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  • 1.
    Alam, Zufishan
    et al.
    Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates; Centre for Health Services Research, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
    Abdalla, Mohammed Altigani
    Hull York Medical School, University of Hull, Hull, UK.
    Alseiari, Saleh
    Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Alameemi, Mahra
    Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Alzaabi, Mayytha
    Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Alkhoori, Reem
    Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Östlundh, Linda
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Al-Rifai, Rami H.
    Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Polycystic ovarian syndrome among women diagnosed with infertility in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries: A protocol for systematic review and meta-analysis of prevalence studies2023In: Women's health., ISSN 1745-5057, E-ISSN 1745-5065, Vol. 19, article id 17455057231160940Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Polycystic ovarian syndrome, a common endocrine disorder, is an important cause of infertility among women of reproductive age. Within the Gulf Cooperation Council countries, polycystic ovarian syndrome is found to affect women increasingly. No study has been carried out to critically summarize the evidence on the prevalence of polycystic ovarian syndrome among women suffering from infertility in these countries.

    OBJECTIVE: This protocol aims to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the studies reporting the prevalence of polycystic ovarian syndrome among women seeking infertility treatment in the six Gulf Cooperation Council countries (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and United Arab Emirates).

    DESIGN/METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The systematic review and meta-analysis will follow the following method. DATA SOURCE: Five databases, including PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, Web of Science, and SCOPUS, will be searched for observational studies using a combination of relevant keywords and Medical Subject Headings from inception of databases.

    DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers will screen titles and abstracts, followed by a full-text search based on the eligibility criteria. The main outcome is to measure the proportion of women who have polycystic ovarian syndrome among infertility-diagnosed patients. In addition, the risk of bias in the included studies will be assessed using the national institute of health quality assessment tool for observational studies. DATA SYNTHESIS: The random-effects method of the analysis with the inverse variance will be used to calculate the pooled prevalence of polycystic ovarian syndrome-attributed infertility. Variation in prevalence estimates will be calculated using subgroup analysis based on study and patients' characteristics and publication bias will be assessed via funnel plot inspection and Eggar's test.

    DISCUSSION: A critical assessment of evidence on the prevalence of polycystic ovarian syndrome in women attending fertility clinics is helpful in risk quantification, enabling better planning for managing infertility in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    REGISTRATION: This protocol has been registered with PROSPERO, protocol registration number (CRD42022355087).

  • 2.
    Alfalasi, Maryam
    et al.
    College of Medicine and Health Sciences, UAE University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Alzaabi, Sarah
    College of Medicine and Health Sciences, UAE University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Östlundh, Linda
    Örebro University, University Library. National Medical Library, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, UAE University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Al-Rifai, Rami H.
    Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, UAE University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Al-Salam, Suhail
    Department of Pathology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, UAE University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Mertes, Paul Michel
    Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, University Hospital of Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France; Faculty of Medicine, EA 3072, Federation of Translational Medicine, University of Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France.
    Alper, Seth L.
    Division of Nephrology and Vascular Biology Research Center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston MA, USA; Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston MA, USA.
    Aburawi, Elhadi H.
    Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, UAE University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Bellou, Abdelouahab
    Institute of Sciences in Emergency Medicine, Academy of Medical Sciences of Guangdong, Guangzhou, China; Department of Emergency Medicine, Academy of Medical Sciences of Guangdong, Guangzhou, China; Department of Emergency Medicine, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit MI, USA.
    Effect of Nitric Oxide Pathway Inhibition on the Evolution of Anaphylactic Shock in Animal Models: A Systematic Review2022In: Biology, E-ISSN 2079-7737, Vol. 11, no 6, article id 919Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simple Summary: Anaphylactic shock (AS) is the most serious consequence of anaphylaxis, with life-threatening sequelae including hypovolemia, shock, and arrhythmias. The literature lacks evidence for the effectiveness of interventions other than epinephrine in the acute phase of anaphylaxis. Our objective was to assess, through a systematic review, how inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) pathways affects blood pressure, and whether such blockade improves survival in AS animal models. AS was induced in all included studies after or before drug administration that targeted blockade of the NO pathway. In all animal species studied, the induction of AS caused a reduction in arterial blood pressure. However, the results show different responses to the inhibition of nitric oxide pathways. Overall, seven of fourteen studies using inhibition of nitric oxide pathways as pre-treatment before induction of AS showed improvement of survival and/or blood pressure. Four post-treatment studies from eight also showed positive outcomes. This review did not find strong evidence to propose modulation of blockade of the NO/cGMP pathway as a definitive treatment for AS in humans. Well-designed in vivo AS animal pharmacological models are needed to explore the other pathways involved, supporting the concept of pharmacological modulation.

    Abstract: Nitric oxide (NO) induces vasodilation in various types of shock. The effect of pharmacological modulation of the NO pathway in anaphylactic shock (AS) remains poorly understood. Our objective was to assess, through a systematic review, whether inhibition of NO pathways (INOP) was beneficial for the prevention and/or treatment of AS. A predesigned protocol for this systematic review was published in PROSPERO (CRD42019132273). A systematic literature search was conducted till March 2022 in the electronic databases PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, Cochrane and Web of Science. Heterogeneity of the studies did not allow meta-analysis. Nine hundred ninety unique studies were identified. Of 135 studies screened in full text, 17 were included in the review. Among six inhibitors of NO pathways identified, four blocked NO synthase activity and two blocked guanylate cyclase downstream activity. Pre-treatment was used in nine studies and post-treatment in three studies. Five studies included both pre-treatment and post-treatment models. Overall, seven pre-treatment studies from fourteen showed improvement of survival and/or arterial blood pressure. Four post-treatment studies from eight showed positive outcomes. Overall, there was no strong evidence to conclude that isolated blockade of the NO/cGMP pathway is sufficient to prevent or restore anaphylactic hypotension. Further studies are needed to analyze the effect of drug combinations in the treatment of AS.

  • 3.
    Arnone, Danilo
    et al.
    Centre for affective Disorders, Psychological Medicine, King's College London, United Kingdom; Department of Psychiatry, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada; Department of Mental Health, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
    Karmegam, Sendhil Raj
    Faillace Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, McGovern Medical School, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, USA.
    Östlundh, Linda
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Alkhyeli, Fatima
    United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Alhammadi, Lamia
    United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Alhammadi, Shama
    United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Alkhoori, Amal
    United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Selvaraj, Sudhakar
    Faillace Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, McGovern Medical School, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, USA; Intra-Cellular Therapies, Inc.
    Risk of Suicidal behavior in patients with major depression and bipolar disorder-A systematic review and meta-analysis of registry-based studies2024In: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, ISSN 0149-7634, E-ISSN 1873-7528Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Suicide is a health priority and one of the most common causes of death in mood disorders. One of the limitations of this type of research is that studies often establish rates of suicide behaviors in mood disorders by using diverse comparison groups or simply monitoring cohort of patients over a time period. In this study registry-based systematic review, national registers were identified through searches in six academic databases, and information about the occurrence of suicide behaviors in mood disorders was systematically extracted. Odds ratios were subsequently calculated comparing rates of death by suicide in mood disorders in comparison with age and period matched rates of death by suicide in the general population obtained from country-wide national registers. The aim was to provide the most recent summary of epidemiological and clinical factors associated to suicide in mood disorders whilst calculating the likelihood of death by suicide in mood disorders in comparison with non-affected individuals according to national databases. The study follows the Preferred Reporting Guidelines for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses and was prespecify registered on Prospero (CRD42020186857). RESULTS: suggest that patients with mood disorders are at substantially increased risk of attempting and dying by suicide. Several epidemiological, clinical and social factors are reported to be associated with clinical populations at risk of suicide. Meta-analyses of completed deaths by suicide suggest that the likelihood for dying by suicide in mood disorders is 8.62 times higher in major depression and 8.66 times higher in bipolar disorder with higher number of untoward events in women compared to men in both conditions. The likelihood of dying by suicide in major depressive disorders is higher in the first year following discharge. Clinical guidelines might consider longer periods of monitoring following discharge from hospital. Overall, due to the higher risk of suicide in mood disorders, efforts should be made to increase detection and prevention whilst focusing on reducing risk in the most severe forms of illness with appropriate treatment to promote response and remission at the earliest convenience.

  • 4.
    Avdic, Anders
    et al.
    Örebro University, Swedish Business School at Örebro University.
    Eklund, Anders
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Searching reference databases: what students experience and what teachers believe that students experience2010In: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, ISSN 0961-0006, E-ISSN 1741-6477, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 224-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Internet has made it possible for students to access a vast amount of high quality references when writing papers. Yet research has shown that the use of reference databases is poor and the quality of student papers is consequently often below expectation. The objective of this paper is twofold. First, it aims to describe the problems students experience when they search information using a university reference database. Second it aims to compare the perspective of students on the problems with that of their teachers. As basis for the study we have used the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) model. A web-based survey was carried out. A total of 150 students at Örebro University in Sweden participated in the survey. The results have been analysed by comparison of median values. Results show that students experience problems mostly in the category of efforts expectancy. Differences between the two groups are most significant in the category of effort expectancy and students’ patience in searching. Teachers are more pessimistic about students’ capacity in information searching than the students themselves.

  • 5.
    Butler, Alexandra E.
    et al.
    Diabetes Research Center (DRC), Qatar Biomedical Research Institute (QBRI), Hamad Bin Khalifa University (HBKU), Qatar Foundation (QF), Doha, Qatar.
    English, Emma
    University East Anglia, Norwich, UK.
    Kilpatrick, Eric S.
    Sidra Medicine, Doha, Qatar.
    Östlundh, Linda
    Örebro University, University Library. College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, UAE.
    Chemaitelly, Hiam S.
    Infectious Disease Epidemiology Group, Weill Cornell Medicine-Qatar, Cornell University, Qatar Foundation-Education City, Doha, Qatar.
    Abu-Raddad, Laith J.
    Infectious Disease Epidemiology Group, Weill Cornell Medicine-Qatar, Cornell University, Qatar Foundation-Education City, Doha, Qatar.
    Alberti, K. George M. M.
    Imperial College, London, UK.
    Atkin, Stephen L.
    Royal College of Surgeons Ireland, Busaiteen, Bahrain.
    John, W. Garry
    University East Anglia, Norwich, UK; Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Norwich, UK.
    Diagnosing type 2 diabetes using Hemoglobin A1c: a systematic review and meta-analysis of the diagnostic cutpoint based on microvascular complications2021In: Acta Diabetologica, ISSN 0940-5429, E-ISSN 1432-5233, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 279-300Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Diabetic microvascular complications of retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy may occur at hemoglobin A1c levels (HbA1c) below the 6.5% (48 mmol/mol) diagnostic threshold. Our objective was to assess the validity of the HbA1c diagnostic cutpoint of 6.5% based upon published evidence of the prevalence of retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy as markers of diabetes.

    Methods: Data Sources PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, Scopus and CINAHL from 1990-March 2019, grey literature sources. Study Selection All studies reported after 1990 (to ensure standardized HbA1c values) where HbA1c levels were presented in relation to prevalence of retinopathy, nephropathy or neuropathy in subjects not known to have diabetes. Data Extraction Studies were screened independently, data abstracted, and risk of bias appraised. Data Synthesis Data were synthesized using HbA1c categories of < 6.0% (< 42 mmol/mol), 6.0-6.4% (42-47 mmol/mol) and >= 6.5% (>= 48 mmol/mol). Random-effects meta-analyses were conducted for retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy prevalence stratified by HbA1c categories. Random-effects multivariable meta-regression was conducted to identify predictors of retinopathy prevalence and sources of between-study heterogeneity.

    Results: Pooled mean prevalence was: 4.0%(95% CI: 3.2-5.0%) for retinopathy, 10.5% (95% CI: 4.0-19.5%) for nephropathy, 2.5% (95% CI: 1.1-4.3%) for neuropathy. Mean prevalence when stratified for HbA1c < 6.0%, 6.0-6.4% and >= 6.5% was: retinopathy: 3.4% (95% CI: 1.8-5.4%), 2.3% (95% CI: 1.6-3.2%) and 7.8%(95% CI: 5.7-10.3%); nephropathy: 7.1% (95% CI: 1.7-15.9%), 9.6% (95% CI: 0.8-26.4%) and 17.1% (95% CI: 1.0-46.9%); neuropathy: 2.1% (95% CI: 0.0-6.8%), 3.4% (95% CI: 0.0-11.6%) and 2.8% (95% CI: 0.0-12.8%). Multivariable meta-regression showed HbA1c >= 6.5% (OR: 4.05; 95% CI: 1.92-8.57%), age > 55 (OR: 3.23; 95% CI 1.81-5.77), and African-American race (OR: 10.73; 95% CI: 4.34-26.55), to be associated with higher retinopathy prevalence. Marked heterogeneity in prevalence estimates was found across all meta-analyses (Cochran's Q-statistic p < 0.0001).

    Conclusions: The prevalence of nephropathy and moderate retinopathy was increased in subjects with HbA1c values >= 6.5% confirming the high specificity of this value for diagnosing T2DM; however, at HbA1c < 6.5% retinopathy increased at age > 55 years and, most strikingly, in African-Americans, suggesting there may be excess microvascular complication prevalence (particularly nephropathy) in individuals below the diabetes diagnostic threshold.

  • 6.
    Danielsen, Marie
    et al.
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Hansson, Birgitta
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Nya studerandegrupper - nya utmaningar2004In: Tidskrift för dokumentation, ISSN 0040-6872, no 3, p. 82-86Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Danielsen, Marie
    et al.
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Torhell, Catta
    Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö, Sweden.
    Från bokbärare till digitala tyngdlyftare2015In: Bokbärare: Biblioteket, bokhandeln och antikvariatet / [ed] Camilla Smedberg, Peter Ullgren, Bengt Erik Eriksson, Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag, 2015, p. 100-104Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Danilo, Arnone
    et al.
    United Arab Emirates University, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates; Centre for Affective Disorders, Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address: danilo.arnone@kcl.ac.uk.
    Omar, Omar
    University of Birmingham, Birmingham Clinical Trials Unit, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
    Arora, Teresa
    Zayed University, College of Natural & Health Sciences, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.
    Östlundh, Linda
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Ramaraj, Reshma
    United Arab Emirates University, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Javaid, Syed
    United Arab Emirates University, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Govender, Romona Devi
    Department of Family Medicine, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Ali, Bassam R.
    Department of Genetics and Genomics, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Patrinos, George P.
    Department of Genetics and Genomics, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates; Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras School of Health Sciences, Patras, Greece.
    Young Allan, H.
    Centre for Affective Disorders, Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, United Kingdom; South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom.
    Stip, Emmanuel
    United Arab Emirates University, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates; University de Montréal, Institute University en Santé Mentale de Montréal, Montreal, Canada.
    Effectiveness of pharmacogenomic tests including CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 genomic variants for guiding the treatment of depressive disorders: Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials2023In: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, ISSN 0149-7634, E-ISSN 1873-7528, Vol. 144, article id 104965Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Major depressive disorders are prevalent conditions with limited treatment response and remission. Pharmacogenomics tests including CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 genomic variants provide the most reliable actionable approach to guide choice and dosing of antidepressants in major depression to improve outcome. We carried out a meta-analysis and meta-regression analyses of randomised controlled trials evaluating pharmacogenomic tests with CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 polymorphisms in major depression. A systematic review was conducted according to PRISMA and Cochrane guidelines to search several electronic databases. Logarithmically transformed odds ratios (OR) and confidence intervals (CI) for improvement, response and remission were calculated. A random-effects meta-analysis and meta-regression analyses were subsequently carried out. Twelve randomised controlled trials were included. Pharmacogenomic tests in the treatment of depression were more effective than treatment as usual for improvement (OR:1.63, CI: 1.19-2.24), response (OR: 1.46; CI: 1.16-1.85) and remission (OR: 1.85; CI: 1.23-2.76) with no evidence of publication bias. Remission was less favourable in recent studies. The results are promising but cautious use of pharmacogenomics in major depression is advisable. PROSPERO registration ID: CRD42021261143.

  • 9.
    Eriksson, Göran
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Why study media talk?2014In: SemiotiX, ISSN 1916-7296, Vol. 12, no 1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Eriksson, Göran
    et al.
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences. Örebro University, University Library.
    Kenalemang, Lame Maatla
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    How cosmetic apps fragmentise and metricise the female face: A multimodalcritical discourse analysis2023In: Discourse & Communication, ISSN 1750-4813, E-ISSN 1750-4821, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 278-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present time, we see a rapid development of so-called cosmetic apps promoted by prominent cosmetic companies. Although there is an emerging market for male consumers, these apps are marketed as technological innovations designed to analyse, rate and evaluate mainly women’s facial appearances through the submission of a selfie. Based on the results generated from the selfie, personalised solutions are offered in the form of recommended products to supposedly help women improve their appearances. Drawing on a critical feminist approach and using multimodal critical discourse analysis (MCDA), the aim of this article is to study how these evaluations are semiotically reproduced and presented to the users. The paper examines in detail how apps convey the evaluation process and transform a selfie into measures, presented through diagrams and charts, that is, how the female face is fragmented and metricised. Coming with affordances of being systematic, exact and scientific, these infographics assign the facial evaluations with meaning. A key argument is that these cosmetic apps are changing the way women are implied to consider and control their (facial) appearance. Following neoliberal notions, the apps put strong pressure on women to take the responsibility to engage in intensive forms of aesthetic labour and to consume the ‘right’ products to appear as the best versions of themselves.

  • 11.
    Fröberg, Kristina
    Örebro University, University Library. Kommunikation och samverkan, Örebro universitet, Örebro, Sweden.
    Projektrapport: Skönlitteratur på Örebro universitetsbibliotek-projekt 22021Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    Projektrapport - Skönlitteratur på Örebro universitetsbibliotek-projekt 2
  • 12.
    Grimbeek, Marinette
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Dangerous Connections and Dissolving Boundaries in Daisy Hildyard’s The Second Body and Emergency2023Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Daisy Hildyard’s book-length essay The Second Body (2017) as well as her novel Emergency (2022) are concerned with interconnection, boundaries, and leakage between bodies on scales ranging from the individual to the planetary. Climate change looms large in The Second Body, which ranges from the Earthrise images to molecular biology, and from butcheries to floods. The titular ‘second body’ – each physical body’s uncanny embeddedness in a global ecosystem of consumption and emissions – encompasses more than an individual ecological footprint, and here the concept is used to read the dark pastoral sketched in Emergency. In the novel, the overwhelming production of interconnections not only threatens to dissolve individuals but also to fill the seemingly empty spaces of the represented countryside to overflowing. This proliferation of interconnections, however, shows little of the exuberance often used to describe entanglement, and instead both the recalled pastoral setting and the pandemic present of Emergency are shown to be overdetermined through interconnection.

  • 13.
    Grimbeek, Marinette
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Dormant Agency: The Temporalities of Seeds2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Seeds are both termini and beginnings. Inscribed with the past, they are simultaneously repositories of future potential. At a time of acute biodiversity loss and cascading environmental crises, seeds also figure large in fictional narratives concerned with issues of land, heritage, belonging, cultivation and food security. By juxtaposing the sterility of industrial agricultural monoculture with the promiscuity and unpredictable agency of open-pollinated heirloom varieties, authors like Leslie Marmon Silko, Ruth Ozeki, Diane Wilson and Barbara Kingsolver show how communities are shaped by their crops as much as they shape their crops through selective cultivation. In the work of these authors, dormant seeds have agency: they are the vehicles of complex intertwined histories of continuity and disruption that span generations, peoples and sometimes continents. Seeds narratively bridge past and future by genetically encoding local growing conditions, their breeding, displacement and survival. They further present a biological record of the collective experiences of the humans who sow, harvest and store seed. While seeds frequently signify abundance and diversity in the fiction under consideration, I here try to pay attention to the representation of their dormancy, to show how the theme of dormant agency is manifest in these texts.

  • 14.
    Grimbeek, Marinette
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Girls Making Families: Agential Assemblage in Nnedi Okorafor’s Speculative Fiction2023In: Populating the Future: Families and Reproduction in Speculative Fiction / [ed] Britt Johanne Farstad, Gävle, Sweden: Gävle University Press , 2023, p. 133-156Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A girl or young woman facing new or dangerous challenges without the support of a family is a recurring motif in Nnedi Okorafor’s multiple award-winning fiction. Okorafor’s protagonists tend to reinvent traditional conceptions of families and create new family constellations through assemblage. These may include members of different human tribes, or even extraterrestrial, engineered or magical nonhuman creatures – and such assemblages are driven by the desire to find new ways of being in the world and relating to others. This chapter examines the kinmaking strategies of four of Okorafor’s protagonists to show how they form cross-culture and cross-species kinships. Binti, Onyesonwu, Phoenix, and Fatima/Sankofa all reinterpret traditions and create new families ranging beyond biological reproduction or kinship ties. To some extent, all the texts under discussion here could be classified as coming-of-age stories, in which assembled families complement and often replace biological families; the assembled families populating Okorafor’s texts are both vehicles of individual agency and utopian expressions of malleable traditions in an ecologically fragile world fraught with racial tension. Although agential assemblage through naming and storytelling has utopian implications in Who Fears Death (2010) and the Binti Trilogy (2015–18), assemblage is also central in the death and dying in The Book of Phoenix (2015) and Remote Control (2021). The assembled families populating Okorafor’s fiction are both vehicles of individual agency and utopian expressions of malleable traditions in an ecologically fragile world fraught with racial tension. Assemblage thus seems central to Okorafor’s utopian Africanfuturist impetus, and the chapter therefore concludes with a brief reflection on the role of narration in Okorafor’s agential assemblages. 

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    Girls Making Families: Agential Assemblage in Nnedi Okorafor’s Speculative Fiction
  • 15.
    Grimbeek, Marinette
    Örebro University, University Library. Institutionen för språk, litteratur och interkultur (from 2013), Karlstads universitet, Karlstad.
    Margaret Atwood's Environmentalism: Apocalypse and Satire in the MaddAddam Trilogy2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study considers the way in which Margaret Atwood’s post-apocalyptic MaddAddam Trilogy functions as an environmental project. The main focus is on how the three novels, Oryx and Crake (2003), The Year of the Flood (2009), and MaddAddam (2013), simultaneously draw on and destabilise the apocalypticism inherent in so much environmental discourse, primarily through the use of satire. The trilogy is securely anchored in the concerns of contemporary readers, and transposition of the action to the near future is integral to Atwood’s environmental project: attention is focussed on the present causes of anticipated environmental catastrophe, which readers implicitly are implored to avoid. Atwood’s environmentalism is performed in the interplay between her literary stature, the equivocal content of her work, and the irreverence with which she metaleptically blurs distinctions between fact and fiction, art and commodity, and activism and aesthetics. Whereas the satiric mode serves as a way of avoiding some of the limitations of apocalyptic thinking by maintaining and even creating complexity, it also renders the entire project ambiguous. Uncertainty about the exact environmental injunction presented in the trilogy creates doubts about the degree to which Atwood’s extradiegetic environmental activism should be taken seriously, or conversely. Storytelling is foregrounded in all three novels, and through its concurrent critique of and reliance on market forces and the political potential of art, the MaddAddam Trilogy demonstrates that there is no external position from which the imagination can perform environmentalist miracles. As such, Atwood’s environmental project furthers a profoundly ecological understanding of the world.

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    Margaret Atwood’s Environmentalism: Apocalypse and Satire in the MaddAddam Trilogy
  • 16.
    Grimbeek, Marinette
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Bonnevier, Jenny (Editor)
    Örebro University, School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences.
    Monstrous Kin in N. K. Jemisin’s Broken Earth Trilogy and Nnedi Okorafor’s The Book of Phoenix2023In: Kinship in the Fiction of N. K. Jemisin: Relations of Power and Resistance / [ed] Berit Åström & Jenny Bonnevier, Lanham: Lexington Books, 2023, p. 177-196Chapter in book (Refereed)
    The full text will be freely available from 2025-09-01 09:02
  • 17.
    Grimbeek, Marinette
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Review: Matthew Oliver, Magic Words, Magic Worlds: Form and Style in Epic Fantasy (2022)2022In: Fantasy/AnimationArticle, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    Review
  • 18.
    Grimbeek, Marinette
    Örebro University, University Library.
    “Say no to life”: Reproductive Futurism and Antinatalist Responses to Environmental Crisis in Contemporary Britain2023In: Journal for the Study of British Cultures, ISSN 0944-9094, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 175-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmentalist discourse has long relied on various reproductive futurisms, ranging from the now almost clichéd appeals to our ethical responsibilities to future generations to more radical demands to end human dominance over the planet by ending humanity itself. Such antinatalist stances are burdened by the legacies of Malthusianism, colonialism, classicism, and racism, and tend to pit current humans against future ones. This article explores the intersection of climate change discourse and antinatalist ideas in contemporary British public discourse and cultural expressions by considering some recent examples which highlight tensions between the individual and collective spheres. These include much publicised calls to reduce the human population for environmental reasons, spectacularised poverty and its associations with uncontrolled reproduction, as well as controversial contradictions between the public stances of prominent figures on overpopulation and their personal reproductive choices. This is followed by a reading of the satirical take on antinatalist environmental policies presented in the recent dystopian novel The Offset (2021), published under the pen name Calder Szewczak. The novel, set in a future Britain ravaged by climate change, troubles the ethics of environmentalist antinatalism by showing how easily environmentalist measures morph into ecofascism. Finally, the quandary of imagining an ahuman future is briefly discussed. While all imaginaries of the future necessarily entail considerations of reproduction, art allows for insightful probing of nonreproductive futurisms.

    The full text will be freely available from 2024-11-07 00:00
  • 19.
    Grimbeek, Marinette
    Örebro University, University Library. Karlstads universitet, Institutionen för språk, litteratur och interkultur (from 2013).
    Scientists’ Fictions and The Collapse of Western Civilization2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2014, respected historians of science Naomi Oreskes and Erik M. Conway published an essay entitled The Collapse of Western Civilization: A View from the Future. This message-driven text uses an overtly science-fictional mode to look back at the present from the vantage point of the late twenty-fourth century. Reflecting on our present, the narrator bleakly notes that “knowledge” about fossil fuel use and climate change “did not translate into power” (2). The authors lay much of the blame for their envisaged collapse of western civilisation at the door of neoliberalism, but also present a sharp attack on present scientific practices that, while certainly founded in some regards, makes for rather uneasy reading in a post-truth age.

    Oreskes and Conway are by no means the first scholars to turn to genre fiction, yet their contribution is particularly interesting because of their prominent positions as historians of science. In their co-authored nonfiction volume Merchants of Doubt (2010), they explored the manner in which politically-connected scientists with certain financial interests have for decades skewed the public’s understanding—and sometimes delayed US policymaking—on a variety of issues, including smoking, the causes of acid rain and the hole in the ozone layer, DDT use and climate change. In The Collapse of Western Civilization they again present themselves simultaneously as critics of science and scientists in their own right, while also using—and sometimes abusing—the conventions of science fiction to present their environmental message.

    The Collapse of Western Civilization illustrates some of the difficulties inherent in translating scholarly work into fiction, especially if the result is presented as prophetic science fiction. In this paper, I focus on the way Oreskes and Conway navigate these tensions through framing their fictional narrative with an introduction, a “Lexicon of Archaic Terms”, notes, and an interview with the authors.

  • 20.
    Grimbeek, Marinette
    Örebro University, University Library. Institutionen för språk, litteratur och interkultur (from 2013), Karlstad.
    Wholesale Apocalypse: Brand Names in Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake2016In: Names, ISSN 0027-7738, E-ISSN 1756-2279, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 88-98, article id 1159448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coinages pervade Margaret Atwood’s post-apocalyptic novel Oryx and Crake (2003). Most of the neologisms in the novel denote corporations and their products and form part of a thoroughgoing critique of consumerism. The coinages are jarringly hyperbolic and their orthography often evokes contrary connotations. However, in the thematic context of the novel, coining practices follow certain patterns and function as effective, if ambiguous, satirical tools. On one level, the practice of branding is thoroughly satirized. On another, however, the neologisms point to both the limitations and possibilities of satire when dealing with the themes addressed in the novel: commoditization, environmental damage on a planetary scale, and a vision of the imminent end of humanity itself.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Wholesale Apocalypse: Brand Names in Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake
  • 21.
    Hansson, Birgitta
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Handledning: ett biblioteksperspektiv2009In: Pedagogiskt arbete i teori och praktik: om bibliotekens roll för studenters och doktoranders lärande / [ed] Birgitta Hansson, Anna Lyngfelt, Lund: Btj , 2009, 1, p. 155-176Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Hansson, Birgitta
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Pedagogisk meritportfölj för bibliotekarier2009In: Pedagogisk arbete i teori och praktik: om bibliotekens roll för studenters och doktoranders lärande / [ed] Birgitta Hansson, Anna Lyngfelt, Lund: Btj , 2009, 1, p. 240-256Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Hansson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Lyngfelt, Anna
    Pedagogiskt arbete i teori och praktik: om bibliotekens roll för studenters och doktoranders lärande2009Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Hansson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Norr, Monica
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Riis, Peder
    Örebro University, School of Music, Theatre and Art.
    Multimedia: så här gjorde vi för att presentera Högskolans nya bibliotek i Örebro!1997In: Biblioteksbladet, ISSN 1651-5447, no 6, p. 29-31Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Kassler, Martina
    et al.
    Karlstad University Library, Karlstad.
    Fors, Veronica
    Örebro University, University Library.
    How library systems influence the interlibrary loan workflow: A comparison between Alma and Koha2023In: Beyond the Library Collections: Proceedings of the 2022 Erasmus Staff Training Week at ULiège Library / [ed] François Renaville; Fabienne Prosmans, ULIÈGE LIBRARY , 2023, p. 91-107Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The interlibrary loan (ILL) workflow is influenced by several outside and inside factors, which can variously affect its efficacy in providing items to library users. This paper will show differences and similarities in the ILL workflow, from customer order to delivery or return of the item, when using two different library systems. The ILL workflow includes both internal and external document supply because the libraries offer and provide services both to their own users and to other libraries. Some supplied items are returnable (for example books) and others are non-returnable (for example copies of articles). This workflow chain involves a series of steps and starts with a request made by a user. This is followed by the entry of necessary data into both the receiving and lending libraries’ ILL systems to administrate the request and continues with the delivery to the end user. For returnable items, the final step is returning them to the provider. This paper will compare how two Swedish libraries (Örebro University Library and Karlstad University Library) established their ILL workflows and how decisions made in the ILL process are based on the different library systems used (Alma and Koha). It concludes with a discussion of what can be learned from the comparison, the benefits and challenges presented by each system and any improvements that can be made.

  • 26.
    Khan, Moien A. B.
    et al.
    Nutrition Studies Research Group, Department of Family Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates; Primary Care, NHS North West London, London, UK.
    Menon, Preetha
    Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Govender, Romona
    Nutrition Studies Research Group, Department of Family Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Abu Samra, Amal Mb
    Nutrition Studies Research Group, Department of Family Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Allaham, Kholoud K.
    Nutrition Studies Research Group, Department of Family Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Nauman, Javaid
    Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates; Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; Healthy Living for Pandemic Event Protection (HL – PIVOT) Network, Chicago IL, USA.
    Östlundh, Linda
    Örebro University, University Library. National Medical Library, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Mustafa, Halla
    Nutrition Studies Research Group, Department of Family Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Smith, Jane E. M.
    Bodreinallt Surgery, NHS Wales, Conwy, UK.
    AlKaabi, Juma M.
    Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates.
    Systematic review of the effects of pandemic confinements on body weight and their determinants2022In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 127, no 2, p. 298-317Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pandemics and subsequent lifestyle restrictions such as 'lockdowns' may have unintended consequences, including alterations in body weight. This systematic review assesses the impact of pandemic confinement on body weight and identifies contributory factors. A comprehensive literature search was performed in seven electronic databases and in grey sources from their inception until 1 July 2020 with an update in PubMed and Scopus on 1 February 2021. In total, 2361 unique records were retrieved, of which forty-one studies were identified eligible: one case-control study, fourteen cohort and twenty-six cross-sectional studies (469, 362 total participants). The participants ranged in age from 6 to 86 years. The proportion of female participants ranged from 37 % to 100 %. Pandemic confinements were associated with weight gain in 7.2-724 % of participants and weight loss in 11.1-32.0 % of participants. Weight gain ranged from 0.6 (SD 1.3) to 3.0 (SD 2.4) kg, and weight loss ranged from 2.0 (SD 1.4) to 2.9 (SD 1.5) kg. Weight gain occurred predominantly in participants who were already overweight or obese. Associated factors included increased consumption of unhealthy food with changes in physical activity and altered sleep patterns. Weight loss during the pandemic was observed in individuals with previous low weight, and those who ate less and were more physically active before lockdown. Maintaining a stable weight was more difficult in populations with reduced income, particularly in individuals with lower educational attainment. The findings of this systematic review highlight the short-term effects of pandemic confinements.

  • 27.
    King, J.K.
    et al.
    Department of Family Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; Home based primary care, Division of Extended Care and Geriatrics, Department of Veterans Affairs, Greater Los Angeles area CA, United States; Primary Care, NHS North West London, London, United Kingdom.
    Kieu, A.
    Department of Family Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; Kanad Hospital, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.
    El-Deyarbi, M.
    Ambulatory Health Services, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.
    Aljneibi, N.
    Emirates Center for Happiness Research, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.
    Al-Shamsi, S.
    Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.
    Hashim, M.J.
    Department of Family Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.
    Östlundh, Linda
    Örebro University, University Library.
    King, K.E.
    Scripps College, Claremont CA, United States.
    King, R.H.
    Academic Family Medical Center, Ventura County Family Medicine Residency Program, Ventura CA, United States.
    AB, Khan M.
    Department of Family Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; Health and Wellness Research Group, Department of Family Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; Primary Care, NHS North West London, London, United Kingdom.
    Govender, R.D.
    Department of Family Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.
    Towards a better understanding between non-Muslim primary care clinicians and Muslim patients: A literature review intended to reduce health care inequities in Muslim patients2023In: Health Policy OPEN, E-ISSN 2590-2296, Vol. 4, article id 100092Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although Muslims are a growing population within many non-Muslim countries, there are insufficient Muslim clinicians to care for them. Studies have shown that non-Muslim clinicians have limited knowledge and understanding of Islamic practices affecting health, which may lead to disparities in the quality of healthcare delivery and outcomes when caring for Muslim patients. Muslims come from many different cultures and ethnicities and have variations in their beliefs and practices. This literature review provides some insights which may strengthen therapeutic bonds between non-Muslim clinicians and their Muslim patients resulting in improved holistic, patient-centered care in the areas of cancer screening, mental health, nutrition, and pharmacotherapy. Additionally, this review informs clinicians about the Islamic perspective on childbirth, end of life issues, travel for Islamic pilgrimage, and fasting during the month of Ramadan. Literature was sourced by a comprehensive search in PubMed, Scopus, and CINAHL along with hand screening of citations. Title and abstract screening followed by full-text screening excluded studies including less than 30% Muslim participants, protocols, or reporting results deemed irrelevant to primary care. 115 papers were selected for inclusion in the literature review. These were grouped into the themes of general spirituality, which were discussed in the Introduction, and Islam and health, Social etiquette, Cancer screening, Diet, Medications and their alternatives, Ramadan, Hajj, Mental health, Organ donation and transplants, and End of life. Summarizing the findings of the review, we conclude that health inequities affecting Muslim patients can be addressed at least in part by improved cultural competency in non-Muslim clinicians, as well as further research into this area.

  • 28.
    Lassi, Monica
    et al.
    Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC).
    Hansson, Emma-Lisa
    LUNARC, Lunds universitet.
    Persson, Mattias
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Örebro University, University Library.
    Olsson, Olof
    Svensk Nationell Datatjänst (SND).
    Rapportering av projektet Forskares behov av lagringslösningar för forskningsdata – ett samarbete mellan SNIC, SND, SUNET, Chalmers tekniska högskola och Örebro universitet2022Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Det svenska e-infrastrukturlandskapet är fragmenterat och trots rekommendationer från beslutsfattare så ökar fragmenteringen. De nationella aktörer som har uppdrag och/eller mandat som rör forskningsdata är främst SNIC, SND, och Sunet. Dessa aktörer tillhandahåller tjänster och stöd till forskare under olika delar av forskningsdatalivscykeln. På grund av de oklara mandat och uppdrag som råder nationellt, så finns förväntningar på de olika aktörerna som inte går att uppfylla. Ett exempel är lagring av forskningsdata, såväl aktiva som inaktiva. Svenska forskare är del av ett globalt forskarsamhälle, och tar därigenom del av en mängd internationella infrastrukturer, verktyg, och sammanhang. I och med den implementeringsfas som EOSC gått in i, så behöver svensk e-infrastruktur vara interoperabel med de internationellt tillgängliga tjänster som svenska forskare använder.Exakt vilka behov som finns hos svenska forskare, och vem som har ansvar för att svara upp mot behoven, är oklart i många frågor. Det infrastrukturella stöd som forskare behöver för att hantera forskningsdata under hela datalivscykeln, med välfungerande gränssnitt mellan nationella och internationella aktörers e-infrastrukturlösningar finns i vissa fall och är i andra fall fragmenterat. För att komma vidare i utvecklingen av sammanhållet stöd för forskare, formerades under 2021 ett nationellt samarbete inom verksamhetsarkitektur för forskningsdataområdet, med syfte att ta fram ett gemensamt bildspråk, visualisera ett mycket komplext område, och att konkretisera krav, villkor, juridiska ramverk, styrdokument etc. som påverkar forskningsdatahantering.Projektet som rapporteras här fokuserade på vad forskare behöver ha för att forskningsdata ska hanteras på ett högkvalitativt sätt och vilket infrastrukturellt stöd forskarna i detta. Projektet fokuserade på helheten i datahanteringen, vad som finns på plats på nationell nivå och vad som behöver åtgärdas. Angreppsättet var verksamhetsarkitekturellt, som med Vintergatan som metod. En grundkarta för forskningsdataområdet, framtagen inom ett tidigare verksamhetsarkitekturellt projekt på Lunds universitet, låg till grund för projektet.

    Denna rapport beskriver resultaten av ett projekt där ett verksamhetsarkitekturellt angreppssätt har använts för att förstå, utforska och beskriva forskares praktiker och behov av stöd i sitt arbete med forskningsdatahantering, och särskilt datalagring. Här beskriver vi rapporten för dig som läser, så att du kan välja de delar som du finner mest intressanta och relevanta för just dig, just nu. Vår ambition har varit att ta fram ett rikt material som kan leva vidare, byggas på, revideras, förkastas, byggas upp på nytt utifrån nya resultat, och så vidare.

  • 29.
    Lauque, Dominique
    et al.
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Purpan Hospital and Toulouse III University, 31300 Toulouse, France; Department of Emergency of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Teaching Hospital of Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
    Khalemsky, Anna
    Management Department, Hadassah Academic College, Jerusalem 91010, Israel.
    Boudi, Zoubir
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Dr Sulaiman Alhabib Hospital, Dubai 2542, United Arab Emirates; Global Network on Emergency Medicine, Brookline, MA 02446, USA.
    Östlundh, Linda
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Xu, Chang
    Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory for Population Health Across-Life Cycle, Anhui Medical University, Hefei 230032, China.
    Alsabri, Mohammed
    Department of Emergency of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Teaching Hospital of Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Department of Pediatrics, Brookdale University Hospital and Medical Center, 1 Brookdale Plaza, Brooklyn, NY 11212, USA.
    Onyeji, Churchill
    Department of Emergency of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Teaching Hospital of Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
    Cellini, Jacqueline
    Countway Library, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA; MATHEMATICA, Inc., Princeton, NJ 08540, USA.
    Intas, Geroge
    Department of Critical Care, General Hospital of Nikaia Agios Panteleimon, 18454 Athens, Greece.
    Soni, Kapil Dev
    Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Center, Ring Road, New Delhi 110029, India.
    Junhasavasdikul, Detajin
    Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400, Thailand.
    Cabello, Jose Javier Trujillano
    Intensive Care Unit, Hospital Universitari Arnau de Vilanova, 25198 Lleida, Spain.
    Rathlev, Niels K.
    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Baystate, Springfield, MA 01199, USA.
    Liu, Shan W.
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
    Camargo, Carlos A.
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
    Slagman, Anna
    Division of Emergency and Acute Medicine, Campus Virchow Klinikum and Charité Campus Mitte, Charité Universitätsmedizin, 10117 Berlin, Germany.
    Christ, Michael
    Department of Emergency Medicine, 6000 Lucerne, Switzerland.
    Singer, Adam J.
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Renaissance Scholl of Medicine at Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA.
    Houze-Cerfon, Charles-Henri
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Purpan Hospital and Toulouse III University, 31300 Toulouse, France.
    Aburawi, Elhadi H.
    Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, UAE University, Al Ain P.O. BOX 15551, United Arab Emirates.
    Tazarourte, Karim
    Department of Health Quality, University Hospital, Hospices Civils, 69002 Lyon, France; Department of Emergency Medicine, University Hospital, Hospices Civils, 69002 Lyon, France.
    Kurland, Lisa
    Örebro University, School of Medical Sciences.
    Levy, Phillip D.
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA.
    Paxton, James H.
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA.
    Tsilimingras, Dionyssios
    Department of Family Medicine & Public Health Sciences, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA.
    Kumar, Vijaya Arun
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA.
    Schwartz, David G.
    Information Systems Department, Graduate School of Business Administration, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 529002, Israel.
    Lang, Eddy
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Emergency Medicine Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada.
    Bates, David W.
    Department of Healthcare Quality, Brigham and Women Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
    Savioli, Gabriele
    Emergency Department, IRCCS Fondazione Policlinico San Matteo, 27100 Pavia, Italy.
    Grossman, Shamai A.
    Department of Emergency of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Teaching Hospital of Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
    Bellou, Abdelouahab
    Department of Emergency of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Teaching Hospital of Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Global Network on Emergency Medicine, Brookline, MA 02446, USA; Department of Emergency Medicine, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA; Institute of Sciences in Emergency Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Guangdong Provincial People's Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou 510080, China.
    Length-of-Stay in the Emergency Department and In-Hospital Mortality: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis2022In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 32Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of emergency department (ED) length of stay (EDLOS) on in-hospital mortality (IHM) remains unclear. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to determine the association between EDLOS and IHM. We searched the PubMed, Medline, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane Controlled Register of Trials, CINAHL, PsycInfo, and Scopus databases from their inception until 14-15 January 2022. We included studies reporting the association between EDLOS and IHM. A total of 11,337 references were identified, and 52 studies (total of 1,718,518 ED patients) were included in the systematic review and 33 in the meta-analysis. A statistically significant association between EDLOS and IHM was observed for EDLOS over 24 h in patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) (OR = 1.396, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.147 to 1.701; p &lt; 0.001, I2 = 0%) and for low EDLOS in non-ICU-admitted patients (OR = 0.583, 95% CI: 0.453 to 0.745; p &lt; 0.001, I2 = 0%). No associations were detected for the other cut-offs. Our findings suggest that there is an association between IHM low EDLOS and EDLOS exceeding 24 h and IHM. Long stays in the ED should not be allowed and special attention should be given to patients admitted after a short stay in the ED.

  • 30.
    Norr, Monica
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Orebro university library: nova univerzitetna knjižnica na Švedskem2001In: Knjižničarske novice, ISSN 0353-9237, no 1/2, p. 23-26Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Otun, Jemiliat
    et al.
    Academic Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Hull York Medical School, University of Hull, Hull, UK.
    Sahebkar, Amirhossein
    Neurogenic Inflammation Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran; Biotechnology Research Center, Pharmaceutical Technology Institute, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran; School of Pharmacy, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.
    Östlundh, Linda
    Örebro University, University Library. National Medical Library, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, UAE University, Al Ain, UAE.
    Atkin, Stephen L.
    Weill Cornell Medicine, Doha, Qatar.
    Sathyapalan, Thozhukat
    Academic Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Hull York Medical School, University of Hull, Hull, UK.
    Systematic Review and Meta-analysis on the Effect of Soy on Thyroid Function2019In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 3964Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Soy foods have had an important dietary role in Asian countries for centuries, and in recent years they have become increasingly popular in Western countries as a result of their suggested health benefits. Nevertheless, there are some concerns that soy can have a negative effect on thyroid function and can alter the levels of thyroid hormones. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the link between soy or soy product consumption and thyroid function via the measurement of thyroid hormone levels. A systematic review and meta-analysis was undertaken on all randomised controlled trials of studies including soy as an intervention and where free triiodothyronine (fT3), free thyroxine (fT4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was measured. The search included PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane and sources for the grey literature. Quantitative data synthesis was performed using a random-effects model, with standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence interval as summary statistics. A total of 18 articles were suitable for review. The meta-analysis showed no significant changes in fT3 (WMD: 0.027 pmol/L, 95% CI: -0.052, 0.107, p = 0.499; I-2: 55.58%), fT4 (WMD: -0.003 pmol/L, 95% CI: -0.018, 0.011, p = 0.656; I-2: 87.58%) while an elevation in TSH levels was observed (WMD: 0.248 mIU/L, 95% CI: 0.001, 0.494, p = 0.049; I-2: 80.31%) levels with soy supplementation. There was no evidence of publication bias. Soy supplementation has no effect on the thyroid hormones and only very modestly raises TSH levels, the clinical significance, if any, of the rise in TSH is unclear.

  • 32.
    Sherif, Moustafa
    et al.
    Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain P.O. Box 15551, United Arab Emirates.
    Makame, Khadija Ramadhan
    Department of Public Health and Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Debrecen, 4032 Debrecen, Hungary.
    Östlundh, Linda
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Paulo, Marilia Silva
    IPH, CHRC, NOVA Medical School, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, NMS, FCM, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 1169-056 Lisbon, Portugal.
    Nemmar, Abderrahim
    Department of Physiology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain P.O. Box 15551, United Arab Emirates.
    Ali, Bassam R.
    Department of Genetics and Genomics, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain P.O. Box 15551, United Arab Emirates.
    Al-Rifai, Rami H.
    Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain P.O. Box 15551, United Arab Emirates.
    Nagy, Károly
    Department of Public Health and Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Debrecen, 4032 Debrecen, Hungary.
    Ádám, Balázs
    Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain P.O. Box 15551, United Arab Emirates.
    Genotoxicity of Occupational Pesticide Exposures among Agricultural Workers in Arab Countries: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis2023In: Toxics, E-ISSN 2305-6304, Vol. 11, no 8, article id 663Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exposure to pesticides in Arab countries is a significant public health concern due to extensive agricultural activity and pesticide use. This systematic review aimed to evaluate the genotoxic effects of agricultural pesticide exposure in the region, identify research gaps, and assess methodological limitations. Following the PRISMA guidelines, a comprehensive search yielded five relevant studies conducted in Egypt, Syria, and Jordan. Various genotoxicity assays were employed, revealing a higher level of DNA damage in exposed compared to non-exposed individuals. Farmers exposed to pesticides exhibited a significantly higher occurrence of chromosomal translocation (t(14;18)), micronuclei, and chromosomal aberrations. However, only two studies assessed cytotoxicity indirectly. The studies predominantly focused on male participants, with variations in sample size and pesticide types. The lack of detailed exposure data necessitates cautious interpretation. This review underscores the need for further research on the genotoxicity of occupational pesticide exposure in the Middle East. Future studies should adopt robust study designs, collect biological and environmental samples, conduct repeated sampling, analyze seasonal variations, and encompass diverse study sites associated with specific crop groups.

  • 33.
    Statsenko, Yauhen
    et al.
    Radiology Department, United Arab Emirates University, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAE; Medical Imaging Platform, ASPIRE Precision Medicine Research Institute Abu Dhabi, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAE; Big Data Analytics Center, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAE.
    Smetanina, Darya
    Radiology Department, United Arab Emirates University, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi Emirate; Medical Imaging Platform, ASPIRE Precision Medicine Research Institute Abu Dhabi, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAE.
    Arora, Teresa
    Psychology Department, College of Natural and Health Sciences, Zayed University, Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAE.
    Östlundh, Linda
    Örebro University, University Library. National Medical Library, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAE.
    Habuza, Tetiana
    Big Data Analytics Center, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAE; Department of Computer Science, College of Information Technology, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAE.
    Simiyu, Gillian Lylian
    Radiology Department, United Arab Emirates University, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAE; Medical Imaging Platform, ASPIRE Precision Medicine Research Institute Abu Dhabi, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAE.
    Meribout, Sarah
    Radiology Department, United Arab Emirates University, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAE; Medical Imaging Platform, ASPIRE Precision Medicine Research Institute Abu Dhabi, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAE; Internal Medicine Department, Maimonides Medical Center, New York, New York, USA.
    Talako, Tatsiana
    Radiology Department, United Arab Emirates University, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAE; Department of Oncohematology, Minsk Scientific and Practical Center for Surgery, Transplantology and Hematology, Minsk, Belarus.
    King, Fransina Christina
    Physiology Department, United Arab Emirates University, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAE; Neuroscience Platform, ASPIRE Precision Medicine Research Institute Abu Dhabi, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAE.
    Makhnevych, Iryna
    Radiology Department, United Arab Emirates University, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAE.
    Gelovani, Juri George
    Radiology Department, United Arab Emirates University, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAE; Biomedical Engineering Department, Wayne State University, College of Engineering, Detroit, Michigan, USA; Radiology Department, Siriraj Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; Provost Office, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAE.
    Das, Karuna M.
    Radiology Department, United Arab Emirates University, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAE.
    Gorkom, Klaus Neidl-Van
    Radiology Department, United Arab Emirates University, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAE.
    Almansoori, Taleb M.
    Radiology Department, United Arab Emirates University, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAE.
    Al Zahmi, Fatmah
    Neurology Department, Mediclinic Parkview Hospital, Dubai, Dubai Emirate, UAE; Neurology Department, Mohammed Bin Rashid University of Medicine and Health Sciences, Dubai, Dubai Emirate, UAE.
    Szólics, Miklós
    Internal Medicine Department, United Arab Emirates University, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAE; Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, Tawam Hospital, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAE.
    Ismail, Fatima
    Pediatrics Department, United Arab Emirates University, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi, UAE.
    Ljubisavljevic, Milos
    Physiology Department, United Arab Emirates University, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAE; Neuroscience Platform, ASPIRE Precision Medicine Research Institute Abu Dhabi, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi Emirate, UAE.
    Multimodal diagnostics in multiple sclerosis: predicting disability and conversion from relapsing-remitting to secondary progressive disease course - protocol for systematic review and meta-analysis2023In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 13, no 7, article id e068608Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The number of patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) has increased significantly over the last decade. The challenge is to identify the transition from relapsing-remitting to secondary progressive MS. Since available methods to examine patients with MS are limited, both the diagnostics and prognostication of disease progression would benefit from the multimodal approach. The latter combines the evidence obtained from disparate radiologic modalities, neurophysiological evaluation, cognitive assessment and molecular diagnostics. In this systematic review we will analyse the advantages of multimodal studies in predicting the risk of conversion to secondary progressive MS.

    METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will use peer-reviewed publications available in Web of Science, Medline/PubMed, Scopus, Embase and CINAHL databases. In vivo studies reporting the predictive value of diagnostic methods will be considered. Selected publications will be processed through Covidence software for automatic deduplication and blind screening. Two reviewers will use a predefined template to extract the data from eligible studies. We will analyse the performance metrics (1) for the classification models reflecting the risk of secondary progression: sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, positive and negative predictive values; (2) for the regression models forecasting disability scores: the ratio of mean absolute error to the range of values. Then, we will create ranking charts representing performance of the algorithms for calculating disability level and MS progression. Finally, we will compare the predictive power of radiological and radiomical correlates of clinical disability and cognitive impairment in patients with MS.

    ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study does not require ethical approval because we will analyse publicly available literature. The project results will be published in a peer-review journal and presented at scientific conferences.

    PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42022354179.

  • 34.
    Tapper, Marie
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Addressing the affective domain in doctoral writing2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cognitive aspect of Bloom’s taxonomy is the aspect that primarily has been focused on in the few studies of the writing development of doctoral students that have been made to date (Burford, 2017; Lea & Street, 1998; Lillis & Curry, 2006). The process of becoming a full-fledged academic writer also includes Bloom’s two other domains, the affective and the psychomotor, but these have been less frequently addressed in the literature (Burford, 2017; Habibe, 2015; Hadjioaunnu, Shelton, Fu, & Dhanarattigannon, 2007). The importance of including the emotional aspects of writing in pedagogical practices that support the development of scholarly writing has, however, been noted (Cotterall, 2011; Wellington, 2010).

    Cotterall (2011) argues that both knowledge production and identity formation are features of doctoral education, and that doctoral writing is “the means by which doctoral students’ claims to scholarly identity are tested”. Thus, in order for doctoral students to become successful scholarly writers, they need not only to master their discipline’s genre specific writing style and rhetorical requirements, but also need to develop their own writing persona which functions to express a sense of personal identity in their writing.

    According to Wellington (2010), there are three main areas where doctoral writers may encounter emotional difficulties in their writing: getting started, handling their unfamiliarity with the “rules of the game”, and emotionally managing receiving feedback, all three of which are addressed in the doctoral writing course Academic Writing, step 1, offered by the Academic Writing Centre at Örebro University. The course has a genre-pedagogical foundation (Swales, 1990, 2004; Swales & Feak, 2012) and focuses on the identification of rhetorical patterns, but also includes peer response techniques, and writing strategies and processes, in order to address the three areas that Wellington (2010) mentions.

    The learning outcomes of the course are: 

    Knowledge and understanding

    • Identify rhetorical patterns for academic texts from participant’s field of research
    • Identify the characteristics of academic writing

    Proficiency and ability

    • Apply basic genre analysis for future academic writing projects
    • Use typical features of academic writing
    • Provide informed peer-response feedback
    • Reflect on writing as a process and self-assess areas of academic writing that require particular focus and improvement

    The affective domain of writing is addressed by assigning chapters from Becker (2007) which deal with writing strategies, persona and authority, and risk taking. In writing logs, the doctoral students then express their feelings after reading Becker, and also reflect on their own writing strategies, and experience of giving and receiving peer review during the course.

    The course has been held 6 times since its inception in the spring term of 2016 and 66 doctoral students from 22 disciplines have completed the course. The material used in this study is writing logs from 33 course participants, and the results are presented from the point of view of Wellington’s (2010) three main areas of emotional difficulties. The results indicate that the pedagogical considerations taken have indeed served to facilitate the overcoming of these three potential emotional obstacles. 

    References

    Becker, H. (2007). Writing for social scientists. How to start and finish your thesis, book, or article (2. ed.). Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

    Burford, J. (2017). Conceptualising doctoral writing as an affective-political practice. International Journal of Doctoral Studies, 12, 17-32. http://www.informingscience.org/Publications/3689

    Cotterall, S. (2011). Doctoral students writing: Where's the pedagogy? Teaching in Higher Education, 16(4), 413-425. doi:10.1080/13562517.2011.560381

    Habibe, P. (2015). An investigation into writing for scholarly publication by novice scholars: Practices of Canadian anglophone doctoral students. Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository. 3281. https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/3281

    Hadjioaunnu, X., Shelton, N., Fu, D., & Dhanarattigannon, J. (2007). The road to a doctoral degree: co-travelers through a perilous passage. College Student Journal, 41(1). 160-177. http://go.galegroup.com/ps/anonymous?id=GALE%7CA161282240&sid=googleScholar&v=2.1&it=r&linkaccess=fulltext&issn=01463934&p=AONE&sw=w&authCount=1&isAnonymousEntry=true

    Lea, M. & Street, B. (1998). Student writing in higher education: An academic literacies approach. Studies in Higher Education 23(2), 157-172.

    Lillis, T. & Curry, M. (2006) Reframing notions of competence in scholarly writing: From individual to networked activity. Revista Canaria de Estudios Ingleses 51, 63-78.

    Swales, J. (1990). Genre analysis: English in academic and research settings. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Swales, J. (2004). Research genres: Explorations and applications. New York: Cambridge University Press.

    Swales, J. & Feak, C. (2012). Academic writing for graduate students. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

    Wellington, J. (2010). More than a matter of cognition: An explorations of the affective writing problems of post-graduate students and their possible solutions. Teaching in Higher Education, 15(2), 135-15

     

  • 35.
    Tapper, Marie
    et al.
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Hadziefendic, Jasmina
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Nilsson, Dana
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Att sätta ord på lärares tysta språkkunskaper – ett sätt att både underlätta och höja kvaliteten på uppsatshandledning2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den senaste medarbetarundersökningen på Örebro universitet visade att lärare lägger alltmer tid på extra stöd till enskilda studenter som har svårt att skriva akademiskt, vilket speglar att studenters förkunskaper inte alltid motsvarar universitetets/ämnets krav på akademiskt skrivande (Dyste, Herzberg & Hoel, 2011; Lindgren, 2005; Ask, 2005, 2007; Bergström, 2007; Blűckert, 2010). Mötet med akademin innebär mötet med en helt ny diskurs och i litteraturen talar man ibland om en diskurschock när nya studenter möter skrivande inom akademin (Ask, 2007, 2013). En del studenter saknar kunskap om universitetets textgenrer, har en sämre skrivförmåga än tidigare studentgrupper och sämre uttrycksförmåga, ordförståelse och läsförmåga/läsförståelse (Pecorari, Shaw, Irvine, Malmström & Mežek, 2012). Också spridningen mellan studenter har ökat och de svagare skribenterna har blivit fler (Bergström, 2007). Dessutom har de inte alltid verktyg för att snabbt kunna ta igen de kunskaper om skrivande som de saknar (Ask, 2013; Pecorari et al., 2012).

    Utifrån ett lärarperspektiv framgår det att lärare inte alltid har ett tillräckligt medvetet förhållande till sitt skrivande och att många också känner att de saknar metaspråket för att kunna resonera kring språk och stil i studenttexter (Brorsson & Ekberg, 2012; Blűckert, 2010). Trots att de är erfarna skribenter av facktexter har de ofta endast en implicit kompetens i skrivande (Handal & Lauvås, 2008).

    Forskningen om akademiskt skrivande lyfter fram handledning som den kanske viktigaste framgångsfaktorn bakom uppsatser och handledning ses som avgörande också för studenters skrivutveckling (Blåsjö, 2010; Eriksson, 2014). Om lärare ska kunna utveckla sina studenters skrivkompetens behöver de kunna beskriva och förklara det de ser i texterna så att studenterna förstår och därför blir det problematiskt ur ett pedagogiskt perspektiv att inte kunna förmedla textnormerna i klartext (Handal, & Lauvås, 2008).

    För att hjälpa lärare att medvetandegöra sin kunskap om akademisk skrivande har Enheten för universitetspedagogik, IKT och lärande (PIL) tillsammans med Akademisk skrivcentrum (ASC) tagit fram en kurs för uppsatshandledare vars syfte är att ge kursdeltagarna en ökad medvetenhet om handledning av studentuppsatser och ett gemensamt underlag för studentuppsatsen som läraktivitet, samt för dess mål och examination, genom att gemensamt formulera en handledarguide eller handledningschecklista. Kursen behandlar även olika språkliga verktyg för att utveckla deltagarnas förmåga att ge respons på struktur, språk och stil i studentuppsatser.

    Resultatet efter två kursomgångar pekar på att lärare efter genomgången kurs har fått ett nytt perspektiv på sin handledarroll:

     ”Jag måste ha en egen tydlig struktur hur jag som handledare ser och granskar texten från studenten.”

     ”Språket behöver arbete.” 

    och fått syn på den kunskap de redan besitter:

     ”Fått förklaringar och ord på ’tyst kunskap’ kring skrivande och skrivregler.”

      ”Fått många begrepp som sätter ord på mina intuitiva språkkunskaper och kunskaper om skrivandet.”

    I denna presentation beskrivs kursupplägg och resultat från kursutvärderingar mer utförligt.  

    Referenser

    Ask, S. (2005). Akademisk skriftspråkskompetens i praktiken. I: Lindgren, M. (red.) Den skrivande studenten. Idéer, erfarenheter och forskning från Textverkstaden vid Växjö universitet. (Rapporter från Växjö universitet, Humaniora 15/2005.) Växjö: Växjö universitet, s. 93-105.

    Ask, S. (2007). Vägar till ett akademiskt skriftspråk. Diss. Acta Wexionensia, Humaniora 115/2007. Växjö: Växjö University Press.

    Ask, S. (2013). Skrivande studenter – problem och möjligheter. Föreläsning vid Studie- och språkverkstädernas nätverkskonferens, Stockholm, Stockholms universitet. 2013-11-14.

    Bergström, A. (2007).  Två olika ämnen? Svenska språket på gymnasiet och på högskolan. MISS 1102-4518; 59. Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet.

    Blűckert, A. (2010). Juridiska – ett nytt språk? En studie av juridikstudenternas språkliga inskolning. Diss. Skrifter utgivna av Institutionen för nordiska språk 79. Uppsala: Uppsala universitet.

    Blåsjö, M. (2010). Skrivteori och skrivforskning. En forskningsöversikt. 2 uppl. MINS 56. Stockholms universitet: Institutionen för nordiska språk.

    Brorsson, B. & Ekberg, K. (2012). Uppsatshandledning och skrivutveckling i högre utbildning – Om det självständiga arbetet och skrivande i alla ämnen. Stockholm: Liber.

    Dyste, O., Herzberg, F. & Hoel, T. L. (2011). Skriva för att lära. Skrivande i högre utbildning. 2 uppl. Lund: Studentlitteratur.

    Eriksson, A.-M. (2014). Formulating knowledge: engaging with issues of sustainable develop-ment through academic writing in engineering education. Diss. Gothenburg studies in educational sciences, 357. Göteborgs univ.: Institution för pedagogik, kommunikation och lärande.

    Handal, G. & Lauvås, P. (2008). Forskarhandledaren. Lund: Studentlitteratur.

    Lindgren, M. (red.) (2005). Den skrivande studenten. Idéer, erfarenheter och forskning från Textverkstaden vid Växjö universitet. (Rapporter från Växjö universitet, Humaniora 15/2005.) Växjö: Växjö universitet.

    Pecorari, D., Shaw, P., Irvine, A., Malmström, H. & Mežek, S. (2012). Reading in tertiary education: undergraduate student practices and attitudes, Quality in Higher Education, 18(2), 235-256, DOI: 10.1080/13538322.2012.706464

  • 36.
    Ternebrandt, Göran
    et al.
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Göran-Rodell, Annika
    Örebro University, School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts & Meal Science.
    Konst- och designbiblioteket i Grythyttan2013In: GUIDE till Årets Svenska Måltidslitteratur 2013 / [ed] Carl Jan Granqvist, Birgit Hemberg, Christina Möller, Dick Norberg, Barbro Stanley, Karsten Thurfjell, Ann Häppich, Grythyttan: Måltidsakademiens förlag i Grythyttan AB , 2013, p. 38-39Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 37.
    Tsenoli, Maido
    et al.
    University of South Wales, Pontypridd, UK; Birmingham Community Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust, Aston, UK.
    Khan, Moien A. B.
    Nutrition Studies Research Group, Department of Family Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, UAE; Primary Care, NHS North West London Local Area Team, London, UK.
    Östlundh, Linda
    Örebro University, University Library. National Medical Library, United Arab Emirates University College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi, UAE.
    Arora, Teresa
    College of Natural & Health Sciences, Zayed University, Dubai, UAE.
    Omar, Omar
    College of Health Sciences, Qatar University, Doha, Ad Dawhah, Qatar.
    Complementary feeding practices and the associated risk of childhood obesity among ethnic minority groups living in high-income countries: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis2022In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 12, no 3, article id e053821Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Complementary feeding (CF) is defined as the period from when exclusive breast milk and formula are no longer sufficient for meeting the infant's nutritional needs. The CF period occurs from birth to 23 months of age. Though the recommended guidelines for introducing CF is from around 6 months of age, data indicates that some infants are introduced to food earlier than 6 months which can predispose children to obesity and overweight. Obesity in ethnic minority groups (EMG) is higher than their native counterparts and often tracks into adulthood. Hence, our aim was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis on the available literature to identify the risk of childhood overweight/obesity associated with CF practices concerning their timing, as well as the frequency and type of CF food introduced. We focused specifically on EMG children living in high-income countries.

    Methods and analysis: A methodological literature search surrounding childhood obesity and overweight (COO) risk associated with CF practices will be conducted in May 2021 following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Protocols guidelines. The following academic databases will be methodologically searched: PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, SCOPUS, Cochrane Library and the WHO Global Index Medicus. Three independent researchers will be involved in independent screening and review the included articles based on the predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Where conflicts arise during the screening process, it will be resolved through discourse until a consensus is reached. Information on CF practices and anthropometric measurements will be extracted to ascertain the risk of COO. For this study, WHO body mass index for age and sex percentiles, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention classification and other recognised country-specific classifications will be utilised for the outcome.

    Ethics and dissemination: Formal ethical approval is not needed as the results will be drawn from currently available published literature. Outcomes of the review will be shared through peer-reviewed publications.

    PROSPERO registration number: CRD42021246029.

  • 38.
    Vimefall, Elin
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Hultkrantz, Lars
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Olofsson, Sara
    Swedish Institute for Health Economics, Lund, Sweden.
    Persson, Mattias
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Willingness to pay for suicidal prevention2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: In 1997 the Swedish Parliament decided on a “vision zero” long-term target for reduction of fatalities and severe injuries caused by traffic accidents. In 2008 a similar zero vision was adopted for suicides. While the former decision has been very successful, resulted in a slimming of the number of traffic fatalities by close to a half percentages, the number of suicides has been more or less constant since the latter decision was made. A possible explanation could be that the general public, and therefore also the many people that need to be involved to accomplish a broad and ambitious target of this kind, give less priority to the reduction of death that is in some sense caused by voluntary action than death brought about by an accident. The objective of this study is to compare the valuation of statistical life (VSL) of a representative sample of Swedish adult residents in traffic accident and suicide prevention contexts.

    Method: We make within-sample comparisons of responses to a pair of consecutive contingent-valuation WTP questions to a web panel of 800 individuals in the age of 18-80. The respondent are asked to state their WTP for interventions that are expected to save 100 (200) lives by prevention of traffic accidents or suicides, respectively. Respondents are also asked whether they think it is more important to reduce the number of deaths due to traffic accidents or due to suicides.

    Results: 68 percent state that they think it is equally important to save lives by prevention of suicides as by traffic accidents. For 18 percent suicide prevention is more important and for 13 percent reduction of traffic safety is more important. The same picture emerges from the WTP responses. 35 percent state equal WTP values and the differences between the average VSL are not statistically significant (preliminary results).

    Discussion: This finding indicates that the same VSL should be used in both areas, implying that funds for prevention of fatalities should be directed to the area with the lowest cost per saved life. To our knowledge the only previous studies on WTP for suicide prevention are Sueki (2015, 2016) that reported a lower average WTP to reduce mortality risk from suicide than from reducing mortality from other causes. However, these studies were framed within a private good context, which is problematic in the specific case of suicide since the respondent has to think of herself as a current “planner” restricting herself future “doer”. In our study, we therefore frame both kind of prevention measures as public goods, which avoids this cognitive task and also can be related to quite commonly made economic trade-offs in budget planning by state and local governments, traffic administrations, hospital boards, etc.

  • 39.
    Vimefall, Elin
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Persson, Mattias
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Örebro University, University Library.
    Olofsson, Sara
    Swedish Institute for Health Economics, Lund, Sweden.
    Hultkrantz, Lars
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Is Prevention of Suicide Worth Less? A Comparison of the Value per Statistical Life2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Vimefall, Elin
    et al.
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Persson, Mattias
    Örebro University, University Library.
    Sara, Olofsson
    Swedish Institute for Health Economics, Sweden.
    Hultkrantz, Lars
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business.
    Is Prevention of Suicides Less important than Prevention of Other Fatalities?: A comparison of the Value of Statistical Life for Suicide vs Traffic Fatality Reduction2019In: Fourteenth Workshop on Costs and Assessment in Psychiatry ‘The Value of Mental Health Services’ Venice - March 29-31, 2019: Book of Abstracts / [ed] Massimo Moscarelli, John Wiley & Sons, 2019, Vol. 22, p. 35-35Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Waller, Susan
    et al.
    College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, UAE; Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia.
    Östlundh, Linda
    Örebro University, University Library. College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, UAE.
    El-Awaisi, Alla
    College of Pharmacy, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar.
    Interprofessional education in health professions education programmes in the Arab world: a scoping review protocol2022In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 12, no 11, article id e065930Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Interprofessional education is a relatively new addition to health professional education curricula in the Arab world. To understand current practice in this area, a scoping review will enable reporting of essential elements for the implementation of interprofessional education. The objective of this scoping review is to report on the implementation components, including presage, process and product, of interprofessional education in prelicensure health professions education programmes in the Arab world.

    METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A comprehensive and systematic search for literature will be conducted using eight electronic databases from their inception to September 2022. A presearch was devised in PubMed, Scopus and CINAHL using a combination of terms related to population, context and concept. The Covidence Systematic Review tool will be used for blind screening, selection and conflict resolution. Data will be presented in tabular format and as a narrative synthesis and will include elements that support the implementation of interprofessional education. This review will be presented according to the Joanna Briggs Institute methodology.Studies conducted with students and/or faculty in prelicensure health professions education programmes will be included. The concept to be explored is interprofessional education. The context is the region commonly known as the Arab world, which includes 18 countries, sharing many common social and cultural traditions and where Arabic is the first language.Excluded will be studies conducted on collaborative practice of health professionals and postlicensure interprofessional education.

    ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: No ethical approval was required. Findings will be disseminated in conference presentations and peer-reviewed articles.

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