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  • 101.
    Asiimwe, Edgar Napoleon
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    On mobile learning with learning content management systems: a contemporary literature review2014In: Communications in Computer and Information Science, ISSN 1865-0929, E-ISSN 1865-0937, Vol. 479, p. 131-145Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning Content management systems (LCMS) are important tools for organizing learning material and communication. Increasingly mobile technologies are used for internet access; particularly important in developing countries where broadband is scarce. Mobile LCMS introduce specific challenges, which are yet not fully addressed. This paper reviews the literature on mobile LCMS for the purpose of identifying current research focus, research gaps, and future research directions regarding how to bridge the gaps and leverage CMS technology to support "mobile learning". The concept matrix method is used to collect and analyze literature. Five prominent research areas are found; Use, access, design and infrastructure; communication and collaboration; engagement and knowledge development; content and service delivery; and implementation experiences and evaluation. A major gap identified is that research does neither clearly nor thoroughly address the intersection between learning and technology. Adjusting technologies to learning contexts and environments is a key area for future research.

  • 102.
    Asl, Reza Mohammadi
    et al.
    Laboratory of Intelligent Machines, Department of Mechanical Engineering, LUT University, Lappeenranta, Finland.
    Hagh, Yashar Shabbouei
    Laboratory of Intelligent Machines, Department of Mechanical Engineering, LUT University, Lappeenranta, Finland.
    Palm, Rainer
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Handroos, Heikki
    Laboratory of Intelligent Machines, Department of Mechanical Engineering, LUT University, Lappeenranta, Finland.
    Integral Non-Singular Terminal Sliding Mode Controller for nth-Order Nonlinear Systems2019In: IEEE Access, E-ISSN 2169-3536, Vol. 7, p. 102792-102802Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, a new integral non-singular terminal sliding mode control method for nonlinear systems is introduced. The proposed controller is designed by defining a new sliding surface with an additional integral part. This new manifold is first introduced into the second-order system and then expanded to nth-order systems. The stability of the control system is demonstrated for both second-order and nth-order systems by using the Lyapunov stability theory. The proposed controller is applied to a robotic manipulator as a case study for second-order systems, and a servo-hydraulic system as a case study for third-order systems. The results are presented and discussed.

  • 103.
    Asl, Reza Mohammadi
    et al.
    Laboratory of Intelligent Machines, Department of Mechanical Engineering, LUT University, Lappeenranta, Finland.
    Palm, Rainer
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Wu, Huapeng
    Laboratory of Intelligent Machines, Department of Mechanical Engineering, LUT University, Lappeenranta, Finland.
    Handroos, Heikki
    Laboratory of Intelligent Machines, Department of Mechanical Engineering, LUT University, Lappeenranta, Finland.
    Fuzzy-Based Parameter Optimization of Adaptive Unscented Kalman Filter: Methodology and Experimental Validation2020In: IEEE Access, E-ISSN 2169-3536, Vol. 8, p. 54887-54904Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study introduces a fuzzy based optimal state estimation approach. The new method is based on two principles: Adaptive Unscented Kalman filter, and Fuzzy Adaptive Grasshopper Optimization Algorithm. The approach is designed for the optimization of an adaptive Unscented Kalman Filter. To find the optimal parameters for the filter, a fuzzy based evolutionary algorithm, named Fuzzy Adaptive Grasshopper Optimization Algorithm, is developed where its efficiency is verified by application to different benchmark functions. The proposed optimal adaptive unscented Kalman filter is applied to two nonlinear systems: a robotic manipulator, and a servo-hydraulic system. Different simulation tests are conducted to verify the performance of the filter. The results of simulations are presented and compared with a previous version of the unscented Kalman filter. For a realistic test, the proposed filter is applied on the practical servo-hydraulic system. Practical results are discussed, and presented results approve the capability of the presented method for practical applications.

  • 104.
    Asnafi, Nader
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    3rd International Conference on Material Engineering and Advanced Manufacturing Technology, 26–28 April 2019, Shanghai, China2020Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We are very pleased to present the proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Material Engineering and Advanced Manufacturing Technology (MEAMT 2019) that was held successfully under the auspices of IASED in Shanghai, China, April 26-28, 2019.

    The theme of the conference - Material Engineering and Advanced Manufacturing Technology - is of key importance to the science and technology and a sustainable industrial development. This conference promotes valuable contacts between academia and industry and addresses both basic research and the societal/industrial technological needs within Material Engineering and Advanced Manufacturing Technology.

    In this era of Industry 4.0, we hope that the conference provided applicable data/information, addressed the issues in the societal/industrial transformation, and facilitated exchange within and between academia and industry.

    We want to express our gratitude to the program chairs and all members of the advisory, publicity, and technical committees for their valuable time and advices. We are grateful to the world renowned scientists who acted as keynote speakers at the conference.

    After a rigorous review process, where each paper was reviewed by at least two reviewers, high quality papers were accepted for presentation at this conference. We would like to thank all the reviewers for their time, effort, and for completing their assignments on time albeit tight deadlines.

    Many thanks to the authors for their valuable contributions and to the attendees for their active participation.

    Finally, a big thank to the organizers who made this conference to yet another unforgettable experience.

    Nader Asnafi

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Örebro University, Sweden Editor of the proceedings of MEAMT 2019 One behalf of the conference committee.

  • 105.
    Asplund, Anton
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Hanna, Gabriel
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Using Mobile Augmented Reality and Reasoning Systems in Industrial Maintenance2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Inspection workers in industries, evaluates the state of machines based on assumptions to decide if a need for service exists. These assumptions varies depending on the person performing the evaluation, which can cause the wrong decision to be made. These decisions on machine service affect the economy of the industry. By using sensors mounted to the machines and a reasoning system to evaluate the data from these sensors, the condition of the machines can be determined. Augmented Reality can then be used to display this condition to the inspection worker, leading to more informed decisions about the need for service being made. This thesis examines the different technologies needed to make this possible, Augmented Reality, Reasoning Systems, and Internet of Things. A prototype application is created using these to show what is possible using the mobile devices we all carry.

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    fulltext
  • 106.
    Babaki, Behrouz
    et al.
    Department of Computer Science, KU Leuven, Belgium.
    Guns, Tias
    Department of Computer Science, KU Leuven, Belgium; Department of Business Technology and Operations, VUB, Belgium.
    De Raedt, Luc
    Department of Computer Science, KU Leuven, Belgium.
    Stochastic Constraint Programming with And-Or Branch-and-Bound2017In: Proceedings of the Twenty-Sixth International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence, AAAI Press, 2017, p. 539-545Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Complex multi-stage decision making problems often involve uncertainty, for example, regarding demand or processing times. Stochastic constraint programming was proposed as a way to formulate and solve such decision problems, involving arbitrary constraints over both decision and random variables. What stochastic constraint programming currently lacks is support for the use of factorized probabilistic models that are popular in the graphical model community. We show how a state-of-the-art probabilistic inference engine can be integrated into standard constraint solvers. The resulting approach searches over the And-Or search tree directly, and we investigate tight bounds on the expected utility objective. This significantly improves search efficiency and outperforms scenario-based methods that ground out the possible worlds.

  • 107.
    Bacciu, Davide
    et al.
    Università di Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    Di Rocco, Maurizio
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Dragone, Mauro
    Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, UK.
    Gallicchio, Claudio
    Università di Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    Micheli, Alessio
    Università di Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    An ambient intelligence approach for learning in smart robotic environments2019In: Computational intelligence, ISSN 0824-7935, E-ISSN 1467-8640, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 1060-1087Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Smart robotic environments combine traditional (ambient) sensing devices and mobile robots. This combination extends the type of applications that can be considered, reduces their complexity, and enhances the individual values of the devices involved by enabling new services that cannot be performed by a single device. To reduce the amount of preparation and preprogramming required for their deployment in real-world applications, it is important to make these systems self-adapting. The solution presented in this paper is based upon a type of compositional adaptation where (possibly multiple) plans of actions are created through planning and involve the activation of pre-existing capabilities. All the devices in the smart environment participate in a pervasive learning infrastructure, which is exploited to recognize which plans of actions are most suited to the current situation. The system is evaluated in experiments run in a real domestic environment, showing its ability to proactively and smoothly adapt to subtle changes in the environment and in the habits and preferences of their user(s), in presence of appropriately defined performance measuring functions.

  • 108.
    Bacciu, Davide
    et al.
    Dipartimento di Informatica, Università di Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    Gallicchio, Claudio
    Dipartimento di Informatica, Università di Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    Micheli, Alessio
    Dipartimento di Informatica, Università di Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    Di Rocco, Maurizio
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Learning context-aware mobile robot navigation in home environments2014In: IISA 2014: The 5th International Conference on Information, Intelligence, Systems and Applications, New York: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2014, p. 57-62, article id 6878733Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present an approach to make planning adaptive in order to enable context-aware mobile robot navigation. We integrate a model-based planner with a distributed learning system based on reservoir computing, to yield personalized planning and resource allocations that account for user preferences and environmental changes. We demonstrate our approach in a real robot ecology, and show that the learning system can effectively exploit historical data about navigation performance to modify the models in the planner, without any prior information oncerning the phenomenon being modeled. The plans produced by the adapted CL fail more rarely than the ones generated by a non-adaptive planner. The distributed learning system handles the new learning task autonomously, and is able to automatically identify the sensorial information most relevant for the task, thus reducing the communication and computational overhead of the predictive task.

  • 109. Bahadori, Shahram
    et al.
    Cesta, Amedeo
    Grisetti, Giorgio
    Iocchi, Luca
    Leone, Riccardo G.
    Nardi, Daniele
    Oddi, Angelo
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Rasconi, Riccardo
    Robocare: an integrated robotic system for the domestic care of the elderly2003In: Proceedings of Workshop on Ambient Intelligence at AI*IA'03, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 110. Bahadori, Shahram
    et al.
    Cesta, Amedeo
    Grisetti, Giorgio
    Iocchi, Luca
    Leone, Riccardo G.
    Nardi, Daniele
    Oddi, Angelo
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Rasconi, Riccardo
    RoboCare: pervasive intelligence for the domestic care of the elderly2004In: Intelligenza Artificiale, ISSN 1724-8035, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 16-21Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 111. Bahadori, Shahram
    et al.
    Cesta, Amedeo
    Iocchi, Luca
    Leone, Riccardo G.
    Nardi, Daniele
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Rasconi, Riccardo
    Scozzafava, L.
    Towards ambient intelligence for the domestic care of the elderly2005In: Ambient intelligence: a novel paradigm / [ed] Gian Luca Foresti, Tim Ellis, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2005, p. 15-38Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 112.
    Banaee, Hadi
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    From Numerical Sensor Data to Semantic Representations: A Data-driven Approach for Generating Linguistic Descriptions2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In our daily lives, sensors recordings are becoming more and more ubiquitous. With the increased availability of data comes the increased need of systems that can represent the data in human interpretable concepts. In order to describe unknown observations in natural language, an artificial intelligence system must deal with several issues involving perception, concept formation, and linguistic description. These issues cover various subfields within artificial intelligence, such as machine learning, cognitive science, and natural language generation.The aim of this thesis is to address the problem of semantically modelling and describing numerical observations from sensor data. This thesis introduces data-driven approaches to perform the tasks of mining numerical data and creating semantic representations of the derived information in order to describe unseen but interesting observations in natural language.The research considers creating a semantic representation using the theory of conceptual spaces. In particular, the central contribution of this thesis is to present a data-driven approach that automatically constructs conceptual spaces from labelled numerical data sets. This constructed conceptual space then utilises semantic inference techniques to derive linguistic interpretations for novel unknown observations. Another contribution of this thesis is to explore an instantiation of the proposed approach in a real-world application. Specifically, this research investigates a case study where the proposed approach is used to describe unknown time series patterns that emerge from physiological sensor data. This instantiation first presents automatic data analysis methods to extract time series patterns and temporal rules from multiple channels of physiological sensor data, and then applies various linguistic description approaches (including the proposed semantic representation based on conceptual spaces) to generate human-readable natural language descriptions for such time series patterns and temporal rules.The main outcome of this thesis is the use of data-driven strategies that enable the system to reveal and explain aspects of sensor data which may otherwise be difficult to capture by knowledge-driven techniques alone. Briefly put, the thesis aims to automate the process whereby unknown observations of data can be 1) numerically analysed, 2) semantically represented, and eventually 3) linguistically described.

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    From Numerical Sensor Data to Semantic Representations: A Data-driven Approach for Generating Linguistic Descriptions
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  • 113.
    Banaee, Hadi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    A framework for automatic text generation of trends in physiological time series data2013In: IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics, 13-16 Oct. 2013, Manchester, IEEE conference proceedings, 2013, p. 3876-3881Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health monitoring systems using wearable sensorshave rapidly grown in the biomedical community. The mainchallenges in physiological data monitoring are to analyse largevolumes of health measurements and to represent the acquiredinformation. Natural language generation is an effective methodto create summaries for both clinicians and patients as it candescribe useful information extracted from sensor data in textualformat. This paper presents a framework of a natural languagegeneration system that provides a text-based representation ofthe extracted numeric information from physiological sensorsignals. More specifically, a new partial trend detection algorithmis introduced to capture the particular changes and events ofhealth parameters. The extracted information is then representedconsidering linguistic characterisation of numeric features. Ex-perimental analysis was performed using a wearable sensor and demonstrates a possible output in natural language text.

  • 114.
    Banaee, Hadi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Data mining for wearable sensors in health monitoring systems: a review of recent trends and challenges2013In: Sensors, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 13, no 12, p. 17472-17500Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The past few years have witnessed an increase in the development of wearable sensors for health monitoring systems. This increase has been due to several factors such as development in sensor technology as well as directed efforts on political and stakeholder levels to promote projects which address the need for providing new methods for care given increasing challenges with an aging population. An important aspect of study in such system is how the data is treated and processed. This paper provides a recent review of the latest methods and algorithms used to analyze data from wearable sensors used for physiological monitoring of vital signs in healthcare services. In particular, the paper outlines the more common data mining tasks that have been applied such as anomaly detection, prediction and decision making when considering in particular continuous time series measurements. Moreover, the paper further details the suitability of particular data mining and machine learning methods used to process the physiological data and provides an overview of the properties of the data sets used in experimental validation. Finally, based on this literature review, a number of key challenges have been outlined for data mining methods in health monitoring systems

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    banaee_etal_sensors2013
  • 115.
    Banaee, Hadi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Descriptive Modelling of Clinical Conditions with Data-driven Rule Mining in Physiological Data2015In: Proceedings of the 8th International conference of Health Informatics (HEALTHINF 2015), SciTePress, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an approach to automatically mine rules in time series data representing physiologicalparameters in clinical conditions. The approach is fully data driven, where prototypical patterns are mined foreach physiological time series data. The generated rules based on the prototypical patterns are then describedin a textual representation which captures trends in each physiological parameter and their relation to the otherphysiological data. In this paper, a method for measuring similarity of rule sets is introduced in order tovalidate the uniqueness of rule sets. This method is evaluated on physiological records from clinical classesin the MIMIC online database such as angina, sepsis, respiratory failure, etc.. The results show that the rulemining technique is able to acquire a distinctive model for each clinical condition, and represent the generatedrules in a human understandable textual representation

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    fulltext
  • 116.
    Banaee, Hadi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Chimamiwa, Gibson
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Alirezaie, Marjan
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Explaining Habits and Changes of Activities in Smart Homes2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early cognitive deterioration can emerge in the form of changes in daily habits and there is a need to go beyond activity recognition for recognising habits and detecting changes in smart homes. In this paper, we propose a system composed of 1) data-driven habit recognition, 2) change detection in the trends of habits, and 3) linguistic descriptions of both habits and changes. Our habit recognition approach relies on both attribute-based analysis and association-based analysis. The generated outputs of the habit recognition and change detection are finally interpreted in linguistic descriptions for the end-users of the system.

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    Explaining Habits and Changes of Activities in Smart Homes
  • 117.
    Banaee, Hadi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Data-driven rule mining and representation of temporal patterns in physiological sensor data2015In: IEEE journal of biomedical and health informatics, ISSN 2168-2194, E-ISSN 2168-2208, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 1557-1566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mining and representation of qualitative patterns is a growing field in sensor data analytics. This paper leverages from rule mining techniques to extract and represent temporal relation of prototypical patterns in clinical data streams. The approach is fully data-driven, where the temporal rules are mined from physiological time series such as heart rate, respiration rate, and blood pressure. To validate the rules, a novel similarity method is introduced, that compares the similarity between rule sets. An additional aspect of the proposed approach has been to utilize natural language generation techniques to represent the temporal relations between patterns. In this study, the sensor data in the MIMIC online database was used for evaluation, in which the mined temporal rules as they relate to various clinical conditions (respiratory failure, angina, sepsis, ...) were made explicit as a textual representation. Furthermore, it was shown that the extracted rule set for any particular clinical condition was distinct from other clinical conditions.

  • 118.
    Banaee, Hadi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Using Conceptual Spaces to Model Domain Knowledge in Data-to-Text Systems2014In: Proceedings of the 8th International Natural Language Generation Conference, Association for Computational Linguistics, 2014, p. 11-15Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This position paper introduces the utilityof the conceptual spaces theory to conceptualisethe acquired knowledge in data-totextsystems. A use case of the proposedmethod is presented for text generationsystems dealing with sensor data. Modellinginformation in a conceptual spaceexploits a spatial representation of domainknowledge in order to perceive unexpectedobservations. This ongoing work aimsto apply conceptual spaces in NLG forgrounding numeric information into thesymbolic representation and confrontingthe important step of acquiring adequateknowledge in data-to-text systems.

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    Banaee_INLG2014
  • 119.
    Banaee, Hadi
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Schaffernicht, Erik
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Data-Driven Conceptual Spaces: Creating Semantic Representations for Linguistic Descriptions of Numerical Data2018In: The journal of artificial intelligence research, ISSN 1076-9757, E-ISSN 1943-5037, Vol. 63, p. 691-742Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an increasing need to derive semantics from real-world observations to facilitate natural information sharing between machine and human. Conceptual spaces theory is a possible approach and has been proposed as mid-level representation between symbolic and sub-symbolic representations, whereby concepts are represented in a geometrical space that is characterised by a number of quality dimensions. Currently, much of the work has demonstrated how conceptual spaces are created in a knowledge-driven manner, relying on prior knowledge to form concepts and identify quality dimensions. This paper presents a method to create semantic representations using data-driven conceptual spaces which are then used to derive linguistic descriptions of numerical data. Our contribution is a principled approach to automatically construct a conceptual space from a set of known observations wherein the quality dimensions and domains are not known a priori. This novelty of the approach is the ability to select and group semantic features to discriminate between concepts in a data-driven manner while preserving the semantic interpretation that is needed to infer linguistic descriptions for interaction with humans. Two data sets representing leaf images and time series signals are used to evaluate the method. An empirical evaluation for each case study assesses how well linguistic descriptions generated from the conceptual spaces identify unknown observations. Furthermore,  comparisons are made with descriptions derived on alternative approaches for generating semantic models.

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    Data Driven Conceptual Spaces, Banaee et. al, JAIR 2018
  • 120.
    Barreiro, Anabela
    et al.
    INESC-ID, Portugal.
    Souza, José G. C. de
    Unbabel, Portugal.
    Gatt, Albert
    University of Malta, Malta; Utrecht University, The Netherlands.
    Bhatt, Mehul
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Lloret, Elena
    University of Alicante, Spain.
    Erdem, Aykut
    Koç University, Turkey.
    Gkatzia, Dimitra
    Edinburgh Napier University, United Kingdom.
    Moniz, Helena
    University of Lisbon, Portugal; INESC-ID, Portugal .
    Russo, Irene
    National Research Council, Italy.
    Kepler, Fábio N.
    Unbabel, Portugal .
    Calixto, Iacer
    Amsterdam University Medical Centers, The Netherlands.
    Paprzycki, Marcin
    Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland .
    Portet, François
    Grenoble Alpes University, France.
    Augenstein, Isabelle
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark .
    Alhasani, Mirela
    Epoka University, Albania.
    Multi3Generation: Multitask, Multilingual, Multimodal Language Generation2022In: Proceedings of the 23rd Annual Conference of the European Association for Machine Translation, European Association for Machine Translation , 2022, p. 345-346Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the Multitask, Multilingual, Multimodal Language Generation COST Action – Multi3Generatio(CA18231), an interdisciplinary networof research groups working on different aspects of language generation. This "meta-paper" will serve as reference for citationof the Action in future publications. It presents the objectives, challenges and a the links for the achieved outcomes.

  • 121.
    Bazzan, Ana L. C.
    et al.
    UFRGS, Porto Alegre, Brazil.
    de Oliveira, Denise
    UFRGS, Porto Alegre, Brazil.
    Klügl, Franziska
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Nagel, Kai
    TU Berlin.
    To adapt or not to adapt: consequences of adapting driver and traffic light agents2008In: Adaptive agents and multi-agent systems III: adaptation and multi-agent learning : 5th, 6th, and 7th European Symposium,ALAMAS 2005-2007on Adaptive and Learning Agents and Multi-Agent Systems : revised selected papers / [ed] Karl Tuyls, Ann Nowe, Zahia Guessoum, New York: Springer , 2008, p. 1-14Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One way to cope with the increasing traffic demand is to integrate standard solutions with more intelligent control measures. However, the result of possible interferences between intelligent control or information provision tools and other components of the overall traffic system is not easily predictable. This paper discusses the effects of integrating co-adaptive decision-making regarding route choices (by drivers) and control measures (by traffic lights). The motivation behind this is that optimization of traffic light control is starting to be integrated with navigation support for drivers. We use microscopic, agent-based modelling and simulation, in opposition to the classical network analysis, as this work focuses on the effect of local adaptation. In a scenario that exhibits features comparable to real-world networks, we evaluate different types of adaptation by drivers and by traffic lights, based on local perceptions. In order to compare the performance, we have also used a global level optimization method based on genetic algorithms.

  • 122.
    Bazzan, Ana L. C.
    et al.
    Instituto de Informática/PPGC, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre RS, Brazil.
    Klügl, Franziska
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    A review on agent-based technology for traffic and transportation2014In: Knowledge engineering review (Print), ISSN 0269-8889, E-ISSN 1469-8005, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 375-403Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last few years, the number of papers devoted to applications of agent-based technologies to traffic and transportation engineering has grown enormously. Thus, it seems to be the appropriate time to shed light over the achievements of the last decade, on the questions that have been successfully addressed, as well as on remaining challenging issues. In the present paper, we review the literature related to the areas of agent-based traffic modelling and simulation, and agent-based traffic control and management. Later we discuss and summarize the main achievements and the challenges.

  • 123.
    Bazzan, Ana L. C.
    et al.
    UFRGS, Porto Alegre, Brazil.
    Klügl, Franziska
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Experience Sharing in a Traffic Scenario2020In: ATT2020 Agents in Traffic and Transportation: Eleventh International Workshop on Agents in Traffic and Transportation co-located with the 24th European Conference on Artificial Intelligence (ECAI 2020) Santiago de Compostela, Spain, September 4, 2020. / [ed] Dusparic, I. , Klügl, F., Lujak, M. and G. Vizzari, Technical University of Aachen , 2020, p. 71-78Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Travel apps become more and more popular giving in-formation about the current traffic state to drivers who then adapt their route choice. In commuting scenarios, where people repeatedly travel between a particular origin and destination, learning effects add to this information. In this paper, we analyse the effects on the overall network, if adaptive driver agents share their aggregated experience about route choice in a reinforcement learning (Q-learning) setup. Drivers share what they have learnt about the system, not just information about their current travel times. We can show in a standard scenario that experience sharing can improve convergence times for adaptive driver agents

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  • 124.
    Bazzan, Ana L. C.
    et al.
    UFRGS, Porto Alegre, Brazil.
    Klügl, Franziska
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Re-routing agents in an abstract traffic scenario2008In: Advances in artificial intelligence: SBIA 2008 / [ed] Gerson Zaverucha, Augusto Loureiro da Costa, Berlin: Springer , 2008, p. 63-72Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human drivers may perform replanning when facing traffic jams or when informed that there are expected delays on their planned routes. In this paper, we address the effects of drivers re-routing, an issue that has been ignored so far. We tackle re-routing scenarios, also considering traffic lights that are adaptive, in order to test whether such a form of co-adaptation may result in interferences or positive cumulative effects. An abstract route choice scenario is used which resembles many features of real world networks. Results of our experiments show that re-routing indeed pays off from a global perspective as the overall load of the network is balanced. Besides, re-routing is useful to compensate an eventual lack of adaptivity regarding traffic management.

  • 125.
    Bazzan, Ana Lucia
    et al.
    Universidade Federal Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil .
    Klügl, Franziska
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Introduction to Intelligent Systems in Traffic and Transportation2013Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban mobility is not only one of the pillars of modern economic systems, but also a key issue in the quest for equality of opportunity, once it can improve access to other services. Currently, however, there are a number of negative issues related to traffic, especially in mega-cities, such as economical issues (cost of opportunity caused by delays), environmental (externalities related to emissions of pollutants), and social (traffic accidents). Solutions to these issues are more and more closely tied to information and communication technology. Indeed, a search in the technical literature (using the keyword ``urban traffic" to filter out articles on data network traffic) retrieved the following number of articles (as of December 3, 2013): 9,443  (ACM Digital Library), 26,054 (Scopus), and 1,730,000 (Google Scholar). Moreover, articles listed in the ACM query relate to conferences as diverse as MobiCom, CHI, PADS, and AAMAS. This means that  there is a big and diverse community of computer scientists and computer engineers who tackle research that is connected to the development of intelligent traffic and transportation systems. It is also possible to see that this community is growing, and that research projects are getting more and more interdisciplinary. To foster the cooperation among the involved communities, this book aims at  giving a broad introduction into the basic but relevant concepts related to transportation systems, targeting researchers and practitioners from computer science and information technology. In addition, the second part of the book gives a panorama of some of the most exciting and newest technologies, originating in computer science and computer engineering, that are now being employed in projects related to car-to-car communication, interconnected vehicles, car navigation, platooning, crowd sensing and sensor networks, among others. This material will also be of interest to engineers and researchers from the traffic and transportation community.

  • 126. Beetz, Michael
    et al.
    Chatila, Raja
    Hertzberg, Joachim
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    AI Reasoning Methods for Robotics2016In: Springer Handbook of Robotics / [ed] Bruno Siciliano, Oussama Khatib, Springer, 2016, 2, p. 329-356Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Artificial intelligence (AI) reasoning technology involving, e.g., inference, planning, and learning, has a track record with a healthy number of successful applications. So can it be used as a toolbox of methods for autonomous mobile robots? Not necessarily, as reasoning on a mobile robot about its dynamic, partially known environment may differ substantially from that in knowledge-based pure software systems, where most of the named successes have been registered. Moreover, recent knowledge about the robot’s environment cannot be given a priori, but needs to be updated from sensor data, involving challenging problems of symbol grounding and knowledge base change. This chapter sketches the main robotics relevant topics of symbol-based AI reasoning. Basic methods of knowledge representation and inference are described in general, covering both logic and probability-based approaches. The chapter first gives a motivation by example, to what extent symbolic reasoning has the potential of helping robots perform in the first place. Then (Sect. 14.2), we sketch the landscape of representation languages available for the endeavor. After that (Sect. 14.3), we present approaches and results for several types of practical, robotics-related reasoning tasks, with an emphasis on temporal and spatial reasoning. Plan-based robot control is described in some more detail in Sect. 14.4. Section 14.5 concludes.

  • 127.
    Begum, Shahina
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Barua, Shaibal
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Filla, Reno
    Emerging Technologies, Advanced Engineering, Volvo Construction Equipment, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin
    Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Classification of physiological signals for wheel loader operators using Multi-scale Entropy analysis and case-based reasoning2014In: Expert systems with applications, ISSN 0957-4174, E-ISSN 1873-6793, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 295-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sensor signal fusion is becoming increasingly important in many areas including medical diagnosis and classification. Today, clinicians/experts often do the diagnosis of stress, sleepiness and tiredness on the basis of information collected from several physiological sensor signals. Since there are large individual variations when analyzing the sensor measurements and systems with single sensor, they could easily be vulnerable to uncertain noises/interferences in such domain; multiple sensors could provide more robust and reliable decision. Therefore, this paper presents a classification approach i.e. Multivariate Multiscale Entropy Analysis-Case-Based Reasoning (MMSE-CBR) that classifies physiological parameters of wheel loader operators by combining CBR approach with a data level fusion method named Multivariate Multiscale Entropy (MMSE). The MMSE algorithm supports complexity analysis of multivariate biological recordings by aggregating several sensor measurements e.g., Inter-beat-Interval (IBI) and Heart Rate (HR) from Electrocardiogram (ECG), Finger Temperature (FT), Skin Conductance (SC) and Respiration Rate (RR). Here, MMSE has been applied to extract features to formulate a case by fusing a number of physiological signals and the CBR approach is applied to classify the cases by retrieving most similar cases from the case library. Finally, the proposed approach i.e. MMSE-CBR has been evaluated with the data from professional drivers at Volvo Construction Equipment, Sweden. The results demonstrate that the proposed system that fuses information at data level could classify 'stressed' and 'healthy' subjects 83.33% correctly compare to an expert's classification. Furthermore, with another data set the achieved accuracy (83.3%) indicates that it could also classify two different conditions 'adapt' (training) and 'sharp' (real-life driving) for the wheel loader operators. Thus, the new approach of MMSE-CBR could support in classification of operators and may be of interest to researchers developing systems based on information collected from different sensor sources.

  • 128.
    Behnam, Moris
    et al.
    Mälardalen Real-Time Research Centre, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Nemati, Farhang
    Mälardalen Real-Time Research Centre, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Nolte, Thomas
    Mälardalen Real-Time Research Centre, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Grahn, Håkan
    School of Computing, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden.
    Towards an Efficient Approach for Resource Sharing in Real-Time Multiprocessor Systems2011In: 2011 6th IEEE International Symposium on Industrial and Embedded Systems: Conference Proceedings, IEEE , 2011, p. 99-102Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Supporting resource sharing in multiprocessor architectures is one of the problems which may limit the benefits that can be archived using this type of architecture. Many approaches and algorithms have been proposed to support resource sharing, however, most of them impose either high blocking times on tasks or require a large memory size. In this paper we investigate the possibility of combining the lock-based approaches and wait-free approaches (using multiple buffers) in order to decrease both the blocking time that may affect the schedulability of tasks and the required memory. To achieve this, we propose a solution based on evaluating the maximum allowed blocking time on each task according to the schedulability analysis, and then find the minimum memory requirement for each resource such that it limits the blocking times on tasks to be less than the maximum allowed blocking times.

  • 129.
    Behzad, Nima
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    3D Context of Objects: A prior for Object Detection and Place Classification2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Contextual information is helpful for object detection and object-based placerepresentation. 3D data significantly helps to capture geometrical informationabout scenes. In this work, a feature descriptor for object context in full 3Dpointclouds of places is introduced together with a method to extract featuresand build the context model.The proposed model is evaluated in experiments on pointclouds from differenttypes of places which include different object categories. Results showthe promising ability of the model to predict the possible context of objects inpointclouds or complete 3D maps of an environment.Among various applications for this, the author suggests object contextmodels to be used in place categorization and semantic mapping and discussesa method for it. To the knowledge of the author, this work is unique regardingits use of full 3D pointcloud of scenes and also introducing this descriptor tobe used to represent places.

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  • 130.
    Bekiroglu, Yasemin
    et al.
    School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
    Damianou, Andreas
    Department of Computer Science, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.
    Detry, Renaud
    Centre for Autonomous Systems, CSC, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Stork, Johannes Andreas
    Centre for Autonomous Systems, CSC, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Kragic, Danica
    Centre for Autonomous Systems, CSC, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Ek, Carl Henrik
    Centre for Autonomous Systems, CSC, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Probabilistic consolidation of grasp experience2016In: 2016 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), IEEE conference proceedings, 2016, p. 193-200Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a probabilistic model for joint representation of several sensory modalities and action parameters in a robotic grasping scenario. Our non-linear probabilistic latent variable model encodes relationships between grasp-related parameters, learns the importance of features, and expresses confidence in estimates. The model learns associations between stable and unstable grasps that it experiences during an exploration phase. We demonstrate the applicability of the model for estimating grasp stability, correcting grasps, identifying objects based on tactile imprints and predicting tactile imprints from object-relative gripper poses. We performed experiments on a real platform with both known and novel objects, i.e., objects the robot trained with, and previously unseen objects. Grasp correction had a 75% success rate on known objects, and 73% on new objects. We compared our model to a traditional regression model that succeeded in correcting grasps in only 38% of cases.

  • 131. Benedetti, Marco
    et al.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Policella, Nicola
    Anatomy of a scheduling competition2007In: Proceedings of Workshop on Network Robot Systems at IROS'08, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 132.
    Benferhat, Salem
    et al.
    Univ. Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, France.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Smets, Philippe
    Univ. Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium.
    Belief functions and default reasoning2000In: Artificial Intelligence, ISSN 0004-3702, E-ISSN 1872-7921, Vol. 122, no 1-2, p. 1-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a new approach to deal with default information based on the theory of belief functions. Our semantic structures, inspired by Adams' epsilon semantics, are epsilon-belief assignments, where mass values are either close to 0 or close to 1. In the first part of this paper, we show that these structures can be used to give a uniform semantics to several popular non-monotonic systems, including Kraus, Lehmann and Magidor's system P, Pearl's system Z, Brewka's preferred sub-theories, Geffner's conditional entailment, Pinkas' penalty logic, possibilistic logic, and the lexicographic approach. In the second part, we use epsilon-belief assignments to build a new system, called LCD, and we show that this system correctly addresses the well-known problems of specificity, irrelevance, blocking of inheritance, ambiguity, and redundancy

  • 133.
    Bengtsson, Jesper
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Development of a Booking System for Office Spaces2021Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This report describes the development of a web application that lets the user book an office seat at their office. The demand for this service arose during the Covid-19 pandemic when there was a big variation in the amount of workers present at the offices from day to day, which resulted in the offices not being used efficiently. Except for the description of the application, the report also contains a theoretical chapter about scheduling. The goal of this chapter is to be able to stand as a foundation if the application should be further developed to contain scheduling features. The finished application has the possibility to have both an economical impact on the company as well as a social impact on the workers. Even though the application fulfills all the requirement that was set in the beginning of the project, the application has good potential for further development which are mentioned in the end of this report.

  • 134.
    Berg, Andreas
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Feinestam, Johan
    Comparing probabilistic models for human motion patterns2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Recent years more and more works are being automatised or made more efficient with the help of robots. In a world where more and more things are digitalized, robots must be able to work in environments that are populated with people.To be able to adapt to their environment, robots need to learn the flow of traffic. For a robot to do this they can use maps of dynamics (MoD), but today there exists no comparison between current implementations.In this thesis, two MoD’s will be implemented and compared foremost for the ILIAD project but also for everyone that needs it. Along with the implementation and comparison, we will also explain what future work to be done on these two implementations.

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  • 135.
    Berglund, Erik
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Iliev, Boyko
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Palm, Rainer
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Krug, Robert
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Charusta, Krzysztof
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Dimitrov, Dimitar
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Mapping between different kinematic structures without absolute positioning during operation2012In: Electronics Letters, ISSN 0013-5194, E-ISSN 1350-911X, Vol. 48, no 18, p. 1110-1112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When creating datasets for modelling of human skills based on training examples from human motion, one can encounter the problem that the kinematics of the robot does not match the human kinematics. Presented is a simple method of bypassing the explicit modelling of the human kinematics based on a variant of the self-organising map (SOM) algorithm. While the literature contains instances of SOM-type algorithms used for dimension reduction, this reported work deals with the inverse problem: dimension increase, as we are going from 4 to 5 degrees of freedom.

  • 136.
    Bergstedt, Martin
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Gillström, Tobias
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Observator för frontlinjen på surfplatta2017Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This project has been carried out at Saab Dynamics. The project's purpose was to develop an application, TBFO, for reporting information containing how the missile GLSDB would strike a target. TBFO is intended to be used in the proximity of the target and information is sent to the planning system GLSDB MPS.

    The application was built around the 3D engine from Vricon and is developed to fit for use of touch devices. The main part of the work concerns the development of user interface for touch input and the system’s application protocol.

    This report describes the processes of developing the system, including what tools and methods that have been used during development. The report also provides an in-depth look at processes used when developing applications for touch devices.

    The conclusion from the results of this project is that the idea of the described system is useful for the process of planning an assault with GLSDB MPS.

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  • 137.
    Bergsten, Pontus
    Örebro University, Department of Technology.
    Observers and controllers for Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy systems2001Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis studies analysis and design issues for observers anc controllers for Takagi-Sugeno (TS) fuzzy systems. Many physical systems are nonlinear in nature and using the well known linear techniques for such systems may result in bad performance, and even instability. On the other hand, analysis and design of observers and controllers for general nonlinear systems tend to be a quite involved procedure. It turns out, however, that a TS fuzzy system is able to represent or approximate a large class of nonlinear systems. Developing methods for observation and control for TS systems should therefore be worthwile.

    The TS fuzzy systems considered in this thesis are allowed to have an affine term. This can be an advantage, because affine TS fuzzy systems may be able to approximate nonlinear functions  to high accuracy with fewer rules than the TS fuzzy system with linear consequents only.

    It is shown that observer design is more difficult when the weights in the TS fuzzy systems depend on the estimated state, and an explicit design procedure is devised for that case. A reduced order observer is also proposed. To deal with modeling errors a fuzzy sliding mode approach is taken.

    The controller design is focused on affine TS fuzzy systems. Analysis and design of observer-based error state feedback controllers are proposed. Furthermore, it is also shown how recent results on classical gain scheduling may be used for control of affine TS fuzzy systems.

    Analysis and design for both observers and controllers are based on quadratic stability analysis, and in some cases, on robust quadratic stability analysis. Although this approach may be conservative, it often results in automatic design procedures based on optimization subject to linear matrix inequalities.

  • 138.
    Bergsten, Pontus
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Palm, Rainer
    Siemens AG Corporate Technology, Otto-Hahn-Ring, Munich, German.
    Driankov, Dimiter
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Observers for Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy systems2002In: IEEE transactions on systems, man and cybernetics. Part B. Cybernetics, ISSN 1083-4419, E-ISSN 1941-0492, ISSN 1083-4419/02, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 114-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We focus on the analysis and design of two different sliding mode observers for dynamic Takagi-Sugeno (TS) fuzzy systems. A nonlinear system of this class is composed of multiple affine local linear models that are smoothly interpolated by weighting functions resulting from a fuzzy partitioning of the state space of a given nonlinear system subject to observation. The Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy system is then an accurate approximation of the original nonlinear system. Our approach to the analysis and design of observers for Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy systems is based on extending sliding mode observer schemes to the case of interpolated multiple local affine linear models. Thus, our main contribution is nonlinear observer analysis and design methods that can effectively deal with model/plant mismatches. Furthermore, we consider the difficult case when the weighting functions in the Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy system depend on the estimated state

  • 139.
    Berna, Amalia
    et al.
    CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences and CSIRO Food Futures Flagship, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory (ACT), Australia.
    Vergara, Alexander
    University of California, San Diego, USA.
    Trincavelli, Marco
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Huerta, Ramon
    University of California, San Diego, USA.
    Afonja, Ayo
    Department of Chemistry, University College London, London, UK.
    Parkin, Ivan
    Binions, Russell
    Trowell, Stephen
    Evaluating zeolite-modified sensors: towards a faster set of chemical sensors2011In: Olfaction and electronic nose: proceedings of the 14th International Symposium on Olfaction and Electronic Nose (ISOEN 2011), May 2-5, 2011, New York City, USA, American Institute of Physics (AIP), 2011, p. 50-52Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The response of zeolite-modified sensors, prepared by screen printing layers of chromium titanium oxide (CTO), were compared to unmodified tin oxide sensors using amplitude and transient responses. For transient responses we used a family of features, derived from the exponential moving average (EMA), to characterize chemo-resistive responses. All sensors were tested simultaneously against 20 individual volatile compounds from four chemical groups. The responses of the two types of sensors showed some independence. The zeolite modified CTO sensors discriminated compounds better using either amplitude response or EMA features and CTO-modified sensors also responded three times faster.

  • 140.
    Berndtsson, Joakim
    et al.
    School of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Peter
    School of Global Studies, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Martin
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Value conflicts and non-compliance: Attitudes to whistleblowing in Swedish organisations2018In: Information and Computer Security, ISSN 2056-4961, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 246-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to explore potential value conflicts between information security work and whistleblowing activities by analysing attitudes to whistleblowing among white-collar workers in Swedish organisations.

    Design/methodology/approach: The study is conducted using survey data among (n = 674) Swedish white-collar workers. Statistical analyses are conducted to explore variations in acceptance of whistleblowing and analyse the relationship between acceptance for whistleblowing and information security attitudes and behaviours.

    Findings: The study finds strong support for whistleblowing in both public and private spheres, and by both private and public sector employees. The study also finds stronger acceptance for intra-organisational whistleblowing, while support for external whistleblowing is low. Finally, the study shows that the whistleblowing activities might be perceived as coming in conflict with information security work, even as the support for including whistleblowing functions in information security practices is high.

    Research limitations/implications: With a focus on one country, the study is limited in terms of empirical scope. It is also limited by a relatively small number of respondents and survey items relating to whistleblowing, which in turn affects its explanatory value. However, the study does provide unique new insight into a specific form of non-compliance, i.e. whistleblowing, which merits further investigation.

    Originality/value: Few studies exist that combine insights from the fields of whistleblowing and information security research. Thus, this study provides a basis for further investigation into attitudes and behaviours linked to whistleblowing in public and private organisations, as well as attendant value conflicts related to information security management and practice.

  • 141.
    Besold, Tarek R.
    et al.
    Institute of Cognitive Science, University of Osnabrück, Osnabrück, Germany.
    Kuehnberger, Kai-Uwe
    Institute of Cognitive Science, University of Osnabrück, Osnabrück, Germany.
    Garcez, Artur d'Avila
    City University London, London, UK.
    Saffiotti, Alessandro
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Fischer, Martin H.
    University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany.
    Bundy, Alan
    University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
    Anchoring Knowledge in Interaction: Towards a Harmonic Subsymbolic/Symbolic Framework and Architecture of Computational Cognition2015In: Artificial General Intelligence (AGI 2015), Springer, 2015, p. 35-45Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We outline a proposal for a research program leading to a new paradigm, architectural framework, and prototypical implementation, for the cognitively inspired anchoring of an agent's learning, knowledge formation, and higher reasoning abilities in real-world interactions: Learning through interaction in real-time in a real environment triggers the incremental accumulation and repair of knowledge that leads to the formation of theories at a higher level of abstraction. The transformations at this higher level filter down and inform the learning process as part of a permanent cycle of learning through experience, higher-order deliberation, theory formation and revision.

    The envisioned framework will provide a precise computational theory, algorithmic descriptions, and an implementation in cyber-physical systems, addressing the lifting of action patterns from the subsymbolic to the symbolic knowledge level, effective methods for theory formation, adaptation, and evolution, the anchoring of knowledge-level objects, realworld interactions and manipulations, and the realization and evaluation of such a system in different scenarios. The expected results can provide new foundations for future agent architectures, multi-agent systems, robotics, and cognitive systems, and can facilitate a deeper understanding of the development and interaction in human-technological settings.

  • 142.
    Bessiere, Christian
    et al.
    CNRS, University of Montpellier, France.
    De Raedt, Luc
    DTAI, KU Leuven, Belgium.
    Guns, Tias
    DTAI, KU Leuven, Belgium.
    Kotthoff, Lars
    University of Wyoming, Wyoming, USA.
    Nanni, Mirco
    ISTI-CNR, France.
    Nijssen, Siegfried
    DTAI, KU Leuven, Belgium.
    O’Sullivan, Barry
    Insight, University College Cork, Ireland.
    Paparrizou, Anastasia
    CNRS, France.
    Pedreschi, Dino
    University of Pisa, Italy.
    Simonis, Helmut
    Insight, University College Cork, Ireland.
    The Inductive Constraint Programming Loop2017In: IEEE Intelligent Systems, ISSN 1541-1672, E-ISSN 1941-1294, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 44-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Constraint programming is used for a variety of real-world optimisation problems, such as planning, scheduling and resource allocation problems. At the same time, one continuously gathers vast amounts of data about these problems. Current constraint programming software does not exploit such data to update schedules, resources and plans. We propose a new framework, that we call the Inductive Constraint Programming loop. In this approach data is gathered and analyzed systematically, in order to dynamically revise and adapt constraints and optimization criteria. Inductive Constraint Programming aims at bridging the gap between the areas of data mining and machine learning on the one hand, and constraint programming on the other hand.

  • 143.
    Bhatt, Mehul
    Cognitive Systems, and Spatial Cognition Research Center, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Between Sense and Sensibility: Declarative narrativisation of mental models as a basis and benchmark for visuo-spatial cognition and computation focussed collaborative cognitive systems2013Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
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    Between Sense and Sensibility
  • 144.
    Bhatt, Mehul
    SFB/TR 8 Spatial Cognition, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Commonsense Inference in Dynamic Spatial Systems: Epistemological Requirements2010In: Proceedings of the Twenty-Third International Florida Artificial Intelligence Research Society Conference (FLAIRS-23) / [ed] Hans W. Guesgen and R. Charles Murray, Menlo Park: AAAI Press , 2010, p. 8-13Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrate the role of commonsense inference toward the modeling of qualitative notions of space and spatial change within a dynamic setup. The inference patterns are connected to those that are required to handle the frame problem whilst modeling inertia, and the causal minimisation of (Lin 1995) that is required to account for the ramifications of occurrences. Such patterns are both useful and necessary in order to operationalize a domain-independent qualitative spatial theory that is re-usable in arbitrary dynamic spatial systems, e.g., for spatial planning and causal explanation tasks. The illustration, grounded in the context of embedding arbitrary 'qualitative spatial calculi' within the situation calculus, utilizes topological and orientation calculi as examples.

  • 145.
    Bhatt, Mehul
    Department of Computer Science, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Dynamical Spatial Systems - A Potential Approach for the Application of Qualitative Spatial Calculi2008In: Proceedings of the Twenty-First International Florida Artificial Intelligence Research Society Conference, May 15-17, 2008, Coconut Grove, Florida, USA, Menlo Park: AAAI Press , 2008, p. 580-585Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A dynamical systems approach for modeling changing spatial environments is formalised. The formalisation adheres to the representational and computational semantics of situation calculus and includes a systematic account of all aspects necessary to implement a domain-independent qualitative spatial theory that is applicable across diverse application areas. Foundational to the formalisation is a situation calculus based causal theory and a generalised view of qualitative spatial calculi that encompass one or more spatial domains. Furthermore, aspects considered inherent to dynamic spatial systems are also accounted for and the relevant computational tasks addressed by the proposed formalisation are stated explicitly.

  • 146.
    Bhatt, Mehul
    Spatial Cognition Research Center (SFB/TR 8), University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Invited Speakers2013In: Space, Time, and Ambient Intelligence, Papers from the 2013 AAAI Workshop, Bellevue, Washington, USA, July 14, 2013, AAAI Press, 2013, Vol. WS-13-14Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In addition to six paper presentations, which will be accompanied by discussions, the workshop features two keynote speakers: Anthony Cohn (University of Leeds, UK) and Henry Kautz (University of Rochester, USA).

  • 147.
    Bhatt, Mehul
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology.
    Visuospatial Commonsense: On Neurosymbolic Reasoning and Learning about Space and Motion2022In: Spatio-Temporal Reasoning and Learning 2022: Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Spatio-Temporal Reasoning and Learning (STRL 2022) co-located with the 31st International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence and the 25th European Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI 2022, ECAI 2022), Vienna, Austria, July 24, 2022 / [ed] Michael Sioutis; Zhiguo Long; John Stell; Jochen Renz, Technical University of Aachen , 2022, Vol. 3190Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 148.
    Bhatt, Mehul
    et al.
    University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Borrmann, André
    Technische Universität München, München, Germany.
    Amor, Robert
    University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Beetz, Jakob
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
    Architecture, computing, and design assistance2013In: Automation in Construction, ISSN 0926-5805, E-ISSN 1872-7891, Vol. 32, p. 161-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design is one of the most complex of human endeavors requiring an enormous number of often conflicting criteria to be contemplated when identifying optimal solutions. Design is constrained by guidelines, codes, and standards applicable to the specific cultural and locational context that the design will be sited. Furthermore, a design has to be created within a collaborative team consisting of many professionals focused on specific subsystems and expert preferences that provide unique functionality to the overall design. The increasing use and capability of software tools involved in the creation and processing of such spatial information has also led to elevated levels of complexity that spurred a need to structure, query and reason about multiple spatial representations of buildings and their components in new ways.

  • 149.
    Bhatt, Mehul
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Science and Technology. Human-Centred Cognitive Assistance Lab. (HCC), University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Cutting, James
    Cornell University, Ithaca, USA.
    Levin, Daniel
    Department of Psychology and Human Development, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, USA.
    Lewis, Clayton
    University of Colorado, Boulder, USA.
    Cognition, Interaction, Design: Discussions as Part of the Codesign Roundtable 20172017In: Künstliche Intelligenz, ISSN 0933-1875, E-ISSN 1610-1987, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 363-371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This transcript documents select parts of discus-sions on the confluence of cognition, interaction, design, and human behaviour studies. The interview and related events were held as part of the CoDesign 2017 Roundtable (Bhatt in CoDesign 2017—The Bremen Summer of Cognition and Design/CoDesign Roundtable. University of Bremen, Bremen, 2017) at the University of Bremen (Germany) in June 2017. The Q/A sessions were moderated by Mehul Bhatt (University of Bremen, Germany., and Örebro Uni-versity, Sweden) and Daniel Levin (Vanderbilt University, USA). Daniel Levin served in a dual role: as co-moderator of the discussion, as well as interviewee. The transcript is published as part of a KI Journal special issue on “Seman-tic Interpretation of Multi-Modal Human Behaviour Data” (Bhatt and Kersting in Special Issue on: Semantic Interpre-tation of Multimodal Human Behaviour Data, Artif Intell, 2017).

  • 150.
    Bhatt, Mehul
    et al.
    SFB/TR 8 Spatial Cognition, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    Dylla, Frank
    SFB/TR 8 Spatial Cognition, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    A Qualitative Model of Dynamic Scene Analysis and Interpretation in Ambient Intelligence Systems2009In: International Journal of Robotics and Automation, ISSN 0826-8185, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 235-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ambient intelligence environments necessitate representing and reasoning about dynamic spatial scenes and configurations. The ability to perform predictive and explanatory analyses of spatial scenes is crucial towards serving a useful intelligent function within such environments. We present a formal qualitative model that combines existing qualitative theories about space with it formal logic-based calculus suited to modelling dynamic environments, or reasoning about action and change in general. With this approach, it is possible to represent and reason about arbitrary dynamic spatial environments within a unified framework. We clarify and elaborate on our ideas with examples grounded in a smart environment.

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