Orthopaedics Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-54816 (URN)10.1016/j.injury.2016.10.041 (DOI)000390544600018 ()2-s2.0-85005893752 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2017-01-19 Created: 2017-01-19 Last updated: 2024-03-06Bibliographically approved
    2. Corrigendum to "Does early beta-blockade in isolated severe traumatic brain injury reduce the risk of post traumatic depression?": [Injury 48 (2017) 101–105]
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Corrigendum to "Does early beta-blockade in isolated severe traumatic brain injury reduce the risk of post traumatic depression?": [Injury 48 (2017) 101–105]
    2017 (English)In: Injury, ISSN 0020-1383, E-ISSN 1879-0267, Vol. 48, no 11, p. 2612-2612Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Elsevier, 2017
    National Category
    Orthopaedics Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-62779 (URN)10.1016/j.injury.2017.09.017 (DOI)000414228200042 ()28965685 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85030663249 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2017-11-24 Created: 2017-11-24 Last updated: 2024-03-06Bibliographically approved
    3. Does beta-blockade reduce the risk of depression in patients with isolated severe extracranial injuries?
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does beta-blockade reduce the risk of depression in patients with isolated severe extracranial injuries?
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 41, no 7, p. 1801-1806Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Approximately half of trauma patients develop post-traumatic depression. It is suggested that beta-blockade impairs trauma memory recollection, reducing depressive symptoms. This study investigates the effect of early beta-blockade on depression following severe traumatic injuries in patients without significant brain injury.

    METHODS: Patients were identified by retrospectively reviewing the trauma registry at an urban university hospital between 2007 and 2011. Severe extracranial injuries were defined as extracranial injuries with Abbreviated Injury Scale score ≥3, intracranial Abbreviated Injury Scale score <3 and an Injury Severity Score ≥16. In-hospital deaths and patients prescribed antidepressant therapy ≤1 year prior to admission were excluded. Patients were stratified into groups based on pre-admission beta-blocker status. The primary outcome was post-traumatic depression, defined as receiving antidepressants ≤1 year following trauma.

    RESULTS: Five hundred and ninety-six patients met the inclusion criteria with 11.4% prescribed pre-admission beta-blockade. Patients receiving beta-blockers were significantly older (57 ± 18 vs. 42 ± 17 years, p < 0.001) with lower Glasgow Coma Scale score (12 ± 3 vs. 14 ± 2, p < 0.001). The beta-blocked cohort spent significantly longer in hospital (21 ± 20 vs. 15 ± 17 days, p < 0.01) and intensive care (4 ± 7 vs. 3 ± 5 days, p = 0.01). A forward logistic regression model was applied and predicted lack of beta-blockade to be associated with increased risk of depression (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.1-7.2, p = 0.04). After adjusting for group differences, patients lacking beta-blockers demonstrated an increased risk of depression (AOR 3.3, 95% CI 1.2-8.6, p = 0.02).

    CONCLUSIONS: Pre-admission beta-blockade is associated with a significantly reduced risk of depression following severe traumatic injury. Further investigation is needed to determine the beneficial effects of beta-blockade in these instances.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    New York: Springer, 2017
    National Category
    Surgery
    Research subject
    Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-57385 (URN)10.1007/s00268-017-3935-5 (DOI)000403056400020 ()28265730 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85014574094 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2017-05-08 Created: 2017-05-08 Last updated: 2024-03-06Bibliographically approved
    4. Effect of beta-blocker therapy on early mortality after emergency colonic cancer surgery
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of beta-blocker therapy on early mortality after emergency colonic cancer surgery
    Show others...
    2019 (English)In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 106, no 4, p. 477-483Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Emergency colorectal cancer surgery is associated with significant mortality. Induced adrenergic hyperactivity is thought to be an important contributor. Downregulating the effects of circulating catecholamines may reduce the risk of adverse outcomes. This study assessed whether regular preoperative beta-blockade reduced mortality after emergency colonic cancer surgery.

    METHODS: This cohort study used the prospectively collected Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry to recruit all adult patients requiring emergency colonic cancer surgery between 2011 and 2016. Patients were subdivided into those receiving regular beta-blocker therapy before surgery and those who were not (control). Demographics and clinical outcomes were compared. Risk factors for 30-day mortality were evaluated using Poisson regression analysis.

    RESULTS: A total of 3187 patients were included, of whom 685 (21·5 per cent) used regular beta-blocker therapy before surgery. The overall 30-day mortality rate was significantly reduced in the beta-blocker group compared with controls: 3·1 (95 per cent c.i. 1·9 to 4·7) versus 8·6 (7·6 to 9·8) per cent respectively (P < 0·001). Beta-blocker therapy was the only modifiable protective factor identified in multivariable analysis of 30-day all-cause mortality (incidence rate ratio 0·31, 95 per cent c.i. 0·20 to 0·47; P < 0·001) and was associated with a significant reduction in death of cardiovascular, respiratory, sepsis and multiple organ failure origin.

    CONCLUSION: Preoperative beta-blocker therapy may be associated with a reduction in 30-day mortality following emergency colonic cancer surgery.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    John Wiley & Sons, 2019
    National Category
    Surgery Cancer and Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-69119 (URN)10.1002/bjs.10988 (DOI)000459801800023 ()30259967 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85053878738 (Scopus ID)
    Conference
    The Sixth Enhanced Recovery After Surgery World Congress, Stockholm, Sweden, May 2018.
    Note

    Published in abstract form as Clin Nutr 2018; 25 : 168. (DOI: 10.1016/j.clnesp.2018.03.009)

    The study was registered on 7 July 2017 with the Open Database for Research in Sweden. It was funded by the Örebro University Research Committee.

    Available from: 2018-10-01 Created: 2018-10-01 Last updated: 2024-03-06Bibliographically approved
    5. The Effects of Beta-Blocker Therapy on Mortality After Elective Colon Cancer Surgery
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Effects of Beta-Blocker Therapy on Mortality After Elective Colon Cancer Surgery
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-74247 (URN)
    Available from: 2019-05-13 Created: 2019-05-13 Last updated: 2024-03-06Bibliographically approved
    6. β-Blockade in Rectal Cancer Surgery: A Simple Measure of Improving Outcomes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>β-Blockade in Rectal Cancer Surgery: A Simple Measure of Improving Outcomes
    Show others...
    2020 (English)In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 271, no 1, p. 140-146Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain whether regular β-blocker exposure can improve short- and long-term outcomes after rectal cancer surgery.

    BACKGROUND: Surgery for rectal cancer is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. There is increasing evidence to suggest that there is a survival benefit in patients exposed to β-blockers undergoing non-cardiac surgery. Studies investigating the effects on outcomes in patients subjected to surgery for rectal cancer are lacking.

    METHODS: All adult patients undergoing elective abdominal resection for rectal cancer over a 10-year period were recruited from the prospectively collected Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry. Patients were subdivided according to preoperative β-blocker exposure status. Outcomes of interest were 30-day complications, 30-day cause-specific mortality, and 1-year all-cause mortality. The association between β-blocker use and outcomes were analyzed using Poisson regression model with robust standard errors for 30-day complications and cause-specific mortality. One-year survival was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression model.

    RESULTS: A total of 11,966 patients were included in the current study, of whom 3513 (29.36%) were exposed to regular preoperative β-blockers. A significant decrease in 30-day mortality was detected (incidence rate ratio = 0.06, 95% confidence interval: 0.03-0.13, P < 0.001). Deaths of cardiovascular nature, respiratory origin, sepsis, and multiorgan failure were significantly lower in β-blocker users, as were the incidences in postoperative infection and anastomotic failure. The β-blocker positive group had significantly better survival up to 1 year postoperatively with a risk reduction of 57% (hazard ratio = 0.43, 95% confidence interval: 0.37-0.52, P < 0.001).

    CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative β-blocker use is strongly associated with improved survival and morbidity after abdominal resection for rectal cancer.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2020
    Keywords
    beta-blocker, mortality, rectal cancer, surgery
    National Category
    Surgery Cancer and Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-74248 (URN)10.1097/SLA.0000000000002970 (DOI)000525016300026 ()30048321 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85077036188 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2019-05-13 Created: 2019-05-13 Last updated: 2024-03-06Bibliographically approved
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  • 7.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Barmparas, Galinos
    Division of Acute Care Surgery and Surgical Critical Care, Department of Surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, USA.
    Riddez, Louis
    Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ley, Eric J.
    Division of Acute Care Surgery and Surgical Critical Care, Department of Surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, USA.
    Wallin, Göran
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Does beta-blockade reduce the risk of depression in patients with isolated severe extracranial injuries?2017In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 41, no 7, p. 1801-1806Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Approximately half of trauma patients develop post-traumatic depression. It is suggested that beta-blockade impairs trauma memory recollection, reducing depressive symptoms. This study investigates the effect of early beta-blockade on depression following severe traumatic injuries in patients without significant brain injury.

    METHODS: Patients were identified by retrospectively reviewing the trauma registry at an urban university hospital between 2007 and 2011. Severe extracranial injuries were defined as extracranial injuries with Abbreviated Injury Scale score ≥3, intracranial Abbreviated Injury Scale score <3 and an Injury Severity Score ≥16. In-hospital deaths and patients prescribed antidepressant therapy ≤1 year prior to admission were excluded. Patients were stratified into groups based on pre-admission beta-blocker status. The primary outcome was post-traumatic depression, defined as receiving antidepressants ≤1 year following trauma.

    RESULTS: Five hundred and ninety-six patients met the inclusion criteria with 11.4% prescribed pre-admission beta-blockade. Patients receiving beta-blockers were significantly older (57 ± 18 vs. 42 ± 17 years, p < 0.001) with lower Glasgow Coma Scale score (12 ± 3 vs. 14 ± 2, p < 0.001). The beta-blocked cohort spent significantly longer in hospital (21 ± 20 vs. 15 ± 17 days, p < 0.01) and intensive care (4 ± 7 vs. 3 ± 5 days, p = 0.01). A forward logistic regression model was applied and predicted lack of beta-blockade to be associated with increased risk of depression (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.1-7.2, p = 0.04). After adjusting for group differences, patients lacking beta-blockers demonstrated an increased risk of depression (AOR 3.3, 95% CI 1.2-8.6, p = 0.02).

    CONCLUSIONS: Pre-admission beta-blockade is associated with a significantly reduced risk of depression following severe traumatic injury. Further investigation is needed to determine the beneficial effects of beta-blockade in these instances.

  • 8.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Sweden Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Forssten, Maximilian Peter
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Pourlotfi, Arvid
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Bass, Gary Alan
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Division of Traumatology, Surgical Critical Care and Emergency Surgery, Penn Medicine, Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
    Matthiessen, Peter
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Division of Colorectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    The Association Between Revised Cardiac Risk Index and Postoperative Mortality Following Elective Colon Cancer Surgery: A Retrospective Nationwide Cohort Study2021In: Scandinavian Journal of Surgery, ISSN 1457-4969, E-ISSN 1799-7267, Vol. 111, no 1, article id 14574969211037588Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Despite improvements in the perioperative care during the last decades for oncologic colon resection, there is still a substantial risk for postoperative complications and mortality. Opportunities exist for improvement in preoperative risk stratification in this patient population. We hypothesize that the Revised Cardiac Risk Index, a user-friendly tool, could better identify patients with high postoperative mortality risks.

    METHODS: A retrospective analysis of operated patients between the years 2007 and 2017 was undertaken, using the prospectively recorded Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry, which has a 99.5% national coverage for all cases of colon cancer. Patients were cross-referenced with the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare dataset, a government registry of mortality and comorbidity data. Revised Cardiac Risk Index (RCRI) scores were calculated for each patient and stratified into four groups (RCRI 1, 2, 3, ⩾ 4). A Poisson regression model with robust standard errors of variance was employed to correlate the 90-day postoperative survival with each level of the Revised Cardiac Risk Index.

    RESULTS: A total of 24,198 patients met the study inclusion criteria. 90-day postoperative mortality increased from 2.4% in patients with RCRI 1 to 10.1% in patients with RCRI ⩾ 4 (p < 0.001). Adjusted 90-day postoperative mortality increased linearly with an increasing RCRI, where an RCRI of 2, 3, and ≥ 4 respectively led to a 46%, 80%, and 167% increased risk of mortality compared to RCRI 1 (p < 0.001).

    CONCLUSIONS: A strong association between an increasing Revised Cardiac Risk Index score and increased 90-day postoperative mortality risk was detected. The Revised Cardiac Risk Index may facilitate risk stratification of patients undergoing elective colon cancer surgery.

  • 9.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Rickard
    Örebro University Hospital. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Unit of Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Riddez, Louis
    Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Orebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Risk factors for depression following traumatic injury: An epidemiological study from a scandinavian trauma center2017In: Injury, ISSN 0020-1383, E-ISSN 1879-0267, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 1082-1087Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: A significant proportion of patients suffer depression following traumatic injuries. Once manifested, major depression is challenging to overcome and its presence risks impairing the potential for physical rehabilitation and functional recovery. Risk stratification for early detection and intervention in these instances is important. This study aims to investigate patient and injury characteristics associated with an increased risk for depression.

    METHODS: All patients with traumatic injuries were recruited from the trauma registry of an urban university hospital between 2007 and 2012. Patient and injury characteristics as well as outcomes were collected for analysis. Patients under the age of eighteen, prescribed antidepressants within one year of admission, in-hospital deaths and deaths within 30days of trauma were excluded. Pre- and post-admission antidepressant data was requested from the national drugs registry. Post-traumatic depression was defined as the prescription of antidepressants within one year of trauma. To isolate independent risk factors for depression a multivariable forward stepwise logistic regression model was deployed.

    RESULTS: A total of 5981 patients met the inclusion criteria of whom 9.2% (n=551) developed post-traumatic depression. The mean age of the cohort was 42 [standard deviation (SD) 18] years and 27.1% (n=1620) were females. The mean injury severity score was 9 (SD 9) with 18.4% (n=1100) of the patients assigned a score of at least 16. Six variables were identified as independent predictors for post-traumatic depression. Factors relating to the patient were female gender and age. Injury-specific variables were penetrating trauma and GCS score of≤8 on admission. Furthermore, intensive care admission and increasing hospital length of stay were predictors of depression.

    CONCLUSION: Several risk factors associated with the development of post-traumatic depression were identified. A better targeted in-hospital screening and patient-centered follow up can be offered taking these risk factors into consideration.

  • 10.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Matthiessen, P.
    School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fang, X.
    Unit of Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Unit of Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; .
    Sjölin, Gabriel
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery.
    Lindgren, R.
    Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Surgery.
    Effect of beta-blocker therapy on early mortality after emergency colonic cancer surgery2019In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 106, no 4, p. 477-483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Emergency colorectal cancer surgery is associated with significant mortality. Induced adrenergic hyperactivity is thought to be an important contributor. Downregulating the effects of circulating catecholamines may reduce the risk of adverse outcomes. This study assessed whether regular preoperative beta-blockade reduced mortality after emergency colonic cancer surgery.

    METHODS: This cohort study used the prospectively collected Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry to recruit all adult patients requiring emergency colonic cancer surgery between 2011 and 2016. Patients were subdivided into those receiving regular beta-blocker therapy before surgery and those who were not (control). Demographics and clinical outcomes were compared. Risk factors for 30-day mortality were evaluated using Poisson regression analysis.

    RESULTS: A total of 3187 patients were included, of whom 685 (21·5 per cent) used regular beta-blocker therapy before surgery. The overall 30-day mortality rate was significantly reduced in the beta-blocker group compared with controls: 3·1 (95 per cent c.i. 1·9 to 4·7) versus 8·6 (7·6 to 9·8) per cent respectively (P < 0·001). Beta-blocker therapy was the only modifiable protective factor identified in multivariable analysis of 30-day all-cause mortality (incidence rate ratio 0·31, 95 per cent c.i. 0·20 to 0·47; P < 0·001) and was associated with a significant reduction in death of cardiovascular, respiratory, sepsis and multiple organ failure origin.

    CONCLUSION: Preoperative beta-blocker therapy may be associated with a reduction in 30-day mortality following emergency colonic cancer surgery.

  • 11.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Matthiessen, Peter
    School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Division of Colorectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Sjölin, Gabriel
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    The Relationship Between Severe Complications, Beta-Blocker Therapy and Long-Term Survival Following Emergency Surgery for Colon Cancer2019In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 43, no 10, p. 2527-2535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Emergency surgery for colon cancer carries significant morbidity, and studies show more than doubled mortality when comparing elective to emergency surgery. The relationship between postoperative complications and survival has been outlined. Beta-blocker therapy has been linked to improved postoperative outcomes. This study aims to assess the impact of postoperative complications on long-term survival following emergency surgery for colon cancer and to determine whether beta-blockade can reduce complications.

    STUDY DESIGN: This cohort study utilized the prospective Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry to identify adults undergoing emergency colon cancer surgery between 2011 and 2016. Prescription data for preoperative beta-blocker therapy were collected from the national drug registry. Cox regression was used to evaluate the effect of beta-blocker exposure and complications on 1-year mortality, and Poisson regression was used to evaluate beta-blocker exposure in patients with major complications.

    RESULTS: A total of 3139 patients were included with a mean age of 73.1 [12.4] of which 671 (21.4%) were prescribed beta-blockers prior to surgery. Major complications occurred in 375 (11.9%) patients. Those suffering major complications showed a threefold increase in 1-year mortality (adjusted HR = 3.29; 95% CI 2.75-3.94; p < 0.001). Beta-blocker use was linked to a 60% risk reduction in 1-year mortality (adjusted HR = 0.40; 95% CI 0.26-0.62; p < 0.001) but did not show a statistically significant association with reductions in major complications (adjusted IRR = 0.77; 95% CI 0.59-1.00; p = 0.055).

    CONCLUSION: The development of major complications after emergency colon cancer surgery is associated with increased mortality during one year after surgery. Beta-blocker therapy may protect against postoperative complications.

  • 12.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Matthiessen, Peter
    School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fang, Xin
    Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Sjölin, Gabriel
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Rickard
    Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Surgery.
    β-Blockade in Rectal Cancer Surgery: A Simple Measure of Improving Outcomes2020In: Annals of Surgery, ISSN 0003-4932, E-ISSN 1528-1140, Vol. 271, no 1, p. 140-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain whether regular β-blocker exposure can improve short- and long-term outcomes after rectal cancer surgery.

    BACKGROUND: Surgery for rectal cancer is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. There is increasing evidence to suggest that there is a survival benefit in patients exposed to β-blockers undergoing non-cardiac surgery. Studies investigating the effects on outcomes in patients subjected to surgery for rectal cancer are lacking.

    METHODS: All adult patients undergoing elective abdominal resection for rectal cancer over a 10-year period were recruited from the prospectively collected Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry. Patients were subdivided according to preoperative β-blocker exposure status. Outcomes of interest were 30-day complications, 30-day cause-specific mortality, and 1-year all-cause mortality. The association between β-blocker use and outcomes were analyzed using Poisson regression model with robust standard errors for 30-day complications and cause-specific mortality. One-year survival was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression model.

    RESULTS: A total of 11,966 patients were included in the current study, of whom 3513 (29.36%) were exposed to regular preoperative β-blockers. A significant decrease in 30-day mortality was detected (incidence rate ratio = 0.06, 95% confidence interval: 0.03-0.13, P < 0.001). Deaths of cardiovascular nature, respiratory origin, sepsis, and multiorgan failure were significantly lower in β-blocker users, as were the incidences in postoperative infection and anastomotic failure. The β-blocker positive group had significantly better survival up to 1 year postoperatively with a risk reduction of 57% (hazard ratio = 0.43, 95% confidence interval: 0.37-0.52, P < 0.001).

    CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative β-blocker use is strongly associated with improved survival and morbidity after abdominal resection for rectal cancer.

  • 13.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Matthiessen, Peter
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sjölin, Gabriel
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Wallin, Göran
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Effects of beta-blocker therapy on mortality after elective colon cancer surgery: a Swedish nationwide cohort study2020In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 10, no 7, article id e036164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Colon cancer surgery remains associated with substantial postoperative morbidity and mortality despite advances in surgical techniques and care. The trauma of surgery triggers adrenergic hyperactivation which drives adverse stress responses. We hypothesised that outcome benefits are gained by reducing the effects of hyperadrenergic activity with beta-blocker therapy in patients undergoing colon cancer surgery. This study aims to test this hypothesis.

    DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study.

    SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: This is a nationwide study which includes all adult patients undergoing elective colon cancer surgery in Sweden over 10 years. Patient data were collected from the Swedish Colorectal Cancer Registry. The national drugs registry was used to obtain information about beta-blocker use. Patients were subdivided into exposed and unexposed groups. The association between beta-blockade, short-term and long-term mortality was evaluated using Poisson regression, Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox regression.

    PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOMES: Primary outcome of interest was 1-year all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes included 90-day all-cause and 5-year cancer-specific mortality.

    RESULTS: The study included 22 337 patients of whom 36.1% were prescribed preoperative beta-blockers. Survival was higher in patients on beta-blockers up to 1 year after surgery despite this group being significantly older and of higher comorbidity. Regression analysis demonstrated significant reductions in 90-day deaths (IRR 0.29, 95% CI 0.24 to 0.35, p<0.001) and a 43% risk reduction in 1-year all-cause mortality (adjusted HR 0.57, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.63, p<0.001) in beta-blocked patients. In addition, cancer-specific mortality up to 5 years after surgery was reduced in beta-blocked patients (adjusted HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.73 to 0.88, p<0.001).

    CONCLUSION: Preoperative beta-blockade is associated with significant reductions in postoperative short-term and long-term mortality following elective colon cancer surgery. Its potential prophylactic effect warrants further interventional studies to determine whether beta-blockade can be used as a way of improving outcomes for this patient group.

  • 14.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Matthiessen, Peter
    School of Medical Science, Örebro University, Örebro, sweden; Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sjölin, Gabriel
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital.
    Wallin, Göran
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Surgery.
    The Effects of Beta-Blocker Therapy on Mortality After Elective Colon Cancer SurgeryManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Phelan, Herb A
    Univ of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Parkland Memorial Hospital, Dallas, USA.
    Dogan, Sinan
    Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Cao, Yang
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Unit of Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cook, Allyson C.
    UT-Southwestern Medical Center. Parkland Memorial Hospital, Dallas, USA.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Predicting In-Hospital and 1-Year Mortality in Geriatric Trauma Patients Using Geriatric Trauma Outcome Score2017In: Journal of the American College of Surgeons, ISSN 1072-7515, E-ISSN 1879-1190, Vol. 224, no 3, p. 264-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Geriatric Trauma Outcome Score, GTOS (= [age] + [Injury Severity Score (ISS)x2.5] + 22 [if packed red blood cells (PRBC) transfused ≤24hrs of admission]), was developed and validated as a prognostic indicator for in-hospital mortality in elderly trauma patients. However, GTOS neither provides information regarding post-discharge outcomes, nor discriminates between patients dying with and without care restrictions. Isolating the latter, GTOS prediction performance was examined during admission and 1-year post-discharge in a mature European trauma registry.

    Study Design: All trauma admissions ≥65years in a university hospital during 2007-2011 were considered. Data regarding age, ISS, PRBC transfusion ≤24hrs, therapy restrictions, discharge disposition and mortality were collected. In-hospital deaths with therapy restrictions and patients discharged to hospice were excluded. GTOS was the sole predictor in a logistic regression model estimating mortality probabilities. Performance of the model was assessed by misclassification rate, Brier score and area under the curve (AUC).

    Results: The study population was 1080 subjects with a median age of 75 years, mean ISS of 10 and PRBC transfused in 8.2%). In-hospital mortality was 14.9% and 7.7% after exclusions. Misclassification rate fell from 14% to 6.5%, Brier score from 0.09 to 0.05. AUC increased from 0.87 to 0.88. Equivalent values for the original GTOS sample were 9.8%, 0.07, and 0.87. One-year mortality follow-up showed a misclassification rate of 17.6%, and Brier score of 0.13.

    Conclusion: Excluding patients with care restrictions and discharged to hospice improved GTOS performance for in-hospital mortality prediction. GTOS is not adept at predicting 1-year mortality.

  • 16.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjölin, Gabriel
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Corrigendum to "Does early beta-blockade in isolated severe traumatic brain injury reduce the risk of post traumatic depression?": [Injury 48 (2017) 101–105]2017In: Injury, ISSN 0020-1383, E-ISSN 1879-0267, Vol. 48, no 11, p. 2612-2612Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjölin, Gabriel
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Does early beta-blockade in isolated severe traumatic brain injury reduce the risk of post traumatic depression?2017In: Injury, ISSN 0020-1383, E-ISSN 1879-0267, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 101-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Depressive symptoms occur in approximately half of trauma patients, negatively impacting on functional outcome and quality of life following severe head injury. Pontine noradrenaline has been shown to increase upon trauma and associated beta-adrenergic receptor activation appears to consolidate memory formation of traumatic events. Blocking adrenergic activity reduces physiological stress responses during recall of traumatic memories and impairs memory, implying a potential therapeutic role of beta-blockers. This study examines the effect of pre-admission beta-blockade on post-traumatic depression.

    Methods: All adult trauma patients (>= 18 years) with severe, isolated traumatic brain injury (intracranial Abbreviated Injury Scale score (AIS) >= 3 and extracranial AIS <3) were recruited from the trauma registry of an urban university hospital between 2007 and 2011. Exclusion criteria were in-hospital deaths and prescription of antidepressants up to one year prior to admission. Pre- and post-admission beta-blocker and antidepressant therapy data was requested from the national drugs registry. Post-traumatic depression was defined as the prescription of antidepressants within one year of trauma. Patients with and without pre-admission beta-blockers were matched 1: 1 by age, gender, Glasgow Coma Scale, Injury Severity Score and head AIS. Analysis was carried out using McNemar's and Student's t-test for categorical and continuous data, respectively.

    Results: A total of 545 patients met the study criteria. Of these, 15% (n = 80) were prescribed beta-blockers. After propensity matching, 80 matched pairs were analyzed. 33% (n = 26) of non beta-blocked patients developed post-traumatic depression, compared to only 18% (n = 14) in the beta-blocked group (p = 0.04). There were no significant differences in ICU (mean days: 5.8 (SD 10.5) vs. 5.6 (SD 7.2), p = 0.85) or hospital length of stay (mean days: 21 (SD 21) vs. 21 (SD 20), p = 0.94) between cohorts.

    Conclusion: beta-blockade appears to act prophylactically and significantly reduces the risk of posttraumatic depression in patients suffering from isolated severe traumatic brain injuries. Further prospective randomized studies are warranted to validate this finding.

  • 18.
    Ahl, Rebecka
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden ; .
    Thelin, Eric Peter
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sjölin, Gabriel
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bellander, Bo Michael
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Riddez, Louis
    Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Talving, Peep
    Department of Surgery, Tartu University Hospital, Tartu, Estonia.
    Mohseni, Shahin
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Department of Surgery, Orebro University Hospital, Orebro, Sweden.
    β-Blocker after severe traumatic brain injury is associated with better long-term functional outcome: a matched case control study2017In: European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, ISSN 1863-9933, E-ISSN 1863-9941, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 783-789Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the predominant cause of death and disability following trauma. Several studies have observed improved survival in TBI patients exposed to β-blockers, however, the effect on functional outcome is poorly documented.

    METHODS: Adult patients with severe TBI (head AIS ≥ 3) were identified from a prospectively collected TBI database over a 5-year period. Patients with neurosurgical ICU length of stay <48 h and those dying within 48 h of admission were excluded. Patients exposed to β-blockers ≤ 48 h after admission and who continued with treatment until discharge constituted β-blocked cases and were matched to non β-blocked controls using propensity score matching. The outcome of interest was Glasgow Outcome Scores (GOS), as a measure of functional outcome up to 12 months after injury. GOS ≤ 3 was considered a poor outcome. Bivariate analysis was deployed to determine differences between groups. Odds ratio and 95% CI were used to assess the effect of β-blockers on GOS.

    RESULTS: 362 patients met the inclusion criteria with 21% receiving β-blockers during admission. After propensity matching, 76 matched pairs were available for analysis. There were no statistical differences in any variables included in the analysis. Mean hospital length of stay was shorter in the β-blocked cases (18.0 vs. 26.8 days, p < 0.01). The risk of poor long-term functional outcome was more than doubled in non-β-blocked controls (OR 2.44, 95% CI 1.01-6.03, p = 0.03).

    CONCLUSION: Exposure to β-blockers in patients with severe TBI appears to improve functional outcome. Further prospective randomized trials are warranted.

  • 19.
    Ahlman, B.
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Karolinska Hospital, Sweden.
    Andersson, K.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Persson, B.
    Wernerman, J.
    Elective abdominal surgery alters the free amino acid content of the human intestinal mucosa1995In: European Journal of Surgery, ISSN 1102-4151, E-ISSN 1741-9271, Vol. 161, no 8, p. 593-601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To assess the impact of a standard moderately severe surgical operation on the mucosal amino acid content of the duodenum and the colon.

    Design: Open study.

    Setting: University hospital, Sweden.

    Subjects: Nine patients who were to undergo elective open cholecystectomy.

    Interventions: Endoscopically obtained biopsy specimens from the intestinal mucosa. Main outcome measures: Changes in the content of free amino acids in the duodenum and colon at three days postoperatively.

    Results: The concentration of glutamine in the duodenum increased by 27% and that of glutamic acid by 34% after operation, whereas their content in colon remained unaltered. The concentration of branched chain amino acids increased by 26% in the duodenal mucosa after operation and by 24% in the colonic mucosa. The total concentration of amino acids (excluding taurine) increased by 9% in the duodenum, but remained unaltered in the colon.

    Conclusion: This study shows characteristic and consistent alterations in the free amino acid content of the intestinal tract after a moderately severe operation.

  • 20.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Atrial fibrillation in cardiac surgery2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia seen in clinical practice. In cardiac surgery, one-third of the patients experience episodes of AF during the first postoperative days (postoperative AF), and patients with preoperative AF (concomitant AF) can be offered ablation procedures in conjunction with surgery, in order to restore ordinary sinus rhythm (SR). The aim of this work was to study the relation between postoperative AF and inflammation; the long-term consequences of postoperative AF on mortality and late arrhythmia; and atrial function after concomitant surgical ablation for AF.

    In 524 open-heart surgery patients, C-reactive protein (CRP) serum concentrations were measured before and on the third day after surgery. There was no correlation between levels of CRP and the development of postoperative AF.

    All 1,419 patients with no history of AF, undergoing primary aortocoronary bypass surgery (CABG) in the years 1997–2000 were followed up after 8.0 years. The mortality rate was 191 deaths/1,000 patients (19.1%) in patients with no AF and 140 deaths/419 patients (33.4%) in patients with postoperative AF. Postoperative AF was an age-independent risk factor for late mortality, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.56 (95% CI 1.23–1.98). Postoperative AF patients had a more than doubled risk of death due to cerebral ischaemia, myocardial infarction, sudden death, and heart failure compared with patients without AF.

    All 571 consecutive patients undergoing primary CABG during the years 1999–2000 were followed-up after 6 years. Questionnaires were obtained from 91.6% of surviving patients and an electrocardiogram (ECG) from 88.3% of all patients. In postoperative AF patients, 14.1% had AF at follow-up, compared with 2.8% of patients with no AF at surgery (p<.001). An episode of postoperative AF was found to be an independent risk factor for development of late AF, with an adjusted risk ratio (RR) of 3.11 (95% CI 1.41–6.87).

    Epicardial microwave ablation was performed in 20 open-heart surgery patients with concomitant AF. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed preoperatively and at 6 months postoperatively. At 12 months postoperatively 14/19 patients (74%) were in SR with no anti-arrhythmic drugs. All patients in SR had preserved left and right atrial filling waves (A-waves) and Tissue velocity echocardiography (TVE) showed preserved atrial wall velocities and atrial strain.

    In conclusion, postoperative AF is an independent risk factor for late mortality and later development of AF. There is no correlation between the inflammatory marker CRP and postoperative AF. Epicardial microwave ablation of concomitant AF results in SR in the majority of patients and seems to preserve atrial mechanical function.

    List of papers
    1. Postoperative atrial fibrillation is not correlated to C-reactive protein
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Postoperative atrial fibrillation is not correlated to C-reactive protein
    2007 (English)In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 0003-4975, E-ISSN 1552-6259, Vol. 83, no 4, p. 1332-1337Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The peak incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) occurs around the second postoperative day, a time at which serum inflammatory markers are elevated. The aim of this study was to investigate differences between patients with and without postoperative AF with special regard to C-reactive protein (CRP) serum levels. METHODS: The study cohort included all heart surgery patients who had sinus rhythm preoperatively, survived postoperative day 3, and were operated on between July 1, 2004, and June 30, 2005 (n = 524). Any episode of AF during the first 7 postoperative days defined the patient as belonging to the postoperative AF group. Creatine kinase-myocardial band (CK-MB) was measured at postoperative day 1, and CRP was measured preoperatively and at postoperative day 3. Risk factors for postoperative AF were determined using bivariate and multivariate regression analysis. RESULTS: Of 524 patients, 182 had at least one episode of AF (34.7%). Preoperative and postoperative CRP concentrations did not differ between the groups (postoperative CRP 175.4 +/- 64.4 versus 175.3 +/- 60.1 mg/L respectively, p = 0.99). Atrial fibrillation patients were significantly older (p < 0.001) and had higher CK-MB levels (33.6 +/- 53.1 microg/L versus 22.5 +/- 26.7 microg/L, respectively, p = 0.009). The odds ratio for postoperative AF with postoperative CK-MB greater than 70 microg/L was 3.5 (confidence interval: 1.4 to 8.6). CONCLUSIONS: Postoperative AF has no correlation to the inflammatory marker CRP in heart surgery patients. Ischemic myocardial injury might predispose for postoperative AF.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Surgery Surgery
    Research subject
    Surgery esp. Thoracic and Cardivascular Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-2986 (URN)10.1016/j.athoracsur.2006.11.047 (DOI)000245178900016 ()17383336 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-33947328899 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2008-09-01 Created: 2008-09-01 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
    2. Patients with postoperative atrial fibrillation have a doubled cardiovascular mortality
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients with postoperative atrial fibrillation have a doubled cardiovascular mortality
    (English)Manuscript (Other academic)
    National Category
    Surgery
    Research subject
    Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-2987 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-09-01 Created: 2008-09-01 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
    3. Postoperative atrial fibrillation as risk factor for late arrhythmia and cardiovascular death: a six-year follow-up after coronary artery bypass surgery
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Postoperative atrial fibrillation as risk factor for late arrhythmia and cardiovascular death: a six-year follow-up after coronary artery bypass surgery
    (English)Manuscript (Other academic)
    National Category
    Surgery
    Research subject
    Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-2988 (URN)
    Available from: 2008-09-01 Created: 2008-09-01 Last updated: 2017-10-18Bibliographically approved
    4. Atrial function after epicardial microwave ablation in patients with atrial fibrillation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Atrial function after epicardial microwave ablation in patients with atrial fibrillation
    2008 (English)In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 192-201Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To study epicardial microwave ablation of concomitant atrial fibrillation and its effects on heart rhythm and atrial function during follow-up. DESIGN: The study included 20 open-heart surgery patients with concomitant atrial fibrillation. Transthoracic echocardiography with flow and tissue Doppler recordings was performed preoperatively and at 6 months postoperatively. Blood samples were obtained preoperatively and postoperatively for analysis of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and amino terminal precursor of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). RESULTS: Fourteen of 19 patients (74%) were in sinus rhythm with no antiarrhythmic drugs at 12 months. All patients in sinus rhythm had preserved left and right atrial-filling waves through atrioventricular valves during atrial contraction. Tissue velocity echocardiography on patients in sinus rhythm showed preserved atrial wall velocities, atrial strain, and atrial strain rate. Levels of natriuretic peptides tended to decrease in patients with stable sinus rhythm at one year compared to patients in atrial fibrillation. CONCLUSIONS: Epicardial microwave ablation results in sinus rhythm in a majority of patients and seems to preserve atrial mechanical function

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Taylor & Francis, 2008
    Keywords
    Aged, Atrial Fibrillation/metabolism/physiopathology/*surgery/ultrasonography, Atrial Function, Atrial Natriuretic Factor/blood, Biological Markers/blood, Catheter Ablation/adverse effects/*methods, Echocardiography; Doppler, Female, Heart Conduction System/*physiopathology, Humans, Male, Microwaves/*therapeutic use, Middle Aged, Myocardial Contraction, Natriuretic Peptide; Brain/blood, Peptide Fragments/blood, Pericardium/*surgery, Prospective Studies, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Surgery
    Research subject
    Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-3585 (URN)10.1080/14017430701882418 (DOI)000256974500004 ()18569951 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-45849107286 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2008-12-11 Created: 2008-12-11 Last updated: 2022-07-07Bibliographically approved
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  • 21.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Bodin, Lennart
    Fengsrud, Espen
    Englund, Anders
    Patients with postoperative atrial fibrillation have a doubled cardiovascular mortalityManuscript (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Fengsrud, Espen
    Bodin, Lennart
    Englund, Anders
    Postoperative atrial fibrillation as risk factor for late arrhythmia and cardiovascular death: a six-year follow-up after coronary artery bypass surgeryManuscript (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Friberg, Örjan
    Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden; School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Källman, Jan
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Infectious Diseases, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    An angry cat causing Pasteurella multocida endocarditis and aortic valve replacement: A case report2016In: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports, E-ISSN 2210-2612, Vol. 24, p. 91-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Cat bite infections usually involve a mix of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria including species of Pasteurella, Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Bacteroides, and Fusobacterium. We report a case of Pasteurella multocida infection from cat bites leading to endocarditis and subsequent aortic valve replacement.

    PRESENTATION OF CASE: A 70-year-old male was admitted because of fever, tachycardia, and malaise. He had a history of alcohol abuse and was living alone with a cat in a rural area. A sepsis of unknown origin was suspected, and intravenous treatment with gentamicin and cefotaxime was initiated. Blood cultures yielded Pasteurella multocida, and the patient history revealed repeated cat bites. After four days, the patient was discharged with oral penicillin V treatment. Two weeks later, the patient returned with fever and a new systolic murmur. An aortic valve endocarditis was diagnosed, and it became clear that the patient had not completed the prescribed penicillin V treatment. The patient underwent a biological aortic valve replacement with debridement of an annular abscess, and the postoperative course was uneventful.

    DISCUSSION: Endocarditis due to Pasteurella is extremely rare, and there are only a few reports in the literature. Predisposing factors in the present case were alcohol abuse and reduced compliance to treatment.

    CONCLUSION: Cat bites are often deep, and in rare circumstances can lead to life-threatening endocarditis. Proper surgical revision, antibiotic treatment, and patient compliance are necessary components in patient care to avoid this complication.

  • 24.
    Ahlsson, Anders J.
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Bodin, Lennart
    Lundblad, Olof H.
    Englund, Anders G.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Postoperative atrial fibrillation is not correlated to C-reactive protein2007In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 0003-4975, E-ISSN 1552-6259, Vol. 83, no 4, p. 1332-1337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The peak incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) occurs around the second postoperative day, a time at which serum inflammatory markers are elevated. The aim of this study was to investigate differences between patients with and without postoperative AF with special regard to C-reactive protein (CRP) serum levels. METHODS: The study cohort included all heart surgery patients who had sinus rhythm preoperatively, survived postoperative day 3, and were operated on between July 1, 2004, and June 30, 2005 (n = 524). Any episode of AF during the first 7 postoperative days defined the patient as belonging to the postoperative AF group. Creatine kinase-myocardial band (CK-MB) was measured at postoperative day 1, and CRP was measured preoperatively and at postoperative day 3. Risk factors for postoperative AF were determined using bivariate and multivariate regression analysis. RESULTS: Of 524 patients, 182 had at least one episode of AF (34.7%). Preoperative and postoperative CRP concentrations did not differ between the groups (postoperative CRP 175.4 +/- 64.4 versus 175.3 +/- 60.1 mg/L respectively, p = 0.99). Atrial fibrillation patients were significantly older (p < 0.001) and had higher CK-MB levels (33.6 +/- 53.1 microg/L versus 22.5 +/- 26.7 microg/L, respectively, p = 0.009). The odds ratio for postoperative AF with postoperative CK-MB greater than 70 microg/L was 3.5 (confidence interval: 1.4 to 8.6). CONCLUSIONS: Postoperative AF has no correlation to the inflammatory marker CRP in heart surgery patients. Ischemic myocardial injury might predispose for postoperative AF.

  • 25.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Jidéus, Lena
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Albåge, Anders
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Källner, Göran
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Holmgren, Anders
    Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Boano, Gabriella
    Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hermansson, Ulf
    Linköping University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Kimblad, Per-Ola
    Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Scherstén, Henrik
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Sjögren, Johan
    Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Ståhle, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Åberg, Bengt
    Blekinge Hospital, Karlskrona, Sweden; Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berglin, Eva
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    A Swedish consensus on the surgical treatment of concomitant atrial fibrillation2012In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 212-218Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia among patients scheduled for open heart surgery and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. According to international guidelines, symptomatic and selected asymptomatic patients should be offered concomitant surgical AF ablation in conjunction with valvular or coronary surgery. The gold standard in AF surgery is the Cox Maze III ("cut-and-sew") procedure, with surgical incisions in both atria according to a specified pattern, in order to prevent AF reentry circuits from developing. Over 90% of patients treated with the Cox Maze III procedure are free of AF after 1 year. Recent developments in ablation technology have introduced several energy sources capable of creating nonconducting atrial wall lesions. In addition, simplified lesion patterns have been suggested, but results with these techniques have been unsatisfactory. There is a clear need for standardization in AF surgery. The Swedish Arrhythmia Surgery Group, represented by surgeons from all Swedish units for cardiothoracic surgery, has therefore reached a consensus on surgical treatment of concomitant AF. This consensus emphasizes adherence to the lesion pattern in the Cox Maze III procedure and the use of biatrial lesions in nonparoxysmal AF.

  • 26.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Linde, Peter
    Rask, Peter
    Englund, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Atrial function after epicardial microwave ablation in patients with atrial fibrillation2008In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 192-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To study epicardial microwave ablation of concomitant atrial fibrillation and its effects on heart rhythm and atrial function during follow-up. DESIGN: The study included 20 open-heart surgery patients with concomitant atrial fibrillation. Transthoracic echocardiography with flow and tissue Doppler recordings was performed preoperatively and at 6 months postoperatively. Blood samples were obtained preoperatively and postoperatively for analysis of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and amino terminal precursor of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). RESULTS: Fourteen of 19 patients (74%) were in sinus rhythm with no antiarrhythmic drugs at 12 months. All patients in sinus rhythm had preserved left and right atrial-filling waves through atrioventricular valves during atrial contraction. Tissue velocity echocardiography on patients in sinus rhythm showed preserved atrial wall velocities, atrial strain, and atrial strain rate. Levels of natriuretic peptides tended to decrease in patients with stable sinus rhythm at one year compared to patients in atrial fibrillation. CONCLUSIONS: Epicardial microwave ablation results in sinus rhythm in a majority of patients and seems to preserve atrial mechanical function

  • 27.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Örebro University Hospital. Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sandin, Mathias
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden. Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg, Örebro Univ Hosp, Örebro, Sweden.
    Souza, Domingos S. R.
    Örebro University Hospital. Dept Cardiothorac & Vasc Surg, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Annular abscess leading to free wall rupture2014In: European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1010-7940, E-ISSN 1873-734X, Vol. 45, no 2, p. E39-E39Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    et al.
    Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sobrosa, Claudio
    Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Kaijser, Lennart
    Division of Clinical Physiology and Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jansson, Eva
    Division of Clinical Physiology and Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bomfim, Vollmer
    Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Adenosine in cold blood cardioplegia: a placebo-controlled study2012In: Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1569-9293, E-ISSN 1569-9285, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 48-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Adenosine as an additive in blood cardioplegia is cardioprotective in animal studies, but its clinical role in myocardial protection remains controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the addition of adenosine in continuous cold blood cardioplegia would enhance myocardial protection.

    Methods: In a prospective double-blind study comparing adenosine 400 μmol l(-1) to placebo in continuous cold blood cardioplegia, 80 patients undergoing isolated aortic valve replacement were randomized into four groups: antegrade cardioplegia with adenosine (n = 19), antegrade cardioplegia with placebo (n = 21), retrograde cardioplegia with adenosine (n = 21) and retrograde cardioplegia with placebo (n = 19). Myocardial arteriovenous differences in oxygen and lactate were measured before, during and after aortic occlusion. Myocardial concentrations of adenine nucleotides and lactate were determined from left ventricular biopsies obtained before aortic occlusion, after bolus cardioplegia, at 60 min of aortic occlusion and at 20 min after aortic occlusion. Plasma creatine kinase (CK-MB) and troponin T were measured at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 24 h after aortic occlusion. Haemodynamic profiles were obtained before surgery and 1, 8 and 24 h after cardiopulmonary bypass. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used for significance testing.

    Results: Adenosine had no effects on myocardial metabolism of oxygen, lactate and adenine nucleotides, postoperative enzyme release or haemodynamic performance. When compared with the antegrade groups, the retrograde groups showed higher myocardial oxygen uptake (17.3 ± 11.4 versus 2.5 ± 3.6 ml l(-1) at 60 min of aortic occlusion, P < 0.001) and lactate accumulation (43.1 ± 20.7 versus 36.3 ± 23.0 µmol g(-1) at 60 min of aortic occlusion, P = 0.052) in the myocardium during aortic occlusion, and lower postoperative left ventricular stroke work index (27.2 ± 8.4 versus 30.1 ± 7.9 g m m(-2), P = 0.034).

    Conclusions: Adenosine 400 μmol l(-1) in cold blood cardioplegia showed no cardioprotective effects on the parameters studied. Myocardial ischaemia was more pronounced in patients receiving retrograde cardioplegia.

  • 29.
    Ahlsson, Anders
    et al.
    Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wickbom, Anders
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Geirsson, Arnar
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Landspitali University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Franco-Cereceda, Anders
    Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ahmad, Khalil
    Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark.
    Gunn, Jarmo
    Heart Center, Turku University Hospital and University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Hansson, Emma C.
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hjortdal, Vibeke
    Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark.
    Jarvela, Kati
    Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark.
    Jeppsson, Anders
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mennander, Ari
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nozohoor, Shahab
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pan, Emily
    Heart Center, Turku University Hospital and University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Zindovic, Igor
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Skane University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Skane University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Gudbjartsson, Tomas
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Landspitali University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Olsson, Christian
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Landspitali University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Is There a Weekend Effect in Surgery for Type A Dissection?: Results From the Nordic Consortium for Acute Type A Aortic Dissection Database2019In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 0003-4975, E-ISSN 1552-6259, Vol. 108, no 3, p. 770-776Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Aortic dissection type A requires immediate surgery. In general surgery populations, patients operated on during weekends have higher mortality rates compared with patients whose operations occur on weekdays. The weekend effect in aortic dissection type A has not been studied in detail.

    Methods: The Nordic Consortium for Acute Type A Aortic Dissection (NORCAAD) registry includes data for 1,159 patients who underwent type A dissection surgery at 8 Nordic centers during 2005 to 2014. This study is based on data relating to surgery conducted during weekdays versus weekends and starting between 8:00 AM and 8:00 Pm ("daytime") versus from 8:00 Pm to 8:00 AM ("nighttime"), as well as time from symptoms, admittance, and diagnosis to surgery. The influence of timing of surgery on the 30-day mortality rate was assessed using logistic regression analysis.

    Results: The 30-day mortality was 18% (204 of 1,159), with no difference in mortality between surgery performed on weekdays (17% [150 of 889]) and on weekends (20% [54 of 270], p = 0.45), or during nighttime (19% [87 of 467]) versus daytime (17% [117 of 680], p = 0.54). Time from symptoms to surgery (median 7.0 hours vs 6.5 hours, p = 0.31) did not differ between patients who survived and those who died at 30 days. Multivariable regression analysis of risk factors for 30-day mortality showed no weekend effect (odds ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 60.67 to 1.60; p = 0.875), but nighttime surgery was a risk factor (odds ratio, 2.43; 95% confidence interval, 1.29 to 4.56; p = 0.006).

    Conclusions: The 30-day mortality in surgical repair of aortic dissection type A was not significantly affected by timing of surgery during weekends versus weekdays. Nighttime surgery seems to predict increased 30-day mortality, after correction for other risk factors.

  • 30.
    Ahlstrand, Erik
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital. Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Medicine.
    Samuelsson, Jan
    Department of Hematology, University Hospital Linköping, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Marie
    Department of Medicine, Kalmar County Hospital, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Helna
    Division of Hematology, Specialist Medicine, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Liljeholm, Maria
    Department of Hematology, University Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ravn-Landtblom, Anna
    Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, Stockholm South Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Scheding, Stefan
    Division of Molecular Hematology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund Stem Cell Center, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Department of Hematology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Andréasson, Björn
    Division of Hematology, Specialist Medicine, NU Hospital Group, Uddevalla, Sweden.
    Highly Reduced Survival in Essential Thrombocythemia and Polycythemia Vera Patients with Vascular Complications during Follow-up2020In: European Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0902-4441, E-ISSN 1600-0609, Vol. 104, no 3, p. 271-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the relative importance of risk factors, treatments and blood counts for the occurrence of vascular complications and their impact on life expectancy in Essential Thrombocythemia (ET) and Polycythemia Vera (PV).

    METHODS: Nested case-control study within the Swedish MPN registry. From a cohort of 922 ET patients and 763 PV patients, 71 ET and 81 PV cases with vascular complications were compared to matched controls.

    RESULTS: Incidence of vascular complications were 2.0 and 3.4 events per 100 patient-years in ET and PV, respectively. At diagnosis, no significant risk factor differences were observed between cases and controls in neither of the diseases. At the time of vascular event, ET complication cases did not differ significantly from controls but in PV, cases had significantly higher WBCs and were to a lesser extent treated with antithrombotic and cytoreductive therapy. Life expectancy was significantly decreased in both ET and PV cases compared to controls.

    CONCLUSIONS: The risk of vascular complications is high in both ET and PV and these complications have a considerable impact on life expectancy. The protective effect of antithrombotic and cytoreductive therapy for vascular complications in PV underscores the importance of avoiding undertreatment.

  • 31.
    Ahlstrand, Rebecca
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Effects of anasthesia on esophageal sphincters2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The esophageal sphincters constitute the anatomical protection against pulmonary aspiration. The aim of this thesis was to study the esophageal sphincters and how they are affected by different components of emergency anesthesia using high-resolution solid-state manometry.

    The effect of propofol (0.3 mg/kg) was studied in young and elderly volunteers. Propofol can be given as an anxiolytic agent for manometric studies of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) without affecting the results. However, propofol is not recommended for studies of the upper esophageal sphincter (UES).

    The effects of cricoid pressure (CP) and peripheral pain were studied in awake volunteers, with and without remifentanil infusion (5 ng/ml). Pain did not affect pressure in the LES, but CP or remifentanil induced a significant decrease in LES pressure. However, neither CP nor remifentanil affected the barrier pressure (LES-intra gastric pressure). When CP was applied during ongoing remifentanil infusion, no further decrease in LES pressure was measured. CP induced high pressures in the area of the UES independent of remifentanil infusion, indicating that CP is effective in preventing gastroesophageal regurgitation.

    Barrier pressure was also studied in anesthetized patients after rocuronium (0.6 mg/kg) administration and no decrease was measured. In addition, alfentanil (20 μ/kg) added during anesthesia induction with propofol did not decrease the barrier pressure.

    In conclusion, CP seems to be effective in preventing regurgitation and does not affect barrier pressure. Muscle relaxation with rocuronium does not risk gastro-esophageal integrity. In addition, opioids can be integrated, even during emergency anethesia, without increasing the risk for pulmonary aspiration.

    List of papers
    1. Effects of propofol on oesophageal sphincters: a study on young and elderly volunteers using high-resolution solid-state manometry
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of propofol on oesophageal sphincters: a study on young and elderly volunteers using high-resolution solid-state manometry
    2011 (English)In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 273-278Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:

    The oesophageal sphincters play an important role in protecting the airway. During manometric studies, administration of an anxiolytic agent is often required to make insertion of the catheter acceptable for the patient. The anxiolytic should not affect the results of the measurements. This study evaluates the effects of two different doses of propofol on the pressures in the oesophageal sphincters. The effect of increased abdominal pressure was also studied.

    METHODS:

    Twenty healthy volunteers, 10 young (mean age 25 years) and 10 elderly (mean age 71 years), were recruited. The effects of a low dose of propofol [0.3 mg kg(-1) intravenously (i.v.)] and a high dose of propofol (young group 0.9 mg kg(-1) i.v. and elderly group 0.6 mg kg(-1) i.v.) were studied with and without external abdominal pressure.

    RESULTS:

    There were no statistically significant changes in lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) pressure after the low dose of propofol. After the high dose, there was an increase in LOS pressure, which was statistically significant in the young group (P < 0.05). The upper oesophageal sphincter (UOS) pressure decreased after both doses of propofol (P < 0.01 for the higher dose and P < 0.05 for the lower dose).

    CONCLUSION:

    A low dose of propofol (0.3 mg kg(-1) i.v.) leaves the LOS unaffected in young and elderly volunteers and can be used safely as an anxiolytic agent during studies of the LOS without influencing the results. However, the UOS is more sensitive to the effects of propofol and we do not recommend the use of propofol as an anxiolytic agent during manometric studies of the UOS.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2011
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
    Research subject
    Anaesthesiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-15384 (URN)10.1097/EJA.0b013e3283413211 (DOI)000288196000009 ()21119519 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-79953874254 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2011-04-26 Created: 2011-04-26 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
    2. Effects of cricoid pressure and remifentanil on the esophageal sphincters using high-resolution solid-state manometry
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of cricoid pressure and remifentanil on the esophageal sphincters using high-resolution solid-state manometry
    2011 (English)In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 55, no 2, p. 209-215Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Cricoid pressure has been shown to decrease the pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), increasing the risk of aspiration. Whether this reaction is due to pain associated with the application of cricoid pressure has not been studied. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of cricoid pressure with those of peripheral pain on pressures in the LES, and to study whether remifentanil influences these effects. Data from the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) are also described.

    METHODS: Continuous solid-state manometry was performed in 14 healthy volunteers. Initially, the effect of remifentanil (target-controlled infusion with a plasma target concentration of 5.0 ng/ml) was studied, and thereafter, the effects of cricoid pressure and peripheral pain stimulation (cold stimulation). Finally, these two interventions were repeated under ongoing remifentanil infusion.

    RESULTS: Remifentanil decreased the LES pressure significantly [ΔP-6.5 mmHg, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) -1.7 to -11.2]. Cricoid pressure application decreased the LES pressure significantly (ΔP-3.7 mmHg, 95% CI -1.4 to 6.1), whereas peripheral pain did not (ΔP 1.2 mmHg, 95% CI -3.5 to 1.1). Under ongoing remifentanil infusion, no cricoid pressure-induced LES relaxation was observed. Cricoid pressure induced high pressures in the area of the UES, 215.7 (±91.2) mmHg without remifentanil vs. 219.4 (±74.2) mmHg with remifentanil.

    CONCLUSIONS: Remifentanil as well as cricoid pressure per se induced decreases in LES pressure. However, cricoid pressure-induced changes of the barrier pressure were not significant whether induced with or without an infusion of remifentanil.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2011
    National Category
    Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
    Research subject
    Anaesthesiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-15386 (URN)10.1111/j.1399-6576.2010.02367.x (DOI)000286208600010 ()21226863 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-78651516200 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2011-04-26 Created: 2011-04-26 Last updated: 2018-02-20Bibliographically approved
    3. High resolution solid-state manometry of the effect of rocuronium on esophagogastric junction integrity
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>High resolution solid-state manometry of the effect of rocuronium on esophagogastric junction integrity
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) is partly dependent on striated muscles derived from the crural portion of the diaphragm. The effect of neuromuscular blockade on the integrity of the esophagogastric junction is not well studied. We conducted a prospective interventional study to determine the effect of rocuronium on the pressure in the LES and the barrier pressure (LES pressure – intra gastric pressure). We also studied the effect of positive pressure ventilation on the barrier pressure after neuromuscular blockade with rocuronium.

    Methods: Fourteen patients classified as ASA I or II (aged 18-75 years) who presented for elective surgery (11 cholecystectomy, 3 inguinal hernia) participated in the study. Esophageal manometry was performed after anesthetization with propofol, fentanyl and sevoflurane. After the insertion of a laryngeal mask airway, the patients breathed spontaneously for one minute. Rocuronium was administrated and the patients observed during the onset of apnea and during one minute of apnea and complete neuromuscular blockade. Volume controlled positive pressure ventilation followed.

    Results: Muscle relaxation with rocuronium showed no significant changes in barrier pressure comparing the pressure immediately before rocuronium administration with the pressure obtained at the time point of 0% TOF. Conversion to positive pressure ventilation did not change the barrier pressure with inspiration or expiration. The greatest decrease in barrier pressure was measured after inducing anesthesia when comparing pressures during inspiration (P< 0.01)

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
    Research subject
    Anaesthesiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-15387 (URN)
    Available from: 2011-04-26 Created: 2011-04-26 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
    4. Integrity of the esophagogastric junction during propofol induction with and without remifentanil: a double-blind,randomized, crossover study in volunteers
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrity of the esophagogastric junction during propofol induction with and without remifentanil: a double-blind,randomized, crossover study in volunteers
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Practice varies regarding the use of opioids during rapid sequence induction. Controversy exists as to whether opioids may increase the risk of pulmonary aspiration by decreasing the barrier pressure (lower oesophageal sphincter pressure – intragastric pressure).

    Objectives: To evaluate the effects of adding alfentanil during anaesthesia induction with propofol with respect to the barrier pressure in the oesophagogastric junction.

    Participants and Setting: Seventeen healthy volunteers (11 males and 6 females) participated in a double-blind, randomised, crossover trial at the University Hospital in Örebro, Sweden.

    Interventions and outcome measures: The volunteers were anaesthetised on two different occasions, randomly assigned to receive either alfentanil 20 g kg ˉ1 or an equivalent amount of saline, administered intravenously, one minute before induction with propofol 2 mg kg ˉ1. One minute after propofol administration, a cricoid pressure of 30N was applied. The primary outcome was the difference in the change in barrier pressure between the alfentanil and the placebo occasion one minute after propofol administration. The secondary outcomes were differences in the changes in barrier pressure one minute after alfentanil or placebo administration and during ongoing cricoid pressure application.

    Results: There were no statistically significant differences in barrier pressure, at any time point, between anaesthesia induction with alfentanil and propofol compared with induction with placebo and propofol. The barrier pressure never decreased to less than 2.4 mmHg in any volunteer.

    Conclusion: Our study showed no increased risk regarding the integrity of the gastrooesophageal junction when alfentanil is added during an induction with propofol in volunteers. This supports the practice of adding opioids as adjuvants during rapid sequence induction.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
    Research subject
    Anaesthesiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-15388 (URN)
    Available from: 2011-04-26 Created: 2011-04-26 Last updated: 2017-10-17Bibliographically approved
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  • 32.
    Ali, Fathalla
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery.
    Sandblom, G.
    Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Clinical Science and Education Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Surgery, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wikner, A.
    Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Wallin, Göran
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery.
    Laparoscopic ventral and incisional hernia repair using intraperitoneal onlay mesh with peritoneal bridging2022In: Hernia, ISSN 1265-4906, E-ISSN 1248-9204, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 635-646Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and safety of a novel IPOM procedure with peritoneal bridging (IPOM-pb) for laparoscopic ventral hernia repair, and to compare the outcomes of this procedure with IPOM with- (IPOM-plus) and IPOM without (sIPOM) defect closure.

    Method: A single-centre retrospective study comparing a novel IPOM technique with peritoneal bridging (IPOM-pb) with the two commonly used IPOM techniques, IPOM with defect closure (IPOM-plus) and without defect closure (sIPOM). The intraoperative and postoperative data of patients who underwent laparoscopic IPOM ventral hernia repair were reviewed. Preoperative data, recurrence, and postoperative seroma, surgical site infection, and pain, were compared.

    Results: From January 2017 to June 2020, a total of 213 patients underwent laparoscopic ventral and incisional hernia repair with IPOM technique. The mean length and width of the ventral hernia was 4.4 +/- 1.8 cm and 3.6 +/- 1.4 cm, respectively, and the mean BMI was 30.1 +/- 5.2 kg/m(2). The mean operating time was 67 +/- 28 min and was longer for IPOM-pb (71 +/- 27 min), less for IPOM-plus (63 +/- 28 min), and least for sIPOM (61 +/- 26 min). The incidence of early postoperative seroma was least in IPOM-pb (1/98, 1%), and similar in the IPOM-plus (4/94, 4%) and sIPOM (1/21, 5%) group. Late postoperative seroma was found only in IPOM-plus (2, 2%). The incidence of early and late postoperative pain was relatively higher in sIPOM (3, 14%; 1, 5%, respectively) compared to IPOM-pb and IPOM-plus in the early (5, 5% and 6, 6%) and late (2, 2% and 1, 1%) postoperative period, respectively. Surgical site infection was higher in sIPOM group (3, 14%), compared to IPOM-pb (1, 1%), and IPOM-plus (3, 3%). Recurrence rates were similar in IPOM-pb group (3/98, 3%) and IPOM-plus (3/94, 3%), and none in sIPOM (0/21).

    Conclusion: IPOM with peritoneal bridging is as feasible and safe as conventional IPOM with defect closure and simple non-defect closure. However, a large randomised controlled trial is required to confirm this finding.

  • 33.
    Ali, Fathalla
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Faculty of Medicine and Health, Department of Surgery, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Surgery, Karlskoga Hospital, 69144, Karlskoga, Sweden.
    Sandblom, Gabriel
    Department of Clinical Science and Education Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fathalla, Blend
    Department of Clinical Science and Education Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Emergency Department, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wallin, Göran
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Surgery.
    Effect of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic on planned and emergency hernia repair in Sweden: a register-based study2023In: Hernia, ISSN 1265-4906, E-ISSN 1248-9204, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 1103-1108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The COVID-19 has had a profound impact on the health care delivery in Sweden, including deprioritization of benign surgeries during the COVID-19 pandemic. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of COVID-19 pandemic on emergency and planned hernia repair in Sweden.

    METHODS: Data on hernia repairs from January 2016 to December 2021 were retrieved from the Swedish Patient Register using procedural codes. Two groups were formed: COVID-19 group (January 2020-December 2021) and control group (January 2016-December 2019). Demographic data on mean age, gender, and type of hernia were collected.

    RESULTS: This study showed a weak negative correlation between the number of elective hernia repairs performed each month during the pandemic and the number of emergency repairs carried out during the following 3 months for inguinal hernia repair (p = 0.114) and incisional hernia repair (p = 0.193), whereas there was no correlation for femoral or umbilical hernia repairs.

    CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic had a great impact on planned hernia surgeries in Sweden, but our hypothesis that postponing planned repairs would increase the risk of emergency events was not supported.

  • 34.
    Ali, Fathalla
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Faculty of Medicine and Health, Department of Surgery, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Surgery, Karlskoga Hospital, Karlskoga, Sweden .
    Sandblom, Gabriel
    Department of Clinical Science and Education Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Surgery, Southern Hospital (Södersjukhuset), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Forgo, Bianka
    Örebro University Hospital. Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Radiology.
    Wallin, Göran
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Surgery.
    Peritoneal Bridging Versus Nonclosure in Laparoscopic Ventral Hernia Repair2023In: Annals of Surgery Open, E-ISSN 2691-3593, Vol. 4, no 1, article id e257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Postoperative seroma and pain are common problems following laparoscopic intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) repair of ventral hernias. These advers outcomes may be avoided by dissecting and using the peritoneum in the hernial sac to bridge the hernia defect.

    Methods: This was a patient- an and outcome assesor-blinded, parallel-design, randomized controlled trial compairing nonclosure and peritoeal bridging approaches in patients schedueled for elective midline ventral hernia repair. The primary end point was seroma volume on ultrasonography. The secondary end points were postoperative pain, recurrence, and complications.

    Results: Between November 2018 and December 2020, 112 patients were randomized of whom 60 were in the nonclosure group and 52 were in the peritoneal bridging group. The seroma volume in the nonclosure and peritoneal bridging groups were 17cm3(6-53cm3) versus 0cm3(0-26cm3) at 1-moth follow-up (P=0.013). The median volume was zero at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-ups in both groups. No significant differences were observed in early postoperative pain (P=0.447) and in recurrencerate (P=0.684). There were 4(7%) and 1(2%) perioperative complictions that lead to reoperations in simple IPOM(sIPOM) and IPOM with peritoneal bridging (IPOM-pb), respectively.

    Conclusion: Seroma was less prevalent after IPOM-pb at 1-month follow-up compaired with sIPOM, with simillar posoperative pain 1 week after index of surgery in both groups. At subsequent follow-ups, the differences in seroma were not statiscally significant. Further studies are required to confirm these results. Trial registration (NCT04229940)

    Keywords: epigastric hernia, incisional hernia, IPOM with fascia closure, IPOM with peritoneal bridging, laparoscopic hernia repair, simple IPOM, umblical hernia, ventral hernia

  • 35.
    Ali, Fathalla
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Departments of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Wallin, Göran
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. epartments of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Fathalla, B.
    Emergency Department, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sandblom, G.
    Department of Clinical Science and Education Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Surgery, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Peritoneal bridging versus fascial closure in laparoscopic intraperitoneal onlay ventral hernia mesh repair: a randomized clinical trial2020In: BJS Open, E-ISSN 2474-9842, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 587-592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Many patients develop seroma after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair. It was hypothesized that leaving the hernial sac in situ may cause this complication.

    METHODS: In this patient- and outcome assessor-blinded, parallel-design single-centre trial, patients undergoing laparoscopic intraperitoneal onlay mesh ventral hernia repair were randomized (1 : 1) to either conventional fascial closure or peritoneal bridging. The primary endpoint was the incidence of seroma 12 months after index surgery detected by CT, evaluated in an intention-to-treat analysis.

    RESULTS: Between September 2017 and May 2018, 62 patients were assessed for eligibility, of whom 25 were randomized to conventional closure and 25 to peritoneal bridging. At 3 months, one patient was lost to follow-up in the conventional and peritoneal bridging groups respectively. No seroma was detected at 6 or 12 months in either group. The prevalence of clinical seroma was four of 25 (16 (95 per cent c.i. 2 to 30) per cent) versus none of 25 patients in the conventional fascial closure and peritoneal bridging groups respectively at 1 month after surgery (P = 0·110), and two of 24 (8 (0 to 19) per cent) versus none of 25 at 3 months (P = 0·235). There were no significant differences between the groups in other postoperative complications (one of 25 versus 0 of 25), rate of recurrent hernia within 1 year (none in either group) or postoperative pain.

    CONCLUSION: Conventional fascial closure and peritoneal bridging did not differ with regard to seroma formation after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT03344575).

  • 36.
    Allvin, Renée
    Örebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences.
    Postoperative recovery: development of a multi-dimensional questionnaire for assessment of Recovery2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis aims to present a multi-dimensional instrument for self-assessment of progress in postoperative recovery. The author employs different research paradigms and methodologies to achieve this aim.

    Walker and Avant’s approach to concept analysis was used to examine the basic elements of postoperative recovery (Study I). The analysis identified different recovery dimensions and developed a theoretical definition showing postoperative recovery to be an energy-requiring process of returning to normality and wholeness, defined by comparative standards.

    Fourteen patients and 28 staff members participated in individual and focus group interviews aimed at describing patient and staff experiences of patient recovery (Study II). The essence of the postoperative recovery process was described as a desire to decrease unpleasant physical symptoms, reach a level of emotional wellbeing, regain functions, and re-establish activities.

    In Study III, 5 dimensions and 19 items were identified as a part of the operationalization process of the concept postoperative recovery. Fifteen staff members and 16 patients participated in the evaluation of content validity. On average, 85% of the participants considered the items as essential to the recovery process. In a test run of the questionnaire, 14 of 15 patients considered the questionnaire to be easy to understand and easy to complete. Twenty-five patients participated in the evaluation of intra-patient reliability. Percentage agreement (PA), systematic disagreement (RP, RC), and individual variability (RV) between the two assessments were calculated. PA measures ranged from 72% to 100%. The observed disagreement could be explained mainly by systematic disagreement.

    In total, 158 patients participated in the evaluation of construct validity, the ability to discriminate between groups, and the investigation of important item variables (Study IV). A rank-based statistical method for evaluation of paired, ordered categorical data from rating scales was used to evaluate consistency between the assessments of the Postoperative Recovery Profile (PRP) questionnaire and a global recovery scale. The number of months needed by participants to be regarded as fully recovered was studied by means of recovery profiles displayed by the cumulative proportion of recovered participants over time. A ranking list based on the participant’s appraisal of the five most important item variables in the PRP questionnaire was compiled to illustrate the rank ordering of the items. In comparing the assessments from the PRP questionnaire and the global recovery scale, 7.6% of all possible pairs were disordered. Twelve months after discharge 73% in the orthopaedic group were regarded as fully recovered, compared to 51% of the participants in the abdominal group (95% CI: 6% to 40%). The pain variable appeared among the top five most important items on eight measurement occasions, of eight possible, in both study groups.

    In conclusion, the PRP questionnaire was developed and support was given for validity and reliability. The questionnaire enables one to evaluate progress in postoperative recovery.

    List of papers
    1. Postoperative recovery: a concept analysis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Postoperative recovery: a concept analysis
    2007 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 57, no 5, p. 552-558Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. This papaer presents a concept analysis of the phenomeneon postoperative recovery.

    Background. Each year, millions of patients throughout the world undergo surgical procedures. Although postoperative recovery is commonly used as an outcome of surgery, it is difficult to identify a standard definition.

    Method. Walker and Avant's concept analysis approach was used. Literature retrieved from MEDLINE and CINAHL databases for english language papers published from 1982 to 2005 was used for the analysis.

    Findings. The theoretical definition developed points out that postoperative recovery is an energy-requiring process of returning to normality and wholeness. It is defined by comparative standards, achieved by regaining control over physical, psychological, social and habitual functions, and results in a return to preoperative level of independence/dependence in activities of daily living and optimum level of psychological well-being.

    Conclusion. The concept of postoperative recovery lacks clarity, both in its meaning in relation to postoperative recovery to healthcare professionals in their care for surgical patients, and in the understanding of what researchers in this area really intend to investigate. The theoretical definition we have developed may be useful but needs to be further explored.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Oxford: Blackwell, 2007
    Keywords
    concept analysis, definition, postoperative, recovery
    National Category
    Surgery Nursing
    Research subject
    Surgery; Nursing Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-8079 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2648.2006.04156.x (DOI)000244244000010 ()17284272 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-33846991897 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2009-10-05 Created: 2009-10-05 Last updated: 2019-04-26Bibliographically approved
    2. Experiences of the postoperative recovery process: an interview study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of the postoperative recovery process: an interview study
    2008 (English)In: Open Nursing Journal, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 2, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Few researchers have described postoperative recovery from a broad, overall perspective. In this article the authors describe a study focusing on patient and staff experiences of postoperative recovery using a qualitative descriptive design to obtain a description of the phenomenon. They performed 10 individual interviews with patients who had undergone abdominal or gynecological surgery and 7 group interviews with registered nurses working on surgical and gynecological wards and in primary care centers, surgeons from surgical and gynecological departments, and in-patients from a gynecological ward. The authors analyzed data using qualitative content analysis. Postoperative recovery is described as a Dynamic Process in an Endeavour to Continue With Everyday Life. This theme was further highlighted by the categories Experiences of the core of recovery and Experiences of factors influencing recovery. Knowledge from this study will help caregivers support patients during their recovery from surgery.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Bentham Science Publishers Ltd, 2008
    Keywords
    postoperative, recovery, experience, interview, content analysis
    National Category
    Surgery Medical and Health Sciences
    Research subject
    Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-8080 (URN)10.2174/1874434600802010001 (DOI)19319214 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-10-05 Created: 2009-10-05 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
    3. Development of a questionnaire to measure patient-reported postoperative recovery: content validity and intra-patient reliability
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of a questionnaire to measure patient-reported postoperative recovery: content validity and intra-patient reliability
    Show others...
    2009 (English)In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 411-419Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. In this study we describe the development of a short, easy-to-use questionnaire to measure postoperative recovery and evaluate its content validity and intra-patient reliability.   The questionnaire is designed to evaluate the progress of postoperative recovery and the long-term follow-up of possible effects of interventions during recovery.

    Method. The study involved four steps. 1) A conceptualisation and item definitions were based on a theoretical framework and a description of patients' postoperative recovery from the perspective of patients, registered nurses and surgeons. 2) Content validity of items was tested through expert judgements. 3) A test run of the questionnaire was performed to confirm its feasibility and workload requirement. 4) The stability of the questionnaire was evaluated through intra-patient reliability assessment.

    Results. As a result of the operationalisation process of the concept postoperative recovery, five dimensions (physical symptoms, physical functions, psychological, social, activity) and 19 items were identified. Each item was formulated as a statement in the questionnaire. Content validity was judged to be high. After the pre-test of the questionnaire a revision with refinements in the layout was made. The vast majority of items showed a high level of intra-patient reliability.

    Conclusion. Based on a theoretical framework and empirical data, we developed a short and easy-to-use tentative questionnaire to measure patient-reported postoperative recovery. Initial support for content validity was established. The vast majority of items showed a high level of test-retest reliability.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Oxford: Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2009
    National Category
    Surgery Medical and Health Sciences
    Research subject
    Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-8081 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2753.2008.01027.x (DOI)000266425900002 ()2-s2.0-66249086918 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Part of thesis: http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-7731

    Available from: 2009-10-05 Created: 2009-10-05 Last updated: 2023-12-08Bibliographically approved
    4. The Postoperative Recovery Profile (PRP): a multidimensional questionnaire for evaluation of recovery profiles
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Postoperative Recovery Profile (PRP): a multidimensional questionnaire for evaluation of recovery profiles
    Show others...
    2011 (English)In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 236-243Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The previously developed Postoperative Recovery Profile (PRP) questionnaire is intended for self-assessment of general recovery after surgery. The aim of this study was to further evaluate the questionnaire regarding the construct validity and ability to discriminate recovery profiles between groups. Furthermore, the item variables of greatest importance during the progress of recovery were investigated.

    Methods. Postoperative recovery was assessed during the period from discharge to 12 months after lower abdominal- and orthopedic surgery. Construct validity was evaluated by comparing the assessments from the PRP-questionnaire and a global recovery scale. Recovery profiles of the diagnose groups were displayed by the cumulative proportion recovered participants over time. The importance of item variables was investigated by ranking ordering.

    Results. A total of 158 patients were included. The result showed that 7.6 % of all possible pairs were disordered when comparing the assessments from the PRP questionnaire and the global recovery scale. Twelve months after discharge 51 % participants in the abdominal group were fully recovered, as compared with the 73%, in the orthopedic group (95% CI: 6 % to 40 %). The item variable pain appeared as top five at eight measurement occasions of eight possible in both the abdominal and the orthopedic groups. The importance of the items was emphasized.

    Conclusions. The PRP questionnaire allows for evaluation of the progress of postoperative recovery, and can be useful to assess patient-reported recovery after surgical treatment. Knowledge about recovery profiles can assist clinicians in determining the critical time points for measuring change.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Blackwell, 2011
    National Category
    Surgery
    Research subject
    Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-8083 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2753.2010.01422.x (DOI)000288217700005 ()20846316 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-79952668667 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2009-10-05 Created: 2009-10-05 Last updated: 2017-12-13
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
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    COVER01
  • 37.
    Allvin, Renée
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine. Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Örebro University Hospital ,Örebro,Sweden.
    Berg, Katarina
    Department of Medicine and Care, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Research Section, Kalmar County Council, Kalmar,Sweden; Department of Medicine and Care, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ulrica
    Örebro University, Department of Nursing and Caring Sciences. Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro,Sweden; Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Örebro University Hospital , Örebro, Sweden.
    Postoperative recovery: a concept analysis2007In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 57, no 5, p. 552-558Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. This papaer presents a concept analysis of the phenomeneon postoperative recovery.

    Background. Each year, millions of patients throughout the world undergo surgical procedures. Although postoperative recovery is commonly used as an outcome of surgery, it is difficult to identify a standard definition.

    Method. Walker and Avant's concept analysis approach was used. Literature retrieved from MEDLINE and CINAHL databases for english language papers published from 1982 to 2005 was used for the analysis.

    Findings. The theoretical definition developed points out that postoperative recovery is an energy-requiring process of returning to normality and wholeness. It is defined by comparative standards, achieved by regaining control over physical, psychological, social and habitual functions, and results in a return to preoperative level of independence/dependence in activities of daily living and optimum level of psychological well-being.

    Conclusion. The concept of postoperative recovery lacks clarity, both in its meaning in relation to postoperative recovery to healthcare professionals in their care for surgical patients, and in the understanding of what researchers in this area really intend to investigate. The theoretical definition we have developed may be useful but needs to be further explored.

  • 38.
    Allvin, Renée
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Ehnfors, Margareta
    Örebro University, Department of Nursing and Caring Sciences.
    Rawal, Narinder
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Experiences of the postoperative recovery process: an interview study2008In: Open Nursing Journal, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 2, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Few researchers have described postoperative recovery from a broad, overall perspective. In this article the authors describe a study focusing on patient and staff experiences of postoperative recovery using a qualitative descriptive design to obtain a description of the phenomenon. They performed 10 individual interviews with patients who had undergone abdominal or gynecological surgery and 7 group interviews with registered nurses working on surgical and gynecological wards and in primary care centers, surgeons from surgical and gynecological departments, and in-patients from a gynecological ward. The authors analyzed data using qualitative content analysis. Postoperative recovery is described as a Dynamic Process in an Endeavour to Continue With Everyday Life. This theme was further highlighted by the categories Experiences of the core of recovery and Experiences of factors influencing recovery. Knowledge from this study will help caregivers support patients during their recovery from surgery.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 39.
    Allvin, Renée
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Ehnfors, Margareta
    Örebro University, Department of Nursing and Caring Sciences.
    Rawal, Narinder
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Svensson, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Development of a questionnaire to measure patient-reported postoperative recovery: content validity and intra-patient reliability2009In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 411-419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. In this study we describe the development of a short, easy-to-use questionnaire to measure postoperative recovery and evaluate its content validity and intra-patient reliability.   The questionnaire is designed to evaluate the progress of postoperative recovery and the long-term follow-up of possible effects of interventions during recovery.

    Method. The study involved four steps. 1) A conceptualisation and item definitions were based on a theoretical framework and a description of patients' postoperative recovery from the perspective of patients, registered nurses and surgeons. 2) Content validity of items was tested through expert judgements. 3) A test run of the questionnaire was performed to confirm its feasibility and workload requirement. 4) The stability of the questionnaire was evaluated through intra-patient reliability assessment.

    Results. As a result of the operationalisation process of the concept postoperative recovery, five dimensions (physical symptoms, physical functions, psychological, social, activity) and 19 items were identified. Each item was formulated as a statement in the questionnaire. Content validity was judged to be high. After the pre-test of the questionnaire a revision with refinements in the layout was made. The vast majority of items showed a high level of intra-patient reliability.

    Conclusion. Based on a theoretical framework and empirical data, we developed a short and easy-to-use tentative questionnaire to measure patient-reported postoperative recovery. Initial support for content validity was established. The vast majority of items showed a high level of test-retest reliability.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 40.
    Allvin, Renée
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Rawal, Narinder
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Johanzon, Eva
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Bäckström, Ragnar
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Open versus Laparoscopic Surgery: Does the Surgical Technique Influence Pain Outcome? Results from an International Registry2016In: Pain Research and Treatment, ISSN 2090-1542, E-ISSN 2090-1550, article id 4087325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Postoperative pain management relevant for specific surgical procedures is debated. The importance of evaluating pain with consideration given to type of surgery and the patient's perspective has been emphasized. In this prospective cohort study, we analysed outcome data from 607 patients in the international PAIN OUT registry for assessment and comparison of postoperative pain outcome within the 24 first hours after laparoscopic and open colonic surgery. Patients from the laparoscopic group scored minimum pain at a higher level than the open group (P = 0.012). Apart from minimum pain, no other significant differences in patient reported outcomes were observed. Maximum pain scores >3 were reported from 77% (laparoscopic) and 68% (open) patients (mean >= 5 in both groups). Pain interference with mobilization was reported by 87-93% of patients. Both groups scored high levels of patient satisfaction. In the open group, a higher frequency of patients received a combination of general and regional anaesthesia, which had an impact of the minimum pain score. Our results from registry data indicate that surgical technique does not influence the quality of postoperative pain management during the first postoperative day if adequate analgesia is given.

  • 41.
    Allvin, Renée
    et al.
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Svensson, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Rawal, Narinder
    Örebro University, Department of Clinical Medicine.
    Ehnfors, Margareta
    Örebro University, Department of Nursing and Caring Sciences.
    Kling, Anna-Maria
    Statistical and Epidemiology Unit, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Idvall, Ewa
    The Postoperative Recovery Profile (PRP): a multidimensional questionnaire for evaluation of recovery profiles2011In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 236-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The previously developed Postoperative Recovery Profile (PRP) questionnaire is intended for self-assessment of general recovery after surgery. The aim of this study was to further evaluate the questionnaire regarding the construct validity and ability to discriminate recovery profiles between groups. Furthermore, the item variables of greatest importance during the progress of recovery were investigated.

    Methods. Postoperative recovery was assessed during the period from discharge to 12 months after lower abdominal- and orthopedic surgery. Construct validity was evaluated by comparing the assessments from the PRP-questionnaire and a global recovery scale. Recovery profiles of the diagnose groups were displayed by the cumulative proportion recovered participants over time. The importance of item variables was investigated by ranking ordering.

    Results. A total of 158 patients were included. The result showed that 7.6 % of all possible pairs were disordered when comparing the assessments from the PRP questionnaire and the global recovery scale. Twelve months after discharge 51 % participants in the abdominal group were fully recovered, as compared with the 73%, in the orthopedic group (95% CI: 6 % to 40 %). The item variable pain appeared as top five at eight measurement occasions of eight possible in both the abdominal and the orthopedic groups. The importance of the items was emphasized.

    Conclusions. The PRP questionnaire allows for evaluation of the progress of postoperative recovery, and can be useful to assess patient-reported recovery after surgical treatment. Knowledge about recovery profiles can assist clinicians in determining the critical time points for measuring change.

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  • 42.
    Alm, Fredrik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Stalfors, Joacim
    Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, Ajman, United Arab Emirates.
    Nerfeldt, Pia
    Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Patient reported outcome of pain after tonsil surgery: An analysis of 32,225 children from the National Tonsil Surgery Register in Sweden 2009-20162017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tonsil surgery is common surgical procedure in children and cause significant pain under postoperative recovery. The objective of this register study was to explore factors affecting pain after pediatric tonsil surgery, using patient-reported outcomes from questionnaires in the National Tonsil Surgery Registry in Sweden, 30 days after surgery. A total of 32,225 tonsil surgeries on children (aged 1-18 years) during January 2009- November 2016 were included; 13,904 tonsillectomies with or without adenoidectomy (TE±A) and 18,321 tonsillotomies with or without adenoidectomy (TT±A). In surgery cases of indication obstruction, the TT±A stopped taking painkillers and returned to normal eating habits sooner, and had less contact with health care services due to pain, compared to TE±A. After TE±A, the indication infection group had more days on analgesics and more contacts with health care services due to pain, compared to the indication obstruction group. TE±A with cold-dissection technique resulted in fewer days on painkillers compared to warm-technique, and reduced the number of contacts with health care services due to pain. Older children were affected by more days of morbidity than the younger ones, but there was no gender difference after adjustment for age, dissection technique and hemostasis technique. Implementation of national guidelines for pain treatment (2013) and patient information on the website tonsilloperation.se seems to have increased the days on analgesics after surgery. Pain after tonsil surgery depends on the surgical procedure and technique, as well as factors such as the patient’s age and surgical indication. More studies including pain interventions are needed to improve the care of tonsillectomy patients.

  • 43.
    Alshamari, Muhammed
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Low-dose computed tomography of the abdomen and lumbar spine2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Radiography is a common radiologic investigation despite abundant evidence of its limited diagnostic value. On the other hand, computed tomography (CT) has a high diagnostic value and is widely considered to be among the most important advances in medicine. However, CT exposes patients to a higher radiation dose and it might therefore not be acceptable simply to replace radiography with CT, despite the powerful diagnostic value of this technique. At the expense of reduced CT image quality, which could be adjusted to the diagnostic needs, low-dose CT of abdomen and lumbar spine can be performed at similar dose to radiography. The aim of the current thesis project was to evaluate low-dose CT of the abdomen and lumbar spine and to compare it with radiography. The hypothesis was that CT would give better image quality and diagnostic information compared to radiography at similar dose levels. Firstly, the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT of the abdomen was evaluated. Results showed that low-dose CT of abdomen has a high sensitivity and specificity compared to radiography, i.e., it has higher diagnostic accuracy. Similar results were obtained from our systematic review. Secondly, in a phantom study, an ovine phantom was scanned at various CT settings. The image quality was evaluated to obtain a protocol for the optimal settings for low-dose CT of lumbar spine at 1 mSv. This new protocol was then used in a clinical study to assess the image quality of low-dose CT of the lumbar spine and compare it to radiography. Results showed that low-dose CT has significantly better image quality than radiography. Finally, the impact of Iterative reconstruction (IR) on image quality of lumbar spine CT was tested. Iterative reconstruction is a recent CT technique aimed to reduce radiation dose and/or improve image quality. The results showed that the use of medium strength IR levels in the reconstruction of CT image improves image quality compared to filtered back projection. In conclusion, low-dose CT of the abdomen and lumbar spine, at about 1 mSv, has better image quality and gives diagnostic information compared to radiography at similar dose levels and it could therefore replace radiography.

    List of papers
    1. Diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography in non-traumatic acute abdominal pain: prospective study and systematic review
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography in non-traumatic acute abdominal pain: prospective study and systematic review
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 1766-1774Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Abdominal radiography is frequently used in acute abdominal non-traumatic pain despite the availability of more advanced diagnostic modalities. This study evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography, at similar radiation dose levels.

    Methods: Fifty-eight patients were imaged with both methods and were reviewed independently by three radiologists. The reference standard was obtained from the diagnosis in medical records. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. A systematic review was performed after a literature search, finding a total of six relevant studies including the present.

    Results: Overall sensitivity with 95 % CI for CT was 75 % (66-83 %) and 46 % (37-56 %) for radiography. Specificity was 87 % (77-94 %) for both methods. In the systematic review the overall sensitivity for CT varied between 75 and 96 % with specificity from 83 to 95 % while the overall sensitivity for abdominal radiography varied between 30 and 77 % with specificity 75 to 88 %.

    Conclusions: Based on the current study and available evidence, low-dose CT has higher diagnostic accuracy than abdominal radiography and it should, where logistically possible, replace abdominal radiography in the workup of adult patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain.

    Key points: • Low-dose CT has a higher diagnostic accuracy than radiography. • A systematic review shows that CT has better diagnostic accuracy than radiography. • Radiography has no place in the workup of acute non-traumatic abdominal pain.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    New York: Springer, 2016
    Keywords
    X-ray computed tomography, abdominal radiography, sensitivity and specificity, abdominal pain, abdomen, acute
    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Research subject
    Radiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47089 (URN)10.1007/s00330-015-3984-9 (DOI)000376100100030 ()26385800 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84942013953 (Scopus ID)
    Note

    Funding Agency:

    Region Örebro County

    Available from: 2015-12-16 Created: 2015-12-16 Last updated: 2023-05-22Bibliographically approved
    2. Low-dose computed tomography of the lumbar spine: a phantom study on imaging parameters and image quality
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Low-dose computed tomography of the lumbar spine: a phantom study on imaging parameters and image quality
    2014 (English)In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 55, no 7, p. 824-832Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Lumbar spine radiography has limited diagnostic value but low radiation dose compared with computed tomography (CT). The average effective radiation dose from lumbar spine radiography is about 1.1 mSv. Low-dose lumbar spine CT may be an alternative to increase the diagnostic value at low radiation dose, around 1 mSv.

    Purpose: To determine the optimal settings for low-dose lumbar spine CT simultaneously aiming for the highest diagnostic image quality possible.

    Material and Methods: An ovine lower thoracic and lumbar spine phantom, with all soft tissues around the vertebrae preserved except the skin, was placed in a 20 L plastic container filled with water. The phantom was scanned repeatedly with various technical settings; different tube potential, reference mAs, and with different convolution filters. Five radiologists evaluated the image quality according to a modification of the European guidelines for multislice computed tomography (MSCT) quality criteria for lumbar spine CT 2004. In a visual comparison the different scans were also ranked subjectively according to perceived image quality. Image noise and contrast were measured.

    Results: A tube potential of 120 kV with reference mAs 30 and medium or medium smooth convolution filter gave the best image quality at a sub-millisievert dose level, i.e. with an effective dose comparable to that from lumbar spine radiography.

    Conclusion: Low-dose lumbar spine CT thus opens a possibility to substitute lumbar spine radiography with CT without obvious increase in radiation dose.

    Keywords
    conventional radiography; CT; spine; structures; techniques
    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Research subject
    Radiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-38243 (URN)10.1177/0284185113509615 (DOI)000342575300008 ()2-s2.0-84907878366 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2014-11-03 Created: 2014-10-30 Last updated: 2020-12-01Bibliographically approved
    3. Low dose CT of the lumbar spine compared with radiography: a study on image quality with implications for clinical practice
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Low dose CT of the lumbar spine compared with radiography: a study on image quality with implications for clinical practice
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 57, no 5, p. 602-611Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Lumbar spine radiography is often performed instead of CT for radiation dose concerns.

    Purpose: To compare image quality and diagnostic information from low dose lumbar spine CT at an effective dose of about 1 mSv with lumbar spine radiography.

    Material and Methods: Fifty-one patients were examined by both methods. Five reviewers scored all examinations on eight image quality criteria using a five-graded scale and also assessed three common pathologic changes.

    Results: Low dose CT scored better than radiography on the following: sharp reproduction of disc profile and vertebral end-plates (odds ratio [OR], 1.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3-2.5), intervertebral foramina and pedicles (OR, 4.3; 95% CI, 3.1-5.9), intervertebral joints (OR, 139; 95% CI, 59-326), spinous and transverse processes (OR, 7.0; 95% CI, 4.3-11.2), sacro-iliac joints (OR, 4.2; 95% CI, 3.2-5.7), reproduction of the adjacent soft tissues (OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 2.1-4.0), and absence of any obscuring superimposed gastrointestinal gas and contents (OR, 188; 95% CI, 66-539). Radiography scored better on sharp reproduction of cortical and trabecular bone (OR, 0.3; 95% CI, 0.2-0.4). The reviewers visualized disk degeneration, spondylosis/diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) and intervertebral joint osteoarthritis more clearly and were more certain with low dose CT. Mean time to review low dose CT was 204 s (95% CI, 194-214 s.), radiography 152 s (95% CI, 146-158 s.). The effective dose for low dose CT was 1.0-1.1 mSv, for radiography 0.7 mSv.

    Conclusion: Low dose lumbar spine CT at about 1 mSv has superior image quality to lumbar spine radiography with more anatomical and diagnostic information.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    London, United Kingdom: Sage Publications, 2016
    Keywords
    Radiation dose, radiography, tomography, X-ray computed, axial skeleton
    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Research subject
    Radiology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47090 (URN)10.1177/0284185115595667 (DOI)000374327600014 ()26221055 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84978646277 (Scopus ID)
    Available from: 2015-12-16 Created: 2015-12-16 Last updated: 2024-03-06Bibliographically approved
    4. Impact of iterative reconstruction on image quality of low-dose CT of the lumbar spine
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of iterative reconstruction on image quality of low-dose CT of the lumbar spine
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Surgery
    Research subject
    Surgery
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-49423 (URN)
    Available from: 2016-03-17 Created: 2016-03-17 Last updated: 2024-03-06Bibliographically approved
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  • 44.
    Alshamari, Muhammed
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Radiology.
    Geijer, Mats
    Department of Radiology, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; Department of Medical Imaging and Physiology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund; Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Norrman, Eva
    Department of Medical Physics, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Lidén, Mats
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Krauss, Wolfgang
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Jendeberg, Johan
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Geijer, Håkan
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Impact of iterative reconstruction on image quality of low-dose CT of the lumbar spineManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Alston-Smith, J.
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Boija, P.-O.
    Ware, J.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, K.
    Endotoxin, epinephrine, glucagon, insulin and calcium ionophore A23187 modulation of kinese activity in cultured rat hepatocytes1990In: Acta Chirurgica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5482, p. 677-681Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Altered glucose metabolism is one of the commonly observed sequelae of sepsis and septic shock. The present investigation was undertaken to determine the role of endotoxin (ET) upon hepatocyte glucoregulation, by measuring the activity of pyruvate kinase (PK), a key glycolytic enzyme. Hepatocytes were exposed to endotoxin concentrations known to occur in vivo during sepsis, i.e., from 1 X 10(-14) to 1 X 10(-8) g/ml. The alteration of the enzyme activities after addition of epinephrine, glucagon, insulin and calcium ionophore A23187 with and without ET preincubation were also examined. ET alone decreased the PK activity by 12% at all concentrations tested. The basal inhibition of the enzyme caused by epinephrine (-48%) was partially blocked by ET preincubation above 1 X 10(-10) g/ml. There were no ET-(glucagon, calcium ionophore, insulin) interaction. These in vitro results do not support pyruvate kinase as a site of hepatic enzyme regulation defect in endotoxaemia.

  • 46.
    Alström, Ulrica
    et al.
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery and Anesthesiology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Granath, Fredrik
    Department of Medicine Solna, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Friberg, Örjan
    Örebro University Hospital. Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery.
    Ekbom, Anders
    Department of Medicine Solna, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ståhle, Elisabeth
    Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery and Anesthesiology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Risk factors for re-exploration due to bleeding after coronary artery bypass grafting2012In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 39-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The study aimed to investigate relevant clinical risk factors for re-exploration due to bleeding after primary coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, and to evaluate the influence of antiplatelet and antifibrinolytic drugs.

    Design: Three retrospective analyses were performed on patients who underwent CABG: (1) Logistic regression was used to identify clinical risk factors for re-exploration (n = 3000). (2) A case-control study (n = 228) was used to obtain information on exposure of antithrombotic and hemostatic therapy. (3) Based on exposure to antiplatelet and antifibrinolytic therapy, and odds ratios (ORs) in multivariate logistic models, the proportion of re-explorations attributed to these drugs was calculated.

    Results: A receiver operating characteristic curve was created for clinical risk factors. The C-index was 0.64, indicating limited ability to predict re-exploration for bleeding. Clopidogrel was the only drug influencing the risk of re-exploration (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.7-5.9). The harmful effect of clopidogrel was confirmed in multivariate model (OR 4.7, 95% CI 2.2-9.9), and aprotinin had a protective effect of the same magnitude (OR 0.2, 95% CI 0.1-0.6).

    Conclusions: Clopidogrel is an essential risk factor for re-exploration due to bleeding, and attributable to at least one-quarter of surveyed cases. Aside from pharmaceuticals, there are no strong clinical risk factors.

  • 47.
    Al-Tai, Saif
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Axer, Stephan
    Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Szabo, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Surgery.
    Ottosson, Johan
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Surgery.
    Stenberg, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Surgery.
    THE IMPACT OF THE BOUGIE SIZE AND THE EXTENT OF ANTRAL RESECTION ON WEIGHT-LOSS AND POSTOPERATIVE COMPLICATIONS FOLLOWING SLEEVE GASTRECTOMY: RESULTS FROM THE SCANDINAVIAN OBESITY SURGERY REGISTRY2023In: Obesity Surgery, ISSN 0960-8923, E-ISSN 1708-0428, Vol. 33, no Suppl. 2, p. 332-332, article id O-316Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) as a primary bariatric procedure has gained increasing popularity world-wide. However, controversies still exist regarding several operative aspects, such as the optimal diameter of thesleeve and the optimal distance from the pylorus to the edge of the resection line, and whether these aspects haveeffects on weight-loss results and the risk to develop postoperative complications.

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare weight-loss results and the incidence of postoperative complications betweensleeve with different diameters measured in bougie size and with different distances from the pylorus to the edge ofthe resection line measured in centimeter.

    Setting: Nationwide registry-based study.

    Method: This study is an analysis of sleeve gastrectomy performed in Sweden between 2012 and 2019. Data were collectedfrom Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry (SOReg). Patients with bougie size 30-32 and 35-36 and patients withdistance from pylorus 1-4 cm, 5 cm, 6-8 cm were identified and compared regarding weight-loss results and the riskto develop postoperative complications.

    Results: 9,360 patients were included. Follow-up rate was 96% at day 30, 78.8% at one year and 50% at two years. Bothbougie size 30-32 compared to 35-36 and distance from the pylorus 1-4 cm compared to 5 cm were associated withsignificant higher weight-loss at one and two years. No difference in the risk for early or late complications was seenbetween bougie size groups 30-32 and 35-36. Resection starting 1-4 cm from the pylorus compared to 5 cm was as-sociated with higher risk for overall early postoperative complications (OR 1.46 (1.17-1.82, P=.001)), but there wasno significant difference in the risk to develop late complication at 1 and 2 years. No difference in the leak rate andin the risk to develop stricture was seen between different Bougie sizes, nor distances from the Pylorus.

    Conclusion: Using a smaller Bougie size and starting the resection closer to the pylorus was associated with better maximumweight-loss. Closer resection to the Pylorus, but not Bougie size was associated with increased risk for early postop-erative complications after sleeve gastrectomy.

  • 48.
    Al-Tai, Saif
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Department of Surgery, Torsby Hospital, Torsby, Sweden.
    Axer, Stephan
    Department of Surgery, Torsby Hospital, Torsby, Sweden; Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Szabo, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Surgery.
    Ottosson, Johan
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Surgery.
    Stenberg, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Surgery.
    The impact of the bougie size and the extent of antral resection on weight-loss and postoperative complications following sleeve gastrectomy: results from the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry2024In: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases, ISSN 1550-7289, E-ISSN 1878-7533, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 139-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The optimal sleeve diameter and distance from the pylorus to the edge of the resection line in laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) remain controversial.

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the influence of bougie size and antral resection distance from the pylorus on postoperative complications and weight-loss results in LSG.

    SETTING: Nationwide registry-based study.

    METHODS: This study included all LSGs performed in Sweden between 2012 and 2019. Data were obtained from the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry. Reference bougie size of 35-36 Fr and an antral resection distance of 5 cm from the pylorus were compared to narrower bougie size (30-32 Fr), shorter distances (1-4 cm), and extended distances (6-8 cm) from the pylorus in assessing postoperative complications and weight loss as the outcomes of LSG. RESULTS: The study included 9,360 patients with postoperative follow-up rates of 96%, 79%, and 50% at 30 days, 1 year, and 2 years, respectively. Narrow bougie and short antral resection distance from the pylorus were significantly associated with increased postoperative weight loss. Bougie size was not associated with increased early or late complications. However, short antral resection distance was associated with high risk of overall early complications [odds ratio: 1.46 (1.17-1.82, P = .001)], although no impact on late complications at 1 and 2 years was observed.

    CONCLUSIONS: Using a narrow bougie and initiating resection closer to the pylorus were associated with greater maximum weight loss. Although a closer resection to the pylorus was associated with an increased risk of early postoperative complications, no association was observed with the use of narrow bougie for LSG.

  • 49.
    Amanda, Demir
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Elin, Påhlson
    Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Norrman, Eva
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Surgery.
    Stenberg, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences. Örebro University Hospital. Department of Surgery.
    The Influence of Mesenteric Defects Closure on the Use of Computed Tomography for Abdominal Pain 5 Years After Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass-a Post Hoc Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial2022In: Obesity Surgery, ISSN 0960-8923, E-ISSN 1708-0428, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 266-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Abdominal pain after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) is a common and unwanted complication that typically leads to further exploration through radiology. Concerns have been raised regarding the consequences of this radiation exposure and its correlation with the lifetime risk of cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences in computed tomography (CT) use between LRYGB patients with open and closed mesenteric defects and to assess the radiological findings and radiation doses.

    METHODS: This subgroup analysis included 300 patients randomized to either closure (n = 150) or nonclosure (n = 150) of mesenteric defects during LRYGB. The total number of CT scans performed due to abdominal pain in the first 5 postoperative years was recorded together with the radiological findings and radiation doses.

    RESULTS: A total of 132 patients (44%) underwent 281 abdominal CT scans, including 133 scans for 67 patients with open mesenteric defects (45%) and 148 scans for 65 patients with closed mesenteric defects (43%). Radiological findings consistent with small bowel obstruction or internal hernia were found in 31 (23%) of the scans for patients with open defects and in 18 (12%) of the scans for patients with closed defects (p = 0.014). The other pathological and radiological findings were infrequent and not significantly different between groups. At the 5-year follow-up, the total radiation dose was 82,400 mGy cm in the nonclosure group and 85,800 mGy cm in the closure group.

    CONCLUSION: Closure of mesenteric defects did not influence the use of CT to assess abdominal pain.

  • 50.
    Amba, Yvette Esah
    Örebro University, School of Health Sciences.
    Effekten av sex olika kirurgiska tekniker på  postoperativ smärtintensitet efter visdomstand  operation i underkäke.  En systematisk litteraturöversikt.2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
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